Winning strategies of ‘Market’ driven organizations<br />December 8, 2009<br />
Market Driven or Market driving<br />
Market Driving firms<br />Market drivers  see the world differently and focus on latent or emerging customer needs. <br />...
Market driver’s attributes<br />They trigger industry breakpoints or what Andy Grove of Intel’s “strategic inflexion point...
‘values’ driven organizations<br />
VALUES DRIVEN CHANGE<br />OR <br />CIRCUMSTANCES DRIVEN VALUES<br />
“Get better”vs“Get different”<br />
A JOURNEY THROUGH WHAT IS FUNDAMENTAL AND WHAT IS CHANGEABLE<br />
“NOTHING SPLENDID HAS EVER BEEN ACHIEVED EXCEPT THOSE WHO DARED BELIEVED THAT SOMETHING INSIDE THEM WAS SUPERIOR TO CIRCUM...
Today We Are In A Brawl With No Rules!<br />
HORSE RACE of TOMORROW<br /><ul><li>All rules subject to change without notice
The prize money may change at short notice
The route and the finish line will likely change after the race starts
Bets may be made at any time during the race
New entrants may join the race at any time
Racers are on line at all the times and may alter their plans based on the most current information
Racers may form alliances
All creative strategies that are not specifically against the law are allowed
Government laws may change at any time (retrospectively)</li></li></ul><li>Confusion<br />And more confusion ….<br />
Forbes100 from 1917 to 1987[70 years]* 	39 members of the Class of 1917 were alive in 	1987*	20 of the firms were in list ...
20 of 267 of top 10*<br />
*P&G: <br />Declining domestic sales in 20 of 26 categories; <br />7 of them belonged to the  top 10 categories: <br />The...
2009 …. <br />“They had the unpleasant job of announcing the second straight quarter of losses in their business empire th...
GM files for bankruptcy …… Ford Motor seeks to gain amid Rival’s pain<br />Economic Times, June 1, 2009<br />
“There will be more confusion in the business world in the next decadethan in any decade in history. And the current pace ...
Uncertainty: We don’t know when things will get back to normal.Ambiguity:We no longer know what “normal” means. .<br />
Security in an insecure world (existence)?<br />
“The greatest dangerfor most of usis not that our aim istoo highand we miss it,but that it istoo lowand we reach it.”<br /...
“Beware of the tyranny of making SmallChanges to SmallThings. Rather, make BigChanges to BigThings.”—Roger Enrico, former ...
Forget > “Learn”“The problem is never how to get new, <br />innovative thoughts into your mind, <br />but how to get the o...
“Our ideal acquisition is a small startup that has a great technology product on the drawing board that is going to come o...
“These days, you can’t succeed as a company if you’re consumer led – because in a world so full of so much constant change...
“If I’d listened to customers, <br />I’d have given them a faster horse.”<br />					Henry Ford<br />1896 Ford Quadricycle<...
“Our strategies must be tied to leading edge customers on the attack. If we focus on the defensive customers, we will also...
Saviors-in-WaitingDisgruntled CustomersUpstart CompetitorsRogue EmployeesFringe SuppliersWayne Burkan, Wide Angle Vision<b...
The Dream Manager—Matthew Kelly“An organization can only become the-best-version-of-itself to the extent that the people w...
“Business has to give people enriching, rewarding lives,<br />or it's simply not worth doing.”—Richard Branson<br />
“We are a ‘Life Success’ Company.”Dave Liniger, founder, RE/MAX[Real Estate]<br />
“The role of the Director is  to create a space where the actors and  actresses  canbecome more than they’ve ever been bef...
Organizing Genius / Warren Bennis and Patricia Ward Biederman“Groups become great only when everyone in them, leaders and ...
“free to do his or her absolute best” … “allow its members to discover their greatness.”<br />Tom Peters, May 28, 2009<br />
“You have to treat your employees like customers.”—Herb Kelleher, complete answer, upon being asked his “secrets to succes...
