GIS Role in FTTx

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The presentation describes the role of GIS in FTTx networks market research, planning, desing, inventory management and cost savings for faster ROI.

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  • As service providers look to boost revenues and offer new multimedia services, bandwidth availability and service quality becomes crucial. The need to deliver high-definition video, faster Internet services, and on-demand content combine to require high-speed fiber-based services. Standards-based GPON and Active Ethernet technologies have become the solutions choice for delivery of fully featured Triple Play networks. Historically, the requisite high construction and installation costs required to deploy FTTx have presented a significant barrier to its widespread adoption. Similarly, the time consuming and costly process to re-wire homes with Ethernet for IPTV have slowed deployment as well. Fiber is commonly looked to for new developments and greenfield applications, where the costs to deploy fiber are no greater than those to deploy new copper. However, increasingly carriers are beginning the migration of FTTx into existing neighborhoods to ensure the necessary bandwidth is available to deliver a competitive suite of services
  • Alexander Graham Bell patented an optical telephone system, which he called the Photophone, in 1880, but his earlier invention, the telephone, proved far more practical. He dreamed of sending signals through the air, but the atmosphere didn't transmit light as reliably as wires carried electricity. In the decades that followed, light was used for a few special applications, such as signalling between ships, but otherwise optical communications, like the experimental Photophone Bell donated to the Smithsonian Institution, languished on the shelf.
  • Where is the bulk of telephone cabling? It may not be where you think! Only 10% is in long distance networks, which were the first links converted to fiber - years ago. Another 10% is local loop (metropolitan) connecting central offices and switches - now mostly converted to fiber too. Fully 80% of all telco cabling is subscriber loop - the ≥last mile≤ that connects the end user to the system. After 20 years of fiber optic installations, virtually all long distance and local loop connections are already fiber. Only the ≥last mile≤ is still copper, and much of it is very old and incapable of carrying modern high bandwidth digital signals. Is FTTH just completing the system to make it all fiber?
  • Where is the bulk of telephone cabling? It may not be where you think! Only 10% is in long distance networks, which were the first links converted to fiber - years ago. Another 10% is local loop (metropolitan) connecting central offices and switches - now mostly converted to fiber too. Fully 80% of all telco cabling is subscriber loop - the ≥last mile≤ that connects the end user to the system. After 20 years of fiber optic installations, virtually all long distance and local loop connections are already fiber. Only the ≥last mile≤ is still copper, and much of it is very old and incapable of carrying modern high bandwidth digital signals. Is FTTH just completing the system to make it all fiber?
  • Where is the bulk of telephone cabling? It may not be where you think! Only 10% is in long distance networks, which were the first links converted to fiber - years ago. Another 10% is local loop (metropolitan) connecting central offices and switches - now mostly converted to fiber too. Fully 80% of all telco cabling is subscriber loop - the ≥last mile≤ that connects the end user to the system. After 20 years of fiber optic installations, virtually all long distance and local loop connections are already fiber. Only the ≥last mile≤ is still copper, and much of it is very old and incapable of carrying modern high bandwidth digital signals. Is FTTH just completing the system to make it all fiber?
  • (Field studies confirm that 25% - 40% of copper plant will not support demands of ADSL, ADSL2+ and VDSL- based services (Video and Data)
  • Where is the bulk of telephone cabling? It may not be where you think! Only 10% is in long distance networks, which were the first links converted to fiber - years ago. Another 10% is local loop (metropolitan) connecting central offices and switches - now mostly converted to fiber too. Fully 80% of all telco cabling is subscriber loop - the ≥last mile≤ that connects the end user to the system. After 20 years of fiber optic installations, virtually all long distance and local loop connections are already fiber. Only the ≥last mile≤ is still copper, and much of it is very old and incapable of carrying modern high bandwidth digital signals. Is FTTH just completing the system to make it all fiber?
  • GIS Role in FTTx

