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Mask Web Quest

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personal identity mask project using plaster cast molding

personal identity mask project using plaster cast molding

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  • 1. Personal Identity Mask Project Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] A WebQuest for a 9th Grade Art Class Designed by Kim Knowles [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Photo by Flikr: Benjieordonez
  • 2. Introduction Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Imagine that you are a renown artist and have been lucky enough to win a commission from a wealthy patron to create a plaster relief mask representing your personal identity: past, present and future. The painted designs for your sculpture will require some historical research of your cultural heritage and input from family members for symbols to reflect ancestors. You will need to brainstorm your own interests, hopes, dreams and hobbies to provide visual references, so you will need to develop and understanding of the universal appeal of masks across the ages, continents and cultures! “ Immediately at birth, we recognize and respond to faces. This is why masks are universal.” Ken Suslick Photo by Flikr: zz9 Photo by Flikr: Sandman Photo by Flikr: feith
  • 3. The Task Student Page Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] An artist uses reference material when creating art, rather than just drawing from his or her head.  You are here as an artist to gather as many images you can to use as visual reference for your sculpture, which will depict your personal identity: past, present and future. Your goal is to collect 10-15 relevant images of high resolution , and put them into a Word document to print out for your use. It is highly recommended that you either copy these images onto a CD, DVD or flash-drive so that you can share these with the class in a slideshow presentation that introduces the inspiration and influences on your project! Additionally, it is highly recommended that you record thoughts, sketches and details in a sketch book. This supplemental resource can be a good place to develop ideas you found interesting through your research. Once you have gathered all of the images that are of significance to you and provide personal reflection and cultural identity, it is time to develop your mask design. You will be required to have a minimum of five well developed sketches that illustrate your proposed mask. Once those have been completed and approved by your art teacher, you will partner up with another classmate to make a plaster cast of your face . You have the freedom to add three dimensional features and a variety of materials to develop the expressiveness you desire in your final mask. Optional: You can develop the inside of your mask as well! Title Photo by flikr: d-d-daisy “ this is kinda weird because i took a plaster cast of someones face...and in this picture the mask is facing the other way, so you are seeing the inside of the mask...the inside of a face...yet you think you are seeing a normal face looking at you....weird! ”
  • 4. The Process Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] So first, to accomplish the ambitious task at hand, you will need to get on the Web and begin your research on masks and start a collection of visual images that will inspire you to create a mask for yourself that will define your Personal Identity! To begin, lets learn a little something about the historical and cultural roles, functions, purposes and designs of masks by reading a Reflection of Culture and Religion in regards to masks. Read through the top section about the origins of masks and their multiple functions. You are welcome (encouraged!) to explore the examples of masks from India as well. Tribal masks are used for special ceremonies and dances. Sometimes a mask is used to hide the wearer from evil; they are also used to frighten away ghosts. Masks have also been created as disguises for people to be able to summon spirtis without being recognized. Take a look at these web sites to gather visual references to this type of mask: Photos of Masks collected by Ken Suslick , Cultural Masks Website ; African Mask History ; Faces of the Dead: Egyptian Mummy Masks ; Guatemalan Masks ; Mexican Masks and West Coast Indian Art Tribal Masks . Some masks are simply painted on. In many cultures, face-painting and tattooing is used to identify tribes and classification (status) of the person within the tribe. These are also used to work magic! Painting one’s face is also a way to enhance perceived beauty, just like why women today wear make-up. Refer to these two web-sites to explore the use of Body Art: A Means of Self Expression from African Conservancy Gallery and Body Art: Marks of Identity from various world cultures. Masks have long been used in theatre. Ancient Greek actors wore masks to convey emotions as well as different characters and even today, masks are still used in traditional Japanese Noh plays and actors in India and Chinese Operas paint their faces to resemble masks, just like the painted face-masks found at the circus! Additionally, Venetian Masks and Alaskan Yup'ik Masks are worn in dramatizations and cultural re-enactments. Mask animation by Lisa Mitchell, Mask Safari WebQuest