“Get better”vs“Get different”<br />
SUCCESSFUL HABITS OF VISIONARY FIRMS<br />COMPANIES HAVE THEIR CORE VALUES AND CORE PURPOSES FIXED WHILE THEIR BUSINESS ST...
VISIONARY FIRMS <br />UNDERSTAND THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN WHAT SHOULD NEVER CHANGE AND WHAT SHOULD BE OPEN FOR CHANGE<br />W...
VISION AND MISSION<br />VISION : WHAT YOU WOULD LIKE TO BE KNOWN FOR?<br />MISSION:WHAT BUSINESS YOU WOULD LIKE TO BE IN?<...
Mission Statement components:<br />Customer/Marketing<br />Product or Service<br />Geographic Domain<br />Technology<br />...
VISIONARY FIRMS<br />Collins & Porras, 1996<br />
44<br />
Built to LastCriteria for a Visionary Company<br />Premier institution in its industry<br />Widely admired by knowledgeabl...
Selection Process<br />Surveyed 700 CEOs at leading corporations from a cross section of industry, size, location and type...
Research Results and Comparison Companies<br />Visionary Companies<br />3M<br />American Express<br />Boeing<br />Citicorp...
List of Visionary & comparison companies …<br />
Visionary Company<br />Premier Institution<br />Widely Admired<br />Indelible imprint on the world<br />50+ year track rec...
Vision<br />Core<br />ideology<br />Vision<br />Envisioned<br />future<br />
Core Ideology<br />Core values<br />Core Purpose<br />Essential, enduring <br />Tenets (beliefs)<br />Reason for being<br ...
YOU DISCOVER CORE IDEOLOGY BY LOOKING INSIDE. <br />IT HAS TO BE AUTHENTIC. <br />YOU CAN’T FAKE IT<br />
What are Core Values?<br />A set of beliefs that influence the way people and groups behave<br />They are the “soul” of th...
Johnson &Johnson Core Values and Purpose<br /><ul><li>The company exists “to alleviate pain and disease”
“We have a hierarchy of responsibilities: customers first, employees second, society at large third, and shareholders fourth”
Individual opportunity and reward based on merit
Decentralization = Creativity = Productivity</li></li></ul><li>Where do Core Values Come From?<br />Most core values come ...
Why are Core Values Important?<br />Influence behavior<br />Communicate what we really believe<br />Core values are sacred...
National interestThe Tata group is committed to benefit the economic development of the countries in which it operates. No...
Tata Code of Conduct<br />Gifts and donations<br />A Tata company and its employees shall neither receive nor offer or mak...
Integration of Core Values<br />Effective core values are integrated into all levels and functions of the organization<br ...
Norstan Inc. Integration of Core Values<br />Employees   Customers   Stakeholders    Owners<br />1. Be Ethical<br />2. Be ...
Characteristics of Effective Core Values <br />Clear and succinct<br />Usually no more than 6<br />Thought about and itera...
Leading with Core Values<br />Communicate to assure that people understand the values and believe in the values.<br />Stan...
Leading with Core Values<br />Align to practices and systems with the values: rewards, information sharing, measures, meet...
CORE VALUES: EXAMPLES<br />MERCK<br />Corporate social responsibility<br />Unequivocal excellence in all aspects of the co...
CORE VALUES: EXAMPLES<br />PHILIP MORRIS<br />The right to freedom of choice<br />Winning – beating others in a good fight...
CORE VALUES: EXAMPLES<br />SONY<br />Elevation of the Japanese culture and national status<br />Being pioneer – not follow...
CORE VALUES: EXAMPLES<br />Nordstrom<br /><ul><li>Service to the customer above all else
Never being satisfied
Hard work and individual productivity</li></li></ul><li>Identifying core values:<br /><ul><li>What core values you persona...
What would you tell your children?
