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    Pecha Kucha Design Document Pecha Kucha Design Document Document Transcript

    • INTE  6710  ~  Creative  Designs  for  Instructional  Materials  Project  1:  Pecha  Kucha  Presentation  Design  Document  Kim  Prokosch  September   2 4,  2 011  1.  Significant  Purpose  My  presentation  is  Everready  with  Evernote,  and  it  teaches  students  to  use  this  software  and  its  associated  services.  Evernote  allows  users  to  work  on  different  devices  and  keep  various  types  of  information  organized.  It’s  a  highly  capable  tool  that  is  especially  helpful  for  higher  education  students  who  need  to  keep  themselves  organized  as  their  educational  journeys  take  them  across  many  parts  of  the  world  of  digital  information.  Evernote  brings  many  items  together  that  students  often  need  to  have  close  at  hand  throughout  their  education.  My  audience  is  higher  education  students  who  are  reliant  on  digital  information  for  their  education.  They  use  of  many  types  of  electronic  media  in  their  educational  pursuits,  and  often  use  different  computers  and  portable  devices  during  the  course  of  their  education.  This  presentation  will  show  them  how  they  can  adapt  their  present  habits  and  realize  a  higher  degree  of  efficiency  and  effectiveness  while  working  in  this  digital  age.  I  will  use  my  experience  as  a  graduate  student  to  tailor  this  presentation  to  their  needs,  and  I  will  weave  the  story  of  my  experience  with  Evernote  throughout  the  presentation.    Evernote  organizes  this  many  types  of  digital  information  in  one  location  that’s  both  robust  and  very  user-­‐friendly.  As  a  graduate  student,  I  use  Evernote  to  organize  many  of  my  electronic  resources,  and  I’ve  found  it  to  be  enormously  helpful.  It  allows  me  to  efficiently  work  on  different  computers,  and  it’s  saved  me  lots  of  time  and  frustration  that  accompanied  transferring  documents  from  one  computer  to  another.  I  organize  all  of  my  course  syllabi,  weekly  agendas,  and  associated  files  in  Evernote,  and  then  I  can  do  my  work  no  matter  if  I’m  using  my  work  PC,  MacBook,  iPad,  or  Android  tablet.  This  has  become  a  very  efficient  system  for  me,  but  it’s  taken  me  a  long  time  to  figure  it  all  out.  Everready  with  Evernote  gives  students  the  opportunity  to  learn  about  Evernote,  and  immediately  connect  it  to  their  workflow  and  improve  their  own  behaviors.  Evernote  allows  users  to  create,  save,  and  share  notes  of  all  types  across  multiple  devices  (Mac,  PC,  Android,  iOS,  Windows  Mobile,  Symbian,  WebOS,  and  BlackBerry).  Evernote  expands  the  definition  of  note:  it  can  clip  selections  from  web  pages  or  entire  pages,  integrate  files  into  notes,  and  create  robust  text,  voice,  and  video  files.  Notes  can  be  annotated  and  commented  on,  tagged  for  easy  searching,  organized  into  notebooks,  and  synchronized  across  all  types  of  devices.  Evernote’s  core  features  can  be  further  extended  with  additional  services,  and  add-­‐ons  can  be  installed  on  all  major  browsers.  Everready  with  Evernote  will  utilize  the  techniques  presented  by  Heath  and  Heath  (2008)  to  ensure  that  my  audience  will  effectively  utilize  the  presentation.  Heath  and  Heath’s  six  principles  of  successful  ideas  (pp.  16-­‐18)  will  be  applied  as  shown  below,  in  Table  1.     1  