  • 5. The Process continued: Personal Interests, Hopes, Dreams and Hobbies--- by no means is this limit of ideas, just a start! Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Country / Culture: Flags of the World Index Countries and everything about them! Cyberschoolbus: From the United Nations - Many aspects of many countries Kidspace from the Internet Public Library on different cultures & countries Say it in your language! Translator to some languages Current Events: Voices of Youth on Current Events Time For Kids - News from Time Magazine Sports Skateboarding Snowboarding Tennis.com Major League Lacrosse ESPN.com Baseball Almanac MLB.com Sporting News Sports Illustrated Use the internet sites below as a start for your image search.  Given that we are a diverse group of people, everyone’s interests may not be found in these sites.  In that case, use a search engine like Google to find your images.    Don’t be satisfied with only one image!  Find different photos or pictures with different angles or sizes!  The images should be as high resolution as possible. You may change your mind about things once you get drawing, so you are trying to get as much as possible so you have CHOICES as an artist!  Remember you need to be expressive and you have a lot of sculpture to paint. Photo by Flikr: tamra hays
  • 6. The Process continued: a few more places to look for inspiration…. Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Dance Voice of Dance Alvin Ailey Website Music – You are on your own! Use Google to search your favorite musicians. Art Find an Artist on artcyclopedia.com Graffiti Images Create your own Graffiti Movies Got a favorite movie?  Find it on movies.com Need a break from your internet search? Check this out! Once you’ve gathered all of your imagery, take a moment to visit this website and see how much fun another class had making “character masks”!: Ancient Indian Ramayana Character Mask Also, I recommend that you visit this unique website as it captures the elegance and mystique of masks. Warning: only French spoken here! Musee Internationale du Carnaval et du masque And lastly, check out this contemporary artist and his work relevant to our project! Relief Cast Sculpture by Ben Jones Photo by Flikr: Ayala Moriel
  • 7. The Process of Making the Mask: Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
    • Choose a classmate as your modeling partner. Make sure that on the day of the mask making, you bring old clothes to wear. If possible, wear a shower cap or small grocery bag to cover your hair and put on a big garbage bag with a hole cut out for your head. This should keep the plaster mess to a minimum! Also, it works best if your partner lays down on a flat surface such as the floor or sturdy table. Cover that surface with a flat sheet of painter’s plastic for easy clean-up.
      • Cut the plaster bandages into strips suitable for the size of your partner’s face: 2"-4" lengths usually work.
      • Cover the face of the "model" with petroleum jelly, especially at the hairline and eyebrows and eyelashes.
      • Put pieces of the straws into nostrils to serve as "breathing tubes” or leave ample breathing room around their nostrils!
      • Dip the bandage strips into the water, gently remove excess water, and begin to cover the model's face.
    Photos by Flikr: larinalou, Schwa 23 and Nina’H
  • 8. Mask Molding continued… Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
    • Tip: The bridge of the nose is a good place to begin; work from there out to cover all areas of the face. Do not go too far under the chin, or the mask will be hard to remove after it's dry. As you work, smooth any rough bandage edges with your wet fingers.
      • Once the face is completely covered, apply a second layer and then let it dry for about ten minutes before you try to remove it.
      • When the model feels the mask begin to dry, they can make the removal process easier by wiggling their face. Scrunching up cheeks, frowning, smiling, scowling, lifting eyebrows--any facial movement will help to release the mask.
      • Remove the mask by carefully lifting it at the outer edges. It will be drying, but not yet firm, so place it on a flat surface, supported by a "cushion" of crumpled paper towels or newspaper as it continues to dry.
    • Tip: You can use more plaster to build up the edges or smooth any roughness at lip or eye openings at this point. While it is still damp, poke holes about an inch in from each edge, in line with the eyes, to run the ribbon or string through. This is also a good time to add any appendages, armature or details required of your personal mask design.
    • Once the mask is completely dry, it can be sanded with medium and fine sandpaper to create a smoother surface in which to paint on.
  • 9. Now it’s Time for the Finishing Touches Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]
      • Once you sanded your dry, plaster mask, you will need to paint it with 2-3 base coats of gesso to seal in the plaster. The gesso can be tinted with acrylic paint if a different base color is desired.
      • Transfer designs to face cast with a contrasting marker color.
    • Now it’s time to put on the finishing touches!