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L2 winning strategies of market driving organization

  1. 1. Winning strategies of ‘Market’ driven organizations<br />December 8, 2009<br />
  2. 2. Market Driven or Market driving<br />
  3. 3. Market Driving firms<br />Market drivers see the world differently and focus on latent or emerging customer needs. <br />Market drivers create new markets or redefine the category in a fundamental way that competitors are rendered obsolete. <br />
  4. 4. Market driver’s attributes<br />They trigger industry breakpoints or what Andy Grove of Intel’s “strategic inflexion points”, which change business innovation.<br />Core Values inspire their radical business concept.<br />Rather than learn from existing customers, they often teach potential customers to consume their drastically different value proposition.<br />
  5. 5. ‘values’ driven organizations<br />
  6. 6. VALUES DRIVEN CHANGE<br />OR <br />CIRCUMSTANCES DRIVEN VALUES<br />
  7. 7. “Get better”vs“Get different”<br />
  8. 8. A JOURNEY THROUGH WHAT IS FUNDAMENTAL AND WHAT IS CHANGEABLE<br />
  9. 9. “NOTHING SPLENDID HAS EVER BEEN ACHIEVED EXCEPT THOSE WHO DARED BELIEVED THAT SOMETHING INSIDE THEM WAS SUPERIOR TO CIRCUMSTANCE”BRUCE BARTON<br />
  10. 10. Today We Are In A Brawl With No Rules!<br />
  11. 11. HORSE RACE of TOMORROW<br /><ul><li>All rules subject to change without notice
  12. 12. The prize money may change at short notice
  13. 13. The route and the finish line will likely change after the race starts
  14. 14. Bets may be made at any time during the race
  15. 15. New entrants may join the race at any time
  16. 16. Racers are on line at all the times and may alter their plans based on the most current information
  17. 17. Racers may form alliances
  18. 18. All creative strategies that are not specifically against the law are allowed
  19. 19. Government laws may change at any time (retrospectively)</li></li></ul><li>Confusion<br />And more confusion ….<br />
  20. 20. Forbes100 from 1917 to 1987[70 years]* 39 members of the Class of 1917 were alive in 1987* 20 of the firms were in list of 100 in 1987 * 18 F100 “survivors” underperformed the market by 20% * Just 2 (2%) GE & Kodak, outperformed the market 1917 to 1987.Source: Dick Foster & Sarah Kaplan, Creative Destruction: Why Companies That Are Built to Last Underperform the Market<br />
  21. 21. 20 of 267 of top 10*<br />
  22. 22. *P&G: <br />Declining domestic sales in 20 of 26 categories; <br />7 of them belonged to the top 10 categories: <br />The “billion-dollar problem.”Source: Advertising Age 01.21.2002ecurities<br />
  23. 23. 2009 …. <br />“They had the unpleasant job of announcing the second straight quarter of losses in their business empire that had never made a loss before.”<br />Mr. Steel's Moment of Truth, Forbes India, June 5, 2009<br />
  24. 24. GM files for bankruptcy …… Ford Motor seeks to gain amid Rival’s pain<br />Economic Times, June 1, 2009<br />
  25. 25. “There will be more confusion in the business world in the next decadethan in any decade in history. And the current pace of change will only accelerate.”Steve Case <br />[America online]<br />
  26. 26. Uncertainty: We don’t know when things will get back to normal.Ambiguity:We no longer know what “normal” means. .<br />
  27. 27. Security in an insecure world (existence)?<br />
  28. 28. “The greatest dangerfor most of usis not that our aim istoo highand we miss it,but that it istoo lowand we reach it.”<br />Michelangelo<br />Italian Renaissance painter<br />
  29. 29. “Beware of the tyranny of making SmallChanges to SmallThings. Rather, make BigChanges to BigThings.”—Roger Enrico, former Chairman, PepsiCo<br />
  30. 30. Forget > “Learn”“The problem is never how to get new, <br />innovative thoughts into your mind, <br />but how to get the old ones out.”Tom Peters<br />
  31. 31. “Our ideal acquisition is a small startup that has a great technology product on the drawing board that is going to come out in six to twelve months. <br />We buy the engineers and the next generation product.…”John Chambers, Cisco<br />
  32. 32. “These days, you can’t succeed as a company if you’re consumer led – because in a world so full of so much constant change, consumers can’t anticipate the next big thing. <br />Companies should be idea-led and consumer-informed.”Doug Atkin, partner, Merkley Newman Harty<br />
  33. 33.