    • Principle   Method  of  Application  Simplicity   The  presentation  will  focus  on  the  use  of  one  specific  piece  of  software,  and   a  limited  number  of  examples  will  be  given.  Explanations  will  be  succinct  and   profound,  and  will  inspire  further  exploration.  Unexpectedness   The  presentation  will  show  students  how  they  can  succeed  in  ways  that  they   may  never  have  thought  possible.  The  element  of  surprise  in  this  case  will  be   the  amazing  degree  of  usefulness  that  Evernote  can  provide.  Concreteness   The  presentation  will  be  highly  visual  and  full  of  real-­‐world  examples,  which   will  provide  clarity  for  audience  members.  Credibility   My  status  as  a  graduate  student  gives  me  credibility  on  this  subject,  and  the   way  I  present  my  own  experience  will  further  demonstrate  the  applicability   of  the  material.  Emotions   I  will  use  my  own  experience  to  allow  audience  members  to  emotionally   connect  with  the  content  of  the  presentation.  This  will  provide  them  with  the   opportunity  to  see  how  their  own  lives  could  be  improved  through  the  use  of   Evernote.  Stories   Woven  throughout  the  entire  presentation  will  be  my  story:  the  story  that   I’m  still  writing  as  a  graduate  student.  This  will  further  enhance  the  learning   opportunities  in  the  presentation  and  allow  audience  members  to  connect   with  the  subject.  Table  1.  Heath  and  Heaths  six  principles  of  successful  ideas  and  their  application  in  my  presentation.  My  presentation  is  focused  on  behaviors  that  can  make  the  members  of  my  audience  more  efficient  students,  including:     1. Organizing  course  information  (i.e.  syllabi,  schedules,  lectures)   2. Gathering  resources  (i.e.  websites,  articles,  images)   3. Creating  a  searchable  library   4. Organizing  resources  into  notebooks   5. Adding  descriptive  tags  to  items  These  behaviors  help  students  to  meaningfully  organize  information  into  a  comprehensive  system,  instead  of  the  discrete  bits  that  they  often  seem  when  stored  in  disparate  programs  and  locations.  Evernote  makes  it  very  easy  to  connect  different  components  through  its  tagging  capabilities,  and  that  can  result  in  a  more  robust  use  of  information.  Everready  with  Evernote  will  teach  students  how  to  positively  supplement  their  existing  behaviors  with  the  use  of  Evernote’s  features  and  available  services.  They  will  make  connections  between  their  own  habits  and  Evernote’s  capabilities.  Students  will  learn  how  to  use  Evernote  in  different  ways  that  they  may  not  have  realized  on  their  own,  and  they  will  be  able  to  immediately  apply  the  information  in  the  presentation  to  their  lives.       2  
    • This  presentation  will  be  instructional  on  two  main  levels:  it  will  teach  students  how  to  use  Evernote,  and  it  will  help  students  to  develop  skills  to  better  utilize  technology.  The  latter  component  is  the  more  fundamental  skill  that  students  need  to  cultivate,  and  this  presentation  format  will  be  particularly  effective  teaching  the  skills  development  through  the  use  of  a  particular  piece  of  software.  Evernote  is  well  suited  for  this  because  it  is  a  powerful  tool,  and  it  has  a  very  intuitive  user  interface.    While  this  presentation  will  focus  solely  on  how  to  use  Evernote  to  organize  their  electronic  resources,  the  behaviors  that  it  will  teach  will  empower  students  to  more  efficiently  evaluate  the  use  of  other  types  of  software  to  accomplish  similar  results.  This  is  another  of  the  soft  skills  that  will  be  conveyed  in  this  presentation,  and  one  that  many  students  currently  do  not  possess.  As  such,  this  presentation  will  further  develop  students’  skills  in  different,  but  connected,  areas.  2.  A  Picture  of  the  Future  One  year  after  students  watch  Everready  with  Evernote,  they  are  more  efficient  and  organized  in  their  student  lives.  The  specific  learning  objectives  may  seem  simple,  but  they  accurately  measure  the  effectiveness  of  Everready  with  Evernote.  The  main  purpose  of  the  presentation,  as  described  in  the  Significant  Purpose  section  of  this  document,  is  to  show  higher  education  students  a  tool  that  will  help  them  to  keep  themselves  organized  as  their  educational  journeys  take  them  across  many  parts  of  the  world  of  digital  information.  