Election 2013 activities
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Election 2013 activities

on

  • 374 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
374
Views on SlideShare
374
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Election 2013 activities Document Transcript

  • 1. Civic Learning Opportunity   Election 2013      Overview  This  learning  opportunity  educates  students  about  democracy,  reading  and  analyzing information, the  election  process,  making  decisions,  different  levels  of  government,  ways  that  citizens  participate  in  political  life,  and  more.  Last  year,  over  100,000  Charlotte‐Mecklenburg  students  participated  in  a  related  learning  opportunity, the mock election.      Objective  Through the activities, students will:   Learn about the roles and structure of local government  Gather, read, and analyze information, and use it to think critically and  make decisions and take action  Identify and problem‐solve community issues, and communicate those  solutions and ideas   Explore democracy, citizen participation and the election process by taking  part in a mock election      Grades  The activity targets students in grades K‐12 and aligns to Common Core and NC  Essential Standards for social studies.       Web resources  Complete list of web resources, including candidate information, hands‐on  activities, and Common Core/Essential Standards correlations at the end of this  document.            www.GenerationNation.org GenerationNation @GenNation
  • 2. Civic Learning Opportunity   1. LEARN  Learn about the candidates, the government offices they are running for, and any  other key issues in the election.  If you find there is too much information, or too many candidates, one way to  start is with an issue you care about (education, environment, jobs, healthcare,  etc.). Then find information about the candidates and their views on that issue.    2. THINK about, and ANALYZE, the information  As you are thinking, ask questions  • Is this information helpful?  • Is it from a good, truthful source? Does it fit with other facts you know?  How does it make you feel?  • Do you have enough information to make a decision? (if not, find more  information!)  • How does this level of government impact children and youth?   • Why is the candidate running for office? What information do I need to  decide if he/she is qualified for the position, and will be a good  representative?  Tip: In an election, focus more on the individual candidates, their ideas, and their  solutions ‐ and less on the political parties and their platforms.    3. DECIDE: Choose a candidate, or a position on an issue  Review what you have learned about the candidates ‐ did they share ideas and  solutions, or mostly complain about the opposing candidate?  Decide who you agree with the most. Based on the information you know, do you  think the candidate will do a good job?   www.GenerationNation.org GenerationNation @GenNation
  • 3. Civic Learning Opportunity Consider the candidate’s:  Background  Positions  Traits  And any other information important to you  Rate the candidates, and use that information to make a good decision.    4. TAKE ACTION, CITIZENS AND LEADERS!  Active citizens and leaders don’t just read and think about information. They take  action with it! One important opportunity for citizens to participate in democracy  and in the community is by voting. Every year there is an election. It is important  to cast a ballot to make your voice heard!  You can make your voice heard outside of voting, too.  Share your ideas and  solutions for community problems, or report on a government meeting, leader or  issue.    5. STAY ENGAGED: Keep paying attention and being involved  Once you vote, are you finished? NO!  • After the election, look for the official election results.  • Keep track of the winning candidates  ‐ do they keep their campaign  promises? do they make good decisions?  • Stay involved ‐ watch or attend government meetings, keep up with the  news, and contact elected officials about issues you care about.    If you are in high school, get involved in the youth advisory council for Charlotte‐ Mecklenburg, and work with public officials to solve community problems. Middle  and elementary school students, one way to get involved is by making sure the  youth council members – your representatives ‐ know what’s on YOUR mind!  www.GenerationNation.org GenerationNation @GenNation
  • 4. Civic Learning Opportunity WEB RESOURCES  GET READY  Common Core and NC Essential Standards for grades k‐2, 3‐5, 6‐8 and 9‐12  www.generationnation.org/index.php/learn/entry/learning‐opportunity‐election‐2013     LEARN  Student candidate guide   www.generationnation.org/index.php/election/candidateguide2013     Learn about local government  www.generationnation.org/index.php/CLC/entry/local‐government‐who‐does‐what   Vocabulary   www.generationnation.org/documents/ElectionsandVotingVocab.pdf     THINK  Getting the message across  www.generationnation.org/documents/get_msg_across_local.pdf     Pick and predict  www.generationnation.org/documents/Pick_predict_local.pdf     Write the headline  www.generationnation.org/documents/Write_headline_local.pdf   Other essential questions  www.generationnation.org/documents/AfewessentialQs_electionsvoting.pdf   DECIDE  Rate the Candidates, a decision‐making chart for student voters  www.generationnation.org/documents/ratethecandidates_local.pdf   www.GenerationNation.org GenerationNation @GenNation
  • 5. Civic Learning Opportunity   ACT  Kids Voting Election 2013   www.generationnation.org/index.php/election   Have an idea for the community? Make your voice heard!  www.generationnation.org/index.php/CLC/entry/my‐wish‐and‐ideas   Be a citizen journalist   www.generationnation.org/documents/Citizen_journalist.pdf     STAY ENGAGED  Youth council   www.generationnation.org/index.php/youthvoice     Contact officials   www.generationnation.org/documents/LocalGovt_whodoeswhat.pdf     MORE INFO ABOUT VOTING  Voting Process in NC  www.generationnation.org/documents/08‐Voter_howdoi_edited.pdf   Voter registration requirements  www.ncsbe.gov/content.aspx?id=1&s=1   Mecklenburg Board of Elections  www.meckboe.org   Check the election 2013 page, where we will continue to post links and info  www.generationnation.org/index.php/learn/entry/learning‐opportunity‐election‐2013     www.GenerationNation.org GenerationNation @GenNation