  34. 34.
  35. 35. “If I’d listened to customers, <br />I’d have given them a faster horse.”<br /> Henry Ford<br />1896 Ford Quadricycle<br />
  36. 36. “Our strategies must be tied to leading edge customers on the attack. If we focus on the defensive customers, we will also become defensive.”John Roth, CEO, Nortel<br />
  37. 37. Saviors-in-WaitingDisgruntled CustomersUpstart CompetitorsRogue EmployeesFringe SuppliersWayne Burkan, Wide Angle Vision<br />
  38. 38. The Dream Manager—Matthew Kelly“An organization can only become the-best-version-of-itself to the extent that the people who drive that organization are striving to become better-versions-of-themselves.” “A company’s purpose is to become the-best-version-of-itself. The question is:What is an employee’s purpose? Most would say, ‘to help the company achieve its purpose’—but they would be wrong. That is certainly part of the employee’s role, but an employee’s primarypurpose is to become the-best-version-of-himself or –herself.… When a company forgets that it exists to serve customers, it quickly goes out of business.Our employees are our first customers, and our most important customers.”<br />
  39. 39. “Business has to give people enriching, rewarding lives,<br />or it's simply not worth doing.”—Richard Branson<br />
  40. 40. “We are a ‘Life Success’ Company.”Dave Liniger, founder, RE/MAX[Real Estate]<br />
  41. 41. “The role of the Director is to create a space where the actors and actresses canbecome more than they’ve ever been before, more than they’ve dreamed of being.”—Robert Altman, Oscar acceptance speech<br />
  42. 42. Organizing Genius / Warren Bennis and Patricia Ward Biederman“Groups become great only when everyone in them, leaders and members alike,is free to do his or her absolute best.”“The best thing a leader can do for a Great Group is toallow its members to discover their greatness.”<br />
  43. 43. “free to do his or her absolute best” … “allow its members to discover their greatness.”<br />Tom Peters, May 28, 2009<br />
  44. 44. “You have to treat your employees like customers.”—Herb Kelleher, complete answer, upon being asked his “secrets to success”<br />Source: Joe Nocera, NYT, “Parting Words of an Airline Pioneer,” on the occasion of Herb Kelleher’s retirement after 37 years at Southwest Airlines (SWA’s pilots union took out a full-page ad in USA Today thanking HK for all he had done; across the<br /> way in Dallas American Airlines’ pilots were picketing the Annual Meeting)<br />
  45. 45. “Get better”vs“Get different”<br />
  46. 46. SUCCESSFUL HABITS OF VISIONARY FIRMS<br />COMPANIES HAVE THEIR CORE VALUES AND CORE PURPOSES FIXED WHILE THEIR BUSINESS STRATEGIES AND PRACTICES ENDLESSLY ADAPT TO CHANGING WORLD<br />
  47. 47. VISIONARY FIRMS <br />UNDERSTAND THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN WHAT SHOULD NEVER CHANGE AND WHAT SHOULD BE OPEN FOR CHANGE<br />WHAT IS VISION?<br />Mission?<br />
  48. 48. VISION AND MISSION<br />VISION : WHAT YOU WOULD LIKE TO BE KNOWN FOR?<br />MISSION:WHAT BUSINESS YOU WOULD LIKE TO BE IN?<br />