The  use  of  this  tool,  and  the  behaviors  taught  in  this  presentation,  are  a  strong  combination.  As  such,  the  objectives  of  the  presentation  are  fairly  straightforward:  teach  students  about  Evernote’s  capabilities,  and  provide  them  with  techniques  for  modifying  their  own  behaviors  to  make  them  more  effective  students.  The  learning  objectives  that  students  will  accomplish  are  listed  below,  in  Table  2,  and  they  will  have  satisfied  the  assessments  listed  below.  Learning  Objective   Method(s)  of  Assessment   Criteria  for  Success  1.  After  viewing  the  presentation,   Students  will  correctly   Students  will  correctly  students  will  understand  how  to  use   answer  questions  about   answer  at  least  80%  of  Evernote  to  organize  their  electronic   Evernote’s  capabilities  in  a   the  questions  included  resources.     post-­‐presentation,  survey.   in  the  survey.  2.  Six  weeks  after  viewing  the   Students  will  be  emailed   Students  will  report  that  presentation,  students  will  use   the  URL  for  a  second   they  use  Evernote  in  Evernote  to  organize  their  electronic   survey,  which  will  include   some  way  to  organize  resources.   questions  about  their   their  electronic   current  use  of  Evernote.   resources.  3.  Six  weeks  after  viewing  the   Students  will  be  emailed   Students  will  report  that  presentation,  students’  electronic   the  URL  for  a  second   they  feel  more  resources  will  be  better  organized   survey,  which  will  include   organized  and  have     3  
    • and  more  easily  used.   questions  about  how  their   been  more  efficient  in   use  of  Evernote  has   their  educational  use  of   benefited  their  experience   electronic  resources.   as  students  in  the  digital   age.  Table  2.  The  learning  objectives  of  Everready  with  Evernote.  It  may  be  difficult  to  measure  the  effectiveness  of  the  learning  objectives  of  this  presentation  because  they  are  reliant  on  students’  participation  in  post-­‐presentation  surveys.  Although  this  is  admittedly  a  shortcoming  of  this  method  of  assessment,  it  is  nonetheless  an  assessment  method  that  lends  itself  well  to  this  presentation.  To  provide  an  incentive  for  students  to  complete  these  surveys,  I  will  design  short  documents  that  will  provide  further  tips  regarding  the  use  of  Evernote.  These  tips  will  become  available  to  students  only  after  they  submit  their  surveys,  and  should  help  to  mitigate  the  issue  of  diminished  response  rate.  3. Clear  Design  Values  The  design  of  a  Pecha  Kucha  presentation  is  absolutely  instrumental  in  its  success  (or  lack  thereof).  I  applied  the  lessons  learned  throughout  the  entire  ILT  program  while  designing  my  presentation.  Here  are  the  five  most  significant  design  decisions  I  made  during  the  creation  of  my  Pecha  Kucha:   I. Simplicity   The  first  chapter  of  Made  to  Stick:  Why  Some  Ideas  Die  and  Others  Survive  (Heath  &  Heath,   2008)  is  titled  “Simple,”  and  it  had  a  profound  impact  on  the  design  of  my  presentation.  I   had  previously  struggled  to  decide  how  much  or  how  little  to  include  in  any  given  project,   and  the  concept  of  simplicity  was  something  I  understood  very  differently.  Heath  &  Heath’s   definition  of  simplicity  helped  me  to  finally  understand  and  apply  this  concept  in  a  very   concrete  manner:  simple  isnt  dumbing  down,  simple  is  “finding  the  core  of  the   idea…’Finding  the  core’  means  stripping  an  idea  down  to  its  most  critical  essence.  To  get  to   the  core,  weve  got  to  weed  out  the  superfluous  and  tangential  elements”  (pp.  27-­‐28).   This  concept  influenced  my  design  on  every  level.  