The 7 Most Critical Questionsto Ask WhenCreating a Mobile Strategy?????
Early this year, Gartner released a report finding thatmobile technology is the number-two priority for CIOs,trailing only ...
Over a year ago Forrester grabbed a lot of headlines whenit suggested that enterprises meet the rising tide of mobilewith ...
hash out their own strategies and processes, potentiallyresulting in big inconsistencies. A recent study from IDCfound tha...
IDC, along with firms like SAP and Forrester, have beencalling for the Center of Excellence Model, which is essen-tially bu...
and vendor relationships, to sharing best practices, tomaintaining a high standard of user experience, to settingpolicy on...
The historic rap against IT is that it’s more focused on itsown backlog than on shaping experiences that truly reso-nate w...
But being employee-centric isn’t simply about having anultraliberal BYOD strategy. It’s keeping your employees topof mind ...
Once the functional requirements are set, careful thoughtneeds to be given to smart design. The Australian intranetdesigne...
When it comes to setting the pace of innovation, there aretwo distinct camps in the mobile world. On one hand youhave the ...
“Sometimes speed is an asset,” said Greg Raiz, founderand CEO of Raizlabs. “Sometimes it’s a detriment.”With enterprise mo...
Probably the biggest question facing the mobile enterpriseover the past several years is BYOD. The introduction ofthe iPho...
But regardless of where it is now, most forecasts tell us it’shere to stay. Gartner predicts that by 2017 half of employ-e...
What security processes need to be put in place? What’sthe reimbursement policy?The policy also needs to spell out the use...
The rather simple assumption has been that if employeesare bringing their own devices, then companies aren’tpaying for tho...
off Siri, the voice-activated personal assistant, on employ-ees’ iPhones,” the article noted. “The company worries thatthe ...
In the past year or so, a new acronym has started to rivalBYOD as the buzzword du jour: COPE. It stands for Corpo-rate Own...
VP-corporate strategy at Veliq, in a 2012 article: “Thedevice (and the corporate data that resides on it) is fullymanaged ...
certainly stirred up debate. It’s less clear how viable it is asan applicable policy. Hamstringing the adoption of COPE is...
If BYOD has meant a loss of control for IT departments,then the BYOA phenomenon may offer an opportunity totake some contro...
Why not just allow employees to get their business appsfrom stores run by Apple, Google, Microsoft or BlackBerry?There are...
the software choices that are available. An enterprise appstore puts the company in the role of curator, not dictator.“Wit...
The 7 Most Critical Questions to Ask When Creating a Mobile Strategy24CIO magazine’s Strategic Guide to BYOD offers a veryc...
About the AuthorMatt Creamer is a writer and editor based in New YorkCity. He has written for Ad Age, where he is editor a...
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7 Most Critical Questions to Ask When Creating a Mobile Strategy

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Kinvey's eBook details the most important questions to ask when creating a mobile strategy. Readers will learn guidelines for a Mobile Center of Excellence, policies for BYOD and get recommendations from industry analysts.

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7 Most Critical Questions to Ask When Creating a Mobile Strategy

  1. 1. The 7 Most Critical Questionsto Ask WhenCreating a Mobile Strategy?????
