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Overcoming barriers to educational innovation (TS32)

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Presentation given by Kieron Kirkland that overviews resistances to educational change, and some models to help achieve innovative change. …

Presentation given by Kieron Kirkland that overviews resistances to educational change, and some models to help achieve innovative change.

For more see
www.futurelab.org.uk
tinyurl.com/flinnovation
or email kieron.kirkland@futurelab.org.uk

Published in: Education

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  • Shorter term challenges: whether adapting to new assessment approaches and curricula; seeking to take advantage of the affordances of new technologies; trying to find new ways to support specific learners, or adapting to the particular needs/requirements of a class ... Change as constant.
  • Micro level influences: This concerns the influence directly relevant to the innovator themselves, such as their capacity and disposition to act as an innovator. This layer also relates to highly personal relationships, such as those with students and peers.Messo level influences: These factors can include local level influences such as school cultures, school management structures, and school infrastructure; and ‘local’ influences from the wider community and the local authority.Macro level influences: These include government-led initiatives, national policy
  • creative partnerships EM example formalised a space to explore new approaches / SSAT ICT register ICT specialists share resources NCSL support for headteachers to recognise innovation – link to NESTA Formal leaders – space in time table Use of PPE time
  • Teach meet – teacher takeover – bars/coffee catch up = follow #BETT10
  • risk of failure, risk of wasting time, risk of expenditure that couldn’t be justified, and risk of criticism from parents, inspectors, governors or studentsAvert risk making it part of the learning process Brenda Bigland – “succeed on your own fail together” idea – ind teachers thinking through so if goes wrong headteacher hasn’t supported teacher, permission forms so processes in place to be flexible, engaging with outside agencies but with benefits to school e.g. come but keep equipment Involvement of stakeholders e.g. Giving reasons for inn, engaging with parents Visionmapper exercises on doing nothing Go to Visionmapper for exploring possible futures not about predicting coming up with possibilities
  • _ Insight: this starts with problem identification, building knowledge of the field and also exploring the routes for finding solutions and the tools to help deliver them. This is also a critical point for generating buy-in and support from a wide range of stakeholders in the identification of problems and issues, and for learning from others about the issues they have identified as important concerns or opportunities. Invention: this comprises creative processes of developing new ideas and challenging existing ‘logic’ or practices. It brings in diverse forms of expertise and knowledge to develop ideas. It necessitates different and creative approaches and ways of finding solutions, as well as employing alternative methods and strategies for idea development and visioning the ‘future’. This is a stage where many of the tools for creative thinking and visioning can be employed to break existing habits of mind._ Application: the use of strategies and organisational structures to implement new approaches, including key issues around innovation diffusion and routes to successful implementation which may themselves require new practice to emerge. This is a stage when the model of leadership and management becomes critical to sustain and embed an innovation. _ Reflection and communication: ensuring strategies in place are effective, regularly reviewed and refined, and that they are disseminated to, and understood by, all those affected. Effective social and support networks need to be established to foster continued innovative practice. New ideas and opportunities may then be identified to begin the next cycle of innovation. This is a stage when the models of communication and networking are critical to ensure that innovations are diffused throughout the system – they are presented here as a joint activity as the reflections must be shared, just as much as the activity and aims.
  • Learning spaces cards – through visionmapper cards END – working accross different disciplines and discourses
  • Conversational space, how do you make sure those gaps are closed – innovation intermediaries
  • Supporting teacher’s passions and use their work across the school Structures - champions innovation / student feedback / hubs and working with outside practitioner / interface between parents /
  • Transcript

