UA_ASU_ 01_2011

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Arizona Archives Summit and UofA Knowledge River talk Jan 2011.

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  • I want to take a step back a moment before jumping into a demo of the Portal and first talk about 1) the origins of the portal project and 2) its connection to some over arching ETHICAL themes and frameworks that exist in the work of tribal archivists and librarians that informed our work.\n\nThe archival projects I’ve been involved with over the last 5 years all fall under the umbrella of “digital repatriation” > a set of practices that encompass more than ‘giving back’ materials from collecting institutions or individual researchers to Indigenous communities...\n\nbut a set of practices that involve:\ntaking seriously the ethical, political and cultural systems of knowledge management that are already existing within these communities--\n\nsystems that can be extended to deal with digital objects that pose specific challenges because of the ease with which they can be reproduced and circulated.\nThe PPWP grew out of my previous work in Central Australia with Aboriginal communities building a community digital archive based on specific CULTURAL PROTOCOLS [next]\n\n\n
  • That is, the digital archive tool that my partners and I built was based on a the Warumungu peoples’\npre-existing system for the circulation, distribution and reproduction of knowledge and materials \n\nin 2002 after receiving hundreds of digital photos back from missionaries the community wanted a way for people to access them based on the system that was already in place--an ethical system of accountability defined by a set of dynamic cultural protocols \nin this case the protocols revolved around: gender, community status, death, kinship relations (different iterations of who could/couldn’t see/access...)\n\nthe community came up with their own analog content management system...[slide]\n\n\n
  • This file cabinet with the restriction label [men only] was one way to deal with documents...\n\nThe file cabinet was a useful, if not cumbersome, solution for documents BUT what we needed was... a digital archive that mirrored the cultural norms and protocols for accessing and circulating information...after 2 years of consultation and design we came up with the...[NEXT]\n\n\n
  • the MWKA...\nthere is a lot I could say (demo online) but the basics are that this is a custom built digital archive and content management system that allows for\n\ndifferential access to materials based on CULTURAL protocols for the VIEWING, REPRODUCTION and DISSEMINATION OF materials\n(the system is adaptable and expandable mimicking the dyanmism of the Warumungu cultural-ethical information management system.\n\nthis project served as a bridge for what has now become this year the MUKURTU platform:[next]\n\n\n\n\n\n
  • through an NEH grant we are in the midst now of creating an open source software platform for content management based on FLEXIBLE CULTURAL PROTOCOLS for any indigenous community globally--\n\nthis will be FREE to download and OPEN SOURCE--so it can be altered to meet specific needs...BUT it will also be ADAPTABLE out of the package (like wordpress etc)\n\nas MUKURTU comes alive the best working example I have of it’s functions are what we have already created in the PPWP\n
  • The PPWP exists as an online archive and content management system at WSU\n\nit came about as a joint venture between:\n
  • the Plateau Center for AM IND STUDIES and 5 of the 11 tribes with whom WSU has an MOU--the MASC @ WSU Libraries and our national partners at the Smithsonian Institution.\n\nTribal reps were concerned about the availability of library and archival materials to tribal members who do not live in and around WSU\n\nThe Plateau Center was interested in the technology we had created in Australia because it mirrored the concerns the tribal members had here in the Plateau Region-- that is:\n\nThe tribes didn’t just want ACCESS to their materials they wanted [next slide] ACCESS + some CONTROL\n\n\n\n
  • ACCESS and CONTROL\n\nby this I mean that the tribes wanted to be able to both access their materials off-site and they wanted to open the back door and be allowed to provide CONTEXT, TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE, EXPERT OPINIONS AND COMMENTS to existing content records\n\nthey wanted access to and SOME control over the holy grail of archival materials...the METADATA [next slide]\n
  • the tribes did NOT want to REPLACE the existing metadata but ADD TO it with tribal knowledge, extra materials, tags and other types of layered knowledge (no one wanted to erase the scholarly record that exists)\n\nso with this project we focused on access and control to archival materials via three main PRINCIPLES\n\nthey are:\n[next slide]\n
  • RESPECT, RECOGNITION AND RESPONSIBILITY \n\nthis project began by RESPECTING [SLIDE]\n\n\n
  • respecting native systems of knowledge and cultural protocols that determine HOW materials circulate, WHO sees them, and the CONTEXT in which they are presented...recognizing [next slide]\n
  • recognizing not only different ways of seeing information but also divergent CULTURAL and ETHICAL PROTOCOLS for determining ACCESS to and CONTROL over materials that CONFLICT with some deeply held ASSUMPTIONS about \n\n1) the CONTOURS and BENEFITS OF OPEN ACCESS and \n\n2) the REACH OF THE PUBLIC DOMAIN: we questioned if adding MORE to the PD and making all content [next]\n