  2. 2. Early this year, Gartner released a report finding thatmobile technology is the number-two priority for CIOs,trailing only business intelligence and analytics. Oddlyenough, this recognition of mobile’s impact hasn’t yieldeda lot of strategy development. An enterprise mobility studyby Jack Gold found that fewer than a quarter of respon-dents have a strategy in place, “leaving the rest with ahodgepodge of procedures that are often costly and incon-sistent.”The reality is that for all the time and money enterprisesare pumping into mobile, a relative few have stepped backand put into place a high-level strategy. That’s a big risk.Forging ahead without a strategic framework that cutsacross business units and involves all the relevant stake-holders means that enterprises are risking delays, redun-dant costs, poor integration and, perhaps worst of all, badmobile experiences for employees and consumers.To do our part in helping to change this, we’ve created aneBook that looks at seven questions an enterprise mustask itself as it creates a mobile strategy. While there couldhave easily been 70 questions, or even 700, we’ve avoidedlisting those to which the answer is: “It depends.” Thatmeans we haven’t gone deep into big issues like whichplatforms you should develop for, which security pro-cesses and tools you should use or which vendors youshould work with. Instead, we’ve focused on topics likeorganizational models, app deployment, and, of course,BYOD. At the eBook’s conclusion is a list of links toresources that will provide deeper dives on many of thesetopics.The 7 Most Critical Questions to Ask When Creating a Mobile Strategy1
  3. 3. Over a year ago Forrester grabbed a lot of headlines whenit suggested that enterprises meet the rising tide of mobilewith a dramatic organizational change: the creation of achief mobility officer. This executive would be charged withcoordinating efforts on an enterprise-wide basis. Unfortu-nately, that role has yet to materialize at scale, leavingmost organizations with a ton of work to do when it comesto figuring out how to organize for mobile. While responsi-bility for enterprise mobility typically falls to the CIO (or insome cases the CTO), there is no one-size-fits-all approachbecause mobile touches so many different areas – acrossinternal IT functions and beyond the department. Manycompanies have responded by either putting no structurein place or simply leaving it to individual business units toThe 7 Most Critical Questions to Ask When Creating a Mobile Strategy2Who’s on your mobile team?CMOCIOVP SalesLegal1
  4. 4. hash out their own strategies and processes, potentiallyresulting in big inconsistencies. A recent study from IDCfound that less than 5% of global enterprises have a dedi-cated team to marshal the company’s mobile strategyforward. It’s an almost unbelievably small number. Thewidespread lack of dedicated mobile strategy teams iscontributing to a host of inefficiencies, from redundantcosts to wasted time.It’s been clear for some time that a collaborative approachis necessary, but if youthink that means enter-prises have been fast increating the cross-functional teams that canproperly advance mobile,think again. YankeeGroup’s IT Decision-MakerMarch survey shows thatlines of business impacttheir company’s mobilestrategy in no more than 30% of companies. “Businessbenefits will only come from greater cross-business orga-nizational collaboration and the development of collectivecompetencies,” writes Yankee Group analyst Chris Marsh.What kind of team an organization needs depends on anumber of factors, from its size to how central mobile is tothe business. For some companies, a steering committeewill do. Mobile-first or mobile-mature companies will needto make a bigger organizational commitment.“less than 5% ofglobal enterpriseshave a dedicatedteam to marshalthe company’smobile strategyforward”The 7 Most Critical Questions to Ask When Creating a Mobile Strategy3Click to tweet
  5. 5. IDC, along with firms like SAP and Forrester, have beencalling for the Center of Excellence Model, which is essen-tially business-speak for what ReadWrite Mobile EditorDan Rowinski calls “a group of knowledgeable people thathave the requisite skills and resources to handle mobilesolutions quickly and efficiently.”He writes, “These people need to have power to makedecisions, well-defined jobs that give them autonomy theyneed get things done. Enabling a group within your ITinfrastructure to handle[all] mobile problemscould actually createcompetitive advantage formany companies.”But this team shouldn’t becomposed just of IT folks.A properly constructedCenter of Excellencemight be anywhere froma few dozen to a couple hundred person group expert ineverything from project management to design. Creatingand executing a mobility strategy isn’t just about solvingtechnical issues. There are also business process andgovernance issues in play, requiring line of business,human resources, finance and legal departments to beincluded throughout the development process, not just atthe end.Once established, the center will be responsible for a widevariety of tasks, from inventorying ongoing mobile projects“Creating andexecuting amobility strategyisn’t just aboutsolving technicalissues.”The 7 Most Critical Questions to Ask When Creating a Mobile Strategy4Click to tweet
