Appendix 6   visual assessment reports - urban design assessment - mansergh graham landscape architects
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Appendix 6 visual assessment reports - urban design assessment - mansergh graham landscape architects

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  • 1. THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS TRUST BOARD TEMPLE VIEW STAKE CENTRE DEVELOPMENT LANDSCAPE AND VISUAL ASSESSMENT PREPAREDBYMANSERGHGRAHAMLANDSCAPEARCHITECTS TEMPLE VIEW HAMILTON NEW ZEALAND
  • 2. This report has been prepared by Mansergh Graham Landscape Architects Ltd on behalf of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints as part of an application for resource consent. All work has been undertaken and/or reviewed by a Registered NZILA Landscape Architect. Michael Graham : B Sc, BLA, Registered NZILA Landscape Architect Director. Registered Member of the New Zealand Institute of Landscape Architects. Version: R2/230813 Date: August 2013
  • 3. Contents INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................... 4  METHODOLOGICAL APPROACH ....................................................................................................... 5  LANDSCAPE AND URBAN CONTEXT ................................................................................................. 6  Wider Context ........................................................................................................................................ 6  Temple View Urban Character ................................................................................................................. 7  Church College Character Area ............................................................................................................... 7  The Road Corridor .................................................................................................................................. 7  The Former Church College of New Zealand Campus ............................................................................... 8  Teacher Housing Area on Tuhikaramea Road ........................................................................................... 9  The Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints ................................................................ 10  THE APPLICATION SITE .................................................................................................................. 11  PROPOSED ACTIVITY ..................................................................................................................... 14  The Tuhikaramea Road Upgrade ........................................................................................................... 14  The Stake Centre ................................................................................................................................. 14  Legacy Park ......................................................................................................................................... 15  ASSESSMENT OF VISUAL AND AMENITY EFFECTS ........................................................................... 17  Visual Catchment ................................................................................................................................. 17  Visual Absorption Capability .................................................................................................................. 18  Viewer Type and Distance ..................................................................................................................... 18  VISUAL EFFECTS OF THE DEVELOPMENT ........................................................................................ 20  Tuhikaramea Road ............................................................................................................................... 20  Stake Centre. ....................................................................................................................................... 21  Legacy Park. ........................................................................................................................................ 22  More Distant View Locations ................................................................................................................. 23  The Combined Effect ............................................................................................................................ 23  ANALYSIS OF THE URBAN DESIGN EFFECTS ARISING FROM THE STAKE CENTRE DEVELOPMENT ..... 25  Urban Integration .................................................................................................................................. 25  Urban Amenity Factors ......................................................................................................................... 25  Permeability; ........................................................................................................................................ 26  Spatial Variety; ..................................................................................................................................... 26  Legibility; ............................................................................................................................................. 26  Robustness; ......................................................................................................................................... 26  Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 2 of 77
  • 4. Visual Appropriateness; ........................................................................................................................ 26  Richness; ............................................................................................................................................ 27  Environmental Responsiveness; ............................................................................................................ 27  Overall Urban Amenity; ......................................................................................................................... 28  Urban Design Panel Review .................................................................................................................. 28  RELEVANT PLANNING MATTERS .................................................................................................... 29  Resource Management Act 1991 ........................................................................................................... 29  Hamilton City Operative District Plan (HCODP) ....................................................................................... 29  Appendix One: Methodological Flow Chart........................................................................................ 39  Appendix Two: MGLA Plan Set ......................................................................................................... 40  Appendix Three: Zone of Theoretical Visibility (ZTV) Map ................................................................... 52  Appendix Four: View Location Map .................................................................................................. 54  Appendix Five: View Locations and Visual Effect Ratings................................................................... 56  Appendix Six: Visual Absorption Capability Ratings .......................................................................... 63  Appendix Seven: Landscape and Visual Amenity Effect ‐ Rating System ......................................... 64  Appendix Eight: View Location Photographs and Photomontages ...................................................... 65  Appendix Nine: Urban Amenity Assessment Factors ......................................................................... 76  Appendix Ten: References ............................................................................................................... 77  Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 3 of 77
  • 5. INTRODUCTION This report has been prepared by Mansergh Graham Landscape Architects (MGLA) on behalf of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (The Church) to review the likely effects of the proposed Stake Centre, Legacy Park development and Tuhikaramea Road upgrade, (referred to in combination as the Stake Centre Development), on existing character, landscape and urban amenity values. The Stake Centre Development includes Tuhikaramea Road and an area to the east of Tuhikaramea Road, bounded by internal roads (Mission way) to the east and to the south (entrance to ‘North Temple’), and by existing Teacher Housing and a proposed roadway (a continuation of Foster Road) to the north. This report identifies the potential urban and visual effects of the proposed Stake Centre, Legacy Park and adjoining road corridor development. Consideration has been given to the effects of the proposed development on the existing receiving environment within the context of Hamilton District Plan. The Stake Centre and adjoining road corridor have been reviewed within the context of current “best practice” in urban design and landscape architecture and within the context of the existing Temple View Township and character area. Effects on amenity have been assessed with regards to existing residents of Temple View, and visitors to Temple View, and the Temple itself (culturally significant). The key factors considered within this report are: a. The existing character of the site and its place in the local and regional context. b. The urban and visual effects of the proposed development from typical viewer locations. c. An assessment against the relevant criteria contained within the Hamilton City Operative District Plan. Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 4 of 77
  • 6. METHODOLOGICAL APPROACH A standard assessment approach has been used to identify the existing character of the site and its surroundings, and to assess the potential effects of the proposed development on existing visual character and urban amenity. A combination of desk top analysis and field assessment has been undertaken to identify the potential visibility of the proposed development from surrounding areas. In broad terms, the assessment consists of the: a) Identification of the key elements or attributes of the proposed development; b) Identification of the landscape values and character; c) Identification of relevant assessment criteria within the context of the relevant statutory instruments, ‘Best Practice’ and Urban Design Guide; and d) Assessment of the effects of the proposed Stake Centre area on existing visual character and urban amenity. A combination view shed analysis, using GIS1 software, and field assessment has been undertaken to identify the potential visibility of the proposed buildings, from surrounding areas. By considering the above, the likely effects of the proposed development are able to be identified and rated. A methodological flow chart is contained in appendix one. Scope of Assessment This assessment has assumed that the three components of the Stake Centre Development have been completed being; a) The Tuhikaramea Road Upgrade; which consists of the introduction of three roundabouts, carriageway realignment and changes to berm configuration, planting and street furniture; b) The Stake Centre (a two storey 3715 m2 building containing chapel, meeting rooms and offices, with external courtyards and outdoor plaza area), access road and an associated a 134 car park area; and c) Legacy Park; a passive recreation reserve with a network of water features, board walks, ecological and ornamental plantings.                                                              1  Geographic Information System  Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 5 of 77
  • 7. LANDSCAPE AND URBAN CONTEXT Landscape character is the expression of natural and cultural elements, processes and patterns in a particular area. The distinctive combination of these attributes gives an area its distinctive identity or genius loci. Wider Context The proposed Stake Centre Development is located within Temple View, a small village, located approximately 7 km southwest of central Hamilton, and separated by 1.8 kilometres of rural land from the urban fringe. The landscape containing the application site is typical of this part of the Waikato Basin and characterised by a combination of its topography and land use. Subtle changes in elevation and undulation in landform, associated with the transition between the flat peat lands found in the low lying areas of the basin, and undulating ridge lines that contain them, are clearly evident due to the existing land use patterns. Temple View is situated on one such low lying undulating ridgeline. Rural land use surrounding Temple View influences the character and visual amenity of the area. Pastoral and horticultural development is the predominant land use and imparts the wider landscape with a largely open spatial character. A degree of compartmentalisation is provided by hedgerows, (e.g. Hawthorne) and exotic shelter planting, (e.g. Poplar, and Willow) on property and paddock boundaries, which enclose views to the broader landscape from some locations. It is noted that a number of the shelter trees in the surrounding landscape are deciduous. As such, during the winter months, the landscape has a more open character than when trees are in leaf. This landscape also contains several small peat lakes, which are typically surrounded with indigenous lake margin vegetation. The organic form of these peat lakes juxtapose the geometric patterns associated with the regular pastoral blocks within the surrounding rural landscape and subdivision within Temple View Village. A matrix of perennial and ephemeral water courses and constructed water races further dissect the landscape, feeding into the peat lakes, and the Waipa and Waikato Rivers and their tributaries. The relationship between the major geographical features contained within this landscape and the human modifications that have occurred upon them are important factors to consider when assessing how the proposed development will influence existing amenity values and the character of the surrounding urban and rural environment. The key landscape features that influence perceptions of overall character of the wider landscape surrounding the subject site include: a) The low lying topographical features of the Waikato Basin; b) Peat lakes and wetlands; c) Pastoral land use; d) Temple View Village, including: i) The former Church College buildings and associated structures; ii) The Hamilton New Zealand Temple, temple grounds, and visitor centre and accommodation facility. iii) Existing residential development. At a broader scale, these features are also influenced by land use, land management and development patterns including: a) Road networks, including State Highway 1, 3 and 23; b) The urban fringe of Hamilton; c) Scattered clusters of rural and rural residential houses along public roads within the peri-urban and rural landscape; d) Koromatua School; Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 6 of 77
  • 8. e) Hamon Bush. The juxtaposition of these key landforms and elements result in a recognisable landscape, and it is at this wider scale that perception of “the landscape” is most significantly influenced. Temple View Urban Character Temple View originally developed as a discrete and separate entity from Hamilton City and was administered by the Waikato County Council up until 1989, and then Waipa District Council up until 2004 before being included within Hamilton City District. The village developed as a corollary to the works undertaken by the Church for the construction and management of a Temple and college facility on land owned and administered by the Church. The adjacent residential component, comprised of residential development based on multiple individually owned lots, evolved separately through a variety of subdivision controls that applied over the intervening decades. This has resulted in the original lot configurations being substantially subdivided since they was first developed in the 1950s. The resulting character is one of comparably fine grained residential development with highly variable form, material, colour and spatial resolution. The difference in land tenure, development type and management has resulted in a notable division of character within Temple View. This has been highlighted in the Operative District Plan with the identification of the Church College Character Area and the Temple Heritage Precinct, comprised predominantly of land under church administration, as areas of particular character. The balance of Temple View residential development has not been attributed any special character status. Church College Character Area The present day distinctive character of Church College Character Area is a combination of the built and landscaped environment. It contains a highly variable building vernacular due to the differing development phases that have occurred as a consequence of the site planning, opportune incremental development, and the removal, remodelling and repurposing of different buildings over time under management by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. The application of a limited colour palette to the wide range of buildings types and styles within the Church College Character Area, provide a sense of coherence to structures which would otherwise appear markedly different. This sense of coherence is reinforced by a consistent quality of maintenance of the surrounding landscape; tidy groomed planting and specimen trees contained within a wider matrix of manicured lawn. In combination these factors lend the former CCNZ campus and Teacher Housing an ostensibly coherent character in spite of the differences in architectural form. Although the present appearance allows the Church College Character Area to be perceived as a whole, the area can be usefully divided into three sections which contribute significantly to the perceived character of the area (refer to figure 6); a) The Road Corridor. b) The former Church College Campus, (which includes areas currently within the Waipa District Boundary). c) 'Teacher Housing' Area adjacent to Tuhikaremea Road. A fourth component, the Temple Precinct, is also discussed as a significant contributor to the perceived character of the area and Temple View itself; d) The Temple Precinct The Road Corridor The character of the road corridor is informed by a degree of consistency and repetition of the elements within a linear corridor when compared to a typical residential street. Although the combination of elements varies, Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 7 of 77
  • 9. typically the road corridor is defined by a delineating element such as a low masonry curtilage wall of uniform cream colour, metal balustrade atop a retaining wall or round timber bollards. These delineating elements typically contain some permutation of the simple combination of footpath, lawn, street trees and the road carriage way of Tuhikaramea Road. At the northern entrance to Temple View, the sweeping driveway into the former CCNZ creates an atypical entrance node with a broad swath of grass separating the development from the road corridor. This then returns to the more typical configuration of street trees, grass and footpath. However the absence of a delineating element, combined with the curvature of the roadway, presents a less defined edge to the corridor. As a result a more expansive experience is obtained with the character being augmented by more lawn, palm trees and the stepped curtain wall which forms part of the covered walkway beyond. Where present, the stature of the street trees and extent of their canopy is such that when viewed from along the road alignment they form an unbroken visual element, which restricts views out and reinforces the corridor experience. Elements to either side are partially visible beneath or above the canopy, but are only readily seen when viewed perpendicular to the alignment of the street trees. The road is wide with a painted central median and no parking on either side. The alignment passes through Temple View, from north to south, over the brow of the hill which marks the entrance to the village, through two gently cambered curves which lead into the long straight past the entrance to the Temple. The current priority given to traffic on Tuhikaramea Road and lack of legible transitions or changes within the road corridor provide little incentive or visual cues to slow traffic. Consequently the road functions as an effective north south transportation conduit through the village. With little reduction in speed from the open road limit, the road impedes east west movement across Tuhikaramea Road. The Former Church College of New Zealand Campus The character of the former Church College of New Zealand (CCNZ) Campus is informed by the distribution of built form over elevated topography within the wider park like campus. The buildings are generally of similar institutional scale, one to two storey rectilinear form of a variety of construction materials. The majority reflect the combination of planned and opportune incremental development that occurred during the initial construction period (which spanned the 1950’s till the late 1970's). The application of a limited colour palette and tended landscaping provides a sense of consistency to these quite disparate structures. A series of covered walkways, both screened and unscreened, pathways and a network of interconnecting roads and car parks link the many buildings. Within the former campus, buildings are predominantly concentrated on the elevated land to the north, either adjacent to Tuhikaramea Road or on the terrace overlooking the campus sport fields. Contrary to current urban design best practice, the majority of the buildings adjacent to Tuhikaramea Road do not address the road (the Matthew Cowley Administration Building and the Wendell B Mendenhall Library being the exception to this rule). As a result, when viewed from Tuhikaramea Road the buildings, in combination with the curtain wall, the permeable masonry structure which screens the covered walkway of the former campus, convey the character of an institutional but introverted development. When approaching Temple View from the north, the former CCNZ campus appears as a cluster of large buildings dominating the ridgeline with groups of specimen trees in the fore ground. The largest of these (the David O McKay building) appears as a three storey complex with only limited windows but expansive blank walls. This building is flanked by an ordered array of similar coloured single and double storied buildings. Although the buildings address the open space, with the playing field in the foreground providing a balance to the bulk of the buildings, the elevated position, limited windows and the expanse of surrounding open space convey a sense of introversion. Toward the south of the campus, the buildings are more widely distributed and tend toward more pragmatic sheds and warehouse type structures (with the notable exception of the G.R Biesinger building and Kai Hall), generally painted in the familiar cream livery. Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 8 of 77