  • OPEN TO THE PUBLIC automatically made it BENEFICIAL, if, in fact, it VIOLATED NATIVE ethical systems\n\nby recognizing these multiple ethical systems and differences in knowledge circulation practices we began to emphasize the need for ARCHIVES AND OTHER COLLECTING INSTITUTIONS to accept the RESPONSIBILITY [next slide] TO\n
  • BALANCE the needs, sovereign rights and ethical concerns of Native communities with the professional concerns and standards of archivists and other information specialists\n\nIn the PPWP these included:\n\n1) meaningful consultation across all parts of the process\n2) equal decision-making in relation to content for the site, information management categories and research directions\n3) encoding cultural needs/protocols into every aspect of the project\n\nAll of these principles guided our work in relation to the TECHNICAL, CULTURAL and CURATORIAL work of the project..the PPWP [next slide]\n
  • then begins with a recognition of BOTH the sovereignty of EACH tribe as well as what UNITES them across time and space--\n\nImage of the Columbia river was chosen by the tribal reps as a way to signify that that body of water unites all the tribes in the area--but each tribe is represented by their own icon and has their own welcome--some in their own languages and some in English--this was all their own choosing and TECHNICALLY on the back end they can change ANY of this design at any time (new image, welcome, text etc)\n\nBUT, this PUBLIC face of the portal in some ways masks the fact that there are two dominant faces behind this--1) TRIBAL and Institutional [next slide]\n\n\n
  • The back end of the system has a robust user profile[ARROW]---here tribes and institutions (like WSU or our partners, NAA and NMAI...) designate administrators....\n\n1) “TRIBAL ADMIN” ----TRIBAL ADMINS can: upload content, add metadata, edit information FOR CONTENT THEY UPLOAD and ADD TRIBAL KNOWLEDGE TO CONTENT THAT THE INSTITUTIONS UPLOADS\n\n2) INSTITUTIONAL ADMIN status (allows us to upload, add metadata, delete, edit content)--FOR THE CONTENT WE UPLOAD\n\n3) Scholar --can upload their own materials, add metadata and comments and link to specific tribes with whom they work (then tribes can log on and add tribal metadata and knowledge\nIN EACH CASE the specific ADMIN can control the flow of their OWN CONTENT and METADATA , so...[next]\n\n
  • FOR EXAMPLE...\nwhen defining METADATA FIELDS\nINST ADMINS & SCHOLARS--maintain the 15 core properties in DC\nTRIBAL ADMINS FOR their uploads--can choose which dublin core fields to display\n\nmaterials can get uploaded then THREE WAYS by:\nINSTITUTIONS\nTRIBAL ADMINS\nAFFILIATED SCHOLARS\n\nI’m going to walk you through the process we have been using with the 5 tribes involved in the project to give you an idea at how the principles function within the system\n[next]\n\n
  • 1) choose materials to be digitized and uploaded [click]\n2) we digitize/we follow BCR standards [click]\n3) upload [slide] one click process or batch [click]\n\nthen we move to metadata ingestion\n[next]\n
  • 1) choose materials to be digitized and uploaded [click]\n2) we digitize/we follow BCR standards [click]\n3) upload [slide] one click process or batch [click]\n\nthen we move to metadata ingestion\n[next]\n
  • 1) choose materials to be digitized and uploaded [click]\n2) we digitize/we follow BCR standards [click]\n3) upload [slide] one click process or batch [click]\n\nthen we move to metadata ingestion\n[next]\n
  • 1) choose TRIBES [arrow] and CATEGORIES [arrow]\n
  • 1) choose TRIBES [arrow] and CATEGORIES [arrow]\n
  • 2) enter metadata under the CATALOGUE RECORD tab (unqualified dc metadata fields)\nnext\n\n\n
  • 4) set as open [arrow]\n5) add to archive\n\ntribes then alerted...it is added to their “my tribal admin” folder \n\nthey can then:\n1) ADD or change categories\nadd subcategories\nadd narrative\nadd tribal knowledge\nadd audio/video comments\n\nso... first..\n
  • when TRIBAL ADMINS are editing content they can ADD MORE CAT (arrow) and SUBCATEGORIES (arrow) on the fly (dynamic process)-- as many as they want in as granular a fashion as they want\n\nthis, then, balances a need for threads of continuity at the same time as acknowledging the differential understandings of materials between tribes\n\nnext they can add metadata in several ways [next]\n\n\n
  • when TRIBAL ADMINS are editing content they can ADD MORE CAT (arrow) and SUBCATEGORIES (arrow) on the fly (dynamic process)-- as many as they want in as granular a fashion as they want\n\nthis, then, balances a need for threads of continuity at the same time as acknowledging the differential understandings of materials between tribes\n\nnext they can add metadata in several ways [next]\n\n\n
  • 1) MAP--place important [click]\n2) tribal catalogue record / catalogue record (basic metadata fields) [click]\n3) KEY --TRIBAL KNOWLEDGE: TRIBES ONLY [click]\n\n***The tribes follow these same steps FOR THEIR OWN MATERIALS except that in STEP 4 [next]\n\n
  • 1) MAP--place important [click]\n2) tribal catalogue record / catalogue record (basic metadata fields) [click]\n3) KEY --TRIBAL KNOWLEDGE: TRIBES ONLY [click]\n\n***The tribes follow these same steps FOR THEIR OWN MATERIALS except that in STEP 4 [next]\n\n