  6. 6. and vendor relationships, to sharing best practices, tomaintaining a high standard of user experience, to settingpolicy on issues like BYOD and BYOA, to entrenching abusiness-outcome mindset when it comes to mobile. It willset guidance for key questions about what apps get devel-oped, whether they should be developed in-house or byan outside partner, and how those apps are deployed.Sometimes it will even be responsible for getting thoseapps out the door.The exact flavor of a Center of Excellence will vary byorganization, but the universal goal is to drive collabora-tion between business and IT and entrench a business-outcome-oriented mindset when it comes to mobile. Giventhe exponential growth of mobile, going through the drillof creating a business case for a mobile strategy may seemcompletely unnecessary. After all, how else can a companyreach all those people staring at their iPhones and Androidhandsets? But the reality is that before getting into specif-ics you need to do a few things to establish overarchinggoals for your particular business. In other words, enter-prise mobility needs to be about more than “just” improv-ing productivity and cutting costs. It must also drivebusiness objectives like time to market, employee andcustomer satisfaction levels, as well as sales growth andmargins.The 7 Most Critical Questions to Ask When Creating a Mobile Strategy5
  7. 7. The historic rap against IT is that it’s more focused on itsown backlog than on shaping experiences that truly reso-nate with users, whether consumers or a workforce. In themobile age, that’s just not acceptable. As Ovum analystRichard Absalom has written, “every employee is first andforemost a consumer. It makes no sense to have a policythat doesn’t acknowledge and include the input of the verypeople that are necessitating its existence in the first place– keeping them out of the loop is more likely to end withpeople bypassing IT policies to find their own (probablyinsecure) way of working; one of the primary drivers ofBYOD in the first place.”6Are you employee-centric?Corp.The 7 Most Critical Questions to Ask When Creating a Mobile StrategyThe 7 Most Critical Questions to Ask When Creating a Mobile Strategy2
  8. 8. But being employee-centric isn’t simply about having anultraliberal BYOD strategy. It’s keeping your employees topof mind in the strategy development and knowing howmobility impacts them. And it’s about cultivating a deepunderstanding of how your employees can benefit fromthe mobility strategy that you’re putting in place. In short,an employee-centric mobility strategy isn’t created in avacuum but with the input of the people who will live outthat strategy.It begins with understanding what your employees arealready doing in mobile. You should have data on whatdevices and apps they’reactually using comple-mented by a sense ofwhat they want and need.What does their wish listlook like? How are theyresponding to currentcompany policies or lackthereof? Are they awareof the current BYODpolicy, for instance? Fieldresearch here is key in order to understand how employ-ees interact with their mobile devices in a business setting.Once the data is in hand, the question becomes: What doyou want them to be able to do? This is a question thatshould be answered in very specific use cases that mightvary by role. For salespeople it might be about betteraccess to the CRM system. For an executive, it might meanmobile access to dashboards with performance metrics.“Being employee-centric isn’t simplyabout having anultraliberal BYODstrategy”Click to tweet8The 7 Most Critical Questions to Ask When Creating a Mobile Strategy
  9. 9. Once the functional requirements are set, careful thoughtneeds to be given to smart design. The Australian intranetdesigner James Robertson has written: “Enterprise soft-ware applications aren’t designed. At best they’re devel-oped, but often they’re just built.” His point is that whenthe end-user is an employee, form often takes a backseatto functionality and user experience isn’t even aconsideration.Happily, mobile enterprise apps have the potential to bequite different, thanks to the high bar set by so manyconsumer applications. People now expect intuitive designwhether they’re acting as employees or acting as consum-ers. It’s up to the enterprise to give it to them. To do so,enterprise app development teams have to avoid an “it’sonly about the backend” mentality and also think hardabout how to develop simple, elegant and even beautifulinterfaces. Not that it stops with the interface. The userexperience, after all, is broader than that and includeseverything from onboarding to updates - and all of thathas to be incorporated into UX philosophy.9The 7 Most Critical Questions to Ask When Creating a Mobile Strategy