    • Recommended materials: acrylic paints, fabric paints, beads, feathers, fake hair and eyelashes, natural found objects, fabric, leather, glass, photos, magazine cutouts, sequins and so on. The sky is the limit!
    • Optional: “What’s inside my head?”
    • You are free to complete the inside of your face mask in addition to the outside.
      • Write a personal reflection once you have completed the work. What do the motifs mean? How do they express culture? What have you learned about yourself and your ancestors?
    • Final Presentation :
    • Class critique will include a 15 minute presentation about your Personal Identity Mask, including a slideshow of the digital 10-15 images required.
    Photo by Flikr: BrittneyBush
  • 10. Evaluation: Rubric for Personal Identity Mask Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ]   The designs have been painted somewhat sloppily, the lines are a bit messy, some or most of the colors are not mixed and the images are not too clear The designs have been painted somewhat carefully – most the lines are pretty smooth, most of the colors have been mixed to suit the artist – but a few may not be, and some of the images are not too clear The designs have been painted pretty carefully – most of the lines are smooth, almost all the colors have been mixed to suit the artist and communicate the idea, and most of the images are very clear The designs have been painted very carefully – the lines are smooth, all the colors have been mixed to suit the artist and communicate the idea, and the images are very clear Painting Technique   The images don’t communicate very clearly to the viewer much about your personal identity – we have many questions The images communicate somewhat clearly to the viewer some things about your personal identity – we have a question in some spots The images communicate pretty clearly to the viewer a lot about your personal identity – we have a question in a spot, but can figure out most of it The images communicate very clearly to the viewer a lot about your personal identity Communication of Identity   A drawing was created for the face, using some of the visual images as references – but some are copied, and they don’t seem unified into one design – all the images they seem very separate A drawing was created for the face, using some of the visual images as references – but some are copied, and they don’t really seem unified into one design – they seem separate A drawing was created for the face, using the visual images as references - not copying, and they are unified into one interesting design A drawing was created for the face, clearly using the visual images as references - not copying, and they are unified into one very interesting design Use of visual References/ Drawing   4 images were searched for and collected from Internet sources, saved and a Word document was created & printed 7 images were searched for and collected from Internet sources, saved and a Word document was created & printed 10 images were searched for and collected from Internet sources, saved and a Word document was created & printed 15 images were searched for and collected from Internet sources, saved and a Word document was created & printed Webquest   The face is very roughly plastered with many rough spots or edges and/or we can’t make out the features The face has been plastered with a some rough spots on the surface and edges, and/or some of the features have disappeared The face has been plastered with a pretty smooth surface and edges, and we can pretty clearly see the features The face has been plastered with a very smooth surface and edges, and we can clearly see the features Plastering Technique Score Unsatisfactory 12 Adequate 14 Good 17 Excellent 20  
  • 11. Conclusion Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Upon conclusion of this WebQuest, you will have learned how to collect a visual reference library for an art project, have developed a general understanding of the impact masks have had on cultures around the world and why they may be viewed as works of art. Your final product will be a plaster relief sculpture/mask of your face which uses symbolic images to represent who you are, where you’ve come from and what your hopes are for the future. This final mask project also includes a digital presentation, web research and a final artist statement. Based upon what you have learned, how does this lesson provide insight on how you view world history and its connection to the development of art? Were masks considered as works of art among tribal societies and are they considered as works of art today? Can we appreciate the design and expression of a traditional mask from another culture? What IS art??? Photo by Flikr: mouse
  • 12. Credits & References Student Page Title Introduction Task Process Evaluation Conclusion Credits [ Teacher Page ] Include a link back to The WebQuest Page and The WebQuest Slideshare Group so that others can acquire the latest version of this template and training materials. Websites and Links Used Unit: African Art - Sculpture - African American Art Lesson Plan: Arm and Face Casts - body art  Grade Level: Middle School (adaptable to high school) Click here for Lotte Petricone's adaptation - See how she broke it down http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/Lotte-bodyart.htm UNIT: Personal Identity - Sculpture - Cultural Awareness Lesson:  Relief Cast Arm and Face with Cultural Symbols Grade Level: Middle School (adaptable to high school) http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/Lotte-bodyart2.htm#Web Mask WebQuest: http://www.gaston.k12.nc.us/resources/teachers/webquests/Safari/index_masks.htm Another Mask WebQuest/lesson plan: http://42explore.com/mask.htm How to make plaster masks: http://www.essortment.com/all/plastermask_razf.htm Article: DeBuse, Carol (art teacher at South High School, Omaha, Nebraska). “Masks: The Face Tells the Story”. Art Education in Action, Tape 2/Episode B: Cultural Dimensions in Art. Date unknown. Books: Milord, Susan. Adventures in Art, Art & Craft Experiences for 7 to 14 year olds . Vermont: Williamson Publishing Co. 1990.
