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Proactively Managing Your Data Center Infrastructure
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Proactively Managing Your Data Center Infrastructure

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Attached is the presentation from our Proactively Manage Data Center Infrastructure Webinar - to view the webinar with audio, go here:http://blog.eecnet.com/proactive-manage-data-center/

Attached is the presentation from our Proactively Manage Data Center Infrastructure Webinar - to view the webinar with audio, go here:http://blog.eecnet.com/proactive-manage-data-center/

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  • Here is the agenda for today’s webinar. In today’s data centers, there is a trend in the key issues that are affecting the physical infrastructure. We will be taking a look at these key issues – and will be presenting to you some information to help you understand these issues more in-depth, as well as offer some recommendations on how to solve them.
  • Today’s presenters are Jim Stark and Lea ChittimJim Stark will be presenting the first portion of the webinar on power and cooling. Jim is the Design/Build Manager here at Electronic Environments, he has been with us since 1993 providing engineering and construction project management. He has extensive experience in delivering mission-critical data center projects and performing site assessments and evaluations with regard to industry standards and power quality. Jim has a degree in electrical engineering and is a registered professional electrical engineer.Lealand Chittim will be presenting the 2nd portion on maintenance. Lea is the Director of Operations here at EEC and has been with ussince 2006. He is a proven leader who has over 18 years of experience successfully leading and managing service organizations within technical industries. Lea’s customer focus, coupled with his drive and enthusiasm, is a welcome asset to EEC and its clients. Lea has Bachelor of Science in Business Administration and Masters of Science in Management.
  • Before I turn this over to Jim, we’d like to do a quick poll to see which of the 3 key points just listed are of most interest to you…Mention the percentages here…Now I’ll turn it over to Jim…
  • OK, we’d like to do another quick poll – Do you have growth restriction due to the amount of available power?Wait a minute and then mention the results…
  • OK and another quick poll …Wait a minute and mention the results…
  • Preventive and Predictive maintenance is conducted to keep equipment working and should be used as a strategy to improve the performance of assets. This strategy will help protect against unplanned downtime as well as extend the operating life of the equipment.
  • Part of managing assets is based on the ROI and getting the maximum benefit from the assets based on cost. A preventive maintenance program will decrease the total cost of the investment by extending the life and reducing repair costs. A significant ROI is achieved because proper maintenance adds years to the life expectancy of the equipment. A 2007 Study of Root Causes demonstrated that two-thirds of unplanned downtime events stem from preventable causes. The number one preventable cause was due to insufficient maintenance.
  • The Consortium of Energy Efficiency has shown that proper preventive maintenance can help save approximately 15% to 20% energy over equipment that is not maintained. Corrective repairs typically cost 2 to 4 times more than preventative maintenance due to their inherent inefficiencies.
  • The Consortium of Energy Efficiency has shown that proper preventive maintenance can help save approximately 15% to 20% energy over equipment that is not maintained. Corrective repairs typically cost 2 to 4 times more than preventative maintenance due to their inherent inefficiencies.
  • OK – one last poll question…Wait a minute and then mention the results…
  • A PM program reduces the amount of reactive maintenance.
  • Predictive maintenance is the use of technologies to see and hear things that we as humans could not otherwise see or hear. Thus the use of these technologies to get a head start on potential failures is critical.In all electrical or mechanical systems excessive heat is usually a hallmark of future failures. Thermography can reliably detect this heat and report potential problem areas to you prior to failure. Battery Monitoring equipment can deliver real time reports for trending analysis and extend the average battery life by balancing the battery voltage.
  • With this amount of money at stake, Infrared thermography should be a key component in the maintenance routine of any data center, especially those serving retail brokerage firms.
