Generations 2009 Charts

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A presentation for the Pew Internet & American Life Project on generational use of the Internet.

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Generations 2009 Charts

  1. 1. Activity pyramid: Online pursuits by generation The vast majority of online adults from all generations uses email and search engines. While there are always exceptions, older generations typically do not engage with the internet past e-commerce. The majority of teens and Gen Y use SNS, but fewer maintain blogs. Less than a fifth of online adults older than Gen X use SNS. Generations Online in 2009 Basic online entertainment (online videos, playing games) E-commerce (online shopping, banking, and travel reservations) Research and information gathering (product research, news, health and religious information searches) Email and search Active engagement with social media (visit SNS, create SNS profile, create blogs) More advanced online entertainment (download videos, music and podcasts) More advanced communication and passive social media use (instant messaging, visit SNS, read blogs)
  2. 2. Activity grid: Online pursuits by generation Above this line, over 50% of internet users in the given generation engage in this online activity (see table on slide 10 for percentages) Generations Online in 2009
  3. 3. Activity diagram: Overall online pursuits Generations Online in 2009 Source: Qualitatively based on the combination of activities pursued by the majority (at least 50%) of each generation, based on type of activity. See next slide for more detail.
  4. 4. Table: Overall online pursuits Types of Activities: Generations Online in 2009 Communication & social media Entertainment E-commerce & online shopping Information seeking & research
  5. 5. Generations in 2009 Generations Online in 2009
  6. 6. Generations online in 2009 Generations Online in 2009
  7. 7. Americans online by age Chart 1: Percentage of Americans online by age (Teens, 12-17, Nov. 2007-Feb. 2008, margin of error = ±3%. Adults, December 2008, margins of error differ by subgroup. See methodology). Generations Online in 2009
  8. 8. Americans with home broadband by age Chart 2: Percentage of all Americans with broadband at home by age (Teens, 12-17, Nov. 2007-Feb. 2008, margin of error = ±3%. Adults, December 2008, margins of error differ by subgroup. See methodology.). Generations Online in 2009
  9. 9. Home internet users with broadband at home Chart 3: Percentage of home internet users with broadband at home (Teen internet users, 12-17, Nov. 2007-Feb. 2008, margin of error = ±4%. Adults, December 2008, margins of error differ by subgroup. See methodology.). Generations Online in 2009
  10. 10. Generational differences in online activities Generations Online in 2009
  11. 11. Methodology The results of this survey are based on data from a series of telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International primarily between August 2006 and December 2008. For all results based on adult internet users, the margin of error is ±3%. For results based on teen internet users (ages 12-17), conducted in October-November, 2004, and October-November, 2006, the margin of error is ±4%. For results based on teen internet users, conducted in November 2007-February, 2008, the margin of error is ±3%. The margin of error for each generational subgroup shown in the table on page four and discussed throughout the report, however, can be considerably higher than that for the sample of all internet users. Below is a list of the average margins of error (MOE) for each age group listed in the table: Generations Online in 2009

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