  • 13. Personal Identity Mask Project (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page A WebQuest for 9th Grade Art Class Designed by Kim Knowles [email_address] Based on a template from The WebQuest Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Photo by Flikr: Benjieordonez
  • 14. Introduction (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Students will cast their face for a temporary sculpture installation. They will paint it with patterns and symbols that reflect their cultural and ancestral heritage with input they have gathered from family members. These artists will also brainstorm their own interests, hopes, dreams and hobbies (past, present and future) by searching the internet for images to use as reference/research.  Back in the art room, they will cast their face in a plaster mold and then paint it, focusing on expression of their personal identity. Additionally, they will have the opportunity to paint the inside of the mold to illustrate what’s going on inside of their heads. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 15. Learners (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
    • This lesson is designed for middle school art students. It can easily be adapted for the high school level.
    • .
    • Students will:
    • Study masks from far-reaching geographical locations and learn about the different purposes of masks within a variety cultures.
    • Analyze the dual role of masks as functional and/or aesthetic objects of art.
    • Apply the benefits of collecting a visual library through the use of the internet and by recording their thoughts and research in a sketchbook.
    • Partner with a classmate to cast their faces;
    • Demonstrate craftsmanship in plaster addition;
    • Design a face to show cultural heritage - reflect on personal identity;
    • Demonstrate an understanding of elements and principles of design;
    • Demonstrate craftsmanship in painting
    Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 16. Curriculum Standards (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion Standard 1: Students recognize and use the visual arts as a form of communication  interpreting and distinguishing intended meanings of visual images, themes, and ideas in works of art;  researching and synthesizing visual images, themes, and ideas to create works of art which reflect personal experiences and intended meanings Standard 2: Students know and apply elements of art*, principles of design*, and sensory* and expressive* features of visual arts.  comparing and contrasting elements of art, principles of design, sensory and expressive features, and functions of art;  creating multiple solutions to visual arts problems* by applying elements of art, principles of design, and sensory and expressive features Standard 4: Students relate the visual arts to various historical* and cultural traditions describing the functions, meanings, and significance of works of art within various cultures;  creating works of art based on comparison and evaluation of various historical and cultural contexts; and  evaluating, analyzing, and i nterpreting works of art as related to the history and culture of various people. Standard 5: Students analyze and evaluate the characteristics, merits, and meaning of works of art.  interpreting meaning in works of art;  evaluating works of art using cr itical analysis and aesthetic inquiry
  • 17. The Process (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
    • Refer to the Student Process Slides for a detailed guide.
    • This lesson is organized in a way that mimics the studio practice of a professional artist:
      • Internet research methods
      • Collection of a Visual Library and image references
      • Use of a sketch book in developing ideas and personal reflections
      • Plaster Cast Mold and Mask Making
      • Digital presentation
      • Development of personal reflections through writing an artist statement
      • A More thorough development and understanding of design elements and principles
    • Timeline: This is a substantial, multidisciplinary unit that will last over a period of about 6 weeks , depending on structure of the school’s class schedule. Periodic check-ins with the instructor will help keep the students on task.
    • The students will work individually while doing their internet research and developing sketches. They will potentially work cooperatively with their families while researching their ancestry and will for a partnership with a classmate in developing their face molds.
    • The instructor will need to do study reputable sources of books and articles to provide an accurate basis of the cultural context of masks in various societies. Select brief passages to help explain the points you wish to convey to students, helping them to verbalize the elements and principles of design in their language.