  • 6. Read, Think, Decide, Act – Election 2013  Kindergarten – Grade 2 Correlates to Common Core and NC Essential Standards for Social Studies    GRADE  READING INFORMATION  WRITING  SOCIAL STUDIES  K  1  RI‐1  With prompting and support, ask and  answer questions about key details in a  text.     RI‐10  Read and comprehend informational texts.        RI‐1  Ask and answer questions about key details  in a text.    RI‐10  Read and comprehend informational texts.      W ‐1  Use a combination of drawing, dictating,  and writing to compose opinion pieces in  which they tell a reader the topic or the  name of the book they are writing about  and state an opinion or preference about  the topic or book (e.g., My favorite book  is...).  K.C&G.1  Understand the roles of a citizen.  W‐2   Use a combination of drawing, dictating,  and writing to compose  informative/explanatory texts in which  they name what they are writing about and  supply some information about the topic.    W ‐1  Write opinion pieces in which they  introduce the topic or name the book they  are writing about, state an opinion, supply  a reason for the opinion, and provide some  sense of closure.  1.C&G.1.2   Classify the roles of authority figures in the  home, school and community (teacher,  principal, parents, mayor, park rangers,  game wardens, etc).    1.C&G.1.3   Summarize various ways in which conflicts  W‐2  could be resolved in homes, schools,  Write informative/explanatory texts in  which they name a topic, supply some facts  classrooms and communities.  about the topic, and provide some sense of    closure.    GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org 
  • 7. Read, Think, Decide, Act – Election 2013  Kindergarten – Grade 2 Correlates to Common Core and NC Essential Standards for Social Studies    GRADE  READING INFORMATION  WRITING  SOCIAL STUDIES  2  RI‐1  Ask and answer such questions as who,  what, where, when, why, and how to  demonstrate understanding of key details  in a text.  RI‐10  Read and comprehend informational texts.  W‐1  Write opinion pieces in which they  introduce the topic or book they are  writing about, state an opinion, supply  reasons that support the opinion, use  linking words (e.g., because, and, also) to  connect opinion and reasons, and provide  a concluding statement or section.  2.C&G.1.1   Explain government services and their  value to the community (libraries, schools,  parks, etc.).    2.C&G.2.1   Exemplify characteristics of good  citizenship through historical figures and  everyday citizens.    W‐2  2.C&G.2.2   Write informative/explanatory texts in  which they introduce a topic, use facts and  Explain why it is important for citizens to  definitions to develop points, and provide a  participate in their community.    concluding statement or section.        GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org 
  • 8. Read, Think, Decide, Act – Election 2013  Grades 3‐5 Correlates to Common Core and NC Essential Standards for Social Studies    GRADE  READING INFORMATION  WRITING  SOCIAL STUDIES  3  RI‐1  Ask and answer questions to demonstrate  understanding of a text, referring explicitly  to the text as the basis for the answers.  RI‐10  Read and comprehend informational texts.    4  RI‐1  Refer to details and examples in a text  when explaining what the text says  explicitly and when drawing inferences  from the text.  RI‐10  Read and comprehend informational texts.  W‐1  Write opinion pieces on topics or texts,  supporting a point of view with reasons.     W‐2  Write informative/explanatory texts to  examine a topic and convey ideas and  information clearly.       W‐1  Write opinion pieces on topics or texts,  supporting a point of view with reasons  and information.  W‐2  Write informative/explanatory texts to  examine a topic and convey ideas and  information clearly.   GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org  3.C&G.1 Understand the development,  structure and function of local  government.    3.C&G.1.2   Describe the structure of local government  and how it functions to serve citizens.    3.C&G.1.3 Understand the three branches  of government, with an emphasis on local  government.    3.C&G.2 Understand how citizens  participate in their communities.    3.C&G.2.1   Exemplify how citizens contribute  politically, socially and economically to  their community.    3.C&G.2.3   Apply skills in civic engagement and public  discourse (school, community).  4.C&G.1.1  Summarize the key principles and revisions  of the North Carolina Constitution. (as it  defines local government and elections)    4.C&G.1.2 Compare the roles and  responsibilities of state elected leaders.    4.C&G.1.4   Compare North Carolina’s government 
  • 9. Read, Think, Decide, Act – Election 2013  Grades 3‐5 Correlates to Common Core and NC Essential Standards for Social Studies    GRADE  READING INFORMATION  WRITING  SOCIAL STUDIES  with local governments.    4.C&G.2.2 Give examples of rights and  responsibilities of citizens according to the  North Carolina Constitution.    4.C&G.2.3  Differentiate between rights and  responsibilities reflected in the NC   Constitution.  5  RI‐1  Quote accurately from a text when  explaining what the text says explicitly and  when drawing inferences from the text.  W‐1  Write opinion pieces on topics or texts,  supporting a point of view with reasons  and information.    RI‐10  Read and comprehend informational texts.    W‐2   Write informative/explanatory texts to  examine a topic and convey ideas and  information clearly.         GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org  5.C&G.1.2   Summarize the organizational structures  and powers of the United States  government (legislative, judicial and  executive branches of government).    5.C&G.2.1 Understand the values and  principles of a democratic republic.    5.C&G.2.2 Analyze the rights and  responsibilities of US citizens in relation to  the concept of the "common good"  according to the Constitution (Bill of  Rights).    5.C&G.2.3 Exemplify ways in which the  rights, responsibilities and privileges of  citizens are protected under the US  Constitution.    5.C&G.2.4 Explain why civic participation is  important in the United States. 
