Housing Project PartnershipSupport for this theKirwan Institute’s “Future            November 10, 2009of Fair Housing” ini...
Today’s Agenda Purpose    To engage you and learn more about the nature of fair     housing and fair credit challenges i...
About Kirwan Multidisciplinary applied  research institute   Our mission is to expand    opportunity for all, especially...
available online:http://4909e99d35cada63e7f757471b7243be73e53e14.gripelements.com/publications/MI_Roundtable_Full_report.pdf
available online:http://4909e99d35cada63e7f757471b7243be73e53e14.gripelements.com/publications/MI_Roundtable_Full_report.pdf
NGrowth of Vacant Housing                Legend:                 W       E   in Detroit 1970-2000                         ...
Background: National Initiative on SubprimeLending, Foreclosure and Race
What happened?                           -Lack of loan information or                           understanding for consumer...
From Redlining toReverse Redlining
On the reverse side of thecoin, J. Hernandez shows howareas in Sacramento with raciallyrestrictive covenants in the pastha...
Background: National Initiative on SubprimeLending, Foreclosure and Race                                Question: Where’s ...
Figure byChristopher L.Peterson, Univ.of Utah LawSchool
Research takeaways Unequal credit markets and segregated housing happened  together.    Fair credit and fair housing (br...
Goals and Objectives Make progress in fair housing in three areas:    Improve access to fair financial options    Affir...
The Future of Fair Credit and FairHousing: Key Questions How do we best tell the story that we know? This is  important b...
Initiative Design and Activities What?    Understand new/current challenges and necessary pathways     to success    Pr...
Upcoming Activities Similar policy feedback from regional policy convening:    Seattle, WA    Austin, TX    New Orlean...
Commissioned workInitial findingsEmerging areas of concern
Commissioned Research (Ex’s) Access to fair financial options (mortgage and  otherwise)   Banks’ increasing reliance on ...
Commissioned Research (Ex’s) Affirmative community revitalization    How has the subprime crisis exacerbated fair housin...
Properties in Foreclosure in North Minneapolis (Mark Ireland)No Home in Indian Country (Janeen Comenote)TARP Programs Must...
Properties in foreclosure Study of North Minneapolis Subprime lenders did disproportionate lending in the area   Vast m...
Properties in foreclosure Under-reported, disproportionate affect on rental  families with school-age children    Rental...
No Home in Indian Country On-reservation populations   Federal government has legal and trust responsibility to    provi...
No Home in Indian Country Off-reservation populations (majority of AI/AN population in US)   8-state study revealed the ...
TARP’s duty to affirmatively further National Fair Housing Alliance paper Federal programs designed to mitigate the effe...
Fair Housing Act requirements Federal programs designed to mitigate the effects of the financial crisis must meet their o...
Example: Home AffordableModification Program (HAMP) Funded by $75 Billion in TARP funds Incentivizes mortgage loan modif...
Overdraft feesRemittance market
Embarrassing fee facts Half of overdraft fees are from small ATM/debit  purchases (the “$40 cup of coffee”) Some banks i...
Civil rights concerns [Tree] People who overdraft repeatedly are more likely than the general population to be lower inco...
Remittance market In 2004, 5% of transfers were done via direct deposit into  accounts at financial institutions (40 mill...
Fair housing and fair lending Group A: Barriers to / Best practices for access to fair  financial options, mortgage and o...
