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Helping paper get up
 

Helping paper get up

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A future publishing concept presentation done originally for a client, which we wanted to share because of its universal findings. We feel that the media field with books and magazines is in the ...

A future publishing concept presentation done originally for a client, which we wanted to share because of its universal findings. We feel that the media field with books and magazines is in the middle of large paradigm change and we tried to find the core of the problems and create a solution, a mash-up by using only existing things. Kind of like they did with the Apollo 13 crisis.

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    Helping paper get up Helping paper get up Presentation Transcript

    • Helping paper get upA future publishing concept for a media ecosystemConcept Presentation, November 12th 2012Markus Sandelin (markus@fwd.fi)FWD Helsi nki Oy tel: +358 20 794 0180 Conf identia l We de sign h appy custome rsKai saniemenkat u 6 A www.f wd.fi ©2012 FWD Helsinki00100, Hels ink i Fin land in fo@fwd. fi All r ights re se rve d
    • The original presentation was originally made for a client, butwe thought it was universal enough to release to the world. We hope it will be of use to you as well. The approach was more books and magazines, but many things apply elsewhere as well. Markus Sandelin - in Helsinki, November 12th 2012
    • The 10 issues the media field will face next
    • “Building separate user interfaces will become1 unmanageable and too expensive.”
    • “The media companies have to start selling and2 adapt to the app store mentality.”
    • “Users aren’t looking for uniqueness, they are3 looking for compatibility.”
    • 4 “Users want to buy once and consume wherever.”
    • “Media companies cannot survive by selling just5 their own products, they have to expand.”
    • “Media companies publication processes for6 current and especially archive material are antiquated.”
    • “The amount of information is growing faster than7 we can consume it. Metadata and automation will play a key role in the media future.”
    • “The former CRM model media companies use is8 facing extinction, they will have to adapt a more data driven model and automate segments.”
    • “Modern lay-outing will eventually lose to UI9 frameworks and modular publishing.”
    • “The magazine format will change, expand and10 evolve in the near future. It cannot maintain the amount of data without change.”
    • “Consumers don’t just buy products, they buy ecosystems.” Kevin C. Tofel, GigaOM
    • 1. Paid web content 2. Kindle + iPhoneThe first two phases of digital publishing have passed.There have been winners and there have been losers.
    • Like with most new technologies, the early versions were focused either on the product or the content producer. Theybecame invested in what they have now. MySpace learned this the hard way.
    • After Apple created its ecosystem, the walled gardens startedto crumble. It was new and it was what the people wanted. It was good, it still is good, but it won’t last the test of time. It too is a walled garden, just bigger.
    • The concept is an ecosystem.
    • A good ecosystem allows the three E’s Evolve Expand EnableEcosystems grow and die with their A ecosystem that does not actively try to A ecosystem is all about the survival ofparticipants, those who are using the expand to encompass other ecosystems the fittest, a good ecosystem gives out ecosystems for their own benefit. will stagnate and die. the best for the best and forgets the rest.
    • The act of consuming content and moving Reading between different content no matter the device The act of finding more content from the Discovering ecosystem, recommendations and browsing The act of purchasing for the individual or Buying groupThe new ecosystemconsists of six parts The act of customer service, account Caring management and portability The act of making a note and/or sharing it in Sharing other services, pulling in other people Administering The art of running the whole show behind the scenes
    • What’s great about our concept that there’s nothing new with it. It is a collection of proven practices and lessons learned. It is basically a mashup.
    • ReadingA Discovering Buying Reading Caring Sharing Administering
    • The book and the magazine have great user interfaces. So do the hundreds of digital designs imitating and/or disrupting those interfaces.
    • From these existing solutions, there are existing standards that people expect to have. We’ll show you a few examples.
    • Let’s start with a unified design and layout,what we call a UI framework. Our example is from Readability.
    • TextReadability has mastered unified layouts.
    • Text
    • They have developed a proven UI framework.
    • Then there’s on how people move between content, we choseAmazon’s Kindle and Feedly iPad applications as our example.
    • TextKindle had to rethink moving between content.
    • TextThey took the convention from other digital media.
    • TextAnd applied an unified UI framework.
    • TextThis same principle has been copied often afterwards.
    • TextLike for example Feedly has done.
    • Where you have content, you have to keep it organized and beable to create collections, we went with Amazon, Google and Feedly.
    • Making lists is very human. Text
    • TextLists have become even more important now.
    • Whether textual or visual. Text
    • A lot of data is only meant for single serving, that’s why there’s a need for a good data stream and the heroes there are LinkedIn and Facebook.
    • Data today is not constantly relevant. Text
    • TextThere’s too much of it, so the stream was invented.
    • All of these have already been done, our standards have been set.
    • The end of Reading In short, we believe there are already very clear and goodconventions in consuming content and media. We can copy the best principles and focus on the important matters. Next up, Discovering.
    • ReadingB Discovering Buying Discovering Caring Sharing Administering
    • When we are able to read and consume content, move aroundit and organize it the way we want in any tool for consumption, we can start searching for new content.
    • Discovering content grows from four corners: Promotions, semantic content, recommendations and searching.
    • You need proper tools for making and showing promotions, we think Apple’s App store and the Chrome store are great examples.
    • PromotionShow off the goods and maintain control.
    • TextSome automated, some manual.
    • Spotify and StumbleUpon are great in showing more relevant content based on your decisions and actions.
    • TextThe more data, the more help we need to get started.
    • TextMetadata and semantics are crucial.