  49. 49. Mission Statement components:<br />Customer/Marketing<br />Product or Service<br />Geographic Domain<br />Technology<br />Concern For Survival<br />Company Philosophy<br />Self (Business) Concept<br />Public Image<br />
  50. 50. VISIONARY FIRMS<br />Collins & Porras, 1996<br />
  51. 51. 44<br />
  52. 52. Built to LastCriteria for a Visionary Company<br />Premier institution in its industry<br />Widely admired by knowledgeable business<br />Made an indelible imprint on the world<br />Had multiple generations of chief executives<br />Been through multiple product life cycles<br />Founded before 1950<br />It is more than “successful”, more than “enduring”<br />Displays resiliency and ability to bounce back from setbacks and mistakes<br />
  53. 53. Selection Process<br />Surveyed 700 CEOs at leading corporations from a cross section of industry, size, location and type/ownership<br />Identified distinguishing essential differences (rather than commonalities) with a similar Comparison Company<br />Examined how they started and evolved (responded to historical circumstances)<br />
  54. 54. Research Results and Comparison Companies<br />Visionary Companies<br />3M<br />American Express<br />Boeing<br />Citicorp<br />Ford<br />General Electric<br />Hewlitt-Packard<br />IBM<br />Johnson & Johnson<br />Marriott<br />Merck<br />Motorola<br />Nordstrom<br />Philip Morris<br />Procter & Gamble<br />Sony<br />Wal-Mart<br />Walt Disney<br />Comparison Companies<br />Norton<br />Wells Fargo<br />McDonnell Douglas<br />Chase Manhattan<br />GM<br />Westinghouse<br />Texas Instruments<br />Burroughs<br />Bristol-Myers Squibb<br />Howard Johnson<br />Pfizer<br />Zenith<br />Melville<br />RJR Nabisco<br />Colgate<br />Kenwood<br />Ames<br />Columbia<br />
  55. 55. List of Visionary & comparison companies …<br />
  56. 56.
  57. 57.
  58. 58.
  59. 59. Visionary Company<br />Premier Institution<br />Widely Admired<br />Indelible imprint on the world<br />50+ year track record<br />Multiple generations of CEOs<br />Multiple product/service cycles<br />
  60. 60. Vision<br />Core<br />ideology<br />Vision<br />Envisioned<br />future<br />
  61. 61. Core Ideology<br />Core values<br />Core Purpose<br />Essential, enduring <br />Tenets (beliefs)<br />Reason for being<br />What the <br />organisation <br />offers to society<br />What is <br />important?<br />Dominant aspiration<br />
  62. 62. YOU DISCOVER CORE IDEOLOGY BY LOOKING INSIDE. <br />IT HAS TO BE AUTHENTIC. <br />YOU CAN’T FAKE IT<br />
  63. 63. What are Core Values?<br />A set of beliefs that influence the way people and groups behave<br />They are the “soul” of the organization<br />Effective values are deep rooted<br />
  64. 64. Johnson &Johnson Core Values and Purpose<br /><ul><li>The company exists “to alleviate pain and disease”
  65. 65. “We have a hierarchy of responsibilities: customers first, employees second, society at large third, and shareholders fourth”
  66. 66. Individual opportunity and reward based on merit
  67. 67. Decentralization = Creativity = Productivity</li></li></ul><li>Where do Core Values Come From?<br />Most core values come from the founders of an organization<br />Some organizations have used a group consensus process to develop core values<br />
  68. 68.
  69. 69.