Save the date; March 11-13, 2010
Thank You!www.kirwaninstitute.org                          38
Fair Credit and Fair Housing in the Wake of the Subprime and Foreclosure Crisis
Fair Credit and Fair Housing in the Wake of the Subprime and Foreclosure Crisis
Fair Credit and Fair Housing in the Wake of the Subprime and Foreclosure Crisis
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Fair Credit and Fair Housing in the Wake of the Subprime and Foreclosure Crisis

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Fair Credit and Fair Housing in the Wake of the Subprime and Foreclosure Crisis

  1. 1. Housing Project PartnershipSupport for this theKirwan Institute’s “Future November 10, 2009of Fair Housing” initiativeis provided by the W.K. Detroit, MIKellogg Foundation Christy Rogers The Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity The Ohio State University
  2. 2. Today’s Agenda Purpose  To engage you and learn more about the nature of fair housing and fair credit challenges in Detroit  To incorporate your feedback into our broader “blue print” for the future of fair housing Agenda  Introduction: The “Future of Fair Housing & Fair Credit”  Small group brainstorming sessions  Report out and discussion
  3. 3. About Kirwan Multidisciplinary applied research institute  Our mission is to expand opportunity for all, especially for our most marginalized communities Founded in 2003 by john powell  Opportunity Communities Program (1/3 of staff)  Opening pathways to opportunity for marginalized communities through investments in people, places and supporting linkages  Opportunity mapping 3
  4. 4. available online:http://4909e99d35cada63e7f757471b7243be73e53e14.gripelements.com/publications/MI_Roundtable_Full_report.pdf
  5. 5. available online:http://4909e99d35cada63e7f757471b7243be73e53e14.gripelements.com/publications/MI_Roundtable_Full_report.pdf
  6. 6. NGrowth of Vacant Housing Legend: W E in Detroit 1970-2000 S City of Detroit % of Homes Vacant (% Vacant Housing Highways 0-3 in 1970 and 2000) Counties 3 - 10 10 - 15 Prepared by: Kirwan Institute Source Data: U.S. Census Bureau 15 - 20 20 - 57.6 % Vacant % Vacant 1970 20008 0 8 16 Miles
  7. 7. Background: National Initiative on SubprimeLending, Foreclosure and Race
  8. 8. What happened? -Lack of loan information or understanding for consumers More than Just in many of these communities Foreclosures and a Few Bad Borrowers: -Communities wereUnderstanding the Credit historically starved of credit Crisis Impact in Communities of Color -Mortgage securitization and the growth of the subprime Why Were Subprime industry created incentives to Loans Concentrated in target new markets with These Neighborhoods? mortgages -Targeting and overconcentration of loans within these communities 9
  9. 9. From Redlining toReverse Redlining
  10. 10. On the reverse side of thecoin, J. Hernandez shows howareas in Sacramento with raciallyrestrictive covenants in the pasthad the fewest loan denialstoday…where “prime” credit wassteered.
  11. 11. Background: National Initiative on SubprimeLending, Foreclosure and Race Question: Where’s the panel on the resultant worldwide economic meltdown?
  12. 12. Figure byChristopher L.Peterson, Univ.of Utah LawSchool
  13. 13. Research takeaways Unequal credit markets and segregated housing happened together.  Fair credit and fair housing (broadly defined) will only happen together. Global finance has evolved against – and plays out in – racially and economically segregated neighborhoods.  We need to know more about banking and finance Fair housing and fair credit is an issue for all of us, but attention needs to be targeted to marginalized communities.  Otherwise, policies miss key opportunities and challenges and miss those most affected by the crisis.
  14. 14. Goals and Objectives Make progress in fair housing in three areas:  Improve access to fair financial options  Affirmative community revitalization  Opportunity-based housing Ensure that programs and policies responding to the subprime crisis reach those most affected Connect and engage diverse stakeholders for cross- cutting advocacy
  15. 15. The Future of Fair Credit and FairHousing: Key Questions How do we best tell the story that we know? This is important because the framing of the problem shapes its solution. How do we climb out of the subprime lending and foreclosure fiasco without worsening the already widening opportunity gaps for communities of color?  Home ownership and mortgage lending  Credit access, debt, leverage  Banking, savings
  16. 16. Initiative Design and Activities What?  Understand new/current challenges and necessary pathways to success  Provide a comprehensive view of changes needed  Provide resources and spark action among advocates How?  Commissioned research from national experts  Input from advisory board  Regional convenings (obtaining local expertise and insight)  Collaboration & policy consensus building with national advocacy organizations
  17. 17. Upcoming Activities Similar policy feedback from regional policy convening:  Seattle, WA  Austin, TX  New Orleans, LA  Oakland, CA Federal policy and advocacy consensus building meeting on fair credit in Washington, DC (November 18) Final policy and advocacy “blueprint” – all papers & blueprint publicly available (website & materials available in early winter 2010)
  18. 18. Commissioned workInitial findingsEmerging areas of concern
  19. 19. Commissioned Research (Ex’s) Access to fair financial options (mortgage and otherwise)  Banks’ increasing reliance on fees…implications for low- income customers and communities of color  Discretionary pricing of financial products  Consumer credit for those coming out of foreclosure Connect and engage diverse stakeholders  What might an advocacy strategy around fair credit and fair banking look like?  What’s the role for philanthropies?
  20. 20. Commissioned Research (Ex’s) Affirmative community revitalization  How has the subprime crisis exacerbated fair housing and equitable community development challenges? (Minneapolis, Cleveland, Boston, Sacramento)  How has the subprime and foreclosure crisis affected immigrants, especially low-income and undocumented immigrant homeowners?  How might the homeowner/rental balance shift and affect rental markets? Ensure that programs and policies responding to the subprime crisis reach those most affected  How do we assess the current federal policy response with respect to fair housing and civil rights goals? (TARP, NSP2)  What has the impact been on the AI/AN population (data)?