  • 10. In the south western portion of the campus, a solitary specimen tree sits within an expanse of grass that continues up a small embankment to the cherry tree lined service lane and the rear of the Teacher Housing on the eastern side of Tuhikaramea Road. Toward the south and south east, beyond the Kai Hall, the GRB Building and a loose cluster of ancillary buildings, are stands of mature trees predominantly Kahikatea with some Titoki. These include three stands of significant trees scheduled under the District Plan (being T62, T63 and T64). To the south, these trees become contiguous with the stands of trees within the Temple Precinct. To the east, the campus extends beyond the stands of trees, to pasture containing scattered specimen trees and the site boundary delineated by a water race. Extensive views of the wider pastoral environment are afforded from this area of the site. To south, the boundary of the former CCNZ campus adjoins the Temple Precinct area, with the expanse of lawn continuing over a shallow depression which then grades into the Temple hill. A planted grove of young Kahikatea afford mark the transition into the Temple Precinct. The southern portion of the campus conveys a more open space character when compared with the northern portion, with expanses of open grass and a lower density of structures. This openness also creates a stronger connection with the rural landscape and the open areas of the Temple Precinct to the east. The consistent maintenance of the surrounding landscape, with tidy groomed planting, individual specimen trees and stands of trees contained within a wider matrix of manicured lawn, provide a degree of consistency to the development. In combination, the application of a limited colour palette and tended landscape, provide a sense of coherence to disparate structures which might otherwise appear markedly different. Overall the former CCNZ campus conveys a coherent albeit introverted character, in spite of the differences in architectural form, of large to medium scale buildings contained within an institutional park like setting. The former CCNZ Character Area contains 5 buildings listed as a Heritage Item under the District Plan being the David O McKay Building (H106), the GRB Building (H107), the Wendell B Mendenhall Library (H109), Kai Hall (H134), and the Block Plant (H135) House. These buildings are not registered with the Historic Places Trust but are valued because of their association with the former CCNZ. Teacher Housing Area on Tuhikaramea Road The Teacher Housing Area, whose character is protected under the HCODP, is an area that is straddles Tuhikaramea Road and encompasses the former Teacher Housing that was constructed as part of the Church College. The Teacher Housing area is closely associated with the road corridor and is characterised by a level of spatial consistency and repetition of residential scale architecture, materiality and colour. In addition to a consistent architectural vernacular, albeit with a degree of variation in architectural form, the Teacher Housing is positioned in a consistent manner relative to their setback from Tuhikaramea Road corridor and with some regularity in the spacing in-between. The buildings themselves are relatively modest in size being mainly one storey, some with basements, but varying in configuration with both single dwelling and duplex configurations present. The buildings are oriented toward Tuhikaramea Road with modest gates and simple direct pathways leading from the street to the houses. The Teacher Housing character area contains a number of features which are considered contrary to current good urban design. On the western side of the road, toward the north, a significant difference in elevation results in houses sitting well below the road level of Tuhikaramea Road. These houses face the retaining wall which supports the road with pedestrian access afforded by a series of steps down the face of the retaining wall. While pedestrian access is afforded from Tuhikaramea Road, no parking is available on Tuhikaramea Road for the residents of these dwellings; garages and vehicular access are obtained only from the ‘rear’ of these properties. Demarcation between individual properties is very limited and for the most part achieved through soft landscaping. The Teacher Housing Character Area contains one building listed as a Heritage Item under the District Plan being the First House /George Biesinger House (H133). This building is not registered with the Historic Places Trust. Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 9 of 77
  • 11. The Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints The heritage values of this area are derived from the combination of the built and landscaped environment immediately surrounding the Hamilton New Zealand Temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, and the significant role that the church has played in the physical, spiritual and social development of the local community and further afield. The Temple itself was the first in the southern hemisphere and is the focal point of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in New Zealand. The siting, design and landscape treatment of the Temple emphasise the vertical proportions of the building and create an impression of a monument. Other buildings within the area include the Visitor’s Centre, which has a strong visual relationship with the northern elevation of the Temple, and the central parking area, the Temple President’s House which is visually connected by the walled car parking area to the south of the Temple, and the Dormitory Accommodation on the eastern side. Much of the character of this area is due to the open space with a notable relative absence of other buildings, particularly when viewed from Tuhikaramea Road. Consequently, landscaping and the tree planting emphasise the dramatic and dominant position of the Temple in the local landscape. This tree planting includes trees that mark periods of occupation and development of the site by the Church. The Temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (H108) is listed as a Heritage Item under the District Plan. This building is not registered with the Historic Places Trust but is valued because of its historic, cultural and architectural qualities. This area contains one tree, a Bunya-bunya tree (T65) scheduled under the District Plan as being significant. Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 10 of 77
  • 12. THE APPLICATION SITE The Stake Centre Development extends over two main areas; a) The Tuhikaramea Road corridor, from the north and including the intersection with Cowley Drive, south to the entry into the Hamilton New Zealand Temple; b) The Campus portion of the development, which encompasses an approximately triangular shaped area of land including the 7 southern Teacher Houses on the eastern side of Tuhikaramea Road. The Stake Centre Development Area is currently characterised by the existing Tuhikaramea Road corridor, a portion of the teacher-housing development (on the western side Tuhikaramea Road from Fosters Road south), and the southern portion of the former CCNZ campus including the GRB and Kai Hall buildings, expanse of lawn and the stands of mature native trees. As previously described, the road corridor is characterised by a consistent repetition of the landscape elements within it. Spatially, it is defined by one of a number of different types of delineating elements along its edge. These include features such as the low masonry curtilage wall (a uniform cream colour along its entire length), the metal balustrade atop a retaining wall or round timber bollards and containing some permutation of the simple combination of footpath, lawn, street trees and the road carriage way of Tuhikaramea Road. The character of the Campus portion of the Stake Centre Development is twofold as it embraces areas of distinctly different urban grain, being both the Teacher Housing character; with its consistent setback and repetition of residential scale architecture, materiality and a limited colour palette, and the character of the southern portion of the former CCNZ campus. The latter area maintains the limited colour palette, but conveys a more open space character, with larger expanses of open grass, a lower density of larger scale structures and a stronger connection with the rural landscape to the east and the open areas of the Temple Precinct. The following series of photos, illustrate the existing character of the receiving environment. Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 11 of 77
  • 13. Figure 1. View East from Tuhikaramea Road towards the GRB Building and Kai Hall. Figure 2. View West from outside the Kai Hall, across to the Teacher Housing fronting Tuhikaramea Road. Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 12 of 77
  • 14. Figure 3. View South from outside the Kai Hall toward the GRB Building and Temple. Figure 4. View East from the Teacher Housing Service Road toward the GRB Building. Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 13 of 77
  • 15. PROPOSED ACTIVITY The applicant is seeking consent to construct the Stake Centre Development which encompasses three distinct but related components: a) The Tuhikaramea Road Upgrade; which consists of the introduction of three roundabouts, carriageway realignment and changes to berm configuration, planting and street furniture; b) The Stake Centre (a two storey 3715 m2 building containing chapel, meeting rooms and offices, with external courtyards and outdoor plaza are), access road and an associated a 134 car park area; and c) Legacy Park; a passive recreation reserve with a network of water features, board walks, ecological and ornamental plantings, and interpretative signage and features recording the contribution of the Labour Missionaries to the area. The Tuhikaramea Road Upgrade The Tuhikaramea Road upgrade is a key component of the overall enhancement of Temple View, with improvements to the functionality of the road in terms of safety for road users, including cyclists and pedestrians alike, a legible speed environment, improved connectivity between the former campus and existing residential development, enhanced lighting and the introduction of specifically design street furniture elements which reference the genius loci of Temple View. Traffic calming measures, including the creation of traffic deviations and the development of three roundabouts, road side parking and also provide the opportunity for the rationalisation of infrastructure. One leg of the roundabout proposed for the Fosters Road intersection provides an access road to the Stake Centre. The present road environment encourages high speed along Tuhikaramea Road which creates a barrier to pedestrian and vehicular movement from east to west. The Tuhikaramea Upgrade proposes the introduction of three roundabouts, traffic islands, pedestrian blisters, flush pedestrian thresholds and car parking along the road side as traffic calming measures. In addition the geometry of the road way will be altered to discourage high speeds while improving visibility at the roundabouts. In combination these measures are intended to create a slower speed environment, enhance east west linkages and encourage pedestrian connectivity and integration between the Stake Centre development and adjacent residential development. While the upgrade of Tuhikaramea Road is predominantly for enhanced safety and traffic management, the changes will alter the existing ground contour resulting in the loss of street trees and the necessity to replace the curtilage walls and pathways. As a result opportunities have been taken to express the sense of place through the introduction of design details and the consistent use of colour and materials into boundary walls, pavement treatment, street furniture and street plantings. These elements often replace existing components that are dilapidated, or absent. Where practical, consideration has been given to replicating the spatial arrangement of the existing elements. (Tuhikaramea Road Plans and design details and photomontages are appended to this report). The Stake Centre The intent of the Stake Centre is to provide church facilities and passive recreation opportunities to replace and enhance the facilities that were temporarily housed in parts of the former Church College buildings. The building will sit astride an embankment and is split level, with a single storey elevation addressing Tuhikaramea Road to the west and a two storey elevation addressing an associated car park to the east. The Stake Centre will respond to the grain of surrounding development with particular consideration given to elevations which address public edges. The overall form, materiality and colour of the building draws on key buildings within the vicinity, such as the W.B. Mendenhall Library and The Temple itself, expressing its own identity within the hierarchy of wider development. The Temple View Stake Centre will represent a marked departure from the standard Stake Centre typology, which requires a flat site, and produces long and low linear buildings with a strongly gabled frontage with Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 14 of 77
  • 16. entrances identified with return gables. The Temple View Stake Centre has been designed as a specific response to the landform, character overlays, functional requirements and proximity to the Temple itself. The building will be comprised of a series of stepped and offset rectilinear shapes articulating a large central volume. The elevations will feature sections of vertical glazing, layered with strong horizontally projecting roof lines and canopies. The northern elevation will present a dramatic two storey glazed frontage, while a lower articulated western elevation addresses Tuhikaramea Road with a single storey, providing an appropriate scale to the adjacent residential development. The eastern elevation will respond to the change in contour across the site by presenting a two storey structure to address the car park and Legacy Park. Within the Stake Centre details, explicit references will be made to patterns and finishes of surrounding buildings in a contemporary form. Both the northern and southern ends of the building will contain enclosed courtyards. The northern courtyard enclosure will be introspective and reflect on the chapel exterior, while the southern courtyard will be externally focussed and embrace the vista across the water feature toward the Temple. Materials proposed for the building and exterior walls will include masonry block and limestone cladding, using a colour palette which complements the livery of key buildings in the vicinity. The proposed car park has been designed to service both the main entrance to the Stake Centre and the repurposed Kai Hall and GRB Buildings. These Heritage buildings will be refurbished in the future under a separate resource consent process. It will also provide access to Legacy Park and the Temple grounds. In combination, multiple users are anticipated to create frequent activity in the area. An open plaza area adjacent to the car park provides a passive pedestrian area and linkage between the Stake Centre, Kai Hall, GRB Building and Legacy Park. This space is anticipated to accommodate a range of activities and events intended to cater for a wide range of uses, extending beyond simply the Christmas Lights. Legacy Park Legacy Park will create a passive recreation setting for the Stake Centre, incorporating boardwalks, developing and restoring watercourses, utilising existing stands of Kahikatea and additional indigenous planting, contrasted and complemented by other areas of ornamental plantings to create an aesthetically and ecologically responsive setting. In addition, Legacy Park is intended to strongly reference the legacy of the early missionary labour force, which in a very real sense built Temple View. The Legacy Park layout provides an appropriate back drop for two heritage buildings built by missionary labour, Kai Hall and the George R Beisinger Building. These buildings are currently being restored and repurposed. The park will include the development of interpretation panels and viewing shelters which draw on the narrative of the labour missionary experience. Overall Legacy Park is intended to provide a coherent framework to appropriately integrate existing heritage structures and the Stake Centre development with the adjacent Temple grounds and Temple. The integrated development of the Stake Centre, Legacy Park and Tuhikaramea Road will create quality exterior spaces that encourage public use. The overall development incorporates the principles of CPTED2, maintaining high levels of passive surveillance, clear visibility, multiple pathways and high light levels. All three components have been designed to reflect the existing materiality, colour palette and spatial configuration where appropriate. Where safety considerations, functionality, legal requirements or best practice required alternate approaches, consideration of the integration of the required design with the overall character of the area has been used as a touch stone for the development. Key components of the application that have the potential to affect urban character and visual amenity include: a. The construction of three roundabouts and a realigned carriageway including pedestrian thresholds and kerb side parking bays; b. The construction of shared use footpaths, street lights and replacement curtilage walls; c. The replacement of specimen tree planting within the berms;                                                              2  Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design  Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 15 of 77
  • 17. d. The construction of approximately 120m metres of road way to service the Stake Centre, 134 car parks and pedestrian and plaza area; e. The construction of the Stake Centre Building including outdoor courtyards and water feature (requiring the removal of 9 dwelling units ( 2 being duplexes) associated with the former teacher houses); and. f. The development of Legacy Park as passive recreation facility including ecological and ornamental plantings, board walks, interpretation facilities and storm water detention ponds. Plans of the proposed development, prepared by MGLA, are contained within appendix two (Refer: Plan 2-A010 - SCLP T3). Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 16 of 77
  • 18. ASSESSMENT OF VISUAL AND AMENITY EFFECTS With regard to the potential for the site to absorb the proposed development, the following factors were evaluated during the assessment. Visual Catchment The visual catchment from within which the proposed Stake Centre will be potentially seen has been identified by a combination of field investigation and GIS viewshed analysis, based on the interrogation of a digital elevation model produced from 1m contour data for the study and surrounding landscape. Existing vegetation immediately surrounding the subject site (700m) and the proposed height of the Stake Centre building was taken into account. The screening effects of buildings within this distance have not been taken into account. Analysis of the view shed ZTV3 map4 indicated that views of the Stake Centre building will be afforded predominantly from the east and west of the site. However, site inspection revealed that existing built development surrounding the subject site will significantly screen the proposed development from view. Although the topography to the east is relatively flat and therefore in theory the site is potentially highly visible, limited publicly accessible opportunities means that views from the east are restricted to a few locations in excess of a kilometre from the site. Site inspection identified that the visual catchment surrounding the site is influenced by topography and land cover in the following way: a) The location of the subject site, on a low saddle between two small hills within Temple View, elevates the surrounding landuse such that the Temple View residential development, the balance of the former CCNZ buildings and the Temple precinct largely restrict views into the area from the north, south and west. b) Close proximity views are accessible from the Tuhikaramea Road but other publicly accessible views from other directions are predominantly either screened by topography and development or reduced to small components of larger vistas due to distance. c) Vegetation, both within the site and in the surrounding area, which consists of amenity/shelter planting and significant stands of existing trees immediately to the south and east of the study area will restrict views of the development from the south and east. d) The application site extends from the residential character of Temple View to the institutional character of the former CCNZ Campus. It is noted that mature native and exotic ornamental planting, hedgerow and shelterbelt vegetation, both on the site boundary and internally, currently obstruct views of the site from many peripheral locations. If this vegetation is removed, a greater extent of the site would be visible from surrounding locations.                                                              3  Zone of Theoretical Visibility  4  Refer appendix three  Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 17 of 77