  70. 70. Why are Core Values Important?<br />Influence behavior<br />Communicate what we really believe<br />Core values are sacred, they do not change<br />They provide a moral compass<br />Provide continuity through change<br />Help people make tough decisions<br />They help to decentralize decision making<br />Help people to be more proactive<br />
  71. 71. National interestThe Tata group is committed to benefit the economic development of the countries in which it operates. No Tata company shall undertake any project or activity to the detriment of the wider interests of the communities in which it operates. <br />
  72. 72. Tata Code of Conduct<br />Gifts and donations<br />A Tata company and its employees shall neither receive nor offer or make, directly or indirectly, any illegal payments, remuneration, gifts, donations or comparable benefits that are intended, or perceived, to obtain uncompetitive favours for the conduct of its business. The company shall cooperate with governmental authorities in efforts to eliminate all forms of bribery, fraud and corruption.<br />However, a Tata company and its employees may, with full disclosure, accept and offer nominal gifts, provided such gifts are customarily given and / or are of a commemorative nature. Each company shall have a policy to clarify its rules and regulations on gifts and entertainment, to be used for the guidance of its employees.<br />
  73. 73. Integration of Core Values<br />Effective core values are integrated into all levels and functions of the organization<br />Practicing the core values in all areas, all the time creates integrity<br />
  74. 74. Norstan Inc. Integration of Core Values<br />Employees Customers Stakeholders Owners<br />1. Be Ethical<br />2. Be Responsive<br />3. Be Profitable<br />
  75. 75. Characteristics of Effective Core Values <br />Clear and succinct<br />Usually no more than 6<br />Thought about and iterated a lot<br />They stay the same through time, they are sacred<br />Widely and frequently communicated<br />Provide substantial guidance<br />Profitability is not the primary ingredient<br />
  76. 76. Leading with Core Values<br />Communicate to assure that people understand the values and believe in the values.<br />Standardize the values: define what they mean and give examples of the value, tell value stories. <br />Practice using the values:<br /> daily, weekly, monthly.<br />Encourage people to use the values to make decisions.<br />
  77. 77. Leading with Core Values<br />Align to practices and systems with the values: rewards, information sharing, measures, meetings, teams, etc.<br />Recognize people and groups that practice the values. Inform others about how the values were used to make a decision.<br />Correct those who do not use the values or violate them.<br />
  78. 78. CORE VALUES: EXAMPLES<br />MERCK<br />Corporate social responsibility<br />Unequivocal excellence in all aspects of the company<br />Science-based innovation<br />Honesty and integrity<br />Profit, but profit from work that benefits humanity<br />
  79. 79. CORE VALUES: EXAMPLES<br />PHILIP MORRIS<br />The right to freedom of choice<br />Winning – beating others in a good fight<br />Encouraging individual initiative<br />Opportunity based on merit; no one is entitled to anything<br />Hard work and continuous self improvement<br />
  80. 80. CORE VALUES: EXAMPLES<br />SONY<br />Elevation of the Japanese culture and national status<br />Being pioneer – not following others; doing the impossible<br />Encouraging individual ability and creativity<br />.<br />
  81. 81. CORE VALUES: EXAMPLES<br />Nordstrom<br /><ul><li>Service to the customer above all else
  82. 82. Never being satisfied
  83. 83. Hard work and individual productivity</li></li></ul><li>Identifying core values:<br /><ul><li>What core values you personally bring to work?
  84. 84. What would you tell your children?
  85. 85. If you have enough money to retire, would you continue to live those values?
  86. 86. Can you envision them being as valid for next 100 years?
  87. 87. Would you hold them even if they become disadvantageous?
  88. 88. If you start a new organization, what core values you would build into it, regardless of industry?</li></li></ul><li>Core Purpose<br />Fundamental reason for being<br />Not to be confused with goals or strategies of the firm<br />Purpose itself does not change, but it inspires change<br />It’s a guiding star on the horizon - forever pursued but never reached<br />