  • 1) MAP--place important [click]\n2) tribal catalogue record / catalogue record (basic metadata fields) [click]\n3) KEY --TRIBAL KNOWLEDGE: TRIBES ONLY [click]\n\n***The tribes follow these same steps FOR THEIR OWN MATERIALS except that in STEP 4 [next]\n\n
  • choose OPEN or set RESTRICTIONS (because it is their content)\n\nif the choose set restrictions--then [next]\n
  • they have the choice to RESTRICT their materials based on the cultural protocols in place (these are changeable and we suspect they will change over time)\n\nwhich are for now\n1) community status [click for arrow] male, female, elder (sacred) children may not view\nand\n2) tribal affiliation [click for arrow] ...\n\nif the choose tribal affilation then [next]\n
  • they have the choice to RESTRICT their materials based on the cultural protocols in place (these are changeable and we suspect they will change over time)\n\nwhich are for now\n1) community status [click for arrow] male, female, elder (sacred) children may not view\nand\n2) tribal affiliation [click for arrow] ...\n\nif the choose tribal affilation then [next]\n
  • they can pick between “open to all, all affiliated tribes, only certain tribes (another drop down) and only to my tribe.”\n\nthey decide WHO can see, add comments, tags, etc through these sharing protocols\n\nNOW once this is all in what do you get\n\nfrom the front end USERS see [next]\n
  • a standard image BUT the METADATA surrounding it is not STANDARD\n\nthe TK (click for arrow) represents the KNOWLEDGE of the tribe (can be multi-authored)--\n\nthe narrative expands the normal “description” field in DC (for example in the DC metadata this image is called “three indian girls”\n\nAfter the Yakama tribal reps viewed the image we get a paragraph discussing the women and who they are as well as sevearl detailed pp about their dress, the ceremonies they were involved in etc (in TK section)\n\nall of this is LAYERED with the CATALOGUE RECORD [next]\n
  • a standard image BUT the METADATA surrounding it is not STANDARD\n\nthe TK (click for arrow) represents the KNOWLEDGE of the tribe (can be multi-authored)--\n\nthe narrative expands the normal “description” field in DC (for example in the DC metadata this image is called “three indian girls”\n\nAfter the Yakama tribal reps viewed the image we get a paragraph discussing the women and who they are as well as sevearl detailed pp about their dress, the ceremonies they were involved in etc (in TK section)\n\nall of this is LAYERED with the CATALOGUE RECORD [next]\n
  • COMES FROM THE INSTITUTION (ARROW)--\n\nin addition the portal record is expanded as well when tribal admins add audio or video comments (ARROW) to existing records\n\nThis audio file doesn’t remain just a COMMENT though--IT GENERATES A RECORD [next]\n\n\n
  • COMES FROM THE INSTITUTION (ARROW)--\n\nin addition the portal record is expanded as well when tribal admins add audio or video comments (ARROW) to existing records\n\nThis audio file doesn’t remain just a COMMENT though--IT GENERATES A RECORD [next]\n\n\n
  • becomes a part of the ARCHIVE (CLICK ARROW)--IT HAS ITS OWN RECORD--& ASSOCIATED METADATA\n\n--the archive in this way is GENERATIVE -- new knowledge and content can constantly be added ALSO--IT ELEVATES INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE PAST the level of mere COMMENTS (that are allowed in some other systems) TO ARCHIVAL CONTENT IN THEIR OWN RIGHT--\n\nThe portal, then, is an example of ETHICAL ARCHIVAL PRACTICE because it takes seriously the need to integrate [next]\n\n\n
  • RESPECT, RECOGNITION AND RESPONSIBILITY INTO THE ARCHIVAL RECORD AND ONGOING PRACTICES without giving up on standards and shared goals\n\nThe portal is a work in progress and we have learned many lessons over the last 2.5 years...so for anyone wanting to undertake this type of digital repatriation project I would suggest [next]\n\n\n\n\n
  • a few steps to follow that might be helpful to achieve an ethical archival platform:\n1) engage: \n\n
  • engage with both tribal nations and knowledgeable software or CMS designers from the beginning--don’t start with technologists\n\nnext: talk\n
  • talk: talk+ talk + talk...be open to talking with multiple groups within the tribal nations and collecting institutions you work with--set aside a fair amount of time to just talk and brainstorm and get to know each other--after the talking you need to\n\n\n
  • help: people along the path--highlight your strengths as well as theirs--\n\n
  • invest--time is one things BUT money, infrastcture and educational tools are the key to success (how we did this with provost...etc)\n
  • create-- NEW platforms, or be willing to find ways to TWEAK the ones that exist instead of asking Native peoples to BEND to your technology, be willing to bend the technology...\n\n
  • support: thread that runs through b.c this is a relationship ...provide on-going and uninterrupted support for tribal partners in the way of technical and educational support--after the platform is built or the archive programmed there is much more to be done\n\nall of this PRODUCES a roadmap for an “ethics” for archival practice [next]\n
  • taking this road won’t guarantee all projects will be successful; but it does set the framework for them all to be RESPECTFUL... (click)\n\nover to Shawn\n\n\n