  • 19. Visual Absorption Capability One of the main factors that will influence a development's effect existing landscape/urban character and visual amenity is the visual absorption capability of the surrounding landscape/urban area. This is the ability of the landscape to integrate a development, or feature, into its existing visual character without significant change. Each view location has been rated in terms of its visual absorption capability (VAC). Factors considered in determining the sites VAC rating include: a) The degree to which the development is visible; b) Visual and physical links with other similar elements or activities in the landscape; c) The level of modification to the surrounding landscape (short and long term); d) Appropriateness of size; e) Distance; and f) Backdrop. The site’s ability to visually absorb the change (VAC) associated with the proposed development ranges from poor to very good. Very good VAC ratings were typically recorded for view locations where a combination of intervening topography, vegetation, development will prevent clear views of the application site, while surrounding development provides relevant context. These included view locations 6, 7 & 8. Good VAC ratings were typically recorded for locations at intermediate proximity, where a combination of vegetation and existing development screened a significant portion of the site from view and existing development, within the view, including the former CCNZ campus, the Temple and the residential component of Temple View, contribute relevant context. These included view locations 1, 4 & 5. Poor VAC ratings were recorded for view locations 2 & 3. These locations are at close proximity and provide relatively unimpeded views to the Stake Centre site due to a combination of lack of topographical screening, moderate foreground vegetative screening and a paucity of back drop elements. Viewer Type and Distance Notable views of the subject site are generally restricted to within one kilometre of the site. Views of the site from locations in excess of this distance diminish to the point at which they become negligible within the wider vista or are less frequent due to intervening vegetation or topography. A number of potential view locations were investigated during the preparation of this report. Eight view locations were selected for review, on the basis of existing views, viewing frequency, viewer types, the availability of the view from public property, viewer distance and the viewing time and framework available at the time of study. These view locations fell into three general categories representative of the visual catchment, as follows: a) Views from close proximity on Tuhikaramea Road; b) Views within Temple View Village; c) Views from the wider surrounding area. These represent the views of: a) Existing residents of Temple View. b) Visitors to Temple View Village and the Temple itself. c) Road users who utilise Tuhikaramea Road as commuting link from SH1, SH 3 and SH 39. These view locations are shown on the View Location Map in appendix four of this report. It is noted that a higher level of effect will be experienced temporarily during the site preparation and construction phase. A higher level of temporary effect is typically considered to be more acceptable if continued progress towards completion is perceived. Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 18 of 77
  • 20. Visual absorption capability rating, a summary of potential effects and effect ratings for all view locations are contained within appendix five of this report. Visual absorption and landscape and visual rating definitions are contained within six and seven of this report respectively. Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 19 of 77
  • 21. VISUAL EFFECTS OF THE DEVELOPMENT The following description outlines the salient visual effects of the proposed development (in its entirety). These are predominantly focussed around close proximity views as, in this instance; these are the views that reflect the nature of the effects of the change. An effects assessment table, identifying the key effects on landscape/urban character and visual amenity from each view location is contained within appendix five of this report. The following sections assess the effect of the three main components of the development on visual amenity, separately and jointly. Tuhikaramea Road Tuhikaramea Road is the primary foreground component within close proximity views. Subject to viewer orientation the existing carriageway extends past the Stake Centre site as a wide expanse of asphalt contained between comparatively narrow grassy berms. A narrow footpath separates the grassy berms from the cream curtilage walls. The curtilage walls are of low but variable height and state of repair, stepping irregularly to accommodate the change in elevation along the road edge. Breaks in the wall provide gateways to service the adjoining housing. The curtilage wall provides an edge to the road corridor and contributes to its visual linearity, however it is the specimen trees which align the road corridor that visually dominate it. Within the view from View Locations 2 & 3, the street trees provide a repetitive vertical element which in combination with the carriageway; define the spatial volume of the road corridor. The evergreen nature of the trees and their canopy provide extensive screening and, when viewed parallel to the carriage way, generally limit views beyond. In combination the elements of the road corridor create a slightly worn tree lined linear character containing a visually unrestrained speed environment. The proposed road upgrade retains the above elements but rearranges and augments them. The carriageway is slightly narrowed to accommodate widened footpaths and berms, but widens to accommodate roundabouts with planted central areas and splitter islands. Parking bays align the western side of the road and are paved so as to be visibly different to the road surface. Flush pedestrian thresholds cross the carriage way, introducing a visible textural difference to the road surface. In a similar fashion the widened pathways and curtilage wall incorporate contrasting feature elements, drawing on architectural cues from the surroundings. The curtilage wall appears more coherent due to its more consistent height. On the eastern side of the road, in front of the Stake Centre, sections of the curtilage wall have foreground planting, providing variety and interest to the extended length of unbroken wall. Specimen trees, although of a different form, continue to provide a repetitive vertical element and define the spatial volume of the road corridor. The trees will be located slightly closer together, due to the widened pathways and berms, subtly reducing the apparent volume of the road corridor but maintaining its visual integrity. It is only at the roundabouts where a change in the rhythm of the street trees, in combination with the traffic islands, and the new access road vary the corridor character. By forming an appropriate response to the altered road configuration, this variation remains consistent with the character of the road corridor. The introduction of flush pedestrian thresholds and parking bays alters elements within the road corridor, creating increased visual diversity and potential traffic impediments, and assists in creating a visually more restrained speed environment. In addition, the replacement curtilage wall and enhanced pavement and the introduction of amenity planting combine to create a more 'street' like character which de-emphasises the north south vehicle priority and introduces a range of pedestrian priorities. Overall the upgrade of Tuhikaramea is anticipated to have little change to the character of the area but result in an enhanced amenity. Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 20 of 77
  • 22. Stake Centre. Within View location 2 & 3, the proposed Stake Centre location on the eastern side of Tuhikaramea Road is visually occupied by the existing Teacher Housing in the mid ground. Subject to viewer location the existing Teacher Housing and associated residential planting extends across the mid ground, and in combination with the road side specimen trees, largely restrict views beyond. Where glimpses of the view beyond are attained, they typically contain elements of the groups of specimen trees and open lawn within the former CCNZ Campus, or distant views of the residential development within Temple View. The Teacher Houses appear as austere single storey masonry dwellings, of a consistent utilitarian architecture, almost mono-toned in cream, save for the contrasting dark brown roof tiles and dark green barge boards. The houses are oriented to face Tuhikaramea and appear aligned at a consistent offset and even spacing. This combination of similar orientation form, colour and repetition of spacing ostensibly conveys a high level of consistency. This impression is reinforced when seen in combination with the matching cream coloured curtilage wall and the presence of similar housing on the other side of Tuhikaramea Road. On closer inspection however the houses appear slightly dilapidated with little presence of activity within the houses and limited amenity planting within the front yards. Further the level of consistency and repetition is belied by the presence of duplexes within the alignment and varying spacing between buildings. When viewed from Tuhikaramea Road the orientation of the view and the fore ground street trees results in only one to two adjacent houses being clearly visible with much of the consistency being inferred from the glimpses of the other houses attained between the street tree canopies, curtilage wall and residential shrub plantings. The uniform setback, modest spacing and height of the houses results in them being a secondary focal element within the view creating a second tier of visual containment along Tuhikaramea Road. When viewed in combination with the Teacher Housing on the western side, this second tier visual containment forms part of the 'gateway' effect, which visually frame portions of Tuhikaramea Road. The overall character is one of institutional residential character where the consistency of building colour and form, and lack of personalisation through planting or modification to the structures infers a uniform approach to building development and maintenance. When viewed at close proximity from the north, the proposed Stake Centre building and associated access road will visually occupy the mid ground. The access road will be glimpsed in the foreground with relatively open views across the mid ground to open lawn and walled northern courtyard of the Stake Centre, and beyond to the groups of specimen trees within the former CCNZ Campus. The Stake Centre itself will appear as a large building comprised of a series of stepped and offset rectilinear shapes articulating a large central volume (Refer photomontage from View Location two). The buildings footprint, including exterior courtyards, will overlay four of the existing seven southern Teacher Houses. Beginning at the second most southern house it extends some 140 metres north and 55 metres east. The elevations of the Stake Centre feature masonry and stone tiled walls, similar in colour to the Teacher Housing. The elevations are detailed with sections of vertical glazing and contrasting with strong horizontally projecting roof lines and canopies. The Stake Centre's form, materiality colour, the language of the architecture and details provide a sense of consistency and coherence with existing architecture within the vicinity, such as the Wendell B Mendenhall Library and the Temple. The overall effect results in a building that appears as a contemporary addition to existing key structures within the area but shifts the grain of development from one of several residential units to the coarser grain of larger community facilities development. Due to the roading configuration, the northern elevation of the Stake Centre will be visible on the corner across an expanse of lawn and presents a dramatic two storey masonry and glazed frontage. The western elevation will also be visible, transitioning from the larger central volume via an intermediate volume to a series of lower single storey volumes which address Tuhikaramea Road and reflect the scale of the adjacent residential development. These single storey volumes articulate the western elevation of the building and emulate the spatial patterning and offset of the Teacher Housing aligning with the First House. A band of shrub planting sits immediately against the building, with lawn filling between the planting and the curtilage wall. Toward the south, a row of specimen trees partially screen the southern courtyard. The access road off the roundabout and the position of the Stake Centre on the corner, change the character of this portion of the site, creating a more open grain and allowing Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 21 of 77
  • 23. more views beyond the Stake Centre area. This will shift the character of the site from being introspective to more open and inclusive. When seen within close proximity from the south, the proposed Stake Centre building and a portion of Legacy Park occupy the mid ground. The Stake Centre will be seen across a foreground water feature and low planting that forms part of Legacy Park. The glazed southern elevation of the Stake Centre opens onto the stepped southern courtyard with a series of formal ponds which link back to the naturalistic water feature in the foreground. The stepped courtyard wall, intermediate planting against the Stake Centre, specimen trees and lawn will infill the view between the Stake Centre and the curtilage wall. The two storey eastern component of the Stake Centre, which addresses the eastern car park is screened by the existing trees within the Temple Precinct and former CCNZ Campus. The Stake Centre building itself does not extend as far south as the Teacher Housing. When viewed from Tuhikaramea Road, the Stake Centre will rarely be viewed in its entirety, the orientation of the view and the fore ground street trees limit the extent clearly visible, with the articulation of western elevation confounding the apprehension of the size of the building. Although the north and south elevations convey in part the bulk of the building, the western elevation will typically only be partially seen between the street tree canopies, curtilage wall and band of shrub plantings. The Stake Centre will be aligned with the First House setback, emulating the Teacher Housing setback, creating a second tier of visual containment along Tuhikaramea Road and maintaining the 'gateway' effect, described within the HCODP. This effect is diminished slightly to the south as the Stake Centre does not extend as far south as the Teacher Housing, however this is partially offset by the introduction of a row of specimen trees which extend the effect but in a different medium. Although the Stake Centre maintains the gateway effect, and the residential scale along the Tuhikaramea Road, and the buildings colour, form, materiality and design link it with its surroundings, the bulk of the building is clearly of a different size than the buildings previously occupying the site. As a consequence, it is considered that the character of the site shifts marginally, from one of institutional residential character to one of institutional character. It is not is considered that this character shift affects the key attributes of the receiving environment as it is consistent with its surroundings and continues to maintain the spatial qualities of the gateway effect of the Teacher Housing. The additional planting and water features are anticipated to enhance the amenity of the area. Legacy Park. The Legacy Park site occupies the expanse of pasture and groups of remnant Kahikatea Trees that are located to the east of the Teacher Housing, before and beyond the GRB building and Kai Hall. It also incorporates the broad band of grass to the south of the Teacher Housing and adjacent to the Temple Precinct. This band extends to Tuhikaramea Road and forms a small part of the view obtained from view location three. The lawn presently appears as a swale within the view and indicates the path of a section of the Koromatua Stream which has been undergrounded some 80 metres to the east. The extensive area of lawn between the Teacher Housing and the GRB and Kai Hall is predominantly screened by a stand of juvenile Kahikatea which are in the foreground located within the Temple Precinct. The overall effect of the broad grass swale is as an extension of the existing lawn that extends across the foreground, to the swale and beyond, providing a sense of openness and separating the Temple Precinct within the view through absence of other elements. The other components of the proposed Legacy Park site visible within the view are the significant stands of remnant Kahikatea. These trees are visible from most other locations that afford views to the general area of the site and from more distant locations are frequently the only elements of the development site visible. Within the view obtained from view location three, these trees appear in the background to the far right. Although these Kahikatea are of a significant size, due to the diminishing effect of perspective they are predominantly screened by the foreground stand of juvenile Kahikatea which are located within the Temple Precinct. The proposed Legacy Park retains the above elements and introduces new ones. The most notable of these being the proposed detention pond which will be created through the day-lighting of the piped section of Koromatua Stream and earthworks to deepen and widen the existing shallow swale. The pond extends to the base of the formal ponds attached to the Stake Centre's southern courtyard and provides a visual connection Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 22 of 77
  • 24. between the two. Low level planting surrounds the pond creating a more naturalistic setting. A board walk provides a transition between the low level planting and the manicured lawn associated with the Temple Precinct. Where the boardwalk connects with Tuhikaramea Road, the curtilage wall is recessed into Legacy Park to provide a formal entry into the park. Additional planting of Kahikatea occurs in and around the detention area which extends back toward the east of the site. Extensive board walks, ornamental plantings, earthworks, viewing structures and sculptures populate the balance of the site but are generally considered to be clearly visible from locations within the park. Overall the effect of the Legacy Park elements are considered to enhance the character of the view, introducing formal and informal elements which assist with the legibility of wider components of the view, and providing increased amenity to the area. More Distant View Locations As previously stated, due to the surrounding context of the site, publically accessible view locations that are not in close proximity to the Stake Centre site along Tuhikaramea Road quickly lose many of the finer grained aspects within the view. These are the 'gateway' effect, the relationship of the Stake Centre to the adjacent Teacher Housing, and the presence of the strong linearity of the road corridor itself. What remains from western locations is the visibility of the upper portion of the Stake Centre amid existing development, (particularly the Temple and Wendell B Mendenhall Library), vegetation and topography, set against the backdrop of the stands of Kahikatea. Crucially the Temple is elevated relative to the Stake Centre and therefore retains its visual primacy. From these locations the context of built form integrates the development such that where visible it appears as a minor change in the ratio of existing elements within the view and is considered to have a low to very low effect on the character of the view. From eastern locations these views are considered to be predominantly screened or at a distance. The Combined Effect Although the visual change as a result of the Stake Centre Development is overt, the change to the character of the view is considered to be relatively small as: a) The topography of the surrounding area, residential development within Temple View and the buildings within the former CCNZ campus, restrict views of the development location; b) The presence of amenity and shelter planting around and within the site provides screening from surrounding locations; c) The presence of existing development, including the buildings within the former CCNZ Campus and the Temple, means that the proposed removal of the Teacher Housing and the replacement with the Stake Centre building will represent a change in the ratio of existing elements in the area, rather than the introduction of an element not already present within the area; d) The location of the Stake Centre site on the urban /institutional transition within the former CCNZ Campus and adjacent to the Temple site results in the size of the Stake Centre being compatible with surrounding development. e) The nature of the changes along Tuhikaramea Road are not inconsistent with general roading improvements and generally replace elements that are already in existence with more contemporary versions and add increased amenity through planting. f) Critical spatial relationships within the road corridor and adjoining Teacher Housing corridor are addressed and maintained albeit with a single larger structure. g) The nature of the Stake Centre and other structures draw heavily on the existing character of the study area for their materiality, form and colour providing a strong visual connection and integration with the surrounding area. h) The development of Legacy Park enhances the amenity of the existing environs both from an aesthetic and ecological perspective. As a result of the above, it is considered that the proposed development will have a moderate-low positive effect on the landscape/urban character and visual amenity of the surrounding area. Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 23 of 77
  • 25. Photographs have been taken from view locations 1-8. Photomontages depicting the changes likely to occur as a result of the construction of the proposed development are shown from view locations 2 and 3. These view location photographs and photomontages have been included in appendix eight of this report. Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 24 of 77