  • 10. Read, Think, Decide, Act – Election 2013  Middle School Correlates to Common Core and NC Essential Standards for Social Studies    GRADE  6  READING INFORMATION  RH‐1  Cite specific textual evidence to support  analysis of primary and secondary sources.  RH‐10  Read and comprehend history/social  studies texts in the grades 6–8 text  complexity band independently and  proficiently.  7  RH‐1  Cite specific textual evidence to support  analysis of primary and secondary sources.    RH‐10  Read and comprehend history/social  studies texts in the grades 6–8 text  complexity band independently and  proficiently.  WRITING  W‐1  Write arguments focused on discipline‐ specific content.     W‐2  Write informative/explanatory texts,  including the narration of historical events,  scientific procedures/ experiments, or  technical processes.       W‐1  Write arguments focused on discipline‐ specific content.     W‐2  Write informative/explanatory texts,  including the narration of historical events,  scientific procedures/ experiments, or  technical processes.     GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org  SOCIAL STUDIES  6.H.2.2  Compare historical and contemporary  events and issues to understand continuity  and change.  6.C&G.1.1  Explain the origins and structures of  various governmental systems (e.g.,  democracy, absolute monarchy and  constitutional monarchy).  6.C&G.1.3   Compare the requirements for (e.g., age,  gender and status) and responsibilities of  (e.g., paying taxes and military service)  citizenship under various governments    7.C&G.1.2  Evaluate how the Western concept of  democracy has influenced the political  ideas of modern societies.  7.C&G.1.3  Compare the requirements for (e.g. age.  gender, legal and economic status) and  responsibilities of citizenship under various  governments in modern societies (e.g.  voting, taxes and military service).    7.C&G.1.4  Compare the sources of power and  governmental authority in various societies  (e.g. monarchs, dictators, elected officials,  anti‐governmental groups and religious,  political factions).   
  • 11. Read, Think, Decide, Act – Election 2013  Middle School Correlates to Common Core and NC Essential Standards for Social Studies    GRADE  READING INFORMATION  WRITING  8  RH‐1  Cite specific textual evidence to support  analysis of primary and secondary sources.  W‐1  Write arguments focused on discipline‐ specific content.     W‐2  Write informative/explanatory texts,  including the narration of historical events,  scientific procedures/ experiments, or  technical processes.     RH‐10  By the end of grade 8, read and  comprehend history/social studies texts in  the grades 6–8 text complexity band  independently and proficiently.  GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org  SOCIAL STUDIES      8.H.1.5  Analyze the relationship between historical  context and decision‐making.    8.H.3.4   Compare historical and contemporary  issues to understand continuity and change  in the development of NC and the US.    8.C&G.1.1   Summarize democratic ideals expressed in  local, state, and national government (e.g.  limited government, popular sovereignty,  separation of powers, republicanism,  federalism and individual rights).    8.C&G.1.3   Analyze differing viewpoints on the scope  and power of state and national  governments (e.g. Federalists and anti‐ Federalists, education, immigration and  healthcare).    8.C&G.1.4  Analyze access to democratic rights and  freedoms among various groups in North  Carolina and the United States (e.g.  enslaved people, women, wage earners,  landless farmers, American Indians, African  Americans and other ethnic groups).  8.C&G.2.1 
  • 12. Read, Think, Decide, Act – Election 2013  Middle School Correlates to Common Core and NC Essential Standards for Social Studies    GRADE  READING INFORMATION  WRITING    GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org  SOCIAL STUDIES  Evaluate the effectiveness of various  approaches used to effect change in North  Carolina and the United States (e.g.  picketing, boycotts, sit‐ins, voting,  marches, holding elected office and  lobbying).    8.C&G.2.2   Analyze issues pursued through active  citizen campaigns for change (e.g. voting  rights and access to education, housing and  employment).    8.C&G.2.3   Explain the impact of human and civil rights  issues throughout NC and US history.   
