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Access Policies for FDLP Collections in Law Libraries
 

Access Policies for FDLP Collections in Law Libraries

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Slides from GD-SIS program at AALL 2010: Reaching our Peak: Resolving Issues for Law Libraries in the Federal Depository Library Program

Slides from GD-SIS program at AALL 2010: Reaching our Peak: Resolving Issues for Law Libraries in the Federal Depository Library Program

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  • Based on academic libraries; policies posted on the web Jan/Feb 2010 Top half of chart lists all occurences of the individual restriction whether that appears alone or in conjunction with another restriction 50 libraries had only ONE type of restriction ID only 14.8% (23/155) Hours only 12.9% (20/155) Ref Int only 4.5% (7/155) Bottom of chart shows the occurrence of overlapping restrictions –policies with multiple restrictive provisions. NO ONE had all three restrictions
  • Do these restrictions appear more in urban or rural locations? Used Census MSAs (2009 population estimate) Top 10 (4.5M), Next 10 (2.55M-4.49M), and others (2.54M and smaller) - #1 – NYC, 19M Note: Denver is cut off city, at 2.52M population (#21) Limitation: position of campus within urban areas hard to determine Explain layout – Groupings across the top (top 10, next 10, other), then types of access restriction down the side. So if you look across the rows, you can see that with one exception, these restrictions are more common in the larger cities, and get less common as your city gets less populous. This trend holds for the multiple restriction libraries. The exception is the Reference Interview requirement, but remember that this is the least common restriction to start with.
  • Privately funded – Southwestern Law School Primarily to serve the needs – Arizona, v. common theme – Golden Gate, Yale, Northwestern, WNEC, Missouri, Franklin Pierce
  • Welcome – Thomas Cooley Unimpeded access – Tulsa All gov docs avail – LSU Encouraged to visit – chicago Community at large – WNEC All individuals - Rutgers
  • Please note: I don’t mean “discouraging” in a judgmental way. Not picking on these libraries – valid reasons to post policies with stricter requirements. (Non-docs patrons trying to use docs to get into the library for other resources, even if you don’t generally enforce those policies; requirements from the parent organization) Closed to public – Golden Gate Only visitors - CWRU Email – Penn Specific docs - touro Fails to register: Franklin Pierce

Access Policies for FDLP Collections in Law Libraries Access Policies for FDLP Collections in Law Libraries Presentation Transcript

  • REACHING OUR PEAK: RESOLVING ISSUES FOR LAW LIBRARIES IN THE FEDERAL DEPOSITORY LIBRARY PROGRAM Access Policies for FDLP Collections in Law Libraries Kate Irwin-Smiler
  • LEGAL REQUIREMENTS OF DEPOSITORIES
    • To make depository materials available for free use by the general public;
    • To maintain the depository materials and the collection so they are accessible to the public.
    • Public access may be provided in a manner and at a time and a location that secures the safety of personnel and property
    • - FDLP Handbook
  • THE PROJECT
    • Examine access policies to see how libraries are implementing the time/manner/location elements of FDLP policy
    • Caveats:
      • Examples and statistics are primarily from academic libraries
        • More variation and more examples
        • Court, special, state and agency libraries: mostly not restricted or policy doesn’t specify restrictions on public access
      • Size of collection based on current collection levels
  • COMMON RESTRICTIONS
    • Identification
    • Limited Hours
    • Reference Interview
  • CONTENT OF IDENTIFICATION RESTRICTIONS
    • Identification required
      • To merely present or to leave
      • Sometimes specify photo ID, government issued
    • Sign in or register
    • At a library desk or security guard
    • In a couple cases: a general ID requirement is waived for docs patrons
  • CONTENT OF HOURS RESTRICTIONS
    • Tiered Access
      • Longer hours for primary patrons than public
      • Weekday business hours, weekday evening, 1 or 2 weekend days
      • Several have no explicit mention of docs patrons
    • Based on staffing (Reference or circulation)
    • Restrictions based on building security
      • Often imposed by the parent organization (the university, the law school, etc.)
  • CONTENT OF REFERENCE INTERVIEW RESTRICTIONS
    • Gatekeeping function
      • Requires an appointment or arrangement for visit
      • Sometimes as a result of parent organization policy
    • Verifying need for materials in collection
      • Context: FDLP collection limited in subject areas
    • Assisting users in finding information
      • Sometimes optional: “for convenience”
      • Sometimes more strict: “under the supervision…”
  • COMMON RESTRICTIONS Restrictions Percent of Policies Number of Policies Identification 21.9% 34 Hours 20.0% 31 Reference Interview 9.7% 15 Identification & Hours 4.5% 7 Identification & Reference Interview 2.6% 4 Hours & Reference Interview 2.6% 4 No Restrictions 58.1% 90
  • RESTRICTIONS BY SIZE OF FDLP COLLECTION
  • RESTRICTIONS BY SIZE OF FDLP COLLECTION
  • RESTRICTIONS BY SIZE OF FDLP COLLECTION
  • RESTRICTIONS BY LOCATION Top 10: 41 libraries (26.5%); Next 10: 17 (11.0%); Outside: 97 (62.6%) Restriction Top 10 Cities Next 10 Cities Outside Top 20 Identification 39.0% 23.5% 14.4% Hours 24.4% 23.5% 17.5% Reference Interview 29.3% 0.0% 3.1% ID & Hours 9.8% 5.9% 2.1% ID & Ref. Interview 9.8% 0.0%* 0.0% Hours & Ref. Interview 4.9% 0.0%* 2.1% No Restrictions 31.7% 58.8% 69.1%
  • ACCESS POLICY CONTENT: GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS
    • Is there a specific mention of government documents patrons?
    • Discussion of the “primary mission”
      • “ privately funded research facility”
      • “ exists primarily to serve the needs of [students, faculty, etc.]
    • Are patrons limited to FDLP collection?
    • Tone of policy
  • ENCOURAGING TONE
    • “ Welcome!”
    • “ Provide free and unimpeded access”
    • Even when the actual access is limited
      • “ All government documents are available for public use”
      • “ Patrons are encouraged to visit during [hours]”
      • “ Welcome the community at large when legal resources are needed”
      • “ collections are available to all individuals for use on site”
  • DISCOURAGING TONE
    • “… closed to the general public, except…”
    • “ Only visitors...accessing federal government documents are welcome”
    • Requiring specific knowledge of documents
      • “ email request…detailing the nature of the research project”
      • “ wish to view specific government documents”
    • “ deny library privileges [to any patron who] fails to register and show appropriate identification”
  • QUESTIONS?
    • Kate Irwin-Smiler
      • [email_address]
    • Thanks to
      • Gretchen Jennings (WFU ’10)
      • Andrew Irwin-Smiler
    • Slides to be posted at SlideShare.com: #AALL2010