  • 26. ANALYSIS OF THE URBAN DESIGN EFFECTS ARISING FROM THE STAKE CENTRE DEVELOPMENT Urban design effects arising from the Stake Centre Development have considered. As part of this process, the Stake Centre Development has been considered within the context of potential future development at a broad scale, the nature of the intended activities, their distribution and how they inter-relate with the surrounding existing and proposed activities. As such consideration has been given to the effect of the Stake Centre Development and its coherent integration into the surrounding architectural grain in terms of its overall exterior design, scale, form and character and appropriate integration with its location. These factors are considered important by the national guidance policies contained in the New Zealand Urban Design Protocol5. Of particular relevance to this proposed development are those aspects relating to the context and connection. (In particular, that quality urban design has a strong spatial dimension and optimises relationships between buildings, places, spaces, activities and networks). Further it responds by creating the following: ...good connections between activities and with careful placement of facilities benefit from reduced travel times and lower environmental impacts. Where physical layouts and activity patterns are easily understood, residents and visitors can navigate around....easily . In evaluating the effect of the proposed development; a number of urban design factors were considered. Of primary concern are those factors that consider how the Stake Centre Development integrates with the existing character of Temple View village and its surrounding context. Urban Integration Integration between Temple View village (existing) and development surrounding the site is dependent on a number of factors. These include: a. Consistency in the general road network pattern, road reserve width and road reserve treatment between old and new areas; b. Ensuring appropriate connections to existing and future roads; c. Accommodating safe traffic speeds and sightlines for all road users (pedestrians, cyclists and motorists). d. Providing sufficient width to safely accommodate all road users, parking, footpaths, cycle ways, amenity landscaping and compliance with Council’s Development Manual. e. Enabling safe pedestrian and cycle linkages to be created to the existing Temple View community; f. Consistency in the general design to achieve high amenity values; g. Being aesthetically coherent and reinforcing good urban design, utilising a variety of architectural elements consistent with the Temple View character. h. Responding to the sites existing landform, vegetation, views, water courses (for the purposes of stormwater runoff) and areas of public open space; Urban Amenity Factors Urban amenity is a function of the environment’s visual expression; that is the elements that contribute to its appearance, and the use and circulation patterns which occur within it. The urban amenity of the site includes the degree of permeability, spatial variety, the legibility of the elements within the environment, the extent to which these elements provide for alternate uses, the human attributes or values applied as visual appropriateness, richness and environmental responsiveness6. These factors are considered in terms of their effects on the amenity of existing residents of Temple View and future residents within the Stake Centre development area. Some design interventions will have noticeable                                                              5  NZ Urban Design protocol  6  Refer to appendix nine for a description of the amenity factors    Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 25 of 77
  • 27. implications on either amenity from within the subject site (e.g. removal of existing Teacher Housing to accommodate the larger Stake Centre). Other interventions, such as the provision of extensive proposed planting will have clear benefits for those both within and surrounding the subject site. These factors are used to identify attributes of the urban fabric which help to identify urban amenity values. They are not used to grade the particular environment but rather to identify the effect of a particular change on that environment. An increase in a particular attribute is considered to be an improvement, a decrease a degradation of a given environment with a corresponding reduction in amenity. Permeability; The Tuhikaramea Road up-grade component of the development offers the most explicit improvement to the areas permeability, both in terms of the introduction of the Stake Centre access road development, a new road for the area, and the enhancement to Tuhikaramea road in respect to the shared cycle /pedestrian ways and pedestrian thresholds. In combination these improve east west movement and enhance the opportunity for a range of modes of transport while extending the existing road network of Temple View in a logically consistent manner. In addition the creation of Legacy Park and the associated system of boardwalk and pathways further increase the number of routes publicly accessible throughout the development area. Spatial Variety; While the Stake Centre itself introduces a change in the ratio of the existing spatial variety, Legacy Park offers an explicit improvement to the overall spatial variety and range of experiences available within the area, introducing a range of passive recreational experiences including the boardwalks, detention ponds, viewing structures, mounds and interpretive signage. Further the additional planting, both native and exotic, complementary to and enhancing the existing protected stands of Kahikatea. In addition the exterior courtyards and plazas associated with the Stake Centre, and the Stake Centre itself, further increase the variety and number of experiences within the area. Legibility; A key aspect to the upgrade of Tuhikaramea Road is the improvement to the legibility of the road in terms of the speed environment, being the shift from the open road environment into the Village environment. This is facilitated through both the inclusion of larger elements such as the roundabouts, and smaller components such as the pedestrian thresholds. The location of the Stake Centre itself, on the corner of a key intersection, further contributes to the legibility of the environment, by distinguishing the roundabout from others in the village and acting as it own identifier, as a landmark 7 building within Temple View Village. In a similar manner, Legacy Park, and the associated water detention ponds and entry nodes from Tuhikaramea Road to the boardwalk, signify the presence of the park and entry to the passive reserve, while discretely separating the Temple Precinct from the Stake Centre's exterior private spaces, such as the southern courtyard. These elements enhance the overall legibility of the development. Robustness; While the Stake Centre itself is a purpose built building, albeit with a wide range of potential uses internally, the associated car park also is located and designed to relate to the repurposing of the heritage buildings of the Kai Hall and the GRB Building and their potential need for car parking. Visual Appropriateness; Visual appropriateness is embedded in the idea of creating immersive environments. Immersive environments are defined by the selection and arrangement of all the components that together comprise a particular type of environment. Each environment (or transect zone) is comprised of elements that keep it true to its locational                                                              7  Responsive Environments  Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 26 of 77
  • 28. character8 . In this case it is important that for neighbouring Residential Zone residents and residents of the Temple View village that the visual character of the subject site integrates appropriately with the existing character of the Church College Character Area and the Temple Heritage Area. This component of the development is most explicitly expressed in the design and siting of the Stake Centre. Within a community with strong ties to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, it is considered the location of the Stake Centre on a visible centrally located junction within Temple View is highly appropriate. The land on which the Stake Centre is proposed to be sited was originally developed as part of the former CCNZ campus and as such the proposed Stake Centre has drawn heavily on design elements, materiality colour and form for the building itself. While the proposed Stake Centre Area design includes natural elements which will break up views of the proposed Stake Centre, given the critical interface within the Teacher Housing and the need to respond at a residential scale to Tuhikaramea Road, careful consideration has been given to each elevation. As a result, while the western elevation responds to adjacent residential architecture through building articulation and lower roof levels, the northern, eastern and southern elevations appropriately express the nature of the building, its approaches and its organisation through glazing and materiality. The use of a palette of materiality, colour, form, scale and road setback will allow integration with the existing transition from residential character to the more institutional character of the former CCNZ Campus and Temple. Similarly, other elements of the development generally replace elements that are already in existence within the study area, such as the curtilage wall, pathway and planting, with more contemporary. They also Centre and other structures draw heavily on the existing character of the study area for their materiality, form and colour providing a strong visual connection and integration with the surrounding area. As such it is considered that this development enhances the visual appropriateness of the area. Richness; Throughout the development an additional layering of visual cues and narrative has been added to components through design. Aspects such as the stylised grid circle emblem drawn from the architecture of the Temple have been repeated in glazing patterns within the Stake Centre and as an inserted detail in the curtilage wall, through to the explicit inclusion of text blocks within structures and features within the external courtyards. In addition the development of Legacy Park and its interpretation of the Labour Missionaries experience, through sculpture, text and memorials and materials contribute to this richness. On a different level the development of Legacy Park itself as a passive recreation reserve makes accessible a wide range of ecological environs into the development area. Overall the Stake Centre Development is considered to enhance the overall richness of the area. Environmental Responsiveness; The Stake Centre Development incorporates a wide range of environmental responsiveness beyond the use of storm water detention ponds to enhance the ecological quality and amenity of the existing stands of Kahikatea. This includes the creation of swales internal to the car park, the introduction of enrichment planting to the stands of Kahikatea, the day lighting and ecological planting of the piped section of the Koromatua Stream. It also incorporates developments that support walking and physical activity to promote healthy communities. Interdisciplinary research has determined that communities with a mix of uses and good connectivity, block structure, public spaces, and transit proximity have residents who are more likely to walk, are less likely to be overweight and have greater social and community interactions. As discussed above, the creation of a street network with a high degree of permeability, which reduces travel distances, and provides pedestrian links to features and reserves is crucial to encouraging walking and cycling. As a result the Stake Centre Development is considered to increase environmental responsiveness.                                                              8  Immmersive  Environments  Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 27 of 77
  • 29. Overall Urban Amenity; On analysis, when the factors that contribute to the urban amenity are considered separately, it is evident that the Stake Centre Development provides an increase relative to each one and therefore will result in an improvement in the net urban amenity of the site. However it should be noted that these factors are not experienced in isolation but rather in combination, in this instance the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. The combination of improvements in factors such as permeability, legibility, spatial variety and visual appropriateness result in an overall improvement in the quality urban design. The Stake Centre Development is consistent with good urban design as it will encourage walking, includes the creation of safe, attractive and secure pathways and links between centres, landmarks and neighbourhoods, and has green networks that link with public and private open space, improved accessibility to public services and facilities, and includes the treatment of streets as positive spaces with multiple functions. Overall it is considered that the cumulative effect of the Stake Centre Development will result in a noticeable increase to the urban amenity consistent with the character of the Temple View. Urban Design Panel Review The positive evaluation of the proposed development urban amenity effects has received external validation through comments received as a result of the presentation of the Stake Centre Development to the Hamilton City Urban Design Panel. On review of the development, the Urban Design Panel commended;  the applicant ... for addressing the urban design issues in a holistic manner  LDS's investment in improving the streetscape of Tuhikaramea Road as an integral part of the project, representing a win-win for LDS and the community at large  and stated that; no fundamental issues were identified  the panel were pleased to see landscape and streetscape design principles were considered well beyond the proposed Stake Centre.  the visual impact of the proposed Stake Centre were considered from both Tuhikaramea Road and from the proposed extension to Foster Road as well as from the proposed Stake Centre car parking area. ... the panel were generally pleased with the visual treatment from these perspectives..  The design of stormwater flows and retention on site is commendable...  The redevelopment of Tuhikaramea Road within the vicinity of the proposed Stake Centre is welcomed. Traffic -calming design features in particular appear to be essential to the success of the Stake Centre and Legacy Park...  ...the design of the Stake Centre building had been uniquely tailored to the site and context. The layering of the built form, and the articulation of the facades greatly assist in visually breaking down the overall form into discreet (sic) elements; and the single storey frontage to Tuhikaramea is beneficial in terms of building mass. The Urban Design Panel recommended some fine tuning of the proposal to address issues in respect to pedestrian connections and cycleway design which were undertaken and are incorporated into the Stake Centre Development Design assessed within this report. Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 28 of 77
  • 30. RELEVANT PLANNING MATTERS Planning documents that have been taken into consideration include the Resource Management Act and The Hamilton City Operative District Plan. Resource Management Act 1991 The development must meet the requirements of this Act, and it is therefore important that the assessment of visual, landscape and amenity effects addresses the requirements of Part 2, of the Act. In particular: 6 Matters of national importance (b) the protection of outstanding natural features and landscapes from inappropriate subdivision, use, and development: 7 Other matters (c) the maintenance and enhancement of amenity values: With regard to section 6(b), the application site is not contained within or adjacent to any identified outstanding natural features or landscapes. With regard to section 7(c), as previously identified an earlier section of this report, the adverse effects of the development on existing landscape character and urban amenity will range between negligible and moderate. Hamilton City Operative District Plan (HCODP) Under the HCOPD, the subject site is contained within a Community Facilities Zone and subject to a Heritage Precinct Overlay, Heritage Items Overlay, Significant Trees Overlay, Significant Archaeological, Historic and Cultural Sites Overlay, Environmental Protection Overlay and the Church College Character Area. The subject site also includes Teacher Housing. The surrounding landscape, to the west and south of the subject site is contained within a Future Urban Zone. The HCOPD contains a suite of rules, objectives and policies pertaining to landscape amenity (both directly and indirectly). These include Policy 7.1. (Built Heritage), Policy 7.6 (Church College Character Area), Rule 2.7 (Church College Character Overlay), Policy 3.1 (Natural Values), Objectives 3.1.3 Indigenous Vegetation Remnants, Rule 2.1 (Environmental Protection Overlay), Rule 2.2 (Significant Trees Overlay), 7.2 (Sites of Archaeological, Historic and Cultural Significance), Rule 2.3 Heritage Items Overlay, Rule 2.4 Heritage Precincts Overlay, Rule 2.5 Significant Archaeological, Historic and Cultural Sites Overlay. Policy 7.1 Built Heritage This Policy seeks to: recognise and enhance the contribution of the City’s urban heritage in terms of their distinctive character as landmark buildings and their overall contribution to the City’s history. Objective 7.1.2c Temple Heritage Precinct: To ensure that development within the Temple Heritage Precinct maintains and enhances the special heritage characteristics of the area. This objective is relevant as the development is adjacent to and encroaches into the Temple Heritage Precinct along the boundary with the Church College Character Area and Tuhikaramea Road. The following policies are considered relevant for this development; b) Ensure that development within the Temple Heritage Precinct is compatible in terms of scale, form and design with the precinct’s heritage characteristics. d) Control development to ensure that the siting and design of new buildings and structures are sensitive to the significance of the Temple as a spiritual and physical landmark. Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 29 of 77
  • 31. f) Enable additions and alterations to be made to buildings and curtilage wall where they will be consistent with the character of the Precinct and the pre-eminence of the Temple building. j) Ensure the preservation and retention of the landscape characteristics and qualities of the Precinct including open and structured spaces, in particular the formal front entry staircases, lawns, walls and planting boxes. These policies are given form under Rule 2.4 Heritage Precincts Overlay. The expected outcome of this rule being; Protection of the unique characteristics of identified heritage precincts while encouraging development and activities which are sympathetic to the precincts’ identified heritage values. It is considered that the proposed development is consistent with the relevant objectives policies and rules as it responds appropriately to the existing character of the area and has been designed to maintain the existing spatial relationships, where practical given the nature of the development, including the integrity of the curtilage wall, while having particular regard for use of appropriate materials, form and appearance. Further that development of open space has enhanced the overall amenity of the area including maintaining view shafts, and the landscape characteristics and qualities of the precinct. Policy 7.6: Church College Character Area The main objective of Policy 7.6 is: To ensure that development within the Church College Character Area maintains and enhances its special character. Relevant policies under this objective relate to controlling development to ensure the appearance and buildings relationship to Tuhikaramea Road and Temple View Village are maintained. The height, materials, scale and form of buildings and walls/fences are in keeping with the scale and character of the area. The Stake Centre buildings and boundary wall structures within the Teacher Housing area are located to retain the existing set back of the Teacher Houses from Tuhikaramea Road. Each of the policies contained within this section are specifically addressed below; a) Control development to maintain its character and appearance and relationship to Tuhikaramea Road and the Temple View Village. Specific consideration has been given to the appearance of the development and its siting in regard to Tuhikaramea Road to ensure the maintenance of the character, appearance and relationship to Tuhikaramea Road and Temple View Village. b) Ensure the design of new buildings and structures in terms of their height, materials, scale and form are in keeping with the scale and character of the area. The development has been designed specifically to respond to the height, materials, scale and form of buildings within the area. Specific considerations include the use of colours and materials consistent with the character of the area, reflecting the form of other structures within the vicinity and maintaining a single storey structure where the development addresses Tuhikaramea Road. c) Ensure that new buildings and structures within the Teacher Housing area are located to retain the existing set back from Tuhikaramea Road. The development has been specifically sited to align with the Teacher Housing set back from Tuhikaramea Road. d) Ensure that new buildings and structures are located to retain the pattern of spacing between dwellings within the Tuhikaramea Road corridor. Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 30 of 77
