Be a citizen journalist
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Be a citizen journalist

on

  • 220 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
220
Views on SlideShare
220
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Be a citizen journalist Be a citizen journalist Document Transcript

    •   YOUR TURN! BE A CITIZEN JOURNALIST      GenerationNation  invites  all  students  to  report  on  schools,  government,  media,  current  events  and  other  civic  activities.  What,  or  who,  do  you  see?  What  is  being  discussed?  What is your opinion? Make your youth voice heard!     Issues and topics important to or impacting youth  People: political leaders, candidates, civic leaders, media  Government meetings or decisions  Events and speeches; media coverage about the elections or civic issues  Your perspective about politics, government or leadership  Anything else you think is relevant and interesting!  Note: Student newspapers are also invited to share their reports or links!      SHARE YOUR REPORT   On all submissions, include your name, age or grade, and school or youth organization. If you  are part of a school newspaper, include the link. Do not worry if you are not a professional. Your  youth voice is important.    Social media  Tag @GenNation and #GenNation (@GenerationNation on Instagram)  Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, Flickr, etc.    Photos  Email to info@GenerationNation.org   or tag on social media (see below)     Video  Upload on YouTube, tag #GenNation and #youthvoice and  Email info@GenerationNation.org with video link    Written report/opinion (100‐200 words or less)  Send text in body of the email (not as an attachment)  Email to info@GenerationNation.org       GenerationNation will review for language, brevity and clarity and share student reports on  the web and social media. Go to www.GenerationNation.org and follow GN on social media.  www.GenerationNation.org GenerationNation @GenNation
    •   YOUR TURN! BE A CITIZEN JOURNALIST    Tips for Reporting    Take photos and tweet about the event  Tag your report/photos  o Twitter and Facebook @GenNation or #GenNation  o Instagram @GenerationNation or #GenNation  o If there is an event tag, use that too  Tip: in at least one tweet, note you are a student. People want to know what you think!  Local government  o #CLT is used for Charlotte. #cltcc is city council and general city government  discussion.   o CMS – use #cmsbd for school board or #cmsk12 for the district.  o Mecklenburg County – use #meckbocc.   o NC General Assembly is #ncga and NC politics is #ncpol.  o Where we can, we will RT/share your tweets with officials and news media  By the end of the day of the event, email photos and at least 3 sentence report (or link  to your article or blog) to info@GenerationNation.org   We will post reports on social media, GN website, etc.     Tips for covering a news event  Importantly, as a student, your perspective is very important – and is often missing from  news reports and discussions about civic issues.  Consider  your  audience.  What  do  people  want  to  know  about  what  happened?  What  can you tell them (or show with photos) that would be different than traditional media  outlets?  How will what has been proposed/discussed impact children and youth?  In an interview, use your phone to record and capture the quotes for later.  How did people react to what was being said? What did YOU think about what was said?   You are the media. That means you help to inform the public about government actions,  goals, and activities. The “media” includes traditional media, such as newspaper and TV  reporters, as well as bloggers and people sharing information on social media.  Facts and Opinions – both important  o Reporting  facts  helps  people  who  are  not  at  the  event  to  learn  what  is  happening, who is talking, what you see, who is in the crowd, the location, etc.  o Sharing  opinions  helps  people  to  learn  and  understand  how  the  information  impacts different people – especially students.    www.GenerationNation.org GenerationNation @GenNation