  10. 10. When it comes to setting the pace of innovation, there aretwo distinct camps in the mobile world. On one hand youhave the folks who dwell at large enterprises. Havinggrown up with SAP, Siebel, Red Hat, and IBM, they areconservative and security-obsessed, wading slowly intonew and uncomfortable territories, like cloud computing.On the other, you have the TechCrunch-reading startupculture that’s all about moving fast and “breaking things,”denting the universe and all that.Who’s right? The answer isn’t as straightforward as youmight think.The 7 Most Critical Questions to Ask When Creating a Mobile Strategy10Is your organization moving fast enough?fastbutdangeroussafebutslow3
  11. 11. “Sometimes speed is an asset,” said Greg Raiz, founderand CEO of Raizlabs. “Sometimes it’s a detriment.”With enterprise mobility, there is risk that goes along withadopting the new, which can be easier to absorb for ayounger or smaller company. Jumping on every new trendor flinching at every new announcement from a platformplayer can lead an enterprise down the wrong paths.A wait-and-see approach can act as a filter. “If they jumpon everything that’s new, they risk jumping on the wrongthing,” said Raiz, adding that he’s seen that with BlackBerryrecently. Its new Black-Berry 10 phone coupledwith a name change hasmade a lot of noise in thepress and stoked thecuriosity of mobile folks atenterprises.Said Raiz, “Because theyhave some weight withenterprises, some compa-nies are saying maybe we should stay with our BlackBerryinfrastructure that’s now crumbling and five years old.”This isn’t an argument for dragging your feet as the worldaround you changes, but rather it is a reminder that a littlebit of conservatism is ok. In other words, if in setting yourmobile strategy you’re going to drink the Silicon ValleyKool-Aid, it’s ok to water it down a bit.“If in setting yourmobile strategyyou’re going todrink the SiliconValley Kool-Aid, it’sok to water itdown a bit.”Click to tweetThe 7 Most Critical Questions to Ask When Creating a Mobile Strategy11
  12. 12. Probably the biggest question facing the mobile enterpriseover the past several years is BYOD. The introduction ofthe iPhone, which finally gave workers better technologyfrom their personal device than they were getting fromtheir employer-issued BlackBerrys, opened up a Pandora’sbox for IT managers. BYOD has been on the lips of ITleaders for years now, though there is a lot of confusionaround the rate of adoption. Depending on the source,anywhere between one-third and 80% of enterprisesalready support BYOD. That’s a huge spread that showsjust how little we really know about the popularity of thetrend.The 7 Most Critical Questions to Ask When Creating a Mobile Strategy12Do you still need to establish a BYOD policy?BYODEmployerProvidedEmployerProvided?4
  13. 13. But regardless of where it is now, most forecasts tell us it’shere to stay. Gartner predicts that by 2017 half of employ-ers will require employees to bring their own devices. Notethe word “require.” If Gartner is right, that turns BYODfrom optional to mandatory for an awful lot of people.Strangely enough, the perceived inevitability of BYODhasn’t resulted in a lot of policy making. According to asurvey from the Computer Technology Industry Associa-tion, only 24 percent of companies have a formal policy inplace. The good news isthat more and morecompanies are recogniz-ing the need. The numberof companies planning toput a policy in placedoubled to 40 percentover the past year,according to CTIA.Is it worth writing a BYODpolicy if you don’t have one by now? It’s important to notethat establishing a policy isn’t the same as supportingBYOD. For those companies that generally say “no” toBYOD, it’s still important to lay out in formal termswhether there are any individual-liable devices that areapproved and, if so, which ones and under what kinds ofconstraints.For the growing number of companies that do supportBYOD, important questions include: What devices aresupported and how is this communicated to employees?“The [BYOD] policyalso needs to spellout the user’sexpectations toprivacy”The 7 Most Critical Questions to Ask When Creating a Mobile StrategyClick to tweet13
  14. 14. What security processes need to be put in place? What’sthe reimbursement policy?The policy also needs to spell out the user’s expectationsto privacy. While it may be tempting to create a policythat’s more enterprise-friendly, it’s important to balancethe employee’s rights against the company’s. After all, thespirit of BYOD is about giving employees freedom, notentangling them in onerous legal agreements.The 7 Most Critical Questions to Ask When Creating a Mobile Strategy14