    1. 1. The power of GIS in Implementation of FTTx Delivering Tangible COST BENEFITS in the Implementation and Ongoing Management of Next Generation FTTx Networks
    2. 2. Agenda <ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>Fiber History </li></ul><ul><li>FTTx Classification </li></ul><ul><li>FTTx Architecture </li></ul><ul><li>FTTx Challenges </li></ul><ul><li>GIS Role in FTTx </li></ul><ul><li>GIS Benefits </li></ul><ul><li>Infotech’s Solution </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusion </li></ul>
    3. 3. <ul><li>Telecommunications is fundamental to the world economy! </li></ul><ul><li>Communication Service Providers (CSP): </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Wireline </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wireless </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Satellite </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Providing “Quad-Play” </li></ul><ul><li>Important – Growth in communications, IT and GIS </li></ul><ul><li>World CSP market expected to rise 11% in 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Indian telecom customer growth - 36.6% p.a. (last 5 years) </li></ul>Introduction
    4. 4. <ul><li>Use of Fiber technology started in 1966 </li></ul><ul><li>Begins to supplement copper post 1970 </li></ul><ul><li>Replacement of Telecom backbones in 1980 </li></ul><ul><li>Adaption to metro cities and corporate connections in 1990 </li></ul><ul><li>Exploring options for FTTx in 2000 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Alternatives to FTTx are inadequate for future bandwidth needs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>xDSL, Wireless, BPL won’t have the bandwidth </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Eventually all CSPs will go FTTx </li></ul>Fiber History Alexander Graham Bell patented an optical telephone system called the photophone in 1880
    5. 5. <ul><li>Fiber-To-The-x (FTTx) is the ideal situation of bringing high-speed internet, HDTV, IPTV, VoD and gaming service to the end-user using fiber optic cable </li></ul><ul><li>FTT x refers the reach of fiber from CO to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>FTT n - Node fiber </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>FTT c - Curb fiber – Hybrid /Copper </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>FTT p - Premises fiber </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>FTT b - Mixed with Copper </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>FTT h - Home fiber </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>FTT d - Desk fiber </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>FTT m - Meter fiber </li></ul></ul>FTTx – Classification
    6. 6. FTTx Architecture FTTB User FTTH User FTTP User FTTC FTTN
    7. 7. <ul><li>Market Analysis: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Present & Future bandwidth demands </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Services Present & Future </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Customer Profiling </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Regulations & Policies </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Cost Analysis: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>CapEX vs OpEX </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ROI vs Time frame </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Construction & Equipment cost </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Greenfield or Overlay </li></ul></ul>FTTx – Business Challenges
    8. 8. <ul><li>Technology: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Existing network infrastructure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Last mile replacement </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Complete replacement of copper </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Old vs New technology </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Greenfield vs Overlay </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Implementation: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Network analysis </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Planning & Design </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quick service provisioning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Network management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Workforce mobilization </li></ul></ul>FTTx – Technical Challenges
    9. 9. What is the solution? GIS is a powerful solution to manage the FTTx infrastructure How to over come all the challenges with quick turnaround? Geographical Information System (GIS)
    10. 10. <ul><li>Market Analysis: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Concentrations of population </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Classification of subscribers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Services vs demand </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cable route analysis </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Network Planning: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Capacity planning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Locating existing infrastructure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identifying optimal routes & DPs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Choosing the right FTTx architecture </li></ul></ul>GIS Role – FTTx Implementations GIS plays vital roles in following FTTx services
    11. 11. <ul><li>Network Engineering: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Detailed physical network designs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Cable route layout </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Switching equipment locations </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Splitting and access locations </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Network Inventory: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Asset Management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>OSP/ISP equipment inventory </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Port/Circuit mapping management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>OSS/BSS integration </li></ul></ul>GIS Role – FTTx Implementations Contd..
    12. 12. <ul><li>Market Analysis: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Drastic cost reduction in field visits </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Better decision-making </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Network Planning Design: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Better network and capacity planning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Constructive network designs </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Implementations: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Faster FTTx network rollouts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Effective workforce mobilization </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Inventory Management: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Accurate OSP/ISP inventory </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quick service provisioning </li></ul></ul>Benefits – GIS
    13. 13. <ul><li>To pave the way of ever rising customer demands, Infotech helps CSPs in their planning, design, implementation and maintenance of FTTx networks. </li></ul><ul><li>Whether project may be  Greenfield or Overlay: </li></ul><ul><li>Infotech provides skilled, experienced professionals in choosing the right solution that meets CSPs requirements. </li></ul><ul><li>Infotech offers cost effective FTTx solutions with its distinctive business model &quot;offshore services, onshore responsibility“ </li></ul>Infotech’s Solution
    14. 14. <ul><li>CSPs can save about 70% (approx) of their planning budget which will intern reduce the CapEX and OpEX </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A GIS solution will help CSPs in their planning, design, implementation and management of FTTx networks </li></ul></ul><ul><li>FTTx providers are looking for automated planning by effective utilization of GIS/IT </li></ul><ul><li>GIS solution proposed by Infotech: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Play vital role in core competent areas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Integrates between GIS and FTTx </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cost reduction in overall planning budget </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Accurate network inventory </li></ul></ul>Conclusion The approach will deliver superior value and high return on investments
    15. 16. Kiran Kumar Infotech Enterprises Ltd, India Email: [email_address]

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