  • UA_ASU_ 01_2011

    1. 1. Digital Repatriation & Reciprocal Curation the ethics of circulating Native knowledge in the Plateau Region Kimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 1
    2. 2. www.kimchristen.com www.kimchristen.com community needs protocol-based access, circulation & content managementKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 2
    3. 3. analog content management system file cabinet at the Nyinkka Nyunyu Art and Culture Centre in Tennant Creek photo by Kimberly Christen Feb. 2006Kimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 3
    4. 4. mukurtu wumpurrarni-kari archive www.mukurtuarchive.org/demoKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 4
    5. 5. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 5
    6. 6. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 6
    7. 7. Plateau Center for American Indian Studies Models for Collaborative CurationKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 7
    8. 8. access & control Text image: twon @ flickrKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 8
    9. 9. image: gideon burton@flickr Text Kimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 9
    10. 10. respect, recognition & responsibilityKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 10
    11. 11. Textimage: moombooloo @ flickr respect Kimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 11
    12. 12. recognition Text image: tschorda@flickrKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 12
    13. 13. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 13
    14. 14. responsibility Text image: andy macdonald@flickrKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 14
    15. 15. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 15
    16. 16. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 16
    17. 17. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 16
    18. 18. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 17
    19. 19. getting started...Kimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 18
    20. 20. getting started... choosing contentKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 18
    21. 21. getting started... choosing content digitizationKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 18
    22. 22. getting started... choosing content digitization uploadKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 18
    23. 23. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 19
    24. 24. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 19
    25. 25. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 19
    26. 26. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 20
    27. 27. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 20
    28. 28. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 21
    29. 29. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 21
    30. 30. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 22
    31. 31. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 22
    32. 32. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 22
    33. 33. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 23
    34. 34. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 23
    35. 35. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 23
    36. 36. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 23
    37. 37. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 24
    38. 38. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 24
    39. 39. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 25
    40. 40. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 25
    41. 41. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 25
    42. 42. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 26
    43. 43. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 26
    44. 44. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 27
    45. 45. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 27
    46. 46. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 27
    47. 47. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 28
    48. 48. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 28
    49. 49. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 28
    50. 50. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 29
    51. 51. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 29
    52. 52. respect | recognition | responsibility TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 30
    53. 53. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 31
    54. 54. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 32
    55. 55. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 33
    56. 56. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 34
    57. 57. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 35
    58. 58. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 36
    59. 59. TextKimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 37
    60. 60. Kimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 38
    61. 61. E (engage) T H I(talk) (help) (invest) C (create) S (support)Kimberly Christen | kachristen@wsu.edu | www.kimchristen.com | Digital Repatriation | Arizona Archives Summit | 01.27-28.2011 38

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