    • 1.
    • 2. The challenge…
      “We need the combined expertise of industry, academia, practitioners and policy to design and implement the tools, the technologies and practices that will revolutionise the way we learn”
      Lord Puttnam
    • 3.
    • 4.
    • 5. Mobi Missions
      Astroversity
      Moovl
      Enquiring Minds
      Exploratree
      My-E
      Fizzees
      Space Signpost
      Ecolibrium
    • 6. Why You’re Here?
      Aims for coming?
      Why is innovation in important?
    • 7. Reasons for Innovation
      ‘…change in education may now be thought of as a constant condition, rather than an event’
      Futurelab Literature review: Teachers Learning with Digital Technologies: A review of research and projects, p.5
    • 8. The successful exploitation of ideas generated at the intersection of invention and insight, which leads to the creation of social or economic value.
      What is Innovation?
    • 9. Thesuccessful exploitationof ideas generated at the intersection of invention and insight, which leads to the creation of social or economic value.
    • 10. Examples of positive innovations (doesn't have to be educational)
    • 11. End-user innovation
      … a source of innovation, only now becoming widely recognized, is end-user innovation. This is where an agent (person or company) develops an innovation for their own (personal or in-house) use because existing products do not meet their needs
      “end-user innovation [is], by far, the most important and critical”
      Eric Von Hippell Sources of Innovation
    • 12. Resistances to innovation
    • 13.
      • Poor communication and access to information
      • 14. Poor participation in teams
      • 15. Poor goal definition
      • 16. Poor alignment of actions to goals
      • 17. Poor monitoring of results (standard and non-standard)
      O'Sullivan, 2002
    • 18.
      • Poor communication and access to information
      • 19. Poor participation in teams
      • 20. Enaction of innovation
      • 21. Teachers independence and influence
      • 22. Teachers and peers
      • 23. Teachers professional development
      • 24. Support network
      • 25. Time to understand
      • 26. Time to understand
      • 27. Time to personalise
      • 28. Time to personalise
      • 29. Poor goal definition
      • 30. Poor alignment of actions to goals
      • 31. Poor monitoring of results (standard and non-standard)
      • 32. Teachers adapting to change
      Bates (2000)
    • 33.
      • Poor communication and access to information
      • 34. Poor participation in teams
      • 35. Understanding new approach
      • 36. Enaction of innovation
      • 37. Teachers independence and influence
      • 38. Confidence in new approach
      • 39. Teachers and peers
      • 40. Confidence in new approach
      • 41. Teachers professional development
      • 42. ITT and CPD
      • 43. Access to training
      • 44. Understanding new approach
      • 45. Support network
      • 46. Management of tools
      • 47. Time constraints
      • 48. Time to understand
      • 49. Poor goal definition
      • 50. Poor alignment of actions to goals
      • 51. Poor monitoring of results (standard and non-standard)
      • 52. Teachers adapting to change
      • Poor communication and access to information
      • 53. Poor participation in teams
      • 54. Inspection and review
      • 55. Assessment constraints
      • 56. Understanding new approach
      • 57. Enaction of innovation
      • 58. Teachers independence and influence
      • 59. Personal interests
      • 60. Personal desire
      • 61. Fear of unknown
      • 62. Challenge to ‘power’
      • 63. Curriculum constraints
      • 64. Confidence in new approach
      • 65. Teachers and peers
      • 66. Confidence in new approach
      • 67. Teachers professional development
      • 68. ITT and CPD
      • 69. Access to training
      • 70. Understanding new approach
      • 71. Support network
      • 72. Management of tools
      • 73. Time constraints
      • 74. Time to understand
      • 75. Time to understand
      • 76. Time to personalise
      • 77. Time to personalise
      • 78. Curriculum constraints
      • 79. Imposed practices
      • 80. Separation of new practice with personal beliefs
      • 81. Poor goal definition
      • 82. Poor alignment of actions to goals
      • 83. Poor monitoring of results (standard and non-standard)
      • 84. Teachers adapting to change
    • Prioritise / note down key resistances
    • 85. Levels of Influence
      Tinyurl.com/flinnovation
    • 86. Micro
      At Level of Innovator