  • 13. Read, Think, Decide, Act – Election 2013  High School Correlates to Common Core and NC Essential Standards for Social Studies    GRADE  READING INFORMATION  WRITING  SOCIAL STUDIES  Civics  &  Econ.  RH‐1  Cite specific textual evidence to support  analysis of primary and secondary sources,  attending to such features as the date and  origin of the information.  W‐1  Write arguments focused on discipline‐specific  content.     W‐2  Write informative/explanatory texts, including  the narration of historical events, scientific  procedures/ experiments, or technical  processes.   Topics include: Federal Government  State and Local Government  Civic Leadership  Economics  Rights and Responsibilities  Public Interest  Contemporary Issues    CE.C&G.1.4  Analyze the principles and ideals underlying  American democracy in terms of how they  promote freedom (e.g., separation of powers,  rule of law, limited government, democracy,  consent of the governed / individual rights –life,  liberty, pursuit of happiness, self‐government,  representative democracy, equal opportunity,  equal protection under the law, diversity,  patriotism, etc.).    CE.C&G.1.5  Evaluate the fundamental principles of  American politics in terms of the extent to  which they have been used effectively to  maintain constitutional democracy in the  United States (e.g., rule of law, limited  government, democracy, consent of the  governed, etc.).    CE.C&G.2.1 Analyze the structures of national,  state and local governments in terms of ways  they are organized to maintain order, security,  welfare of the public and citizen protection.    CE.C&G.2.2 Summarize the functions of NC  state and local governments within the federal  RH‐10  Read and comprehend history/social studies  texts independently and proficiently.  GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org 
  • 14. Read, Think, Decide, Act – Election 2013  High School Correlates to Common Core and NC Essential Standards for Social Studies    GRADE  READING INFORMATION  WRITING  SOCIAL STUDIES  system of government.    CE.C&G.2.7  Analyze contemporary issues and  governmental responses at the local, state, and  national levels in terms of how they promote  the public interest and/or general welfare.    CE.C&G.2.8   Analyze America’s two‐party  system in terms of the political and economic  views that led to its emergence and the role  that political parties play in American politics.    CE.C&G.3.6 Explain ways laws have been  influenced by political parties, constituents,  interest groups, lobbyists, the media and public  opinion.    CE.C&G.4.1  Compare citizenship in the American  constitutional democracy to membership in  other types of governments (e.g., right to  privacy, civil rights, responsibilities, political  rights, right to due process, equal protection  under the law, participation, freedom, etc.).    CE.C&G.4.3  Analyze the roles of citizens of North Carolina  and the United States in terms of  responsibilities, participation, civic life and  criteria for membership or admission (e.g.,  voting, jury duty, lobbying, interacting  successfully with government agencies,  organizing and working in civic groups,  volunteering, petitioning, picketing, running for  political office, residency, etc.).    GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org 
  • 15. Read, Think, Decide, Act – Election 2013  High School Correlates to Common Core and NC Essential Standards for Social Studies    GRADE  READING INFORMATION  WRITING  US  RH‐1  History  Cite specific textual evidence to support  analysis of primary and secondary sources,  connecting insights gained from specific details  to an understanding of the text as a whole.    RH‐10  Read and comprehend history/social studies  texts independently and proficiently.  W‐1  Write arguments focused on discipline‐specific  content.     W‐2  Write informative/explanatory texts, including  the narration of historical events, scientific  procedures/ experiments, or technical  processes.      GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org  SOCIAL STUDIES  CE.C&G.5.1  Analyze the election process at the national,  state and local levels in terms of the checks and  balances provided by qualifications and  procedures for voting (e.g., civic participation,  public hearings, forums, at large voting,  petition, local initiatives, local referendums,  voting amendments, types of elections, etc.)        Multiple ways to align. Topics include:  Federal Government  State and Local Government  Civic Leadership  Elections and Voting  Citizenship  Suffrage  Rights and Responsibilities  Public Interest  Contemporary Issues   
  • 16.   GETTING THE MESSAGE ACROSS      Watch candidates in interviews and debates. Write your answers or share in groups, with your class or at home.   What is the key message the candidate is trying to deliver?  How does the speaker communicate the information? Does the candidate read from a piece of paper?   Does the candidate raise or lower a voice or move hands to illustrate a specific point?   Does the speaker show emotions and expressions? How? Why? When?   Does the candidate look confident? How?   How is the candidate dressed? Does this matter?   Do people pay attention? How?   Is the candidate persuasive? How?   What is the most effective thing he/she does to communicate the information? Least effective?         Make copies for each candidate, interview or debate, and compare notes. Do the candidates change their  delivery in different debates or interviews?  GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org | Home of K-12 civic education, Kids Voting, Youth Civics and Youth Voice
  • 17.   GETTING THE MESSAGE ACROSS      Date: Interview or debate: CANDIDATE NAME                Key message      Communication skills    Confidence    Appearance    Do people pay attention    Is the person persuasive?    Most effective    Least effective        GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org | Home of K-12 civic education, Kids Voting, Youth Civics and Youth Voice
  • 18.   ARE THEY TALKING TO ME?      Pick and predict  Before you watch or read about the candidates:  Decide which 1‐3 topics are most important to you.  Then decide which 1‐3 topics you predict the candidates will talk about.   Are the topics you picked the same, or different, as the ones you predict they will talk about?  Watch or read about the debates and candidates:  Were your topics covered? How many times? Did you correctly predict what the candidates would talk about?     POSSIBLE TOPICS  Airport  Housing   Research   Children/ Youth   Jobs   Safety   Cities   Justice   Schools  Economy   K‐12 Education   Taxes   Environment   Leadership   Technology   Global issues   Politics   Transportation  Government   Pre‐K Education   Working together   Healthcare    Regionalism  Other?  Use the worksheet on the next page to write your topics and take notes. GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org | Home of K-12 civic education, Kids Voting, Youth Civics and Youth Voice