  21. 21. Properties in Foreclosure in North Minneapolis (Mark Ireland)No Home in Indian Country (Janeen Comenote)TARP Programs Must Affirmatively Further (DeeDee Swesnick)
  22. 22. Properties in foreclosure Study of North Minneapolis Subprime lenders did disproportionate lending in the area  Vast majority of foreclosed mortgages issued through mortgage broker (unregulated)  CRL study: pay on avg. $35,000 more over life of loan vs. sub-prime mortgage through retail lender Prime lenders disproportionately absent Foreclosed homeowners owed 4-5% more than the original principal balance
  23. 23. Properties in foreclosure Under-reported, disproportionate affect on rental families with school-age children  Rental properties accounted for 61% of foreclosures  40% of foreclosed households had children in Minneapolis public schools; 60% were African American  Yet most foreclosure policies directed to homeowners Properties lose value and endanger neighbors  Averaged ten months to sell at average loss of $65K  83% of properties had 911 calls post-Sheriff’s Sale, with an average of 8 calls per property
  24. 24. No Home in Indian Country On-reservation populations  Federal government has legal and trust responsibility to provide housing for Native people  NAHASDA – Block grants to tribes and tribally designated housing entities  Currently able to meet 5% of need for housing  Denial rate for conventional home purchase loans of 23% -- twice that of Whites
  25. 25. No Home in Indian Country Off-reservation populations (majority of AI/AN population in US)  8-state study revealed the following barriers to housing for urban Native people: credit checks, low income, lack of affordable housing stock, background checks, deposit/down payment requirements  Disproportionate number of Natives in homeless shelter care, but very few projects serving the Native community  Little known about barriers to fair credit
  26. 26. TARP’s duty to affirmatively further National Fair Housing Alliance paper Federal programs designed to mitigate the effects of the financial crisis must meet their obligations under the Fair Housing Act TARP scope close to $ 3 Billion (OSIG Report) TARP funds relate to housing and urban development TARP funds must be spent in a way to affirmatively further fair housing
  27. 27. Fair Housing Act requirements Federal programs designed to mitigate the effects of the financial crisis must meet their obligations under the Fair Housing Act  “All executive departments and agencies shall administer their programs and activities relating to housing and urban development (including any Federal agency having regulatory or supervisory authority over financial institutions) in a manner affirmatively to further the purposes of this subchapter and shall cooperate with the Secretary [of HUD] to further such purposes.” – Sec. 808(d)
  28. 28. Example: Home AffordableModification Program (HAMP) Funded by $75 Billion in TARP funds Incentivizes mortgage loan modifications to keep families in their homes Civil rights & consumer groups had to advocate for the collection and reporting of data on race, ethnicity & sex of applicants for HAMP loan modifications
  29. 29. Overdraft feesRemittance market
  30. 30. Embarrassing fee facts Half of overdraft fees are from small ATM/debit purchases (the “$40 cup of coffee”) Some banks include the overdraft allowance in the account balance shown at the ATM In undercover visits, GAO officials often couldn’t get required disclosures detailing fees A handful of consumers pay the lion’s share of fees (i.e. FDIC study showed that customers with 5 or more NSF transactions – 14% of customers -- accounted for 93.4% of total NSF fees)
  31. 31. Civil rights concerns [Tree] People who overdraft repeatedly are more likely than the general population to be lower income, single, non-white, and renters  Center for Responsible Lending. “Quick Facts on Overdraft Loans.” April 9, 2009. http://www.responsiblelending.org/overdraft-loans/research- analysis/ [Forest] Incomes lag while housing, health care, and education costs skyrocket…more people get in more debt, but the picture is uneven.
  32. 32. Remittance market In 2004, 5% of transfers were done via direct deposit into accounts at financial institutions (40 million transactions/year) Western Union and Money Gram charge $12-50 fee per transaction  People are suspicious of bank pricing, don’t have needed ID, or know of hand-to-hand alternatives  Bank of America has offered free remittance service since 2005…banks want new customers If banks are going to get new customers via the remittance market, how do we ensure that they subsequently offer them sustainable options?
  33. 33. Fair housing and fair lending Group A: Barriers to / Best practices for access to fair financial options, mortgage and otherwise Group B: Barriers to / Best practices for affirmative community revitalization Group C: Barriers to / Best practices for opportunity- based housing
  34. 34. Save the date; March 11-13, 2010
  35. 35. Thank You!www.kirwaninstitute.org 38

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