      E.g. The innovator’s capacity and disposition to act as an innovator
      Can also be personal relationships e.g. With students and peers
    • 87. Messo
      Local level influences, e.g. school culture, school management structures, and school infrastructure
      Local influences from the wider community and local authority be personal relationships e.g. With students and peers
    • 88. Macro
      Macro level influences
      E.g. Macro level influences: These include government-led initiatives, national policy and national curricula, and wider research.
    • 89. Layers of Influence
      Briefly map out the ones that affect you...
    • 90. Formal Environment
      Technical support
      Structures to share practice internally and externally across disciplines
      Encourage and officially value innovation
      Increase capacity through workloads
      Formal, appropriate training (DD model)
      Effective resourcing
      Policies and rules
      Formal communication structures like ‘translators’
    • 91. Distance and dependence
      Intertwining of practice and technology rather than ‘pedagogy before practice’
      Innovation Itself
    • 92. Have a go!
      Could be any new thing your trying, whether set up of desks, new scheme of work, curriculum, use of technology...
    • 93. Informal Social Support
      Peer encouragement
      Sharing practice
      PLNs can mitigate lack of social support
      Being ‘savvy’, with resource and people
      ‘In it together’ (messo)
      Social capital (messo)
    • 94. Personal Learning Networks
      Picture: Dr Alec Couros,
      http://pwoessner.com/2008/12/15/21st-century-literacy-network-literacy/
    • 95. Picture: Dr Alec Couros,
      http://pwoessner.com/2008/12/15/21st-century-literacy-network-literacy/
    • 96. What’s in your PLN?
      What tools do you use? (and why?)
    • 97. Mediate your web (you’re doing it already)
      www.twitter.com
    • 98. Digital (video) resources
      http://www.teachertube.com/
    • 99. Be a magpie
    • 100. Shoulders of giants? Or at least get a leg up....
      http://jdorman.wikispaces.com/Social+Learning
    • 101. http://www.boxoftricks.net/?page_id=29
    • 102. http://www.c4lpt.co.uk/recommended/top100-2010.html
    • 103. Theft Mediated search
      http://www.delicious.com/tbarrett
    • 104. Research tools
      http://www.slideshare.net/
    • 105. Risk Aversion
      Accept risks as part of learning process and mitigate risk, e.g. through change management cycle
      Sometimes perceived risk
      Recognise risk of ‘doing nothing’
      Risk management strategies, e.g. Pilots
      Involvement from stakeholders – sharing problem and reasons for innovation
      Ongoing evaluation
    • 106.
    • 107. Shared Vision
      Reflective practice and self aware – DD
      Internal and external, national local
      Teacher’s included in shared vision
      Igniting purpose – moral purpose
      Sharing vision means sharing language
    • 108. Perceived and actual
      Different characteristics: Longevity, Fecundity, Copy Fidelity,
      Innovation Itself
    • 109. http://www.visionmapper.org.uk/
    • 110. Stimulus to get thought going, use visual as well as words...
    • 111. Leadership
      Management style supporting individual creativity
      Responding to perceived direction in the world (PLNs – links)
      Distributed leadership, flexible structures
      Shared responsibility
      Champions of innovation
      Comfortable with change, at ease with ambiguity, saw problems as opportunities. Clarity of direction, Thoroughness, Participative management style, persuasiveness , persistence, and discretion:
      http://www.futurelab.org.uk/resources/publications-reports-articles/handbooks/Handbook1155
    • 112. Education Eye
      To provide an inspiring, easy-to-use online resource that gives access to useful, relevant and interesting innovations across educations varied communities.
      Audience: policy makers, ed. practitioners/leaders, education industry, research communities.
    • 113. Education Eye (Map of Innovations)The aim is to provide an inspiring, easy-to-use online resource that gives access to useful, relevant and interesting innovations across educations varied communities.
      Audience:
      Policy makers
      Education practitioners
      Non-innovative education practitioners
      Education industry
      Innovative education practitioners
    • 114.
    • 115. www.educationeye.org.uk
    • 116.
    • 117.
    • 118. kieron.kirkland@futurelab.org.uk
      twitter.com/kieronkirkland
      www.futurelab.org.uktwitter.com/futurelabedu
    • 119. www.futurelab.org.uk