  • 32. Due to the scale of the development, it cannot reproduce the spacing between the existing dwellings; however the eastern elevation of the development has been articulated to retain the appearance of the pattern of spacing along the road corridor. When viewed along Tuhikaramea Road, the single story projections from the building give the appearance of being separate elements, emulating the pattern of the Teacher Housing. e) Ensure that new structures such as fences and walls within the setback of the Teacher Housing fronting Tuhikaramea Road are consistent with the original colour and materials used throughout the Character Area. The boundary wall proposed for the development will be consistent with the colour of the original boundary wall within Temple View and will utilise contemporary equivalent materials with a contemporary interpretation to reflect the original structure. f) Ensure that the existing low brick walls in the front yard of houses fronting Tuhikaramea Road are retained. The proposal includes the replacement of the low boundary walls with a contemporary interpretation of the original structure. (Refer policy i) above.) The original walls are no longer structurally sound. g) Ensure that additions, alterations and renovations of the Teacher Housing are undertaken in a sensitive and sympathetic manner that retains the form and style of existing buildings and the appearance of the streetscape. The proposed development replaces nine of the existing Teacher Housing dwelling units (being five detached dwellings and two duplexes); the proposed development is of a different nature but has been designed to respond appropriately to the scale, style, form and materiality to the existing Teacher Housing along Tuhikaramea Road and is sympathetic to the appearance of the streetscape. h) Control the demolition, removal and alteration of buildings and structures that contribute significantly to the overall cohesion and character of the area. The proposed development is anticipated to alter the ratio of elements that are present within the Church College Character Area, due the removal of 9 dwelling units associated the Teacher Housing and their replacement with a single larger building. This will produce a localised change in the distribution of elements within Church College Character Area, but it is not to considered to affect the overall cohesion and character of the area due its sensitive and sympathetic design. i) Control works that could affect the treatment of open spaces and boundaries. The treatment of open space and boundaries have been given detailed consideration with the development of Legacy Park, the Stake Centre exterior spaces and the Tuhikaramea Road up grade. (Plans outlining the proposed spatial resolution and design for the exterior areas are appended to this report). In combination these are considered to enhance the existing character of the Church College Area, the Temple precinct and Temple View as a whole. In terms of 7.6 j) and k), the proposed development includes colours, forms and materials which integrate with the predominant themes of the existing Church College Character area and will allow continued use of the buildings and grounds in a manner consistent with their distinctive character. Rule 2.7 Church College Character Overlay Under the Operative District Plan, Rule 2.7 relates to an overlay, (identified as appendix 2.7 -1E Church College Character Area) which identifies restrictions on development. The Rule Statement explains: ...the purpose of the rule is to protect the visual unity and coherence of buildings and spaces established through the development of the Church College and associated buildings in the 1950s. The Character Area straddles Tuhikaramea Road and seeks to maintain the gateway appearance of the former Teacher Housing fronting onto Tuhikaramea Road that were Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 31 of 77
  • 33. constructed as part of Church College. The Rule Statement also identifies that: The Character Area will not preclude developments that maintains and enhances the special character of the area and that can meet the performance standards and assessment criteria. The overlay provides an enabling framework for the re-use or redevelopment of the area and its buildings, while having regard to important character elements. The Expected Outcome from Rule 2.7 is: The distinctive character of Church College will be maintained and enhanced. Under Rule 2.7.1 Activities, the proposed development are Restricted Discretionary Activities with discretion restricted to the effect on character and amenity values and additional matters where specified, but are required to comply with Rule 2.72 Specific Standards. This includes the following; a) The removal of Teacher Housing buildings (but not the First House); b) Erection of a boundary wall along Tuhikaramea Road frontage; c) Contouring and modification to the landform; d) Construction of additional private roads and car park areas. The following specific standards are considered relevant to the proposed development: Rule 2.72 Specific Standards. i) Building Height within the Teacher Housing Area The maximum height of any buildings shall be 5.0 metres and single storey along the frontage with Tuhikaramea Road. The articulated western elevation of the Stake Centre addresses the Tuhikaramea Road frontage with a series of single storey (under 5 metres ) components consistent with the requirements of rule 2.72. Beyond these components, the building height progressively increases through a stepped roof profile reaching 9 metres within the Teacher Housing Area Zone. ii) Setbacks Buildings in the Teacher Housing Area shall retain the original setback distance set by the existing dwellings along Tuhikaramea road. The siting of the Stake Centre aligns with the set back of the First House and retains the original setback distance set by the existing dwellings along Tuhikaramea Road. iv) Curtilage Wall: Any works to the curtilage wall along Tuhikaramea Road shall ensure that it is reinstated to its present height, and closely match as possible to the colour, and design as referenced in the report for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by Walker Group Architects titled ‘The Church College of New Zealand Heritage Record’ dated November 2009. The proposed curtilage wall along Tuhikaramea Road closely matches the present colour and is similar in design and height as referenced in ‘The Church College of New Zealand Heritage Record’ dated November 2009. vii) Colour: New buildings or alterations of the painting or repainting of any building or structure shall be in general accordance with the colour scheme used extensively throughout the Church College Character Area and adjoining Temple Heritage Precinct as referenced in the report for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by Walker Group Architects titled ‘The Church College of New Zealand Heritage Record’ dated November 2009. Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 32 of 77
  • 34. The Stake Centre area has been designed to utilise a similar colour palate to the existing colour scheme used throughout the Church College Character Area and Temple Heritage Precinct and is in general accordance with the schemes references in the report 'The Church College of New Zealand Heritage Record’ dated November 2009. ix) New Buildings: Materials used in the construction of any new building shall be required to have a similar or complementary appearance in terms of texture and colour as those found on the adjacent buildings. The Stake Centre area has been designed to utilise materials that are similar or complementary to the existing materials used throughout the Church College Character Area and Temple Heritage Precinct and is in general accordance with the appearance of the buildings referenced in the report 'The Church College of New Zealand Heritage Record’ dated November 2009. Rule 2.7.5 Assessment Criteria – Restricted Discretionary and Discretionary Activities Rule 2.75 identifies that: Restricted Discretionary Activities will be assessed only in respect of the subject matter identified in Rule 2.7.1c) or the standard with which the activity was unable to comply. The following assessment criteria are considered relevant to the proposed development; ii) The extent to which the proposed building or structure is compatible with the scale, form, style, bulk, height and materials of surrounding buildings. iii) Whether building intrusion into the front setback of the Teacher Housing fronting Tuhikaramea Road affects the streetscape character of the area. iv) Whether removal of any building and/or structure within the Character Area will affect the gateway appearance of the Character Area. vi) The extent to which an even setback from the Tuhikaramea Road boundary is maintained. vii) Whether the creation of additional private roads or car parking areas would adversely affect the consistency of design or the open, landscaped character of the Church College Character Area. x) Whether it has been clearly demonstrated that demolition of any building is necessary, considering alternatives for the refurbishment or re-use of the building. xi) Any immediate or cumulative effects of the loss, alteration or removal of any buildings on the overall coherence of the Character Area. xiii) The extent to which any excavation, modification or disturbance of the ground would adversely affect views of buildings and their intervening spaces within the Church College Character Area and its overall coherence. xiv) The extent to which provision has been made for the investigation, recording or preservation of any archaeological deposit or feature. xv) The ability of the applicant to economically develop the site without demolition or alteration of any building. As previously identified in this report, it is considered that the proposed development responds appropriately to the existing character of the area and has been designed to maintain the existing spatial relationships, where practical given the nature of the development, including the gateway appearance of the character area, while having particular regard for use of appropriate materials, form and appearance. Further that development of open space has enhanced the overall amenity of the area. It is acknowledged that during the construction period a notable change will be readily identifiable but this will be a temporary effect. Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 33 of 77
  • 35. Rule 2.2 (Significant Trees Overlay) The development site contains a number of stands of trees which are listed in the HCOPD Appendix 2.2-1 Significant Trees Register. They are as follows;  T62 ; Kahikatea x69, Titoki x1 : Dacrycarpus Dacrydioides, Alectryon Excelsus, 465 Tuhikaramea Road, Lot 1 DPS 88403 864 2.  T63; Kahikatea x9: Dacrycarpus Dacrydioides, 509 Tuhikaramea Road, Lot 1 DPS 88403 576 2.  T64; Kahikatea x14, Titoki x4: Dacrycarpus Dacrydioides, Alectryon Excelsus,465 Tuhikaramea Road, Lot 1 DPS 88403 1152 1.  T65; Bunya Pine: Araucaria Bidwillii,509 Tuhikaramea Road,Pt Allot 371, Tuhikaramea Parish. The Rule Statement recognises the value of significant trees for their ecological, botanical, and amenity contribution to the community. The expected outcome of this rule is: The protection of identified significant individual trees and groups of trees and the ongoing maintenance of their values. The proposed Stake Centre Development design is considered consistent with this rule as it maintains and protects the listed trees and ensures any construction works will not affect the health of the trees. Extensive proposed planting will aid in creating ecological links to the wider Temple View/ Hamilton City landscape and enhance the existing planting groups. This extensive proposed planting will also act as screen planting and will reduce visual impacts of the proposed Stake Centre building from the south and east. The planting of waterways surrounding the proposed Stake Centre development will enhance links between areas of indigenous vegetation and fauna habitats. Objectives and Policies pertaining to Natural Values and Significant Indigenous Vegetation As shown on Map No 14a of the Hamilton City Operative District Plan, the development area contains Known Sites Of Significant Indigenous Vegetation. Policy 3.1 Natural Values considers the: Protection of these natural features and their associated processes are important for the survival of the city's natural values... and as a consequence,...The plan seeks to recognise and protect these natural values in a way that integrates these values with urban development. Objective 3.1.3 Indigenous Vegetation Remnants and its associated policies are relevant to the proposed development as they seek to.... maintain and enhance the city’s remaining indigenous vegetation ecosystems and associated ecological processes. This is to be achieved through the following policies; a) Identify, maintain and enhance significant remnant vegetation and fauna habitat. b) Control activities adjoining significant sites of indigenous vegetation to minimise the adverse effects on indigenous vegetation and fauna habitats. c) Ensure adjoining activities are compatible with maintaining the identified natural values of significant vegetation and fauna habitats. d) Minimise the clearance of indigenous vegetation and subsequent adverse effects on the quality of water, soils, native vegetation and fauna habitat, and the mauri of those resources. e) Encourage activities on public and private land that promote and enhance the restoration of linkages between areas of indigenous vegetation and fauna habitats in particular the re-planting of gully and riverbanks with indigenous vegetation. Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 34 of 77
  • 36. The proposed development is considered consistent with these policies in that the day lighting of the existing Koromatua Stream, development of storm water detention areas, planting of indigenous vegetation in and around Legacy Park, the development with board walks and encouraging passive recreation within the area, will enhance the ecological quality of the remnant and increase the overall quality of the area. Rule 2.3 Heritage Items Overlay The development site contains a two listed buildings in the HCOPD Appendix 2.3-11 Heritage Items Schedule. They are as follows; H107 GRB Hall ('B ' Ranking) H133 First House ('B ' Ranking) As identified in the rule statement; The purpose of this rule is control activities which will have an adverse effect on the heritage values of the scheduled heritage items. It is anticipated as a consequence that; Significant heritage items will be protected and conserved while encouraging their continued use and refurbishment to ensure their heritage values are maintained. The proposed development retains the listed buildings and seeks to repurpose them for future use with regard to the rules and objectives of the HCODP. The proposed development is considered to be consistent with the HCODP in this regard. Objective 3.5.1 Urban Trees Objective 3.5.1 seeks; To maintain and improve the urban tree resource to enhance the city’s amenity, character, identity and health and heritage values. The existing street trees are not identified as significant trees with the HCODP Significant Tree Schedule but are considered to be a component of the character of Tuhikaramea Road. As part of the development, the Tuhikaramea Road upgrade would result in the replacement of the existing street trees as they are unlikely to survive the associated extent of disturbance due to vertical re-alignment of the carriageway and infra structure upgrades. A replacement street tree strategy has been proposed which introduces an increased number of large grade (in excess of 3 metres height) deciduous specimen trees. This strategy is considered to be consistent with objective 3.5.1 as the trees would perform the same role as the existing trees assisting with spatial definition of the Tuhikaramea Road corridor and improves amenity. While it is considered that a temporary reduction in amenity would result during the initial removal of the existing trees and establishment of the replacement tree strategy, the long term effect would result in a net increase in amenity. The net increase in amenity is considered to occur due to an increase in the number of trees being introduced and the replacement of the existing evergreen species with deciduous species to avoid dense shading on adjacent residential properties during. This is consistent with the Hamilton City Road Reserve Planting Strategy January 2007 - Part 2 Planting Guidelines; section 2.3.6 (a) Shade; which states; Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 35 of 77
  • 37. The use of evergreen species will generally be limited to situations where their shading is not a problem, typically on wide berms and on north-south routes. Dense and evergreen species will be used less frequently for this reason. Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 36 of 77
  • 38. FINDINGS A number of factors influence the extent to which the Stake Centre Development will affect existing landscape character and amenity values (visual and urban). These include: i. The Stake Centre Development involves the replacement and recreation of a significant number of pre- existing elements. Not only do these elements incorporate contemporary materials and additional layers of detail, they employ the current best practice urban design response. ii. The presence of existing development, including the buildings within the former CCNZ Campus and the Temple, means that the proposed removal of the Teacher Housing and the replacement with the Stake Centre building will represent a change in the grain of development within the area and alter the ratio of existing elements, rather than introduce an element that is not already present within the area; iii. The nature of the changes along Tuhikaramea Road are consistent with general roading improvements and generally replace elements that are already in existence within the study area with a more contemporary version. iv. Critical spatial relationships within the road corridor and adjoining Teacher Housing corridor are addressed and maintained albeit with a single larger structure. v. The nature of the Stake Centre and other structures that form part of the Stake Centre Development draw heavily on the existing character of the study area for their materiality, form and colour providing a strong visual connection and integration with the surrounding area. vi. The development of Legacy Park enhances the amenity of the existing environs both from an aesthetic and ecological perspective. Analysis of the Stake Centre Development, within context of the above factors, when considered from the view locations within and surrounding Temple View found that: i. The Stake Centre Development will have positive potential effects on the landscape/urban character and amenity of Temple View. Due to the detailed design of the building, and its strong referencing of and response to the existing architecture in all elements, critical character issues regarding the spatial relationship of the 'gateway' effect of the Teacher Housing and Road Corridor are considered to be maintained. ii. In general, visual effects will increase at close proximity to the development but quickly decrease beyond Tuhikaramea Road. Effects in close proximity (being View Locations 2 & 3) are considered to have a moderate positive effect on visual amenity. These visual effects will include a minor shift in the character of the area due to the change in grain of development within the Teacher Housing area of the Stake Centre Site, (being the replacement of a several smaller building with one large building), and the creation of more open space with the development of the access road and siting of the Stake Centre which results in a more open and inclusive character. iii. From other view locations the effect on visual amenity is low - negligible, where visible the development will be integrated into the surrounding development such that it quickly becomes a minor increase in the ratio of built structures within the view. On balance, once the Stake Centre Development works have been undertaken, the visual character of the surrounding environment is considered not to be adversely affected. iv. When considering urban amenity effects, the development will provide an enhancement to the existing amenity of the area. The Stake Centre Development is consistent with good urban design as it includes the creation of safe, attractive and secure pathways and links between centres, landmarks and neighbourhoods, which encourage walking and has green networks that link with public and private open Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 37 of 77
  • 39. space, improved accessibility to public services and facilities, and includes the treatment of streets as positive spaces with multiple functions. It is considered that, the Stake Centre Development meets the intent of the relevant objectives, policies and rules of the HCODP and is consistent with the requirements of sections 6(b) and 7(c) of the RMA. Overall the Stake Centre Development, although likely to have a moderate effect at close proximity, this effect is considered to be positive on urban character and visual amenity. Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 38 of 77
  • 40. Appendix One: Methodological Flow Chart Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 39 of 77
  • 41. Appendix Two: MGLA Plan Set Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 40 of 77
  • 42. Site Location Proposed Stake Centre Development, Temple View, Hamilton . Scale 1:3,200 at A3 . JuLY 2013 . R1
  • 43. PREPAREDBYMANSERGHGRAHAMLANDSCAPEARCHITECTS TEMPLE VIEW STAKE CENTRE AND LEGACY PARK OVERVIEW CONCEPT CLIENT / THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS TRUST BOARD PROJECT / 2012-019 SCALE / 1:1,200 AT A1 DATE / 21/08/2013 / R14 2-A010 PLANNO. KEY STAKE CENTRE AND LEGACY PARK SITE BOUNDARY LEGACY PARK SITE BOUNDARY (COMPONENT WITHIN HAMILTON CITY COUNCIL) LEGACY PARK SITE BOUNDARY (COMPONENT WITHIN WAIPA DISTRICT COUNCIL) SITE AREA = 59,270 M2 SITE COVERAGE = 4,800 M2 (8%) RECREATION AND AMENITY SPACE (10% MINIMUM) LEGACY PARK AREA = 32,285 m2 (55%) SERVICE AREA = 37 M2 LOADING SPACE = 1 SETBACK PLANTING (30% MINIMUM) TOTAL SETBACK AREA = 1550 M2 PLANTED AREA = 480 M2 (31%)
  • 44. PREPAREDBYMANSERGHGRAHAMLANDSCAPEARCHITECTS TEMPLE VIEW STAKE CENTRE AND LEGACY PARK OVERVIEW DETAIL 1 CONCEPT CLIENT / THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS TRUST BOARD PROJECT / 2012-019 SCALE / 1:400 AT A1 DATE / 31/07/2013 / R13 2-A011 PLANNO.
  • 45. PREPAREDBYMANSERGHGRAHAMLANDSCAPEARCHITECTS TEMPLE VIEW STAKE CENTRE AND LEGACY PARK NORTHERN COURTYARD DEVELOPED DESIGN CLIENT / THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS TRUST BOARD PROJECT / 2012-019 SCALE / AS SHOWN AT A1 DATE / 15/05/2013 / R0 2-B090 PLANNO.
  • 46. PREPAREDBYMANSERGHGRAHAMLANDSCAPEARCHITECTS TEMPLE VIEW STAKE CENTRE AND LEGACY PARK SOUTHERN COURTYARD DEVELOPED DESIGN CLIENT / THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS TRUST BOARD PROJECT / 2012-019 SCALE / 1:100 AT A1 DATE / 19/07/2013 / R5 2-B110 PLANNO.
  • 47. PREPAREDBYMANSERGHGRAHAMLANDSCAPEARCHITECTS TEMPLE VIEW STAKE CENTRE AND LEGACY PARK PAVING DEVELOPED DESIGN CLIENT / THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS TRUST BOARD PROJECT / 2012-019 SCALE / 1:125 AT A1 DATE / 10/06/2013 / R4 2-B010 PLANNO.