  15. 15. The rather simple assumption has been that if employeesare bringing their own devices, then companies aren’tpaying for those devices – yeilding instant savings. Overseveral years of BYOD, however, reality has proven to bemore complex.In an interview last year with the MIT Technology Review,IBM’s CIO Jeanette Horan said that BYOD hasn’t saved thecompany any money and has caused a number of securitychallenges. Employee phones need to be reconfigured somemory can be erased remotely and so iCloud and otherpublic file-transfer programs are disabled. “IBM even turnsThe 7 Most Critical Questions to Ask When Creating a Mobile Strategy15Are BYOD-driven cost savingsand security guaranteed?BYOD$!5
  16. 16. off Siri, the voice-activated personal assistant, on employ-ees’ iPhones,” the article noted. “The company worries thatthe spoken queries, which are uploaded to Apple servers,could ultimately reveal sensitive information.”Moreover, there are many hidden costs of BYOD that youwill find if you, well, simply Google “hidden costs of BYOD.”To sum up, though, Aberdeen Group has found that anenterprise with more than one thousand BYOD mobiledevices will spend an average of $170,000 more per yearthan a company with corporate-procured, corporate liabledevices. Why? There are alot of additional costs,from the vagaries ofcarrier billing, to anincrease in the processingof expense reports forreimbursement, to secu-rity.This doesn’t necessarilyamount to an argumentagainst BYOD. After all, embracing consumerization bringsother benefits besides cost-saving — productivity,employee satisfaction and the like. Just a little research,however, does throw a bucket of cold water on the over-simplified argument that adopting BYOD is all aboutpushing the costs of mobility on to your employee.“Embracingconsumerizationbrings otherbenefits besidescost-saving”Click to tweet16The 7 Most Critical Questions to Ask When Creating a Mobile Strategy
  17. 17. In the past year or so, a new acronym has started to rivalBYOD as the buzzword du jour: COPE. It stands for Corpo-rate Owned Personally Enabled, and is meant to be acompromise between the security benefits of command-and-control IT and the freedom that many employeesyearn for.Here’s how it works: The company provides the employeewith the mobile device of his or her choice. Then, it flipsthe script on the security issues we’re accustomed to withBYOD. Instead of worrying about securing company dataon personal devices, a crucial challenge of BYOD, COPEallows employees to have their own personal apps anddata on their work device. Wrote Philippe Winthrop,17Should you COPE?CorpThe 7 Most Critical Questions to Ask When Creating a Mobile Strategy6X
  18. 18. VP-corporate strategy at Veliq, in a 2012 article: “Thedevice (and the corporate data that resides on it) is fullymanaged and controlled, but also allows for employees toinstall the apps they like for their personal use. Wealready see this in many organizations where employeesare installing their favorite media players and their musicor personal photos on their laptops … so why not extendthat to the other mobile devices?”Even while it gives employees more freedom to personal-ize their mobile devices, COPE yields advantages in thesecurity department that are reminiscent of pre-BYODdays. Because it owns the device, the company can wipe itor disallow access to the network.In his article, Winthrop anticipated the objection that COPEdoesn’t give you the cost-cutting benefits that BYOD does,arguing that BYOD’s cost savings only really kick in whenthe employee pays for the device and the plan. But, Win-throp argues, “Too often I see companies fully reimbursethe price of the device, or the service plans or makeemployees fill out a reimbursement form to get theirmonthly stipend. There are zero economies of scale inthese scenarios that truly provide long term cost savings tothe organization. On the flip side, through savvy WirelessExpense Management, organizations leveraging the COPEmodel could negotiate great contracts with the wirelesscarriers to get steep discounts on devices, upgrades, aswell as voice, data and messaging plans.”Since this article was published, COPE has caught theattention of many analysts and journalists and hasThe 7 Most Critical Questions to Ask When Creating a Mobile Strategy18
  19. 19. certainly stirred up debate. It’s less clear how viable it is asan applicable policy. Hamstringing the adoption of COPE isthe widespread belief that the growth of BYOD is inevi-table, not to mention the lack of publicly-available datadetailing the cost and efficacy of COPE strategies. At thispoint, it’s probably one more tool for the toolbox, perhapsworth testing with a subset of employees, and a questionworth asking as part of a comprehensive mobile strategy.The 7 Most Critical Questions to Ask When Creating a Mobile Strategy19