  • 19.   ARE THEY TALKING TO ME?        MY TOPICS:    Date and activity:   CANDIDATE NAME              HOW  MANY  TIMES  MY  TOPICS     WERE MENTIONED            WHO COVERED THE TOPICS I AM    INTERESTED IN?            PREDICTION OF TOPICS        BIG TOPICS COVERED       WHY  WERE  SOME  TOPICS  THE    SAME  AS,  OR  DIFFERENT  THAN,  MINE?    OTHER NOTES  GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org | Home of K-12 civic education, Kids Voting, Youth Civics and Youth Voice
  • 20.   WRITE THE HEADLINE    Read  about  the  candidates  and  watch  videos  of  interviews  and  debates.  Pay  attention,  and  answer  these  questions. Write your answers to share in groups or with your class or with your family.   If you were reporting on what the candidate said, what would your headline be?   The next day, read actual headlines. Were you close? Were they right? Why or why not?   Read headlines from different news sources. What do they say? How are they similar or different? Why?     CANDIDATE NAME, ISSUE OR ACTIVITY AND DATE: ______________________________________  MEDIA SOURCE HEADLINE My Name:    Charlotte Observer http://www.charlotteobserver.com   News 14 http://charlotte.news14.com/     WBTV http://www.wbtv.com     WCNC http://www.wcnc.com     WSOC http://www.wsoctv.com/     WFAE http://wfae.org/     WBT http://www.wbt.com/     (OTHER NEWS SOURCES)  My headline:                      GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org | Home of K-12 civic education, Kids Voting, Youth Civics and Youth Voice
  • 21.   RATE THE CANDIDATES ‐ DECISION‐MAKING CHART    Before  voting  in  this  year’s  election,  learn  about  the  candidates.  Find  out  their  background  and  experience,  and  how  they  communicate  their  positions  on  issues  that  matter  to  you.  Then,  rank  the  candidates  on  each  issue  and  characteristic,  with  1=worst and 10‐best, and add up the scores. Make notes, too. This will help you to decide which candidate you want to vote for.       Office: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________  (City and town offices – mayor and council)    Role: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________  (What will this official be responsible for doing?)            CANDIDATE NAME:                                        BACKGROUND Am I able to find good  information about this  candidate? Where?    Why or why not? Does this tell you  anything about the candidate?  Education      Experience      Other background info  important to me    GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org | Home of K-12 civic education, Kids Voting, Youth Civics and Youth Voice
  • 22.   RATE THE CANDIDATES ‐ DECISION‐MAKING CHART    Before  voting  in  this  year’s  election,  learn  about  the  candidates.  Find  out  their  background  and  experience,  and  how  they  communicate  their  positions  on  issues  that  matter  to  you.  Then,  rank  the  candidates  on  each  issue  and  characteristic,  with  1=worst and 10‐best, and add up the scores. Make notes, too. This will help you to decide which candidate you want to vote for.             CANDIDATE:      POSITIONS                                                    Where does the candidate stand on  policies and issues? (list some or all)  First priority      Benefit young people      Economy      Growth/transportation      Safety      Housing/neighborhoods      Budget            GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org | Home of K-12 civic education, Kids Voting, Youth Civics and Youth Voice
  • 23.   RATE THE CANDIDATES ‐ DECISION‐MAKING CHART    Before  voting  in  this  year’s  election,  learn  about  the  candidates.  Find  out  their  background  and  experience,  and  how  they  communicate  their  positions  on  issues  that  matter  to  you.  Then,  rank  the  candidates  on  each  issue  and  characteristic,  with  1=worst and 10‐best, and add up the scores. Make notes, too. This will help you to decide which candidate you want to vote for.             CANDIDATE:                                                                          Role of local government      Government collaboration      Big accomplishment will be      TRAITS  Rank the candidate (1=worst/10=best)    Has experience/education?    Knows about the issues?    Has ideas and solutions?    Good communication skills?    Shows leadership?    Works with others?    Total score (add for each  candidate)  GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org | Home of K-12 civic education, Kids Voting, Youth Civics and Youth Voice
  • 24.   RATE THE CANDIDATES ‐ DECISION‐MAKING CHART    Before  voting  in  this  year’s  election,  learn  about  the  candidates.  Find  out  their  background  and  experience,  and  how  they  communicate  their  positions  on  issues  that  matter  to  you.  Then,  rank  the  candidates  on  each  issue  and  characteristic,  with  1=worst and 10‐best, and add up the scores. Make notes, too. This will help you to decide which candidate you want to vote for.             CANDIDATE:                        Write other notes you    think are important or      want to remember    about the candidate                      GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org | Home of K-12 civic education, Kids Voting, Youth Civics and Youth Voice
  • 25.   RATE THE CANDIDATES ‐ DECISION‐MAKING CHART    Before  voting  in  this  year’s  election,  learn  about  the  candidates.  Find  out  their  background  and  experience,  and  how  they  communicate  their  positions  on  issues  that  matter  to  you.  Then,  rank  the  candidates  on  each  issue  and  characteristic,  with  1=worst and 10‐best, and add up the scores. Make notes, too. This will help you to decide which candidate you want to vote for.       Office: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________  (school board)    Role: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________  (What will this official be responsible for doing?)            CANDIDATE NAME:          BACKGROUND                               Am I able to find good  information about this  candidate? Where?    Why or why not? Does this tell you  anything about the candidate?  Education      Experience      Other background info  important to me    GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org | Home of K-12 civic education, Kids Voting, Youth Civics and Youth Voice
