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  • 1. Kimberly Detterbeck Art Librarian Candidate Purchase College Library November 29, 2010 “ Every picture has many layers and many truths . But we know that behind every image revealed there is another image more fateful to reality and in back of that image there is another and yet another behind the last one and so on up to the true image of that absolute mysterious reality that no one will ever see .” - Michelangelo Antonioni, film maker René Magritte. The Eye . c. 1932/35 . The Art Institute of Chicago. The Curious Eye: Understanding Visual Literacy in the Arts
  • 2. “ Visual literacy is a set of abilities that enables an individual to effectively find , interpret , evaluate , use , and create images and visual media. Images and visual media may include photographs, illustrations, drawings, maps, diagrams, advertisements, and other visual messages and representations, both still and moving. Visual literacy skills equip a learner to understand and analyze the contextual , cultural , ethical , aesthetic , and technical components involved in the construction and use of images and visual media. A visually literate individual is both a critical consumer of visual media and a competent contributor to a body of shared knowledge and culture.” -ACRL/IRIG Visual Literacy Standards Task Group Honoré-Victorin Daumier. The Connoisseur . ca. 1860–65. Metropolitan Museum of Art.
  • 3. Why is Visual Literacy Important? Giovanni Paolo Panini. Interior of a Picture Gallery with the Collection of Cardinal Gonzaga . 1749. Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art.
  • 4. 3 Areas of Competency
    • Image Literacy : the ability to find and analyze or read images
    • Digital Literacy : the ability to use, handle and manipulate images
    • Image Composition : the ability to create and communicate through images
  • 5. Syntax and Semantics
    • Visual Syntax
    • Scale
    • Dimension
    • Motion
    • Arrangement
    • Composition
    • Balance
    • Space
    • Perspective
    • Size
    • Color
    • Light
    • Tone
    • Editing
    • Cropping
    • Symbolism
    • Metaphor
    • Parody
    • Visual/text relationship
    • Fore/back ground
    Visual Semantics Questions Who created the image? At what point of history and in what context was the image created? Who commissioned the image? For what purpose was the image created? In what context is the image being seen? Who is the intended audience of the image? In what form(s) of media will the image be seen? What has been omitted, altered, or included in the image? What does the image say about our history? What does the image communicate about our individual or national identity? What does the image say about society? What does the image say about an event? What aspects of culture is the image communicating?
  • 6. Art History Jan van Eyck. The Arnolfini Portrait . 1434. National Gallery, London.
  • 7.
    • Visual Syntax
    • Scale
    • Dimension
    • Motion
    • Arrangement
    • Composition
    • Balance
    • Space
    • Perspective
    • Size
    • Color
    • Light
    • Tone
    • Editing
    • Cropping
    • Symbolism
    • Metaphor
    • Parody
    • Visual/text relationship
    • Fore/back ground
    Visual Semantics Questions Who created the image? At what point of history and in what context was the image created? Who commissioned the image? For what purpose was the image created? In what context is the image being seen? Who is the intended audience of the image? In what form(s) of media will the image be seen? What has been omitted, altered, or included in the image? What does the image say about our history? What does the image communicate about our individual or national identity? What does the image say about society? What does the image say about an event? What aspects of culture is the image communicating?
  • 8. I Like Music Logo(s) . Powell Allen, London, England, 2009. Graphic Design
  • 9.
    • Visual Syntax
    • Scale
    • Dimension
    • Motion
    • Arrangement
    • Space
    • Perspective
    • Size
    • Color
    • Light
    • Tone
    • Symbols
    • Editing
    • Cropping
    • Manipulation
    • Symbolism
    • Metaphor
    • Parody
    • Visual/text relationship
    • Fore/back ground
    Visual Semantics Questions Who created the image? At what point of history and in what context was the image created? Who commissioned the image? For what purpose was the image created? In what context is the image being seen? Who is the intended audience of the image? In what form(s) of media will the image be seen? What has been omitted, altered, or included in the image? What does the image say about our history? What does the image communicate about our individual or national identity? What does the image say about society? What does the image say about an event? What aspects of culture is the image communicating?
  • 10. Arts Management Black Rock Arts Foundation campaign poster to install Raygun Gothic Rocketship at Pier 14 in San Francisco, 2010.
  • 11.
    • Visual Syntax
    • Scale
    • Dimension
    • Motion
    • Arrangement
    • Composition
    • Balance
    • Space
    • Perspective
    • Size
    • Color
    • Light
    • Tone
    • Editing
    • Cropping
    • Symbolism
    • Metaphor
    • Parody
    • Visual/text relationship
    • Fore/back ground
    Visual Semantics Questions Who created the image? At what point of history and in what context was the image created? Who commissioned the image? For what purpose was the image created? In what context is the image being seen? Who is the intended audience of the image? In what form(s) of media will the image be seen? What has been omitted, altered, or included in the image? What does the image say about our history? What does the image communicate about our individual or national identity? What does the image say about society? What does the image say about an event? What aspects of culture is the image communicating?
  • 12. 3 Areas of Competency
    • Image Literacy : the ability to find and analyze or read images
    • Digital Literacy : the ability to use, handle and manipulate images
    • Image Composition : the ability to create and communicate through images
  • 13. The Library Playing its Part
    • Collections
    • Technology
    • Pedagogy
    Jacob Lawrence. The Library . 1960. Smithsonian Museum of American Art.
  • 14. Collections ___________________________________________________________________
  • 15. Technology ____________________________________________________________________
  • 16. Pedagogy _________________________________________________ +
  • 17. 3 Areas of Competency
    • Image Literacy : the ability to find and analyze or read images
    • Digital Literacy : the ability to use , handle and manipulate images
    • Image Composition : the ability to create and communicate through images
  • 18. ARTStor
  • 19. Thank you note in every language . Flickr user woodleywonderworks .
  • 20. Selected Bibliography
    • ACRL Arts Section / Instruction Section, "Eye to I: Visual Literacy Meets Information Literacy" (program and virtual poster session), American Library Association Annual Conference 2007, Washington, DC), http://eye2i.wordpress.com/ (accessed Nov. 28, 2010).
    • Elkins, James. Visual Studies: A Skeptical Introduction . New York: Routledge, 2003.
    • Harris, Benjamin R. "Image-Inclusive Instruction," College & Undergraduate Libraries 14, no. 2 (2007): 65-75.
    • ------. "Visual Information Literacy via Visual Means: Three Heuristics,“ Reference Services Review 34, no. 2 (2006): 213-21.
    • Hill, Charles A. and Marguerite Helmers, eds. Defining Visual Rhetorics . Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2004.
    • Marcum, James W. "Beyond Visual Culture: The Challenge of Visual Ecology," Libraries & the Academy 2, no. 2 (2002): 189-206.
    • Messaris, Paul. “Visual ‘Literacy’: A Theoretical Synthesis.” Communication Theory, no. 4 (1993): 277-294.
    • Nelson, Nerissa. "Visual Literacy and Library Instruction: A Critical Analysis,“ Education Libraries 27, no. 1 (2004): 5-10.
    • Prown, Jules David. “Mind in Matter.” In Art as Evidence: Writings on Material Culture . New Haven: Yale University Press, 2001.
    • Seppanen, Janne. The Power of the Gaze: An Introduction to Visual Literacy . New York: Peter Lang Publishing, 2006.
    • Snavely, Loanne "Visual Images and Information Literacy," Reference & User Services Quarterly 45, no. 1 (2005): 27-32.
    • Tufte, Edward R. Visual Explanations: Images and Quantities, Evidence and Narrative . Cheshire, Conn: Graphics Press, 1997.