On  the  visual  level,  I  created  extremely   simple  slides:  they  are  relevant  to  the  instructional  message  associated  with  each,  but  I   made  sure  that  I  did  not  include  anything  more  than  the  essence  of  that  message.  In  my   narration,  I  carefully  restrained  everything  I  said  to  make  sure  that  it  clearly  supports  the   core  message  of  my  presentation.   The  value  of  simplicity  is  echoed  by  Medina  in  Chapter  4  of  Brain  Rules:  12  Principles  for   Surviving  and  Thriving  at  Work,  Home,  and  School.  Medina  states  that  the  brain  is  incapable   of  multitasking,  and  that  any  attempt  at  forcing  the  brain  to  multitask  is  going  to  prove   detrimental.  Medina  does  not  dispute  that  basic  functions  can  occur  simultaneously,  but   instead  that  the  “attentional  ability  is  not  capable  of  multitasking”  (p.  85).  This  trait  of  the     4  
    • brain  is  another  reason  why  I  kept  my  visuals  simple:  I  did  not  want  the  brain  to  have  to   ‘decide’  whether  to  pay  attention  to  the  visuals  or  the  narration.  I  wanted  the  visuals  to   require  a  minimal  amount  of  attention  but  still  be  appealing,  as  the  true  instructional  value   of  my  presentation  is  contained  in  the  narrative  element.   II. Embracing  Constraints   The  Pecha  Kucha  format  is  strict  (20  slides  shown  for  20  seconds  each),  and  at  first,  it   seemed  a  daunting  challenge.  But,  Garr  Reynolds  helped  me  to  realize  that,  by  embracing   the  constraints  of  this  format,  I  could  actually  design  a  presentation  that  was  far  stronger   than  it  would  have  been  without  those  constraints.  In  Presentation  Zen  Design,  Reyonds   introduces  the  idea  that  “constraints  and  limitations  are  wonderful  allies.  They  lead  to   enhanced  creativity  and  ingenious  solutions  that,  without  constraints,  might  never  have   been  discovered...view  limitations  not  as  annoyances  but  as  welcome  editors  that  force  you   to  think  creatively”  (p.  16).  Had  I  not  been  forced  to  apply  the  constraints  of  a  Pecha  Kucha   format  to  my  presentation,  I  probably  would  have  designed  a  presentation  with  bulleted   bits  of  information,  and  far  more  visual  elements.  Instead,  I  created  a  presentation  that  is   better  able  to  hold  learners’  attention.     This  idea  is  deeply  related  to  the  concept  of  simplicity,  as  described  above.  Heath  &  Heath   touched  upon  the  meaning  I  inferred  from  Reynolds  in  a  slightly  different  manner  when  they   stated  that  “to  make  a  profound  idea  compact  youve  got  to  pack  a  lot  of  meaning  into  a   little  bit  of  messaging”  (p.  52).  The  constraints  of  the  Pecha  Kucha  format  made   compactness  a  necessity,  and  I  am  grateful  for  the  opportunity  to  make  the  most  of  what   this  format  afforded  me  in  terms  of  creative  possibilities.   III. Surprise   The  topic  of  my  presentation  is  a  particular  piece  of  technology.  Because  there  are  so  many   pieces  of  technology  that  address  the  topic  of  organization,  it  was  especially  important  that  I   got  my  learners’  attention  immediately.  Heath  &  Heath  state  that  “the  first  problem  of   communication  is  getting  peoples  attention”  (p.  64),  and  to  address  this  issue,  I  needed  to   find  a  way  of  breaking  through  learners’  preconceptions  of  the  depiction  of  technology.  I  did   this  by  weaving  the  metaphor  of  being  imprisoned  throughout  my  presentation.  My  first   slide  (containing  the  image  of  a  prison  cell)  is  designed  to  get  learners’  attention  in  a  very   active  manner,  and  in  a  way  that  is  counterintuitive  to  their  notion  of  a  presentation  about  a   particular  piece  of  technology.   This  concept  was  reinforced  in  Reynolds’  spotlight  with  David  S.  Rose  (pp.  56  –  58).  Rose   emphasizes  the  importance  of  creating  a  strong  opening  to  any  presentation.  He  states  that   “the  presenter  has  between  30  and  60  seconds  to  grab  the  attention  of  the  audience…begin   with  something  dramatic  and  memorable  that  will  have  the  audience  want  to  follow  along   with  you  for  the  rest  of  the  presentation”  (p.  56).  I  believe  that  my  first  slide  is  an  extremely     5  