  • 48. PREPAREDBYMANSERGHGRAHAMLANDSCAPEARCHITECTS TEMPLE VIEW STAKE CENTRE AND LEGACY PARK LEGACY PARK OVERVIEW CONCEPT CLIENT / THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS TRUST BOARD PROJECT / 2012-019 SCALE / 1:750 AT A1 DATE / 21/08/2013 / R8 2-A015 PLANNO.
  • 49. PREPAREDBYMANSERGHGRAHAMLANDSCAPEARCHITECTS TEMPLE VIEW STAKE CENTRE AND LEGACY PARK TREES AND PLANTING CONCEPT CLIENT / THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS TRUST BOARD PROJECT / 2012-019 SCALE / 1:750 AT A1 DATE / 21/08/2013 / R10 2-A013 PLANNO.
  • 50. PREPAREDBYMANSERGHGRAHAMLANDSCAPEARCHITECTS TEMPLE VIEW TUHIKARAMEA ROAD PAVING DEVELOPED DESIGN CLIENT / THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS TRUST BOARD PROJECT / 2012-019 scale / AS SHOWN at a1 DATE / 31/07/2013 / R7 3-B010 PLANNO.
  • 51. PREPAREDBYMANSERGHGRAHAMLANDSCAPEARCHITECTS TEMPLE VIEW TUHIKARAMEA ROAD WALLS AND PAVING DEVELOPED DESIGN CLIENT / THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS TRUST BOARD PROJECT / 2012-019 scale / 1:75 at a1 DATE / 04/07/2013 / R4 3-B021 PLANNO.
  • 52. PREPAREDBYMANSERGHGRAHAMLANDSCAPEARCHITECTS TEMPLE VIEW STAKE CENTRE AND LEGACY PARK LEGACY PARK THEMING AND IMAGERY CONCEPT CLIENT / THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS TRUST BOARD PROJECT / 2012-019 SCALE / NOT TO SCALE DATE / 17/06/2013 / R0 T1 PLANNO. REFURBISHED PEDESTRIAN AND VEHICULAR BRIDGE | COMBINES FUNCTION AND ORNAMENT. ORNAMENTAL LASERCUT BALUSTRADES ARE BASED ON AN ORGANIC ECOLOGICAL PATTERN, THE DECKING MATCHES THE SURROUNDING TIMBER BOARDWALKS ELEVATED DECKING AND SEATING | TRAVERSE THE STORMWATER RETENTION POND FEATURES. SWEEPING CURVED FORMS PROVIDE A CONNECTION WITH THE PONDS ECOLOGY. AN OCCASSIONAL BRONZED TOOL CAN BE FOUND NEAR THE INTEGRATED SEATING IN MEMORY OF THE LABOUR MISSIONARIES CRUSHED LIMESTONE PEDESTRIAN LINK | CONNECTING WITH TEMPLE
  • 53. Appendix Three: Zone of Theoretical Visibility (ZTV) Map Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 52 of 77
  • 54. COLLINS ROAD TUHIKARAM EA ROAD KOROMATUA ROAD FOSTER ROAD HOWDENROAD O'REGANROAD WILLISROAD BARRETT ROAD ROWE ROAD WALLACE ROAD TAITUA ROAD WOODROAD KAHIKATEA DRIVE O'DEA ROAD COWLEY DRIVE FLETCHER ROAD BOWMANROAD M CCANDLISH RO AD DESERETROAD HIGGINSROAD GOODWINTERRACE WADELANE NEWTON PLACE Scale at A3 . June 2013 . Map No-1 R0 Zone of Theoretical Visibility (ZTV) 1:20,000Stake Centre Development,Temple View. 0 450 900 1,350 1,800225 Meters Legend Property Boundaries 500m Distance Rings Proposed Stake Centre Visibility 0.1% - 11% 12% - 21% 22% - 30% 31% - 40% 41% - 50% 51% - 60% 61% - 70% 71% - 80% 81% - 90% 91% - 100% Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 53 of 77
  • 55. Appendix Four: View Location Map Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 54 of 77
  • 56. 7 1 3 6 8 5 4 2 TUHIKARAM EA ROAD COLLINS ROAD FOSTER ROAD KOROMATUA ROAD WOODROAD WALLACE ROAD COWLEY DRIVE MCKAY DRIVE DESERETROAD WADELANE Scale at A4 . June 2013 . Map No-1 R0 View Location Map 1:15,000Stake Centre Development,Temple View. 0 180 360 540 72090 Meters Legend View Locations Property Boundaries 500m Distance Rings Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 55 of 77
  • 57. Appendix Five: View Locations and Visual Effect Ratings Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 56 of 77
  • 58. No.  Name  Type  VAC Ratings and Notes  Key Attributes of the View  Potential Effects    Effect Rating   VL1  Tuhikaramea  Road  Public  Good:  Predominantly due to:     Majority of proposed  development will be  screened/ back‐ dropped by existing  vegetation.     Existing residential/  former CCNZ Campus  development  adjacent to the  subject site will  partially screen and  backdrop the  proposed  development and  provide development  context.     Lack of topographic  screening, partial  topographic  backdrop.     Views across residential  and former CCNZ Campus  development, containing  Tuhikaramea Roadway,   mature street trees,  curtilage wall, previous  teacher housing buildings in  the fore and mid‐ground,  giving way to glimpsed  views of agricultural  landscape and the Temple  in the background.  Due to extensive existing intervening buildings and  vegetation adjacent to Tuhikaramea Road, the proposed  Stake Centre building and Legacy Park will be difficult to  discern from this view location. Clear views of the  Tuhikaramea Road upgrade and northern roundabout will  be afforded. Although the roundabouts will require an  increased extent of road surface, which will slightly alter  the existing distinctive Tuhikaramea Road corridor  character, this will be offset by the proposed street tree  planting which will maintain the enclosed corridor  character. Extensive amenity planting within the  roundabouts, adjacent to parking bays and at pedestrian  crossings will enhance amenity values. The proposed  roundabouts will also promote good urban design  practice, aiding in slowing traffic down through temple  View village.    Existing former CCNZ Campus (adjacent to subject site) will  provide a development context for proposed Stake Centre  development.     Proposed planting along Tuhikaramea Road frontage will  provide further screening of the Stake Centre  development.  Visual effects of the proposed Stake Centre  development will therefore be negligible.    Negligible  VL2  Tuhikaramea  Road  Public  Poor:  Predominantly due to:     Lack of vegetative  back‐drop.     Existing residential/  former CCNZ Campus  development  adjacent to the  subject site will  provide development  Views across residential  and former CCNZ Campus  development, containing  Tuhikaramea Roadway,   mature street trees,  curtilage wall, previous  teacher housing buildings in  the fore and mid‐ground,  giving way to glimpsed  views of agricultural  landscape and the Temple  in the background.  Proposed development will be focal feature of view  (framed by proposed street trees) as motorists travel  south along Tuhikaramea Road. The proposed size and of  the Stake Centre building is greater than the existing  teacher housing along Tuhikaramea Road. However, the  visual bulk of the building will be reduced by the  articulated form of the building and single storey height  along the Tuhikaramea Road frontage. The Tuhikaramea  Road offset will be consistent with the existing teacher  housing buildings. The former CCNZ Campus and Temple  developments of a similar size, form and materiality will  provide a context for the development.   Moderate  Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 57 of 77
  • 59. No.  Name  Type  VAC Ratings and Notes  Key Attributes of the View  Potential Effects    Effect Rating   context.     Lack of topographic  screening or  backdrop.    Unobstructed views of the Tuhikaramea Road upgrade and  roundabouts will be afforded. Although the roundabouts  result in an increased extent of road surface, the upgrade  also reduces the width of the road surface visible. The  shared use pathways and replacement curtilage walls in  conjunction with the replacement street tree planting  enhance the corridor character along the road. Amenity  planting within the roundabouts, adjacent to parking bays  and at pedestrian crossings will enhance amenity values.  The proposed roundabouts will also promote good urban  design practice, aiding in slowing traffic down through  Temple View village.    Existing vegetation within the subject site and  neighbouring properties provide partial screening of the  proposed development. Proposed planting along  Tuhikaramea Road frontage will provide further screening  of the Stake Centre development and soften the building  form, and aid in integrating the proposed building with the  existing landscape.    A slight change in the existing grain of development will  result (height and spacing between teacher housing  buildings) with moderate visual effects of the proposed  Stake Centre development.    VL3  Tuhikaramea  Road  Public  Poor:  Predominantly due to:     Majority of proposed  development will be  screened/ back‐ dropped by existing  vegetation.     Existing residential/  former CCNZ Campus  development  Views across residential  and former CCNZ Campus  development, containing  Tuhikaramea Roadway,  mature street trees,  curtilage wall, teacher  housing in the mid‐ground.  Portion of planting in the  Temple Precinct comprises  the foreground.   Proposed development will be focal feature of view as  motorists travel north along Tuhikaramea Road. From this  view location, the greatest extent of development will be  visible: partial views of both levels of the Stake centre  building and associated car park, Legacy Park,  Tuhikaramea Road upgrade (including roundabouts) and  proposed curtilage wall.     The full height of the Stake Centre building will be seen  from this location and the relationship of the articulated  form of the building and single storey height along the  Tuhikaramea Road frontage. The offset from Tuhikaramea  Moderate  Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 58 of 77
  • 60. No.  Name  Type  VAC Ratings and Notes  Key Attributes of the View  Potential Effects    Effect Rating   adjacent to the  subject site will  partially screen and  backdrop the  proposed  development and  provide development  context.     Elevated position will  increase potential  visibility. Partial  topographic  backdrop.    Road will be consistent with the existing teacher housing.  Existing former CCNZ Campus and Temple development  (adjacent to subject site) of a similar size, form and  materiality provide context for proposed development.     Unobstructed views of the Tuhikaramea Road upgrade will  be afforded. The upgrade reduces the width of the road  surface visible and in conjunction with the shared use  pathways, replacement curtilage walls and the  replacement street tree planting enhance the corridor  character along the road.    Existing vegetation within the subject site and within  neighbouring properties will provide partial screening of  the proposed development. Proposed planting along  Tuhikaramea Road frontage will provide further screening  of the Stake Centre development and soften the building  form, integrating the proposed building with the existing  landscape.    There will be a change in the existing grain of development  (height and spacing between teacher housing buildings)  with moderate visual effects of the proposed Stake Centre  development.      VL4  Foster Road  Public  Good:  Predominantly due to:     Majority of Proposed  Stake Centre  Development will be  screened and back  dropped by existing  buildings and existing  and proposed  vegetation.     Views across mixed  landscape character  containing  residential/community  facility development and  pastoral landscape  containing shelterbelts,  hedgerows and mature  trees in the fore‐ midground, giving way to  background views of the  Temple building and former  Topography grades up towards Tuhikaramea Road  preventing extensive views out over the surrounding  pastoral plains.    Glimpsed views of the Stake Centre building may be  obtained through existing vegetation along Foster Road  and proposed vegetation. These views will be seen within  the context of residential development. The proposed  development is unlikely to alter existing landscape  character or affect existing amenity values from this view  location.    Negligible  Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 59 of 77
  • 61. No.  Name  Type  VAC Ratings and Notes  Key Attributes of the View  Potential Effects    Effect Rating    Existing Temple  building will provide  building size and  character context.     Lack of topographic  screening and  backdrop.  CCNZ Campus  development.  The proposed roundabout development associated with  the Tuhikaramea Road upgrade will be visible at the end of  Foster Road from this view location. The proposed  amenity planting within the roundabout will reduce the  visual effect of the increased road extent at this junction.     VL5  McKay Road  Public  Good:  Predominantly due to:     Majority of Proposed  Stake Centre  Development will be  screened and back‐ dropped by existing  residential buildings  and existing and  proposed vegetation.     Existing Temple  building will provide  building size and  character context.     Lack of topographic  screening and  backdrop.    Elevated Views across  residential development in  the fore‐midground, with  extensive vegetation and  glimpsed distant views of  pastoral plains containing  shelterbelts, hedgerows,  mature trees and  horticultural fields.   The roofline of the Stake Centre is likely to be the only  element of the proposed development visible from this  view location. Due to the screening afforded from existing  residential houses, community facility buildings and  vegetation; the proposed development will only be  partially visible and integrate with the existing urban  landscape.     Existing vegetation within the subject site and within the  surrounding landscape will provide partial backdrop of the  proposed development.      Very low  VL6  Foster Road  Public  Very Good:  Predominantly due to:     Existing partial  vegetative screening  and backdrop of  proposed  development.    Views over mixed  landscape character, with  flat‐gently undulating  pastoral plains containing  shelterbelts, hedgerows,  mature trees, rural  residential housing in the  foreground and mid‐ ground, giving way to a  The elevation of this particular view location allows partial  views through gaps in existing vegetation to the upper  portion of the Stake Centre building.      The proposed building will be partially screened and back‐ dropped by existing vegetation, and seen within the  context of existing residential development, former CCNZ  Campus and Temple development (adjacent to subject  site). Visual effects will therefore be low; as the proposed  Low  Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 60 of 77
  • 62. No.  Name  Type  VAC Ratings and Notes  Key Attributes of the View  Potential Effects    Effect Rating    Existing residential,  former CCNZ Campus  and Temple  development  adjacent to the  subject site provide  context for proposed  Stake Centre  development.     Lack of topographic  screening and  backdrop. Buffer  distance.    backdrop of pastoral  landscape and Temple View  residential and Hamilton  city development, with the  Kaimai Ranges, Mangakino  hills and Mount Pirongia in  the far distance.  development will integrate with the existing grain of  development.     Similar materiality, colour and building scale to the  surrounding former CCNZ Campus and Temple  development will further aid in ensuring a consistent  character and reduce adverse visual effects. Extensive  proposed planting will integrate the proposed  development with surrounding vegetation patterns and  provide additional screening and back‐dropping of the  proposed development.    Considerable distance of view and context of existing  development will limit visual effects.    VL7  Wallace Road  Public  Very Good:  Predominantly due to:     Some vegetative  screening of  proposed  development, some  vegetative backdrop.     Existing   development within  subject site provides  context for proposed  development.     Some midground  topographic  screening and  backdrop.    Views over mixed  landscape character, with  flat‐gently undulating  pastoral plains containing  shelterbelts, hedgerows,  mature trees in the  foreground, residential  development/ Temple/  former CCNZ Campus of  Temple View in the mid‐ ground, giving way to a  backdrop of Hamilton City  development and  agricultural/ horticultural  land, with the Kaimai  Ranges, Mangakino hills  and Mount Pirongia in the  far distance.  Views of the Stake Centre building roofline will be afforded  from this view location.    Existing former CCNZ Campus and Temple development  (adjacent to subject site) will provide context for proposed  Stake Centre development.     Existing vegetation within and surrounding the subject site  will provide partial screening of the proposed  development.    Amenity planting within the subject site will screen and  provide a backdrop for the proposed Stake Centre  development and will reduce visual effects by screening  the majority of the Stake centre building from view.  Proposed street tree planting along Tuhikaramea Road will  provide further screening and ensure the distinctive  character of the road remains. Proposed mass planting  and retention of extensive existing planting, as well as  proposed water features will increase amenity values.    Considerable distance of view and context of existing  development will limit visual effects.  Negligible  Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 61 of 77
  • 63. No.  Name  Type  VAC Ratings and Notes  Key Attributes of the View  Potential Effects    Effect Rating   VL8  Collins Road  Public  Very Good:  Predominantly due to:     Extensive existing  and proposed  vegetative screening  of proposed Stake  Centre development.     Existing Church  College campus and  Temple building,  adjacent to subject  site will provide  context for proposed  Stake Centre  development.     Lack of topographic  screening, some  topographic  backdrop. Buffer  distance.    Views over mixed  landscape character, with  flat‐gently undulating  pastoral plains containing  shelterbelts, hedgerows,  mature trees, dwellings,  Temple and Temple  accommodation and  former CCNZ Campus.  Buffer distance from proposed development, extensive  existing vegetative screening and backdrop mean that the  majority of the proposed development will not be visible  from this view location. The roofline of the proposed Stake  Centre building may be visible between gaps in the  existing vegetation.    Materiality, colour and building scale akin with the  surrounding former CCNZ Campus and Temple  development will further aid in ensuring a consistent  character and reduce adverse visual effects. Extensive  proposed planting will integrate the proposed  development with surrounding vegetation patterns and  provide additional screening and back‐dropping of the  proposed development.    Negligible    Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 62 of 77
  • 64. Appendix Six: Visual Absorption Capability Ratings Visual Absorption Capability Rating Definition The Visual Absorption Capability rating (VAC) is an indicator of a landscape’s ability to absorb visual change, i.e. how well a landscape can either screen or hide a development or how well a development integrates with the surrounding landscape without changing its essential character and qualities. VAC ratings are not effect laden. This means that a very poor rating does not necessarily correspond with an extreme adverse effect. Visual Absorption Capability Definition Ratings VAC Rating Use Very Good  The proposed development/activity would be completely screened, almost completely screened or completely absorbed by existing landscape features. Any views of the development would be either unidentifiable or at a great distance, and/or;  The development/activity would not affect the existing character of the surrounding landscape or view in which it is seen, and/or;  The development/activity would introduce a visual element into the landscape or view which may be viewed very frequently or continuously in that or similar landscape types. Good  The proposed development/activity would be mostly screened or visually absorbed by existing landscape features, but still be identifiable. The development/activity may act as a tertiary focal attraction within the landscape or view in which it is seen, and/or;  The development/activity would not affect the existing character of the surrounding landscape or view in which it is seen, and/or;  The development/activity may introduce a visual element into the landscape or view which may be viewed frequently in that or similar landscape types. Neutral  The proposed development/activity would neither be screened nor become a visual intrusion or focal attraction within the landscape or view in which it is seen. The proposed development/activity may act as a minor focal attraction from some locations, and/or;  The development/activity would alter the existing character of the surrounding landscape or view in which it is seen, and/or;  The development/activity would introduce a visual element into the landscape or view which may be viewed occasionally in that or similar landscape types. Poor  The proposed development/activity would be clearly visible but would not act as a primary focal attraction, and/or;  It would be expected that the proposed development/activity would alter the existing character of the surrounding landscape or view in which it is seen, and/or;  The development/activity may introduce a new visual element into the landscape or view. The development/activity may be viewed infrequently in that or similar landscape types. Very Poor  The proposed development/activity will be highly visible and may act as a primary focal attraction or feature. It would also be expected that the proposed development/activity will significantly alter the existing character of the surrounding landscape or view in which it is seen, and/or;  The development/activity will introduce a new visual element into the landscape or view, which will be significantly different in appearance, or scale from the landscape elements surrounding it, and/or;  The development/activity would be found very rarely in that or similar landscape types. Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 63 of 77
