Course Planning: The Big Picture

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Look at your class from a variety of angles and with a variety of lenses. Want to teach a blended course? Let's assess your face-to-face course and make a great blended one!

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Course Planning: The Big Picture

  1. 1. The Big Picture!! ! ! ! ! ! http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0 Course title: Start date: # weeks: Class length? End date: # credits: “Big ideas” or course goals: Required materials: Major projects/grading: (No more than three, please. One is sufficient.) Textbooks Group projects/presentations Print packets/articles Portfolios Online articles Research papers Case studies Individual projects Textbook publisher’s materials Case studies Library e-reserves & databases Reflective journals Media (DVDs, CDs, etc.) Exams; (number ______ ) Specialized software Service or outreach activities Other ______________________ Other ______________________ What are the problem areas for students? What is difficult to teach? Student feedback: When and how do students get feedback? Learning objectives (LOs): My course content: Student engagement: Check all that apply. Where does your content reside when you’re How will students work? Check all that apply. not teaching? Individually I have specific LOs for each unit. In my brain. I’ve taught this forever. In a team My LOs link to big ideas above. In my (analog) lecture notes. In more than one team I plan to change/streamline my LOs Digitally, in slides or docs. In whole class projects I could use some help with these. Digitally, online (LMS, blog, etc.). In fieldwork/internships I could simplify these. Other ______________________ Other _______________________ © The University of North Carolina @ Chapel Hill
  2. 2. The Big Picture!! ! ! ! ! ! http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0 Preferred teaching strategies: Your physical classroom: Your time spent on assessment: Check all that apply. Check all that apply if known... Rank order course assessments that require the majority of your time to grade: Movable desks 1. _______________________ Group work Whiteboard & markers Lecture 2. _______________________ Projector Socratic questioning; discussions Internet access (wired or wireless) 3. _______________________ Student presentations Computer (or laptop accessible) Problem-based learning 4. _______________________ Audio system Role-playing/simulations 5. _______________________ Windows with shades Other ______________________ Other ______________________ 6. _______________________ Online enhancements: What is your greatest strength As an educator, if you had to reach Check all that apply to your class web site use. as an educator? out of your comfort zone, what one new thing would you try and why? Lecture notes Slides Auto-graded quizzes Gradebook Assignment submission & directions URLs & online resources Announcements Course calendar Virtual office hours Other ______________________ © The University of North Carolina @ Chapel Hill
  3. 3. The Big Picture!! ! ! ! ! ! http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0 Course Mapping stdt to stdt stdt goals to interactions prof course content activities graded un- graded © The University of North Carolina @ Chapel Hill
  4. 4. The Big Picture!! ! ! ! ! ! http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0 Lessons at-a-Glance In an ideal world, all of your efforts toward improving learning align so that students gain a deeper appreciation and understanding for the topics you have studied together. Ultimately, this helps to prepare students to contribute to a community of practice within their field or discipline. Let’s take a 30,000-foot view to see if your instructional goals, specific learning objectives (observable outcomes), and assessments are aligned. Consider the following format to capture your ideas and notes. Example from an Introductory Environmental Studies course: Week/topic: Big idea/course goal: Learning objective: Assessment: Overarching concept(s) essential This is something you can observe to This provides students the opportunity to the course and discipline see that students “get” the big idea. to demonstrate they “get” the big idea. 1 Systems-thinking and By the end of the course, students Portfolio assignments: Use Living and understanding natural should be able to diagram the water diagramming or mind-mapping Non-living systems holistically is cycle, carbon cycle, and nitrogen software to illustrate water, carbon, Systems key to this field cycle and nitrogen cycles 1 Students should be able to identify and This is an essay question on Exam discuss the significance of energy flow 1 (cont’d) (cont’d) through at least 2 different systems. © The University of North Carolina @ Chapel Hill
  5. 5. The Big Picture!! ! ! ! ! ! http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0 Week/topic: Big idea/course goal: Learning objective: Assessment: Overarching concept(s) essential This is something you can observe to This provides students the opportunity to the course and discipline. see that students “get” the big idea. to demonstrate they “get” the big idea. © The University of North Carolina @ Chapel Hill
  6. 6. The Big Picture!! ! ! ! ! ! http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0 © The University of North Carolina @ Chapel Hill

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