    • Ideally, the students would benefit from a field trip to a museum with a mask exhibit!
  • 18. Resources (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Materials: Sketch books plaster gauze  petroleum jelly plastic bowls old t-shirts Large, plastic trash bags acrylic paints gesso drinking straws Small grocery bags Roll of painter’s plastic Chicken wire Wire Sand paper: 80-120 grit Hasp files Glue, hot glue guns Various materials for mask embellishments – beads, feathers, dried plant material, sequins, fake fur and eyelashes etc. Resources: Access to a computer lab for image research; Books with history and images of masks from around the world; Magazines, such as National Geographic; World map Field trip to a regional museum or art gallery with a relevant exhibit; Videos Family interaction and interviews Instructor might also want to read this age-relevant article: "Revealing the Hopes of Adolescents through the Art of Tattoos" Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 19. Evaluation (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Success of this project will not only be realized through the implementation of the grading rubric but in the reward the students feel in completing this task. The incorporation of digital media in the art room will provide a key connection between the students and the world around them. Helping them to learn how to express themselves via this internet research through the ploy of learning about masks will be powerful in their future applications of visual imagery and sketches in the art room. See: Mask Grading Rubric for a complete breakdown of points. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 20. Teacher Script (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page
    • Instruction/Motivation:
    • Ask students to bring in a mask example from home and have them discuss its purpose.
    • Present some introductory activities on tribal masks and show examples of body adornment - show slides, videos, real examples.
    • Discuss various functions of masks within cultures that personify spirits, natural forces, how they relate to their ancestors and/or celebrate important events; tie this discussion in with what masks they have brought from home and their significance.
    • Discuss the concept of culture and how art reflects culture.
    • Discuss expressive qualities of the masks studied so far – how did the creator of the mask use formal properties to achieve a particular look? What does the mask express?
    • Discuss how the masks were made and what materials and techniques were used by the artist.
    • Research contemporary artists that use casting process in their work.
    • Demonstrate casting process 
    • Note: Get parent permission for casting the students’ face as some student may have a slight allergy to the plaster. If in doubt, use plastic face molds for those with highly sensitive skin.
    • ADDITIONAL IDEAS
    • Interested students might do research on masks from a selected culture, collect pictures of exemplary masks, write a brief paper and report to the rest of the class.
    • Acting in the role of art critics, the class might select a student mask design for a class t-shirt.
    • Invite community or school experts in African or Native American history and cultures to make visits and presentations to the class.
    Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 21. Conclusion (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Not only is this project a sculptural lesson in plaster molds and expressive painting, it also allows kids to find personal meaning for themselves while learning about the universal use of masks around the world. The process of researching masks and body art from various cultures and societies around the world allows for personal reflection in the role of their own family and cultural heritage while involving them through the course of the work. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion
  • 22. Credits & References (Teacher) [ Student Page ] Title Introduction Learners Standards Process Resources Credits Teacher Page Websites and Links Used Unit: African Art - Sculpture - African American Art Lesson Plan: Arm and Face Casts - body art  Grade Level: Middle School (adaptable to high school) Click here for Lotte Petricone's adaptation - See how she broke it down http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/Lotte-bodyart.htm UNIT: Personal Identity - Sculpture - Cultural Awareness Lesson:  Relief Cast Arm and Face with Cultural Symbols Grade Level: Middle School (adaptable to high school) http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/Lotte-bodyart2.htm#Web Mask WebQuest: http://www.gaston.k12.nc.us/resources/teachers/webquests/Safari/index_masks.htm Another Mask WebQuest/lesson plan: http://42explore.com/mask.htm How to make plaster masks: http:// www.essortment.com/all/plastermask_razf.htm Article: DeBuse, Carol (art teacher at South High School, Omaha, Nebraska). “Masks: The Face Tells the Story”. Art Education in Action, Tape 2/Episode B: Cultural Dimensions in Art. Date unknown. Books: Milord, Susan. Adventures in Art, Art & Craft Experiences for 7 to 14 year olds . Vermont: Williamson Publishing Co. 1990. Include a link back to The WebQuest Page and The WebQuest Slideshare Group so that others can acquire the latest version of this template and training materials. Evaluation Teacher Script Conclusion