  20. 20. If BYOD has meant a loss of control for IT departments,then the BYOA phenomenon may offer an opportunity totake some control. Bring-your-own-apps raises many ofthe same issues that bring-your-own-device does, espe-cially around security. The difference when it comes toapps is that the horse isn’t yet out of the barn. Whileemployees are pretty much already using whatever devicesuits them, CIOs can still get their hands around the appchallenges. As a result, expect more enterprises to developtheir own corporate app stores that allow them to manageand distribute approved applications to their employees.By 2017, about one-quarter of enterprises will have theirown corporate app stores, according to a recent forecastby Gartner.The 7 Most Critical Questions to Ask When Creating a Mobile StrategyDo you need a corporate “app store”?corpappstore720
  21. 21. Why not just allow employees to get their business appsfrom stores run by Apple, Google, Microsoft or BlackBerry?There are a few key benefits that come from tending yourown store. Assuming that proper vetting processes are inplace, there’s little chance of employees downloadingapplications that put the enterprise in jeopardy. Thesecond benefit goes to procurement practices. In anowned app store, the number of software licenses in usecan be limited, potentially saving a lot of money. It’s alsopossible to exercise granular control over who has accessto what version of what app, ensuring that employeeshave access only to the programs they need. Finally,enterprise app stores can open up access to smaller devel-opment shops and, thanks to all the feedback available,prompt more competition among development teams todeliver the most popular or effective apps.An enterprise app store won’t be for everyone. Indeed,Gartner’s prediction of 25% is relatively modest given theoverall growth of enterprise mobility. Building one can becostly and the group of vendors who offer them is smallbut growing. Gartner pointed out that mobile device man-agement (or MDM) vendors are increasingly offering appstore support.Among the key challenges in managing an enterprise appstore are ensuring that it’s just as user-friendly as thepublic stores employees are used to and making sure thatit’s chock-full of choice. While control is important, it’s alsocrucial for IT departments not to go overboard on limitingThe 7 Most Critical Questions to Ask When Creating a Mobile Strategy22
  22. 22. the software choices that are available. An enterprise appstore puts the company in the role of curator, not dictator.“Without a dynamic selection of apps to choose from,users will eventually have little reason to continue to visitan enterprise app store,” wrote Gartner. “A dramaticincrease in the app options available to internal stakehold-ers is a precondition of any successful enterprise appstore.”Intel, which has a very liberal BYOD policy, offers morethan 80 apps and allows employees to download frompublic stores as well. SAP offers apps developed bothin-house and from outside. It will link to apps that arepopular among employees but aren’t stocked in the store.The 7 Most Critical Questions to Ask When Creating a Mobile Strategy23
  23. 23. The 7 Most Critical Questions to Ask When Creating a Mobile Strategy24CIO magazine’s Strategic Guide to BYOD offers a verycomprehensive look at how to shape up your devicepolicy.http://www.cio.com/documents/pdfs/ebook4-BYOD-final.pdfAnd its interview with attorney Matt Karlyn is alsoinformative, as he narrates the pitfalls of BYOD poli-cies.http://www.cio.com/article/732665/How_to_Craft_the_Best_BYOD_PolicyFor those in the market for a mobility service pro-vider, Forrester’s recent Wave report surveys theplaying field.http://www.forrester.com/pimages/rws/reprints/document/87581/oid/1-LTEQDUSAP has published a useful paper on best practicesfor setting up a Mobility Center of Excellence:http://blogs.sap.com/wp--content/blogs.dir/15/files/2012/02/MobileSense_Mobility_COE_whitepaper.pdAs has Forrester:http://www.xtopoly.com/blog/pdf/Forrester_Your_Company_Needs_A_Mobile_Organization_Courtesy.pdfHere are some resources that willhelp you create your mobilestrategy
  24. 24. About the AuthorMatt Creamer is a writer and editor based in New YorkCity. He has written for Ad Age, where he is editor at large,The Awl, The Atlantic, the New York Daily News, The NewYork Observer and other publications. Matt wrote a previ-ous Kinvey eBook titled, “CIO vs. CMO in the War forMobile”. He tweets at @matt_creamer.The 7 Most Critical Questions to Ask When Creating a Mobile StrategyWhat is Kinvey? Kinvey makes a fully-featured Backend as aService solution, offering 3rd party data integrations, multi-platform support, push notifications, and custom business logic ona platform where its free to get started and you only pay whenyour app is successful.Build your backend todayBuild your backend todayProject ManagerKelly Rice - @kellyrice88DesignerJake McKibben - @ez_Jake_oven

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