  • 26.   RATE THE CANDIDATES ‐ DECISION‐MAKING CHART    Before  voting  in  this  year’s  election,  learn  about  the  candidates.  Find  out  their  background  and  experience,  and  how  they  communicate  their  positions  on  issues  that  matter  to  you.  Then,  rank  the  candidates  on  each  issue  and  characteristic,  with  1=worst and 10‐best, and add up the scores. Make notes, too. This will help you to decide which candidate you want to vote for.             CANDIDATE:      POSITIONS                                        Where does the candidate stand on  policies and issues? (list some or all)  First priority      Student readiness for  college, career and civic life        District growth          School safety          Teachers          GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org | Home of K-12 civic education, Kids Voting, Youth Civics and Youth Voice
  • 27.   RATE THE CANDIDATES ‐ DECISION‐MAKING CHART    Before  voting  in  this  year’s  election,  learn  about  the  candidates.  Find  out  their  background  and  experience,  and  how  they  communicate  their  positions  on  issues  that  matter  to  you.  Then,  rank  the  candidates  on  each  issue  and  characteristic,  with  1=worst and 10‐best, and add up the scores. Make notes, too. This will help you to decide which candidate you want to vote for.             CANDIDATE:        Role of public education      Government collaboration      Big accomplishment will be                        TRAITS                                                  Rank the candidate (1=worst/10=best)    Has experience/education?    Knows about the issues?    Has ideas and solutions?    Good communication skills?    Shows leadership?    Works with others?    Total score (add for each  candidate)  GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org | Home of K-12 civic education, Kids Voting, Youth Civics and Youth Voice
  • 28.   RATE THE CANDIDATES ‐ DECISION‐MAKING CHART    Before  voting  in  this  year’s  election,  learn  about  the  candidates.  Find  out  their  background  and  experience,  and  how  they  communicate  their  positions  on  issues  that  matter  to  you.  Then,  rank  the  candidates  on  each  issue  and  characteristic,  with  1=worst and 10‐best, and add up the scores. Make notes, too. This will help you to decide which candidate you want to vote for.             CANDIDATE:  Write other notes you  think are important or  want to remember  about the candidate                                                        GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org | Home of K-12 civic education, Kids Voting, Youth Civics and Youth Voice
  • 29.   RATE THE CANDIDATES ‐ DECISION‐MAKING CHART    Before  voting  in  this  year’s  election,  learn  about  the  candidates.  Find  out  their  background  and  experience,  and  how  they  communicate  their  positions  on  issues  that  matter  to  you.  Then,  rank  the  candidates  on  each  issue  and  characteristic,  with  1=worst and 10‐best, and add up the scores. Make notes, too. This will help you to decide which candidate you want to vote for.     Office: ___________________________________________________________________________    Candidate I will vote for: ____________________________________________________________    Why I am voting for this candidate: ____________________________________________________    _________________________________________________________________________________    _________________________________________________________________________________  _________________________________________________________________________________  _________________________________________________________________________________    _________________________________________________________________________________      Now, go and make your voice heard by voting! Visit www.GenerationNation.org to learn how K‐12 students can cast votes in this  year’s election, or ask your teacher about GenerationNation’s Kids Voting election!  GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org | Home of K-12 civic education, Kids Voting, Youth Civics and Youth Voice
  • 30.   YOUR TURN! BE A CITIZEN JOURNALIST      GenerationNation  invites  all  students  to  report  on  schools,  government,  media,  current  events  and  other  civic  activities.  What,  or  who,  do  you  see?  What  is  being  discussed?  What is your opinion? Make your youth voice heard!     Issues and topics important to or impacting youth  People: political leaders, candidates, civic leaders, media  Government meetings or decisions  Events and speeches; media coverage about the elections or civic issues  Your perspective about politics, government or leadership  Anything else you think is relevant and interesting!  Note: Student newspapers are also invited to share their reports or links!      SHARE YOUR REPORT   On all submissions, include your name, age or grade, and school or youth organization. If you  are part of a school newspaper, include the link. Do not worry if you are not a professional. Your  youth voice is important.    Social media  Tag @GenNation and #GenNation (@GenerationNation on Instagram)  Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Flickr, etc.    Photos  Email to info@GenerationNation.org   or tag on social media (see below)     Video  Upload on YouTube, tag #GenNation and #youthvoice and  Email info@GenerationNation.org with video link    Written report/opinion (100‐200 words or less)  Send text in body of the email (not as an attachment)  Email to info@GenerationNation.org       GenerationNation will review for language, brevity and clarity and share student reports on  the web and social media. Go to www.GenerationNation.org and follow GN on social media.  www.GenerationNation.org GenerationNation @GenNation
  • 31.   YOUR TURN! BE A CITIZEN JOURNALIST    Tips for Reporting    Take photos and tweet about the event  Tag your report/photos  o Twitter and Facebook @GenNation or #GenNation  o Instagram @GenerationNation or #GenNation  o If there is an event tag, use that too  Tip: in at least one tweet, note you are a student. People want to know what you think!  Local government  o #CLT is used for Charlotte. #cltcc is city council and general city government  discussion.   o CMS – use #cmsbd for school board or #cmsk12 for the district.  o Mecklenburg County – use #meckbocc.   o NC General Assembly is #ncga and NC politics is #ncpol.  o Where we can, we will RT/share your tweets with officials and news media  By the end of the day of the event, email photos and at least 3 sentence report (or link  to your article or blog) to info@GenerationNation.org   We will post reports on social media, GN website, etc.     Tips for covering a news event  Importantly, as a student, your perspective is very important – and is often missing from  news reports and discussions about civic issues.  Consider  your  audience.  What  do  people  want  to  know  about  what  happened?  What  can you tell them (or show with photos) that would be different than traditional media  outlets?  How will what has been proposed/discussed impact children and youth?  In an interview, use your phone to record and capture the quotes for later.  How did people react to what was being said? What did YOU think about what was said?   You are the media. That means you help to inform the public about government actions,  goals, and activities. The “media” includes traditional media, such as newspaper and TV  reporters, as well as bloggers and people sharing information on social media.  Facts and Opinions – both important  o Reporting  facts  helps  people  who  are  not  at  the  event  to  learn  what  is  happening, who is talking, what you see, who is in the crowd, the location, etc.  o Sharing  opinions  helps  people  to  learn  and  understand  how  the  information  impacts different people – especially students.    www.GenerationNation.org GenerationNation @GenNation