    • effective  way  of  implementing  this  concept,  and  by  carrying  this  metaphor  throughout  my   presentation,  I  strengthen  the  impact  of  that  initial  message.   IV. Color   Reynolds’  approach  to  presentations  is  highly  dependent  on  practicing  restraint,  and  this  is   especially  true  when  it  comes  to  the  use  of  color.  One  of  the  concepts  that  Reynolds   extrapolated  from  the  practice  of  sumi-­‐e  is  that  “you  can  express  more  with  less”  (p.  65),   and  that  is  what  I  did  throughout  my  presentation.  I  used  only  three  text  colors  in  the  entire   presentation,  and  the  only  time  I  added  the  second  and  third  text  colors  was  for  very   specific  emphasis.     This  concept  is  reinforced  by  Medina  in  Chapter  10,  “Vision.”  In  it,  Medina  mentions  that   “we  pay  lots  of  attention  to  color”  (p.  237),  and  this  is  why  I  used  colored  text  where  I  did.   There  were  only  a  few  specific  words  that  warranted  this  extra  emphasis,  and  the  use  of   color  ensures  that  my  learners  are  attending  to  these  words.   V. Combinations   Medina  describes  that  the  human  brain  functions  better  when  more  than  one  sense  is  used   at  a  time.  This  is  a  concept  that  was  completely  foreign  to  me,  and  I  added  design  elements   to  my  presentation  to  apply  this  new  knowledge.  In  Chapter  9  (“Sensory  Integration”),   Medina  describes  that  “students  learn  better  from  words  and  pictures  than  words  alone”   and  that  “students  learn  better  when  corresponding  words  and  pictures  are  presented   simultaneously  rather  than  successively”  (p.  210).  To  accommodate  this  characteristic  of  the   human  brain,  I  displayed  the  text  and  images  on  my  slides  simultaneously,  which  also   allowed  learners  to  absorb  those  elements  before  the  narrative  element.   To  make  sure  that  I  applied  this  concept  in  an  appropriate  and  effective  manner,  I  went  back   to  Reynolds,  and  utilized  another  technique  described  by  David  S.  Rose.  Rose  states  that   “slides  should  be  completely  incapable  of  standing  by  themselves”  (p.  58),  and  goes  on  to   ask  “if  the  slides  can  stand  by  themselves,  why  the  heck  are  you  up  there  in  front  of  them”   (p.  58)?  By  designing  slides  that  could  not  work  without  my  narration,  I  ensured  that  each   component  of  my  presentation  was  necessary,  and  worked  together  to  create  an  effective   instructional  product.  The  many  resources  that  have  been  explored  during  the  course  influenced  all  of  the  design  choices  I  made  while  creating  my  presentation.  I  believe  that  the  end  result  is  a  very  strong  product,  and  one  that  is  more  creative  than  it  would  have  been  had  I  not  been  exposed  to  these  concepts.  4. Formative  Evaluation  Response  To  determine  the  instructional  effectiveness  of  my  presentation,  I  asked  the  five  questions  shown  in  Table  3.  Table  3  also  outlines  my  rationale  for  these  questions.     6  
