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  • Thanks BJORN, WELCOME ALL, MY NAME IS FATIH K. OZENC, TODAY I AM HERE ON BEHALF OF MY TEAM AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY AND `I WILL BE PRESENTING OUR WORK TITLE GETTING HOLD OF THE IMMATERIAL MATERIALITY OF INTERACTIVE BEHAVIORS.
  • DESIGNERS develop a tacit knowledge BY ACTIVELY ENGAGING THEMSELVES WITH THEirMATERIAl. They do this through Learning BY DOING in a shop or studio environment.
  • I will give an example of such engagement with material from my own work. This work is part of a bigger project. In this portion of the project I have a brief to design a stage-like display that will house other design elements that will show up on the stage. To Conceive of ideas, I began working with pen and paper, sketching form possibilities. through my conversation with paper I gradually move from a conventional stage idea to a more organic one.
  • first worked with Styrofoam which is a pretty easy material to work with, I got really excited that the material responding back with dynamic flowing curves. With this excitement I got curious how it would work in a more sturdy material, When I moved to the mdf- the wood material, the material pushed me back, told me I cannot create such strong curves with such depth and material. I stepped back and thought that may be I should better lighten the curves. MDF helped me to resolve the details of how 3D would work with the curves. it was now time for moving to the plastic, and begin experimenting with how the actual housing would work and encountered another problem, the depth of the form doesn’t allow me to have a clear plastic end in the form. I again stepped back, went back to the other form factors inside the housing, pushed the other design elements and decreased the depth of the form, plastic began to respond with more clear cuts. It was a big relief, I felt I was close to a resolution
  • Through this active reflecting in and on action and being comfortable with having conversation with material, I accomplished having A RESOLVED DESIGN CONCEPT ready to go to the field and meet the end users.
  • How about interaction designers? Do they have the same breath and depth in their design process? May be they DON’T DESIGN THINGS, and THEY WORK WITH BEHAVIORS but they still work with material to compose form. previous research show that interaction designers ARE NOT COMFORTABLE WORKING WITH developing interactive Behaviors. partly because they cannot develop a healthy CONVERSATION WITH Material due to the immaterial materiality of novel controls and partly because they cannot develop a tacit knowledge with the current software tools expecting designers to implement ideas before they actually conceiving or fully refining them- showing coding instead of this image, JAVA or action script
  • MOREOVER, DESIGNERS WORKING WITH THIS software tools HAVING HARD TIME ADJUSTING THEMSELVES TO THE RAPID CHANGES IN THE SOFTWARE TECHNOLOGIES AND PROGRAMMING PLATFORMS, AND they LACK COMPETENCY TO EFFECTIVELY IMPLEMENT THEIR IDEASTHEY ENDED UP HANDING OFF STATIC SCREEN DESIGNS BEFORE THEY HAVE SUFFICIENTLY CONCEIVE AND REFINED AN IDEA, simply put they don’t know if they get the right design or get the design right, when they are handing out these screens.
  • In our research, we found that people use gestures a lot bridging the gaps in the design process
  • WITH THIS FRAMING WE WANT TO UNDERSTAND THE NATURE OF IMMATERIAL MATERIALITY, AND HOW DESIGNERS HAVE CONVERSATION WITH SUCH MATERIAL TO CREATE A TACIT KNOWLEDGE LIKE THEIR PEERS IN INDUSTRIAL DESIGN ARE DEVELOPING. FINALLY WE WANT TO DEVELOP INSIGHTS ON DESIGN OF FUTURE Support TOOLS BASED ON OUR FIRST TWO MOTIVATIONS.
  • ToPURSUE these GOALS WE CONDUCTED TWO WORKSHOPS TO envision TOOLS TO HAVE BETTER CONVERSATION WITH MATERIAL.

De Presentation Transcript

  • 1. A Hands-on Workshop at the 7th International Conference on Design & Emotion, Chicago
  • 2. Conversation with materialFatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman | Carnegie Mellon University |3 of 11
  • 3. Conversation with materialFatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman | Carnegie Mellon University | 4 of 11
  • 4. Conversation with materialFatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman | Carnegie Mellon University | 5 of 11
  • 5. Conversation with materialFatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman | Carnegie Mellon University | 6 of 11
  • 6. Problem: conceiving of immaterial materialFatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman | Carnegie Mellon University | 7 of 11
  • 7. Problem: refinement & communicationFatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman | Carnegie Mellon University | 8 of 11
  • 8. Gesture as a means of sketching
  • 9. Goal: Understanding gesture
  • 10. Goal: Developing a toolFatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman | Carnegie Mellon University | 10 of 11
  • 11. Today’s scheduleFatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman | Carnegie Mellon University | 11 of 11