  • 32. MY WISH AND IDEAS…  Kids, adults, leaders and officials work together  to solve school, community and national challenges.    My name: ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………    I have a wish for: (check one)    ………………… MY SCHOOL  ………………… MY NEIGHBORHOOD  ………………… MY CITY  ……………….. MY STATE  ………………… MY NATION   My big issue is about: (circle one)  ANIMALS  CHILDREN AND YOUTH  COLLEGE  CRIME  ECONOMY  EDUCATION  ENVIRONMENT  HEALTH  HOUSING  JOBS  LAWS AND RULES  POVERTY  RECYCLING  SAFETY  SCHOOLS  SIDEWALKS AND STREETS  SPORTS  TECHNOLOGY  TRANSPORTATION  OTHER………………………………..…    The problem is: …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….…………..    My wish to make it better or different: …………………………………………………………………..……………....    …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..    ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..……………………    …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..    My wish can be possible if: (solution)  ……………………………….……………........………………………….......    ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..…    ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..…    ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..…    © GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org
  • 33.   MY WISH AND IDEAS…  (for younger children)  Kids, adults, leaders and officials work together  to solve school, community and national challenges.    My name: ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………    I have a wish for: (check one)    ………………… MY SCHOOL  ………………… MY COMMUNITY  ………………… MY NEIGHBORHOOD  ………………… MY STATE   ………………… MY NATION   My big issue is about: (circle one)  ANIMALS  CHILDREN AND YOUTH  COLLEGE  CRIME  ECONOMY  EDUCATION  ENVIRONMENT  HEALTH  HOUSING  JOBS  LAWS AND RULES  POVERTY  RECYCLING  SAFETY  SCHOOLS  SIDEWALKS AND STREETS  SPORTS  TECHNOLOGY  TRANSPORTATION  OTHER………………………    Draw a picture about it here:    © GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org
  • 34. MY WISH AND IDEAS…  (for older students)  Students, adults, leaders and officials work together to solve school, community and national challenges.      ME  CASE STUDY  OUTLINE HOW A CURRENT/HISTORIC  LEADER SOLVED A CIVIC PROBLEM   Area of impact?                        Example: School,  neighborhood, community,  state, country or world    What’s the problem?    Example: Kids don’t have a  safe place to play      What’s your vision?    Example: Kids need access to  playgrounds.    What’s your solution?    Example: Build a  playground in my  neighborhood    Who to influence? How?  What needs to happen?    Example: The City of Charlotte  works with neighborhoods. I  will contact my City Council  representative to outline the  problem and ask for support  for my solution.     My plan and timeline is…  © GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org
  • 35. My Wish – Photo Voice  Instructions    1. Start with a blank Wish Page  Print the Wish Page (next page…or make your own)    2. Write your wish and ideas  Make sure to write clearly so people can read it!  Say where you are wishing (my wish for my school is…, or my wish for Charlotte is…)  Write your name and school (optional)    3. Take a photo or make a short video  Take a photo of yourself, your friends, or your class holding your wish and ideas, or make a short video    4. Make your voice heard!  Share your wish and idea with GenerationNation, so we can share it with decision‐makers  Email the photo or video to info@GenerationNation.org  Post on social media – and tag #GenNation so we can find it  Follow GenerationNation on social media – links on homepage of www.GenerationNation.org     © GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org
  • 36. My wish and idea…                    #GenNation      #GenerationNation © GenerationNation | www.GenerationNation.org
  • 37. Civic Literacy: Reading + Analyzing Information   Reading, Analyzing, and Using Information    Overview  This  learning  opportunity  helps  students  to  explore,  think  about,  and  make  decisions  about  a  public  policy,  issue,  government  process,  or  decision.  The  activity  can  be  used  as  a  framework  for  reading  and  thinking  critically  about  different topics on the school, community, state, nation or global scale.      Objective  Through the activities, students will:   Read, analyze and think critically about information  Define a public policy, issue, government process, or decision, and come up  with problem‐solving ideas  Identify the roles of government, leaders, citizens, businesses or media in  policy and decision‐making  Learn ways that citizens take action on policy or decision      Grades  The activity can be used/adapted for students in grades K‐12 and aligns to  Common Core and NC Essential Standards for social studies.         www.GenerationNation.org GenerationNation @GenNation
  • 38. Civic Literacy: Reading + Analyzing Information   Do you know what your government is doing, and why? Whether it is  a community issue that needs to be solved, a public policy that is being  introduced, or an action being taken by your government, you can use  the  same  simple  steps  to  help you know  what’s going on,  the  impact,  and what you can do to make a difference.    LEARN, by reading information from a variety of sources  Read as much as you can about both sides of the issues, policies, actions or decisions. Good  sources of information include:  Government websites, especially legislation and other documents that outline the issue  and the government’s solution for it.  News media, gathering information from multiple sources.  Search the web – remember to look for both sides (different solutions for or opinions  about) the issue.    THINK about, and ANALYZE, the information  As you are thinking, ask questions:  Is this information helpful? Is it from a good, truthful source? Does it fit with other facts  you know? How does it make you feel?  Use the worksheet to help you to analyze and think critically.    DECIDE: What do YOU think about it?  Review what you have learned. Do you have enough information to make a good decision or  take a position? If not, find more information!    KNOW how to take action  Active citizens and leaders don’t just read and think about information. They take action with it  to make a difference! Depending on the policy, issue, action, or decision, you can:  Communicate with elected officials    Write a letter to the newspaper editor  Make your voice heard by voting   Share your ideas   Get involved   www.GenerationNation.org GenerationNation @GenNation