    • Question   Rationale  1. Did  the  presentation   Although  a  Pecha  Kucha  presentation,  by  definition,  is  short,  it  hold  your  attention  all  the   still  must  hold  learners’  attention  or  it  will  fail  to  be  instructional.  way  to  the  end?   Many  of  my  learners  are  familiar  with  different  types  of   technology  already,  so  I  needed  to  ensure  that  they  did  not  ‘tune   out’  my  presentation.  2. Did  you  find  any  aspects   The  flow  of  any  presentation  is  crucial  to  its  success,  and  I  believe  of  the  presentation   this  is  even  more  important  in  the  Pecha  Kucha  format.  If  any  repetitive?   information  is  repetitive,  that  means  I  have  squandered  precious   time  –  and  possibly  lost  the  attention  of  my  learners.  Every   second  of  my  presentation  must  accomplish  something,  even  if  it   is  time  intentionally  allotted  for  reflection.  3. Were  you  able  to  make   One  of  the  ways  to  transform  a  presentation  from  informative  to  any  personal  connections   instructional  is  to  make  it  personally  relevant  to  learners.  I  to  the  topic?   needed  to  know  if  my  presentation  contained  information  that   learners  could  connect  with,  so  that  I  could  determine  if  I  had   successfully  engaged  them  in  the  instructional  process.  4. Did  you  find  any  way  to   This  question  was  intended  to  gauge  the  instructional  supplement  your  own   effectiveness  of  my  presentation.  As  my  learners  are  higher  routines  as  a  student  with   education  students,  I  wanted  to  both  establish  credibility  with  the  information  I   them  (by  interweaving  my  story  as  a  graduate  student  throughout  presented?   the  presentation)  and  inspire  them  to  invest  some  of  their  time   and  energy  into  both  Evernote  and  behavioral  modifications  that   could  positively  impact  their  lives.  5. Did  you  think  the   No  matter  how  good  a  presentation  may  be,  if  one  of  its  various  forms  of  media   components  is  out  of  balance  with  the  others,  it  can  fail  in  its  (images,  narration,  music)   instructional  objectives.  I  needed  to  know  if  I  had  created  a  worked  well  together?   presentation  that  successfully  used  different  types  of  media.  The   harmonious  combination  of  elements  can  have  a  huge  impact  on   the  instructional  success  of  any  product,  so  I  wanted  to  see  if  I   had  reached  that  crucial  balancing  point.  Table  3.  My  formative  evaluation  questions  and  my  rationale  for  them.  I  received  excellent  feedback  on  the  draft  of  my  presentation.  A  great  deal  of  the  feedback  was  highly  relevant  and  provided  me  with  very  clear  opportunities  for  improvement.  The  feedback  is  listed  below,  in  Table  4.       7  
    • Question   Response  (Summaries;  items  revised  in  red)  1. Did  the  presentation   Evaluator  1:    hold  your  attention  all  the   • The  presentation  did  hold  attention  all  the  way  to  the  end    way  to  the  end?   • Pace  was  slightly  challenging;  narration  is  too  fast   Evaluator  2:   • Yes  -­‐  quickly  paced  and  very  informative;  taught  me  some  new   things  about  an  application  I  have  already  been  using.   • Revisit  slide  3  narration  because  it  is  a  bit  fast  2. Did  you  find  any  aspects   Evaluator  1:    of  the  presentation   • Not  really,  focus  is  maintained  throughout.    repetitive?   • The  tips  at  the  end  about  taking  a  leap  and  sharing  are  caring   may  be  a  bit  off  topic  or  not  necessary  but  I  can  see  how  they   relate  to  using  Evernote.     Evaluator  2:     • No  -­‐  I  felt  that  each  of  your  slides  built  upon  each  other   reinforcing  information;  smooth  flow   • Could  possibly  come  full  circle  at  the  end  of  your  presentation   and  revisit  the  prison  reference  from  the  beginning  3. Were  you  able  to  make   Evaluator  1:    any  personal  connections   • I  really  liked  that  you  mentioned  your  life  as  a  grad  student,  to  the  topic?   gave  examples  of  the  things  you  organize  with  Evernote.     • You  might  want  to  talk  about  people  in  various  roles  could  use   it,  like  high  school  students,  secretaries  or  office  managers.   Evaluator  2:   • Yes  -­‐  I  am  already  an  Evernote  user,  but  your  presentation   really  enhanced  my  knowledge  of  the  application.  I  also  like  that   you  reference  the  sharing  is  caring  idea  -­‐  I  think  this  is  great,   especially  when  it  involves  concepts  or  products  that  are  not   heavily  advertised  -­‐  like  Evernote  -­‐  they  mainly  get  by  on  word  of   mouth.     • Could  incorporate  a  quick  narrative  aimed  at  current  users   informing  them  that  they  will  benefit  from  your  presentation,   also,  because  you  cover  information  they  may  not  already  know  -­‐   viewers  like  me!  4. Did  you  find  any  way  to   Evaluator  1:    supplement  your  own   • Yes  -­‐  I  am  actually  in  the  process  of  setting  up  an  Evernote     8  