  • 65. Appendix Seven: Landscape and Visual Amenity Effect - Rating System   Effects Rating Use and Definition Extreme Use The development/activity would: a. Result in an extreme change on the characteristics or key attributes of the receiving environment and/or the vista within which it is seen; and/or b. Have an extreme effect on the perceived amenity derived from it. Oxford English Dictionary Definition Extreme: adjective 1 utmost. 2 reaching a high or the highest degree. Very High Use The development/activity would: c. Have a very high level of effect on the character or key attributes of the receiving environment and/or the vista within which it is seen; and/or d. Have a very high level effect on the perceived amenity derived from it. Oxford English Dictionary Definition Very: adverb 1 in a high degree. 2 with superlative or own without qualification: the very best quality. High: adjective 1 extending above the normal level. 2 great in amount, value, size, or intensity. 3 great in rank or status. 4 morally or culturally superior. High Use The development/activity would: e. Have a high level of effect on the character or key attributes of the receiving environment and/or the vista within which it is seen; and/or f. Have a high level of effect on the perceived amenity derived from it. Oxford English Dictionary Definition High: adjective 1 extending above the normal level. 2 great in amount, value, size, or intensity. 3 great in rank or status. 4 morally or culturally superior. Moderate Use The development/activity would: g. Have a moderate level of effect on the character or key attributes of the receiving environment and/or the vista within which it is seen; and/or h. Have a moderate level of effect on the perceived amenity derived from it. Oxford English Dictionary Definition Moderate: adjective 1 average in amount, intensity, or degree. “Minor” Threshold Under the RMA. Ratings above this threshold are “More than Minor”. Ratings below this threshold are “Less than Minor”. Low- Moderate ratings are “Minor”. Low Use The development/activity would: i. Have an low level of effect on the character or key attributes of the receiving environment and/or the vista within which it is seen; and/or j. Have a low level of effect on the perceived amenity derived from it. Oxford English Dictionary Definition Low: adjective 1 below average in amount, extent, or intensity. 2 lacking importance, prestige, or quality; inferior. Very Low Use The development/activity would: k. Have an very low level of effect on the character or key attributes of the receiving environment and/or the vista within which it is seen; and/or l. Have a very low level of effect on the perceived amenity derived from it. Oxford English Dictionary Definition Very: adverb 1 in a high degree. 2 with superlative or own without qualification: the very best quality. Low: adjective 1 below average in amount, extent, or intensity. 2 lacking importance, prestige, or quality; inferior. Negligible Use The development/activity would: m. Have an negligible effect on the character or key attributes of the receiving environment and/or the vista within which it is seen; and/or n. Have a negligible effect on the perceived amenity derived from it. Oxford English Dictionary Definition Negligible: adjective that need not be considered. Detectable Effect Threshold No Effect The development/activity would have no effect on the receiving environment. Note: Ratings may be positive (e.g. high level of enhancement) or negative (e.g. high adverse effect). Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 64 of 77
  • 66. Appendix Eight: View Location Photographs and Photomontages Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 65 of 77
  • 67. View Locations and Photomontages Proposed Stake Centre Development, Temple View, Hamilton . June 2013 . R0 View Location Data NZMG Easting: 1795956 NZMG Northing: 5811840 Focal length: 50mm Photographer: L. Burge Camera: Canon EOS D5 Full Frame Digital with EF 50mm F/1.4 USM (Prime) Date: 24 May 2013 View Location One - Existing Panorama, Looking South, from Tuhikaramea Road Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 66 of 77
  • 68. View Locations and Photomontages Proposed Stake Centre Development, Temple View, Hamilton . June 2013 . R0 View Location Data NZMG Easting: 1795927 NZMG Northing: 5811581 Focal length: 50mm Photographer: L. Burge Camera: Canon EOS D5 Full Frame Digital with EF 50mm F/1.4 USM (Prime) Date: 27 September 2012 View Location Two - Existing Panorama, Looking Southwest, from the corner of Tuhikaramea and Foster Roads Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 67 of 77
  • 69. View Locations and Photomontages Proposed Stake Centre Development, Temple View, Hamilton . June 2013 . R0 View Location Data NZMG Easting: 1795927 NZMG Northing: 5811581 Focal length: 50mm Photographer: L. Burge Camera: Canon EOS D5 Full Frame Digital with EF 50mm F/1.4 USM (Prime) Date: 27 September 2012 View Location Two - Photomontage of Stake centre Development, Looking Southwest, from the corner of Tuhikaramea and Foster Roads A 3D digital model of the proposed development was produced and accurately superimposed into each image using a combination of Adobe Photoshop CS5, ArcGIS ArcMap and Cameramatch for Vectorworks 2012, in accordance with NZILA best practice guidelines. Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 68 of 77
  • 70. View Locations and Photomontages Proposed Stake Centre Development, Temple View, Hamilton . June 2013 . R0 View Location Three - Existing Panorama, Looking Northeast, from Tuhikaramea RoadView Location Data NZMG Easting: 1795795 NZMG Northing: 5811347 Focal length: 50mm Photographer: L. Burge Camera: Canon EOS D5 Full Frame Digital with EF 50mm F/1.4 USM (Prime) Date: 24 May 2013 Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 69 of 77
  • 71. View Locations and Photomontages Proposed Stake Centre Development, Temple View, Hamilton . August 2013 . R1 View Location Three - Photomontage of Stake Centre Development, Looking Northeast, from Tuhikaramea RoadView Location Data NZMG Easting: 440545 NZMG Northing: 695066 Focal length: 50mm Photographer: L. Burge Camera: Canon EOS D5 Full Frame Digital with EF 50mm F/1.4 USM (Prime) Date: 24 May 2013 A 3D digital model of the proposed development was produced and accurately superimposed into each image using a combination of Adobe Photoshop CS5, ArcGIS ArcMap and Cameramatch for Vectorworks 2012, in accordance with NZILA best practice guidelines.
  • 72. View Locations and Photomontages Proposed Stake Centre Development, Temple View, Hamilton . June 2013 . R0 View Location Four - Existing Panorama, Looking Southeast, from Foster RoadView Location Data NZMG Easting: 1795506 NZMG Northing: 5811672 Focal length: 50mm Photographer: L. Burge Camera: Canon EOS D5 Full Frame Digital with EF 50mm F/1.4 USM (Prime) Date: 24 May 2013 Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 71 of 77
  • 73. View Locations and Photomontages Proposed Stake Centre Development, Temple View, Hamilton . June 2013 . R0 View Location Five - Existing Panorama, Looking Southeast, from McKay DriveView Location Data NZMG Easting: 1795616 NZMG Northing: 5811881 Focal length: 50mm Photographer: L. Burge Camera: Canon EOS D5 Full Frame Digital with EF 50mm F/1.4 USM (Prime) Date: 24 May 2013 Stake Centre Building Location Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 72 of 77
  • 74. View Locations and Photomontages Proposed Stake Centre Development, Temple View, Hamilton . June 2013 . R0 View Location Six - Existing Panorama, Looking Southeast, from Foster RoadView Location Data NZMG Easting: 1794650 NZMG Northing: 5811742 Focal length: 50mm Photographer: L. Burge Camera: Canon EOS D5 Full Frame Digital with EF 50mm F/1.4 USM (Prime) Date: 24 May 2013 Stake Centre Building Location Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 73 of 77
  • 75. View Locations and Photomontages Proposed Stake Centre Development, Temple View, Hamilton . June 2013 . R0 View Location Seven - Existing Panorama, Looking South, from Wallace RoadView Location Data NZMG Easting: 1795437 NZMG Northing: 5812831 Focal length: 50mm Photographer: L. Burge Camera: Canon EOS D5 Full Frame Digital with EF 50mm F/1.4 USM (Prime) Date: 24 May 2013 Stake Centre Building Location Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 74 of 77
  • 76. View Locations and Photomontages Proposed Stake Centre Development, Temple View, Hamilton . June 2013 . R0 View Location Eight - Existing Panorama, Looking Northwest, from Collins RoadView Location Data NZMG Easting: 1796424 NZMG Northing: 5810465 Focal length: 50mm Photographer: L. Burge Camera: Canon EOS D5 Full Frame Digital with EF 50mm F/1.4 USM (Prime) Date: 24 May 2013 Stake Centre Building Location Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 75 of 77
  • 77. Appendix Nine: Urban Amenity Assessment Factors Urban amenity is a function of the environment’s visual expression; that is the elements that contribute to its appearance, and the use and circulation patterns which occur within it. The urban amenity of the site includes the degree of permeability, surrounding spatial variety, the legibility of the elements within the environment, the extent to which these elements provide for alternate uses, the human attributes or values applied as visual appropriateness, richness and personalisation. The use of the urban amenity assessment factors allows the assessment of urban amenity values associated with these attributes. The following factors are used to identify attributes of the urban fabric which help to identify urban amenity values. They are not used to grade the particular environment but rather to identify the effect of a particular change on that environment. An increase in a particular attribute is considered to be an improvement, a decrease a degradation of a given environment. 1. Permeability: the number of alternative ways through an environment; the ability to pass through an environment with greatest number of options. A distinction is made between public and private routes, and between vehicle and pedestrian routes. 2. Spatial Variety: The number of different experiences in an environment; the different uses provided by a development, the different spaces they provide. 3. Legibility: The ease of understanding of the layout of a place; the extent to which routes and their junctions are differentiated from one another and how easily people can understand the opportunities they offer. 4. Robustness: The number of potential uses and activities possible in an environment; The extent to which the development’s spatial and constructional organisation is suitable for the widest possible range of likely activities and future uses, both in the short and long term. 5. Visual Appropriateness: The extent to which the appearance of the development reflects the choices offered by the development. How the detailed appearance of the place makes people aware of the choices. This is distinct from, but related to, the visual appearance of the development. It considers what information is being conveyed by the development rather than how much of the development is seen from particular locations. 6. Richness: The extent to which an environment offers a choice of sensory experience both visually and non visually. 7. Personalisation: The extent to which people can put their own stamp on a place. While an environment should encourage it, it should be tempered by the public utility of the environment. The order of these criteria is not a reflection on their importance but does reflect an element of scale in their application in as much as the earlier factors are more applicable to large scale aspects of a place, while the latter are more relevant at the small scale or personal level. Whilst these criteria are separated out for clarity they are inter-related in the effect they have. Thus the permeability of a place has implications on the legibility of a site. The legibility in turn has implications for visual appropriateness which also affects and may be affected by personalisation. For example while a site may allow for a number of routes through (permeability), the ability to recognise those routes (legibility) may be influenced by the layout of the site and/or the extent to which the appearance of entrances and routes are differentiated in their treatment (visual appropriateness). This may be further enhanced or confounded by changes introduced by individuals (personalisation) when they modify aspects of a building, entrance or route to accommodate a personal interest. This may be seen to occur with the addition of plants in tubs, or tables and chairs to a thoroughfare, or obscuring visual cues through signage or change of colour. Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 76 of 77
  • 78. Appendix Ten: References Beyond the pavement: RTA urban design policy, procedures and design principles, Roads and Traffic Authority, New South Wales, Australia, August 2009. New Zealand Urban Design Protocol, Ministry for the Environment, 2005. New Zealand Urban Design Toolkit: Third Edition, Ministry for the Environment, 2005. Responsive Environments: A Manual for Designers, Bently et al, 1985. Smartcode: A comprehensive Form-Based Planning Ordinance, Duany Plater-Kyberk, 2005. Smart Growth: From Sprawl to Sustainability, Jon Reeds, 2011. Sprawl Repair Manual, Galina Tachieva, Island Press, 2010. State Surgeon General Seal of Walkability: Promoting Health One step at a Time, University of Miami School of medicine, via CFS, November18, 2009. Temple View Stake Centre Development: Landscape and Visual Assessment R1 77 of 77
  • 79. 2013-008 Temple View S92 Response Page 1 of 24 This report has been prepared by Mansergh Graham Landscape  Architects Ltd on behalf of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day  Saints as part of an application for resource consent.  All work has  been undertaken and/or reviewed by a Registered NZILA  Landscape Architect.                        Michael  Graham :  B Sc, BLA, Registered NZILA Landscape Architect  Director.        Registered Member of the New Zealand Institute of Landscape Architects.                                  Version: 2013008/190313  Date: March 2013   
  • 80. 2013-008 Temple View S92 Response Page 2 of 24   INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................................... 3  METHODOLOGY .............................................................................................................................................. 3  LANDSCAPE CONTEXT .................................................................................................................................. 4  PROPOSED ACTIVITY..................................................................................................................................... 5  ASSESSMENT OF VISUAL EFFECTS ............................................................................................................ 6  Figure 1: View Location Map.......................................................................................................................... 8  TYPICAL VIEW LOCATIONS........................................................................................................................... 9  View Location 1; Looking South from Tuhikaramea Road............................................................................. 9  Figure 2: VL1: View from Tuhikaramea Road 300m North of the site....................................................... 10  View Locations 2 and 3 : From Close Proximity .......................................................................................... 11  Figure 3: VL2: View from Tuhikaramea Road 50m North of the site......................................................... 12  Figure 4: VL3: View from Tuhikaramea Road 50m South of the site. ........................................................ 13  View Location 4; Looking North from Tuhikaramea Road ........................................................................... 14  Figure 5: VL4: View from Tuhikaramea Road 300m South of the site. ...................................................... 15  RELEVANT PLANNING MATTERS............................................................................................................... 16  Resource Management Act 1991 ................................................................................................................ 16  Operative Hamilton City District Plan........................................................................................................... 16  FINDINGS........................................................................................................................................................ 18  APPENDIX 1: METHODOLOGICAL FLOW CHART..................................................................................... 19  APPENDIX 2: GENERAL ARRANGEMENT PLAN & LONG SECTION....................................................... 20  APPENDIX 3: EFFECTS RATING DEFINITIONS.......................................................................................... 22  APPENDIX 4: VISUAL ABSORPTION CAPABILITY RATING DEFINITION................................................ 23  APPENDIX 5: MGLA VIEW LOCATIONS AND RATINGS............................................................................ 24 
  • 81. 2013-008 Temple View S92 Response Page 3 of 24 INTRODUCTION The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints Trust Board has lodged an application for resource consent for the demolition of four boys dormitories, an associated lounge and recreation area, and a medical centre and accessory garage, the construction of a roundabout on Tuhikaramea Road; and the formation of 150m of a new internal road within the former Church College New Zealand campus Temple View. Mansergh Graham Landscape Architects (MGLA) have been engaged by Bloxam Burnett & Olliver on behalf of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints Trust Board to undertake a visual assessment report in response to Hamilton City Council's Request For Further Information (letter dated 7 March 2013 in regard to Resource Consent No: 10/2013/6801). The following visual assessment report has been prepared with specific attention to the relevant assessment criteria contained within Rule 2.7 .5 Assessment Criteria - Restricted Discretionary and Discretionary Activities within the Operative District Plan. This report should be read in conjunction with the consent application and AEE documentation. Three main aspects are evaluated within this report. They are: a. The existing character of the site and its place in the local and regional context. b. The potential landscape and visual effects of the proposed development from typical viewer locations. c. An assessment against the relevant criteria contained within Rule 2.7.5 Assessment Criteria - Restricted Discretionary and Discretionary Activities of the Operative District Plan. METHODOLOGY A standard assessment approach has been used to identify the existing landscape character of the site and its surroundings and to assess the potential effects of the proposed demolition and development on landscape and visual amenity. A combination of desk top analysis and field assessment has been undertaken to identify the potential visibility of the proposed development from surrounding areas. In broad terms, the assessment consists of the: a. Identification of the key elements or attributes of the proposed activity; b. Identification of the landscape values, character, key attributes within the context of associative and visual landscape interpretation; and c. Identification of relevant assessment criteria within the context of the relevant statutory framework. By considering the above, the likely effects of the proposed development are able to be identified and rated. The application has been assessed against the existing environment baseline. A methodological flow chart is contained in appendix one.