  • 39. Civic Literacy: Reading + Analyzing Information Reading, Analyzing, and Using Civic Information        Topic: ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..    Problem that needs to be solved/reason for government action:     …………………………………….……………………………………………………………………………………    My sources of information:    …………………………………….……………………………………………………………………………………    …………………………………….……………………………………………………………………………………    …………………………………….……………………………………………………………………………………    Which levels of government are involved?    …………………………………….……………………………………………………………………………………    …………………………………….……………………………………………………………………………………    Who are the key leaders or decision‐makers involved?    …………………………………….……………………………………………………………………………………    …………………………………….……………………………………………………………………………………    Are citizens or businesses involved? How?    …………………………………….……………………………………………………………………………………    …………………………………….……………………………………………………………………………………    How is the media covering the issue?    …………………………………….……………………………………………………………………………………  www.GenerationNation.org GenerationNation @GenNation
  • 40. Civic Literacy: Reading + Analyzing Information What is the government’s solution or action? (write a short summary about the  legislation, new policy, decision, debate, or vote)    …………………………………….……………………………………………………………………………………  …………………………………….……………………………………………………………………………………  …………………………………….……………………………………………………………………………………  …………………………………….……………………………………………………………………………………    What do you think the leaders are trying to accomplish with this action?  (Whether you agree with it or not, what was the main goal?)    …………………………………….……………………………………………………………………………………    …………………………………….……………………………………………………………………………………    Will it make a difference? When? Now? In a few years? The future? What will  change? Why?    …………………………………….……………………………………………………………………………………    …………………………………….……………………………………………………………………………………    Do you agree with the idea? Why or why not? How would you solve the issue?    …………………………………….……………………………………………………………………………………    …………………………………….……………………………………………………………………………………    …………………………………….……………………………………………………………………………………    Was it easy to find information about the issue or action? Was the information  easy to understand? Why or why not? Can you think of ways the government or  media can do a better job communicating about this issue? …………………………………….……………………………………………………………………………………  …………………………………….……………………………………………………………………………………  www.GenerationNation.org GenerationNation @GenNation
  • 41. Civic Literacy: Reading + Analyzing Information Web resources      Links to information and suggested issues  www.generationnation.org/learn   Contact officials  http://generationnation.org/index.php/CLC/entry/local‐government‐who‐does‐what   Letter to the editor  www.charlotteobserver.com/2008/08/05/108022/write‐the‐forum.html     Make your voice heard by voting on candidates and issues  http://generationnation.org/index.php/election     Share an idea  http://generationnation.org/index.php/CLC/entry/my‐wish‐and‐ideas     Get involved in government and civic leadership  http://generationnation.org/index.php/youthvoice         www.GenerationNation.org GenerationNation @GenNation
  • 42. THE DECISION-MAKING CHART DECISION-MAKING CHART CONSIDER: Does this information represent the entire issue? Do I need more information on other parts of this issue? Gather (more) information Ask: Is this information essential to the decision? YES NO Ask: Is this information credible? YES NO Ask: Does this information fit with other known facts? YES CONSIDER: Was this information developed to trigger emotions? Does it make me angry, scared, happy, confused? NO Ask: Is the source reliable? YES NO CONSIDER: Upon whom does this issue have an impact? Do I have input from everyone who may be affected by this issue? Ask: Is this information enough to make a decision? YES NO Decision: Grades 6-8 ACTIVE CITIZENSHIP ©2005 Kids Voting USA, Inc. – All rights reserved. 6
  • 43.   Civic Learning Opportunity: Election 2013  For more information visit www.generationnation.org    This learning opportunity educates students about democracy, reading and analyzing  information, the election process, making decisions, different levels of government,  ways  that  citizens  participate  in  political  life,  and  more.    In  2012,  over  100,000  Charlotte‐Mecklenburg students participated.    What is the mock election program?  K‐12  students  experience  elections  through  hands‐on  activities.  They  learn  about  and  vote  on  real  candidates and issues and take part in community service‐learning to compliment classroom learning  about civics and democracy in the classroom.   Kids Voting is a program of GenerationNation. Educational resources are available to help students to  learn  about  government,  the  candidates,  the  election  process,  and  student  voice  on  community  policies and decisions impacting K‐12 students.    K‐12 students have different ways to participate   Vote at school (October 22 – November 5, as determined by School Representative)  Vote in designated polling places (October 26, November 1, November 2, and November 5)  Community service‐learning (October 26, November 1, November 2, and November 5)  GenerationNation can also assist your school with other elections through the year      Student Ballot Questions – Election 2013  The following is a list of ALL races – your students will only vote on certain questions based on age  and location.  Grades K‐12 ‐ Mayor (Charlotte, Cornelius, Davidson, Huntersville, Matthews, Mint Hill, Pineville)  Grades 3‐12 ‐ School Board and Education Bonds  Grades 6‐12 ‐ Charlotte City Council At‐Large and Town Councils  Grades 3‐12 will have opportunity to vote in student referendum on local issues (student  voice on issues highlighted by city, county and CMS leadership)      When are results announced?  Students’ votes are tabulated and reported to the community, announced through the media and  posted on www.generationnation.org   School‐level results are available for schools using the online ballot    www.GenerationNation.org GenerationNation GenNation