    • routines  as  a  student  with   account  and  I  think  it  will  help.    Ive  already  started  creating  the  information  I   different  files  for  my  classes  and  some  stuff  for  work.presented?     Evaluator  2:     • Yes  –  current  Evernote  user  but  will  extend  use  from  solely   personal  to  student   • Could  make  a  quick  reference  to  the  other  uses,  outside  of   school  5. Did  you  think  the   Evaluator  1:    various  forms  of  media   • Liked  the  soft  background  music  (images,  narration,  music)   • Fast  narration;  image  of  transition  from  confusion  to  clarity  a  worked  well  together?   little  incongruent  (two  different  people)     Evaluator  2:   • Good  recording  voice;  narration  really  supports  your  images;   good  humor;  positive  encouragement;  professional  music   • Could  increase  the  size  of  the  images  of  Evernote  and   documents;  green  arrow  on  the  "Big  Picture"  slide  blends  into  the   images;  could  put  a  fade  out  on  the  tail  end  of  the  music    Table  4.  Summary  of  formative  evaluation  responses.  During  the  revision  process,  I  addressed  many  of  the  items  that  showed  room  for  improvement.  To  better  hold  learners’  attention,  I  rewrote  and  rerecorded  my  narration,  and  slowed  down  the  overall  narrative  pace  of  the  presentation.  My  evaluators  reported  that  the  presentation  was  not  repetitive,  so  to  positively  use  repetition  as  an  element,  I  added  two  references  to  the  prison  metaphor  at  the  end  of  the  presentation.  My  evaluators  felt  that  an  additional  connection  opportunity  existed  by  describing  other  applications  of  Evernote;  although  I  searched  for  a  way  to  add  this  type  of  information  to  my  presentation,  I  did  not  feel  that  it  was  important  enough  to  sacrifice  any  of  the  content  more  directly  relevant  to  students.  I  felt  that  removing  any  of  that  content  could  have  a  negative  impact  on  the  instructional  effectiveness  of  my  presentation,  as  aligned  with  my  learning  objectives.  I  did  add  several  minor  references  to  using  Evernote  in  other  ways,  but  they  are  small.  The  evaluation  revealed  that  the  presentation  did  successfully  convince  my  evaluators  to  use  Evernote  to  organize  their  student  resources.  In  general,  the  different  types  of  media  worked  well  together,  although  several  image  modifications  were  made  to  address  specific  feedback.  I  also  modified  the  settings  for  the  background  music.  I  found  that  reacting  to  feedback  was  very  challenging,  because  I  could  only  incorporate  a  certain  amount  of  the  ideas  that  were  provided  by  my  evaluators.  On  many  occasions,  I  had  to  compare  potential  changes  against  my  learning  objectives.  I  believe  that  I  applied  an     9  
    • appropriate  amount  of  feedback  into  my  final  presentation,  and  that  the  finished  product  was  greatly  improved  through  those  changes.  Bibliography  Heath,  C.,  &  Heath,  D.  (2008).  Made  to  Stick:  Why  Some  Ideas  Die  and  Others  Survive.  New  York:  Random  House.  Medina,  John  (2008).  Brain  Rules:  12  principles  for  surviving  and  thriving  at  work,  home,  and  school  (book  and  dvd).  Pear  Press.    Reynolds,  Garr  (2009).  Presentation  Zen  Design:  Simple  Design  Principles  and  Techniques  to  Enhance  Your  Presentations.  Berkeley,  CA:  New  Riders.     10