  • The “run it until it breaks” methodology doesn’t work when dealing with critical environment equipment in a data center.Long term benefits for preventive/predictive maintenance include: improved reliability, decreased cost, decreased downtime, and more efficient equipment. Companies should work with their maintenance provider to develop a scope of work and standardize that scope throughout the company. With the extreme cost of downtime, a strong maintenance program is not an option, it is a must. Turn it over to Kim for a quick summary of the webinar and then we will get to the questions…
  • Kim will take it from here????In summary - it is obvious that Proactive management of your it environment is very importantElectronic Environments offers services such as preventive maintenance, data center power & cooling assessments, environmental monitoring and other services that can help ensure the reliability of your data center’s infrastructure.To learn more about all of the services that Electronic Environments offers, feel free to visit our web site at eecnet.com or contact us at any time.
  • This is the first in a series of webinars that we will be offering over the coming months. – this one is a general overview of what is involved in managing your data center’s infrastructure. We will be offering future webinars that will breakdown the main points within this presentation and discuss them in more depth.At this point, lets take a look at some of the questions. Again, you can submit questions via the chat function on the web page. If we don’t get to all of your questions, we will answer them via email later.Regarding thermography – are there any special requirements in order to perform this?Do you have any recommendations on the frequency of PMs?I have some of the problems that you mentioned, but how do I know which are the most critical that I should tackle first?With the increase in server density – what is the typical power consumption you see per rack?We have plenty of cooling capacity but still have hot spots – what do you recommend we do to alleviate this?

Transcript

  • 1. Proactively Managing Your Data Center Infrastructure
    POWER -- COOLING -- MAINTENANCE
  • 2. Webinar Agenda
    • Data Center Power
    • 3. Data Center Cooling
    • 4. Other Issues Found in Data Centers
    • 5. Maintaining Data Centers
    • 6. Summary
  • Today’s Presenters
    James Stark, P.E.
    Design / Build Manager
    Lealand Chittim
    Director of Operations
  • 7. Key Issues
    Power –
    More than 50% of power going into a typical data center goes to the power and cooling systems –NOT to the IT loads
    Every kW saved in a data center saves about $1,000 per year
     Cooling –
    Legacy data centers can be overcooled by up to 2.6 times of the required capacity
    For each raise in set point – you can save 4% off the cost of running the unit
    Maintenance
    Preventive – routine scheduled maintenance
    Predictive – Infrared scanning and battery trending
  • 8. Polling Question
    Which of the three key points just listed affect you most or are of most interested to you?
  • 9.
  • 10.
  • 11. Common Power Problems Found in Legacy Data Centers
    Insufficient power capacity to support higher load densities – can lead to excessive branch circuits and overloading.
    Insufficient quantity of breaker positions. Distribution panels & PDU’s were not specified for dual power supply servers and 3-phase power supplies.
    Unexpected load drop with dual power supply servers. Electrical design has single power path and/or single points of failure.
  • 12. Common Power Problems Found in Legacy Data Centers
    Dropped load due to PDU failure or tripped circuit breakers. Mismanagement of load utilization on redundant PDU’s and circuits.
    UPS dropped load during utility power outage. UPS batteries not monitored or maintained properly. Generator not maintained properly.
  • 13. Legacy vs. Modern Data Center Power
    Legacy Data Centers
    Power design based on total kW
    N or N+1 UPS redundancy
    N UPS distribution redundancy
    Benchmark is 100 watts/sq ft or 3 kW/rack
    Modern Data Centers
    Power design based on kW plus distribution
    Med density 5–10 kW/rack
    High density > 10 kw/rack
  • 16. Legacy Data Center Power
    Power design based ontotal kW
    N or N+1 UPS redundancy
    N UPS distribution redundancy
    Benchmark is 100 watts/sq ft or 3 kW/rack
  • 17. Modern Data Center Power
    Power design based on kW plus distribution
    Med density 5–10 kW/rack
    High density > 10 kW/rack
  • 20. Polling Question
    Do you have growth restriction due to the amount of available power?
  • 21.
  • 22.