    • Sometimes human touch is required for properrecommendations, but there’s always use for a good algorithm. Our examples are from Spotify and Kindle store which have combined both.
    • TextThe power of recommendations still lives strong.
    • TextWhether it comes from peers or machines.
    • If all else fails, we need to implement a good enough search,maybe even tailor a custom Google installation. The end users like results like Steam and Kickstarter searches provide.
    • TextThe users know how to search.
    • TextAnd we expect good results, every time.
    • Conventions have a tendency of being self-amplifying. In laymans terms this means: These are conventions people areused to and the more familiar they feel, the more they will use it.
    • The media houses also have a massive history of content. With this model, we can deliver a massive archive without much extra work and we can do that in big or small steps.
    • The end of DiscoveringThere are multiple generations of promotion tools and existingecosystems that we can take as a foundation, helping us to save our strength for the administrator tools. Next up, Buying.
    • ReadingC Discovering Buying Buying Caring Sharing Administering
    • Once people are able to read and find more content, we will help them to pay for said content.
    • There are a lot of conventions in buying for myself, but not somany where people can buy in bulk in a corporate setting. At least in general ecommerce applications.
    • We’ll handle buying in three scenarios: Subscriptions forindividuals, purchasing for individuals and subscriptions/ purchasing in bulk.
    • Managing subscriptions for individuals with Spotify and LinkedIn as the poster boys.
    • TextDon’t hide the price, no one likes that.
    • TextWe are used to pay and consume.
    • Buying products for individuals is mastered by Amazon.
    • TextUsers are very used to buy products.
    • TextBuying has to be at least as good.
    • The only “new” thing here is thinking how to fix buying andsubscribing for groups, we think we can take a model from the IT world. Our examples, Google Apps user management and billing and 37 signals suite management.
    • TextBuying in bulk for media is new, but we cross over.
    • TextThe app scene has answered this already.
    • The end of Buying Subscriptions and purchases for individuals don’t require much thought, it’s been done so many times over. What weshould focus on are bulk and business users, that will be the killer app in our ecosystem. Next up, Caring.
    • ReadingD Discovering Buying Caring Caring Sharing Administering
    • In order to buy and save content, the users need an account to store their data and purchases.
    • This too, has been done many times.
    • There are great examples of account management, we chose LinkedIn and Google.
    • TextSelf service and transparency is a must.
    • TextAnd there are examples of this too.
    • Data portability is a must. We like how Google and 37 Signals have done it.
    • TextData portability doesn’t have to be too big.
    • TextBut doing it well makes you the good guy.
    • We feel that proper customer service can not be overemphasized and we like Get Satisfaction and Zendesk.
    • TextCustomer service can become a platform.
    • TextBut it doesn’t mean that the quality should suffer.
    • The end of Caring A good self service environment is a great boon for theecosystem when done right, customer service will make or break any newcomer to the market. Next up, Sharing.
    • ReadingE Discovering Buying Sharing Caring Sharing Administering
    • Once weve created a happy customer, we help to share the experience.
    • Sharing happens everywhere, every day. Such as blogs, Facebook and Youtube, which are our example.
    • TextYou can do it on any site.
    • TextAll of Facebook is sharing.
    • TextNot forgetting embedding and other types of sharing.
    • In a modern service, we also want to share with ourselves. We think we have great examples from Amazon and Spotify.
    • TextFor readers, notes are important.
    • TextSuch are personal data collections like playlists.
    • The end of Sharing We should start with basic sharing and then improve it laterafter we have the rest of the ecosystem working. The basics are simple: Lists, notes and links. Next up, Administering.
    • ReadingF Discovering Buying Admin Caring Sharing Administering
    • The user side is just half of the story, we need great admin tools to succeed.
    • Luckily, these tools are already known to us and our users are used to handle them. We take care of our own blogs,advertising, communications and many other things. Here are a few examples.
    • TextWith Wordpress users know how to publish our content.
    • TextUsers know how to talk to our fans in Facebook.
    • TextUsers know how to advertise on Google and earn from it.
    • TextUsers know how to build web shops themselves.
    • TextUsers know what an ecosystem is, they understand it.
    • What we are trying to say, that everything has already beendone. We just need to put it together in a different way that hasn’t been done before.
    • Very similarly like Apple approaches product design.
    • Just like the whole western civilization and every single invention has developed through iteration. (Steam engine development started in first century AD and the “beta” came out in 1698, the first proper release was by Thomas Newcomen in 1712)
    • The end of Administering. Admin tools are amazingly important in any ecosystem.Whether it’s for customer service or promotion, adding newbooks or reading reports. They are paramount. They are our chance to shine beyond others. And now for something completely different.
    • The act of consuming content and moving Reading between different content no matter the device The act of finding more content from the Discovering ecosystem, recommendations and browsing The act of purchasing for the individual or Buying groupThat’s it, your new ecosystem. The act of customer service, account Caring management and portability The act of making a note and/or sharing it in Sharing other services, pulling in other people Administering The art of running the whole show behind the scenes
    • Thanks for your time.
    • “The secret of getting ahead is getting started. The secret of getting started is breaking your complex overwhelming tasks into small manageable tasks, and then starting on the first one.” Mark TwainFWD Helsi nki Oy tel: +358 20 794 0180 Conf identia l We de sign h appy custome rsKai saniemenkat u 6 A www.f wd.fi ©2012 FWD Helsinki00100, Hels ink i Fin land in fo@fwd. fi All r ights re se rve d
    • Lisäinfoa: Kiitos Markus Varha Account Director More information: +358 44 36 99 887 Tack Markus Sandelin Designer markus.varha@fwd.fi +358 44 36 99 887 markus.sandelin@fwd.fi ThanksFWD Helsi nki Oy tel: +358 20 794 0180 Conf identia l We de sign h appy custome rsKai saniemenkat u 6 A www.f wd.fi ©2012 FWD Helsinki00100, Hels ink i Fin land in fo@fwd. fi All r ights re se rve d