  89. 89. Core Purpose is a company’s raison d’etre, not a goal or business strategy<br />3M : To Solve unsolved problems innovatively<br />Hewlett-Packard : To make technical contributions for the advancement and welfare of humanity<br />Mary Kay Cosmetics: to give unlimited opportunity to women<br />Nike: to experience the emotion of competition, winning, and crushing the competition<br />McKinsey: To help corporations and Govts. be more successful in 100 years<br />Merck : To preserve and improve human life<br />Wal-Mart : To give ordinary folk the chance to buy the same things as rich people<br />Walt Disney : To make people happy<br />
  90. 90. ROLE OF CORE IDEOLOGY IS TO GUIDE AND INSPIRE, NOT TO DIFFERENTIATE<br />Core ideology needs to be meaningful and inspirational to people inside the organization; it need not be exciting to outsiders.<br />
  91. 91. A CLEAR AND WELL ARTICULATED IDEOLOGY ATTRACTS TO THE COMPANY PEOPLE WHOSE PERSONAL VALUES ARE COMPATIBLE WITH THE COMPANY’S CORE VALUES<br />CORE VALUES AND PURPOSES CANNOT BE IMPOSED ON THE PEOPLE<br />
  92. 92. Envisaged Future<br />BHAGS<br />Vivid Description<br />Huge, daunting <br />goals<br />Making goals <br />‘imaginable’<br />Clear & compelling, <br />tangible<br />The ‘mind’s eye’<br />Unifying, inspiring,<br />engaging<br />Hopeful, <br />passionate, <br />inspiring<br />images & symbols<br />Difficult Target<br />Common enemy<br />Role-model<br />Internal -<br />transformation<br />
  93. 93. ENVISIONED FUTURE<br />Big, Hairy, Audacious Goals : Aid Long Term Vision<br />BHAGs can be quantitative or Qualitative<br />Target, common enemy, role-model or internal transformation<br />Become a $125 billion company by 2000 (Wal-Mart)<br />Democratize the automobile (Ford Motors, 1900)<br />Common-enemy<br />Crush Adidas (Nike, 1960)<br />Yamaha wo tsubusu! We will destroy Yamaha! (Honda, 1970)<br />
  94. 94. ENVISIONED FUTURE<br />Vivid Description<br />Vibrant, engaging and specific description.<br />In 10-20 yrs. What would we love to see? <br />What will a writer say?<br />Passion, emotion and conviction are essential parts of the vivid description<br />
  95. 95. Sony in the 50s<br /><ul><li>CORE IDEOLOGY
  96. 96. CORE VALUES
  97. 97. Elevation of Japanese culture & national status
  98. 98. Being a pioneer-not following others, doing the impossible
  99. 99. Encouraging individual ability & creativity
  100. 100. PURPOSE
  101. 101. To experience the sheer joy of innovation & the application of technology for the benefit & pleasure of the general public</li></li></ul><li>SONY [Contd.]<br /><ul><li>ENVISIONED FUTURE
  102. 102. Become the company most known for changing the worldwide poor-quality image of Japanese products
  103. 103. VIVID DESCRIPTION
  104. 104. We will create products that become pervasive around the world.
  105. 105. … be the 1st Japanese company to go into the U.S. market & distribute directly… succeed with innovations that U.S. companies have failed at- such as the transistor radio… 50 years from now, our brand name will be as well known as any in the world…”MIJ” will mean +</li></li></ul><li>3M vs. Norton<br />No<br />Yes<br />Comparison Company<br />Amex vs. Wells Fargo<br />No<br />No<br />Visionary Company<br />Boeing vs. McDonnell Douglas<br />No<br />Yes<br />Comparison Company<br />Citicorp vs. Chase<br />No<br />No<br />Indistinguishable<br />Ford vs. GM<br />Yes<br />No<br />Visionary Company<br />GE vs. Westinghouse<br />Yes<br />Yes<br />Indistinguishable<br />HP vs. TI<br />No<br />Yes<br />Comparison Company<br />IBM vs. Burroughs<br />No<br />Yes<br />Comparison Company<br />J & J vs. Bristol - Myers<br />Yes<br />No<br />Visionary Company<br />Marriott vs. Howard Johnson<br />No<br />No<br />Indistinguishable<br />Merck vs. Pfizer<br />No<br />Yes<br />Indistinguishable<br />Motorola vs. Zenith<br />No<br />Yes<br />Comparison Company<br />Nordstrom vs. Melville<br />No<br />No<br />Comparison Company<br />Procter & Gamble vs. Colgate<br />No<br />Yes<br />Indistinguishable<br />Philip Morris vs. R.J. Reynolds<br />No<br />Yes<br />Comparison Company<br />Sony vs. Kenwood<br />No<br />Yes<br />Comparison Company<br />Wal-Mart vs. Ames`<br />No<br />Yes<br />Comparison Company<br />Walt Disney vs. Columbia<br />No<br />No<br />Comparison Company<br />FOUNDING ROOTS OF VISIONARY COMPANIES AND COMPARISON COMPANIES<br />Founding Roots Summary<br />Founding with a “Great Idea”<br />Visionary<br />Comparison<br />
  106. 106. Thanx<br />+<br />?<br />
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