  • 23. Solving Power Issues
    Insufficient power capacity
    As rack power densities increase, UPS branch circuits become overloaded – replace with larger capacity circuits.
    Imbalanced/overloaded power distribution units (PDU) – circuit tracing, load balancing and additional PDU’s may be required.
    • Insufficient quantity of breaker positions
    • 24. As racks require more power, replacing single-phase circuits with larger capacity, three-phase circuits can reduce breaker space requirements.
    • 25. Additional PDU’s and/or panel boards may need to be installed.
  • Solving Power Issues
    Loads dropped despite power supply redundancy
    Trace and properly label circuits to avoid human error.
    Sites with single power paths may have to be upgraded with redundant power paths.
    Redundant power paths and equipment can become overloaded if not managed properly
    Loads should be metered either real-time or at maintenance intervals.
    Site documentation should be kept up-to-date.
    Model failure scenarios to predict system reaction to a failure.
    Proper maintenance, record keeping and trending are key components to avoiding preventable equipment failures
  • 26. Common Cooling Issues Found in Legacy Data Centers
    Traditional floor mounted CRAC unit designs are insufficient for loads exceeding 5kW per rack.
    CRAC units misaligned with hot aisles - leads to hot air mixing, cooling ineffectiveness and inefficiency.
  • 27. Common Cooling Issues Found in Legacy Data Centers
    Sub-floor air plenums choked off due to excessive cabling, limiting airflow through perforated floor tiles.
    Improper location of high density rack - Causes hot spots due to insufficient supply airflow.
  • 28. Common Cooling Issues Found in Legacy Data Centers
    Overcooling - excessive number of CRAC units running to cool “the hot spots”.
    Perforated floor tiles located in hot aisle and near CRAC units. Allows mixing of hot and cold air – reduces cooling system effectiveness and efficiency.
    Lack of blanking panels in data racks allows hot air to re-circulate to rack fronts and server inlets.
    Before
    Installing
    Blanking
    panels
    After
    Installing
    Blanking
    panels
  • 29. Legacy vs. Modern Cooling Issues
    Legacy Data Centers
    • Cooling design based on total tonnage plus CRAC unit redundancy
    • 30. Supply air delivery through raised access floor or ductwork
    • 31. CRAC units placed within 35’ supply air throw radius
    Modern Data Centers
    • Cooling design based on close coupled cooling and engineered heat rejection capability
    • 32. In row or overhead systems
    • 33. Hot or cold aisle containment
  • Typical Legacy Data Center Layout
    Power equipment in Red
    Cooling equipment in Blue
  • 34. Legacy vs. Modern Cooling Issues
    Legacy Data Centers
    • Cooling design based on total tonnage plus CRAC unit redundancy
    • 35. Supply air delivery through raised access floor or ductwork
    • 36. CRAC units placed within 35’ supply air throw radius
    Modern Data Centers
    • Cooling design based on close coupled cooling and engineered heat rejection capability
    • 37. In row or overhead systems
    • 38. Hot or cold aisle containment
    23
  • 39. Typical ModernData Center Layout
    Power equipment in Red
    Cooling equipment in Blue
  • 40. Polling Question
    If you have cooling issues, please identify the related cause(s) below?
    25
  • 41.
  • 42.
  • 43. Solving Cooling Issues
    High density IT racks (> 5kW):
    Isolated racks can be treated with specialized cooling solutions (fan-tray tiles).
    Larger quantities of high density racks can be configuredin “high density cooling zones” and cooled with high density solutions (fan-tray tiles, in-row cooling, etc.)
    • Air mixing:
    • 44. IT racks should be arranged in Hot Row – Cold Row layouts, with CRAC units positioned to efficiently capture the heated return air.
    • 45. Perforated tiles should not be located near CRAC units.
    • 46. Blanking panels should be installed in racks to eliminate hot air re-circulation.
