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GDC Beyond the Screen Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Beyond the Screen the principles of pervasive game design Markus Montola, Nokia Research Center Jaakko Stenros, University of Tampere Annika Waern, Mobile Life Center
  • 2. Epidemic Menace
  • 3. Day of the Figurines
  • 4. Interference
  • 5. Insectopia
  • 6. Momentum
  • 7. adaptronic games alternate reality games ambient games appropriative games augmented reality games big games brink games crossmedia games hybrid games immersive games invasive games location-based games location-aware games locative games massive games mixed reality games mobile games pervasive games reality games supergames total games trans-reality games ubiquitous games urban games
  • 8.
    • Examples of pervasive games with tech here!
  • 9.  
  • 10.
    • magic circle
  • 11.  
  • 12.
    • magic circle
  • 13.
    • pervasive game is a game that has one or more salient features that expand the contractual magic circle of play spatially, temporally or socially
  • 14.
    • spatial expansion:
    • the whole world is a playground
    • temporal expansion:
    • renounce the discrete play session
    • social expansion:
    • play with outsiders
  • 15.  
  • 16.
    • there is no game state
    • embrace infinite affordances
  • 17. embrace infinite affordances BotFighters
  • 18.
    • rules of irrelevance are irrelevant
    • everything matters
  • 19. everything matters Deathgame (Killer the Game of Assassination)
  • 20.
    • play does not take place in a vacuum
    • plan for emergence and coincidence
  • 21. plan for emergence and coincidence Abstract Tours
  • 22.
    • doing things for real is pleasurable
    • design tangible immediate experiences
  • 23. design tangible immediate experiences The Real Race
  • 24.
    • real and artificial blur
    • harness reality as a source book
  • 25. Prosopopeia harness reality a s a source book
  • 26.
    • pervasive games bring the playfulness of
    • game to ordinary life…
    • … and the pleasurable immediacy and
    • tangibility of ordinary life to game
  • 27. gps cell positioning augmented reality wlan rfid bluetooth infrared gprs mobile augmented reality gesture recognition semacodes phone cameras nfc galileo 3g magnetometer image recognition haptic feedback pedometer biometric sensors gps map voip
  • 28. mobile tech supports pervasive games play takes place beyond the screen
  • 29. Epidemic Menace play takes place beyond the screen
  • 30. rich history of pervasive play without tech be inspired by predecessors
  • 31. Skateboarding be inspired by predecessors
  • 32. Funeral Ceremony of the Anti-Proces (Happening, 1960) be inspired by predecessors
  • 33. Masquerade be inspired by predecessors
  • 34. principles of spatial expansion
  • 35. balance between global and local is difficult choose physical, local, glocal or global
  • 36. choose physical, local, glocal or global
  • 37. cities are filled with exciting areas turn players into urban explorers
  • 38. Momentum turn players into urban explorers
  • 39. division to physical, virtual and mediated is fake appropriate all space
  • 40. appropriate all space Heroes Evolution
  • 41. principles of temporal expansion
  • 42. temporal play modes help mix game and life design for dormancy, ambient play, asychronicity and seamlessness
  • 43. design for dormancy, ambient play, asychronicity and seamlessness
  • 44. you never know when your game is played support contextual adaptability
  • 45. support contextual adaptability Leisure Suit Larry in the Land of Lounge Lizards
  • 46. principles of social expansion
  • 47. pervasive games are joined not purchased lure players with open, implicit, rabbit hole and viral invitations
  • 48. lure players with open, implicit, rabbit hole and viral in vitations
  • 49. players enjoy different levels of involvement tier participation
  • 50. The Truth about Marika tier participation
  • 51. games serve as a social alibi use brink of magic circle to empower players
  • 52. use brink of magic circle to empower players Twister
  • 53. play changes the way you look at the world hide in plain sight
  • 54. Shelby Logan’s Run hide in plain sight
  • 55. you decide where players go and what they do create social events to transform space
  • 56. Pillow Fight Club create social events to transform space
  • 57.
    • spatial expansion:
    • the whole world is a playground
    • temporal expansion:
    • renounce the discrete play session
    • social expansion:
    • play with outsiders
  • 58.
    • the whole world is a playground
    • explore the spatial
    • renounce the discrete play session
    • exploit the temporal
    • play with outsiders
    • steer the social
  • 59. challenge: literacy
  • 60. Spacewar!
  • 61. challenge: ethical
  • 62. Vem gråter
  • 63. challenge: profitable
  • 64. BotFighters
  • 65. Prisoner Escape from the Tower questions? comments?
  • 66. http://pervasivegames.wordpress.com/
  • 67.
    • Boal, A. (2002): Games for Actors and Non-Actors. Second Edition. London, Routledge.
    • von Borries, F., Walz, S.P. and Böttger, M. (eds.) (2007): Space Time Play. Computer Games, Architecture and Urbanism: The Next Level . Birkhäuser, Berlin.
    • Dena, C. (2008): Emerging Participatory Culture Practices: Player-Created Tiers in Alternate Reality Games. In Convergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies , Vol. 14, No. 1, 41-57. Sage.
    • Ericsson, M. (2003): Enchanting reality: a vision of big experiences on small platforms. In Copier, M. and Raessens, J. (eds.) Level up. Digital Games Research Conference 4-6 November 2003 Proceedings. Universiteit Utrecht, Utrecht.
    • Goffman, E. (1961): Encounters: Two Studies in the Sociology of Interaction. Bobbs-Merrill, Indianapolis.
    • Huizinga, J. (1938): Homo Ludens. A Study of Play Element in Culture. Beacon Press, Boston.
    • Martin, A., Thompson, B. & Chatfield, T. (eds.) (2006): 2006 Alternate Reality Games White Paper . International Game Developers Association IGDA.
    • McGonigal, J. (2006): This Might Be a Game: Ubiquitous Play and Performance at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century. Doctoral dissertation. University of California, Berkeley.
    • Ninjalicious (2005): Access All Areas. A User’s Guide to the Art of Urban Exploration . Infiltration, Canada.
    • Poremba, C. (2007): Critical Potential on the Brink of the Magic Circle. In Baba, A. (ed.): Proceedings of DiGRA 2007 Situated Play.
    • Salen, K. & Zimmerman, E. (2004): The Rules of Play. Game Design Fundamentals. MIT Press, Massachusetts.
    • Szulborski, D. (2005): This Is Not A Game. A Guide to Alternate Reality Gaming. Exe Active Media Group.
  • 68. http://pervasivegames.wordpress.com/