  • Solving Cooling Issues
    Sub-floor plenums should be planned to reduce cable congestion. Designated cable pathways and wire management solutions can help to limit congestion. Abandoned cables should be routinely removed from the plenum.
    Overcooling: The tendency to overcool the data center is common. Targeted cooling solutions for high-density loads and hot spots can save on infrastructure costs and operating costs.
  • 47. Common Problems Found in Any Data Center
    Stranded Capacity
    Mismanagement of power - cooling – space utilization
    Upgrade of one infrastructure without looking at the big picture
    Unprotected EPO buttons
    Accidental actuation will shut the room down!
    Dry chemical fire extinguishers
    Dry chemical agent will destroy computer equipment – Clean agents only.
    30
  • 48. Common Problems Found in Any Data Center
    Excessive debris and dust
    Contaminate computer equipment
    Cause false fire suppression system alarms
    Wall / ceiling / floor penetrations
    Compromise cooling system effectiveness & fire suppression system integrity
    Generator impairment
    Not in “auto”
    Battery failure condition
    31
  • 49. Maintaining Data Center Infrastructure
    Preventive Maintenance
    Neglecting to maintain equipment or implementing improper maintenance procedures are two of the biggest reasons why mission critical equipment fails.
    Predictive Maintenance
    Maintain critical equipment at high performance levels and prevent failures that could cause unplanned downtime with catastrophic results.
    32
  • 50. Maintaining Data Center Infrastructure
    The management of a company’s assets is based on maximizing those assets (ROI) and getting the maximum benefit from assets based on cost
    Asset management includes Preventive Maintenance
    In today’s critical environments, IT service continuity is a high priority
    Downtime is measured
    Emphasis on planning, preparedness, and adoption of best practice standards
  • 51. Preventive Maintenance (PM) Program
    • Key to any successful asset management program
    • 52. Allows equipment to run more efficiently and can minimize energy consumption up to 5% less
    • 53. Corrective repairs typically cost 2 to 4 times more than preventative maintenance due to their inherent inefficiencies
  • Preventive Maintenance (PM) Program
    • Most Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM’s) require a PM program to continue warranty of the product.
    • 54. Can help identify problems before they become headlines.
    Pictured here is a damaged UPS inverter assembly, the damage happened when one of the aging capacitors blew; this is the type of damage that can occur if your UPS isn’t properly maintained.
  • 55. Polling Question
    With Maintenance being key to preventing down time, which type of service contract do you prefer?
  • 56.
  • 57.
  • 58. Preventive vs. Reactive cost
    • A ratio of 85% planned to 15% unplanned work/cost as a target value is considered to be a good maintenance practice.
    • 59. Current EEC customer with $954k annualized PM cost.
  • Predictive Maintenance
    With no room for downtime, data centers need a strategy to ensure that supporting assets are reliable.
    Infrared Thermography
    An effective means of identifying potential problems before an incident or failure occurs.
    Monitoring
    Battery Trending - the battery is the most vulnerable part of any UPS, regardless of capacity, topology or brand.
  • 60. Hourly Impact / System Outages
    A Meta Group study identified the hourly impact on different organizations to system outages.
    Source Meta Practice
  • 61. Maintenance Summary
    • Preventive maintenance is conducted to keep equipment working.
    • 62. Preventive maintenance activities include partial or complete overhauls at specified periods and recording trends.
    • 63. The ideal preventive/predictive maintenance program would prevent equipment failure beforeit occurs.
  • Summary
    Proactive Management of your IT Environment
    Pay attention to potential problem areas before the problems exist
    Diagnose potential problems through maintenance & systems management
    Electronic Environments – Data Center Experts
    43
  • 64. Thank-You
    Recorded version will be available on www.eecnet.com
    Questions? Contact
    Jim Stark, Design/Build Manager508-229-1414 / jstark@eecnet.com
    Lea Chittim, Operations Manager508-229-1425 / lchittim@eecnet.com
    44