  • 82. 2013-008 Temple View S92 Response Page 4 of 24 LANDSCAPE CONTEXT Landscape character is the expression of natural and cultural elements, processes and patterns in a particular area. The distinctive combination of these attributes gives an area its distinctive identity or genius loci. The Existing Site and Context The application site is located within Temple View, a discrete suburb located approximately 1.7km south west of the main conurbation of Hamilton City. Surrounded by rural landuse, Temple View overlays a series of gentle to steeply rolling low hills, which rise above an area of low lying peat land to the north and north- east. Temple View is connected to Hamilton City by Tuhikaramea Road, a collector road which passes through the low lying rural landscape before reaching Temple View, at the crest of the hill before continuing in a south to south-westerly direction through to State Highway 39. Temple View is a suburb of two distinct characters, effectively separated by Tuhikaramea Road. Development to the east broadly parallels Tuhikaramea Road and through a combination of layout, building scale, colour, landscape treatment and maintenance has a distinctive institutional and ecumenical character. Much of this character is derived from the cultural influence of the Hamilton New Zealand Temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and the associated former Church College of New Zealand (CCNZ) campus. The present day character reflects the combination of planned and opportune incremental development that occurred over the initial construction period throughout the 1950's and 1960's, and has continued to evolve to present day. This process involved the construction of a range of buildings, some specifically for or in support of the former CCNZ, while others formed part of the construction industry which developed onsite during this period. Over time buildings were removed, re-purposed or modified, and others added as required. This has resulted in a variety of styles and forms of building, reflecting the pragmatic and utilitarian requirements of their time. The application of a limited colour palette and tended landscape, has provided a sense of coherence to what would otherwise appear markedly disparate elements. However many of the structures, while appearing ostensibly sound, are now over 50 years old and no longer meet contemporary standards for building code compliance or structural integrity. The continued management of the area by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints has to date ensured the maintenance of the development. By contrast the existing residential development extends in a broadly perpendicular band westward from Tuhikaramea Road. This area is of a different character; predominantly closely grained residential development which has evolved through successive district planning regimes, subdividing the original lot configuration that followed the establishment of the CCNZ. This has produced a mix of housing styles, both single and double storey, that have continued to evolve to present day and is similar to many suburbs developed through the 50's and 60s in Hamilton and elsewhere in New Zealand. The Teacher Housing Character Area, as defined in the Operative District Plan, is a distinct variation to these two broad character areas which straddles Tuhikaramea Road. It occupies the more southerly eastern and western edge of the former CCNZ and the residential development respectively. The character of the Teacher Housing Character Area is a product of the 1950's, informed by a level of spatial consistency and repetition of modest residential scale architecture, materiality and colour. The buildings are pragmatic, oriented toward Tuhikaramea Road with modest gates and simple direct pathways leading from the street to the houses. The buildings are positioned in a regular manner relative to their setback from Tuhikaramea Road corridor and side yards, which sets them apart from the balance of residential development in the area.
  • 83. 2013-008 Temple View S92 Response Page 5 of 24 The Application Site The application site is located toward the northerly extent of the former CCNZ campus, some 250 metres north of the Teacher Housing Character Area. This area sits on the transition between the rural/urban edge of Temple View. The application site includes a cluster of four dormitory buildings, (Boyack, Taylor, Wiser and Oakes), an associated lounge/recreational building, the Medical Centre and associated garage outbuilding. These sit on a modified ridgeline, several metres below the existing road level. Two of the buildings proposed for demolition, the Boyack and Taylor dormitories, are located adjacent, but oriented obliquely to Tuhikaramea Road. When viewed from the west, the balance of the buildings sit behind these two dormitory buildings, extending away in a south easterly direction. These buildings form part of development that is visible along the modified ridgeline that overlooks the playing fields at the northern extent of the former CCNZ. The context and location of the buildings, with road elevated above and the grass embankment and playing fields below creates a discrete node of development that is separated from its surroundings. This area is typically accessed through the main campus. PROPOSED ACTIVITY The applicant is seeking consent to demolish six buildings and an accessory building, form a roundabout on Tuhikaramea Road and approximately 150m of new public road. The new road will provide access to an existing formed car park located to the north west of the Matthew Cowley administration building. In time this road will be extended to link with a new internal roading network, which will be the subject of a separate future consent application. Minor earthworks and re-grading will be undertaken to integrate the proposed development with the surrounding area. The area will then be grassed and specimen tree planting undertaken, subject to the timing of any future consent applications for this area. Key components of the application that have the potential to affect the landscape and visual amenity include: i. The removal of the seven buildings within the former church college complex; and ii. The construction of a roundabout and some 150 metres of new road. A plan of the proposed development, prepared by Bloxam Burnett & Olliver Ltd, is contained in appendix 2 ( Refer; General Arrangement Plan and Long Section).
  • 84. 2013-008 Temple View S92 Response Page 6 of 24 ASSESSMENT OF VISUAL EFFECTS With regard to the potential for the site to absorb the proposed subdivision, the following factors were evaluated during the visual assessment; Visual Catchment Site inspection identified that the visual catchment surrounding the site is influenced by topography and land cover in the following way: i. The ridgeline location of the subject buildings, the relative elevation of the Tuhikaramea Road and the balance of the former CCNZ buildings largely restrict views into the area from the south and east. Close proximity views are accessible from the Tuhikaramea Road but other publicly or privately accessible views from other directions are predominantly either screened by topography or reduced to small components of larger vistas due to distance. ii. Vegetation, both within the site and in the surrounding area, which consists of amenity/shelter planting and significant stands of existing trees immediately to the north and north east of the study area will restrict views of the changes to the extent and configuration of buildings within the former CCNZ campus from the north and north east. iii. The application site is located on the transition between rural and urban character on the edge of Temple View. Visual Absorption Capability One of the main factors that will influence a developments’ visual effect, is the visual absorption capability of the surrounding landscape. This is the ability of the landscape to integrate a development, or feature, into its existing visual character without significant change. Each view location has been rated in terms of its visual absorption capability (VAC). Factors considered in determining the sites VAC rating include: i. The degree to which the development is visible; ii. Visual and physical links with other similar elements or activities in the landscape; iii. The level of modification to the surrounding landscape (short and long term); iv. Appropriateness of scale; v. Distance; vi. Backdrop; and vii. Atmospheric conditions. The site’s ability to visually absorb the change associated with the proposed development is good to very good. Very good ratings were typically recorded for view locations where intervening topography and/or vegetation prevented clear views of the application site. These included view locations 1 & 4. Good ratings were typically recorded for locations with more open, close proximity views, such as view location 2 & 3. Visual absorption capability ratings for all view locations and rating definitions are contained within appendix four and five of this report respectively. It is noted that during winter, when some of the trees surrounding the site are not in leaf some VAC ratings may reduce somewhat.
  • 85. 2013-008 Temple View S92 Response Page 7 of 24 Viewer Distance Notable views of the subject site are generally restricted to within one kilometre of the site. Views of the site from locations in excess of this distance diminish to the point at which they become negligible or are less frequent due to intervening vegetation or topography. A number of potential view locations were investigated during the preparation of this report. Four view locations were selected for review, on the basis of existing views, viewing frequency, viewer types, the availability of the view from public or private property, viewer distance and the viewing time and framework available at the time of study. (These view locations are shown on View Location Map page 8).These view locations fell into three general categories representative of the visual catchment, as follows:  Views from north of the site;  Views from close proximity;  Views from south of the site. Potential visual, landscape and amenity effects, arising from the development, on these view locations are described later in the following section. A number of factors within and surrounding the subject site, either restrict viewing potential or assist in mitigating potential effects on visual amenity values. These include:  The topography of the site and the balance of buildings within the former CCNZ campus which restrict views of the ridgeline location and the buildings to be removed;  The presence of amenity and shelter planting around and within the site which provide screening from surrounding locations;  The presence of the balance of the existing CCNZ development, means that the proposed removal of buildings will represent a change in the proportion of existing elements in the landscape, rather than the removal of all buildings within the CCNZ site.  The location of the application site on the urban /rural transition results in the removal of the buildings not being framed by other buildings and therefore not producing an obvious gap in development. Notable views from private land into the proposed development are limited to a relatively small number of properties to the north of the site and limited by elevation and distance from the study area . Publicly accessible views will generally be restricted to surrounding local roads. This assessment has assumed the completed development. It is noted that a higher level of effect may be experienced temporarily during the site preparation and construction phase.  
  • 86. View Location Map Temple View Boys Dorm . Scale 1:5,000 at A4 . March 2013 . Map No-1 Rev-0 1 2 3 4 View Locations Application Site 1 Legend TUHIKARAMEA ROAD 0 100 200 M TEMPLE VIEW
  • 87. 2013-008 Temple View S92 Response Page 9 of 24 TYPICAL VIEW LOCATIONS View Location 1; Looking South from Tuhikaramea Road View location 1 is located approximately 300m north of the site and is representative of the view of nearby residents to the north and motorists on Tuhikaramea Road as they approach Temple View. The immediate foreground within the view is characterized by flat pastoral farmland extending to the playing fields that form the northern component of the former CCNZ campus. In the mid ground a series of buildings are visible atop a grassed embankment, the largest and most visually prominent of these being the David O McKay building. Several stands of specimen trees are located around the playing field and on the embankment clustered toward the west. These trees partially obscure the buildings on the embankment. Tuhikaramea Road can be seen to the west rising up a moderate hill before being obscured by vegetation and the mid ground trees clusters. In general the view is moderately coherent with the horizontal elements of the flat farmland, playing fields and the embankment, reflected in the narrow horizontal band of built form. The skyline is an important component of this view. Although the David O McKay building provides the largest individual contribution, several of the buildings form a portion of the skyline, however the stands of specimen trees which extend above, to the fore and beyond the buildings are equally dominant and act as minor focal attractants within the view. Of the buildings to be removed, only two are readily visible, being the medical centre, the one and two storey building located in the middle of the view, and a portion of the Wiser Dormitory, the balance of which is screened by a foreground stand of trees. The buildings proposed to be removed are either substantially screened by vegetation or these foreground buildings. From this location, the proposed removal of the buildings is anticipated to produce a reduction in the extent of buildings seen. The removal of the buildings will open up views beyond to existing buildings, being portions of Classroom Blocks 1 and 2, and Cowley Administration building. These buildings would of a similar character and appear lower on the horizon. The proposed roundabout is not anticipated to be visible, however the roadway may be partially visible as a narrow band on the embankment. Vehicles parked on or using the roadway would also be visible. Over all the effect will be a minor change in the composition of mid ground elements with a change in configuration and minor reduction in the extent of built form within the view. It will be seen within the context of the existing development on the embankment and not introduce any new element into the landscape. Given the small extent of the development potentially visible from this location, and the transient nature of the view from the perspective of motorists, the removal of buildings and the addition of the road are anticipated to have a very low effect on the amenity and character of the surrounding landscape.
  • 88. View Locations and Photomontages Temple View Boys Dorm . March 2013 View Location One - Existing Photograph, Looking South From Tuhikaramea Road View Location Data Focal length: 50mm Photographer: M. Graham Camera: Canon EOS D5 Full Frame Digital with EF 50mm F/1.4 USM (Prime) Date: 25th January 2013
  • 89. 2013-008 Temple View S92 Response Page 11 of 24 View Locations 2 and 3 : From Close Proximity View locations 2 and 3 are located immediately to the north west and south west of the site and are representative of views by motorists and nearby residents on Tuhikaramea Road. This view locations transition between the rural/urban edge of Temple View. From these locations, views are afforded toward the western extent of the study area from Tuhikaramea Road. View location 2, is approximately 50m from the nearest site boundary looking south east into the site along the top of the embankment. At this point Tuhikaramea Road is slightly elevated relative to the study area. Round timber posts delineate the site boundary and Tuhikaramea Road. Within the site in the foreground specimen trees, contained within an expanse of lawn, partially obscure the buildings beyond. Tuhikaramea Road continues to rise to the south. Above and beyond the crest of the rise, the Temple and the crown of specimen trees which align Tuhikaramea Road can be seen. Extending from the toe of the embankment, to north of the stand of specimen trees, lies the flat low lying pastoral land. Two of the buildings to be removed are visible within the fore to mid ground and dominate the view. From this location one looks toward the side elevation of the Boyack Dormitory, while the end elevation of the Wiser Dormitory is partially visible beyond a specimen tree in the mid ground. In conjunction with the foreground vegetation, these buildings effectively obscure views into the study area beyond. View location 3 looks north east into the site from the intersection of Tuhikaramea Road and Cowley Drive. This view captures southern elevations of the Taylor and Oakes Dormitory buildings, a portion of the Cowley Administration Building and the interconnecting covered walkways. Above and between these buildings the medical centre and associated garages can also be seen. These buildings comprise the bulk of the view and in combination of the presence of Tuhikaramea Road, the sweeping driveway into the Cowley administration building and the expanse of lawn and ornamental planting in the fore ground contribute to an institutional/urban character. Two palm trees in the foreground act as minor focal attractants due to their contrasting presence and prominence within the view. The clusters of specimen trees which figure predominately in other views can be seen above and to the west of the dormitory buildings. For both view locations 2 and 3, the removal of the buildings is more noticeable than when compared with other view locations, as they comprise a much greater portion of the view. In view location 2, the removal of the buildings opens up slightly more distant views to the Cowley Administration building, and introduces more lawn and road way. Similarly, in view location 3 the removal of the buildings open up more expansive views through the trees, over the playing fields, to the low lying rural land and Hamilton city beyond. Overall this increases the extent of open space and road way visible within the view while decreasing the extent of building visible. This reduces the sense of containment, subtly shifting the perceived built extent of the former CCNZ campus back to the Cowley Administration Block. The overall effect is to increase the extent of open space in the view. Although the visual change is overt, the change to the character of the view is relatively minor. Given the location of the study area within the urban/rural transition for Temple View, and that the change in ratio and configuration of the elements within the view does not introduce new elements into the view, it is considered that effects will be low -moderate and they will not adversely affect the character of the surrounding area.
  • 90. View Locations and Photomontages Temple View Boys Dorm . March 2013 View Location Data Focal length: 50mm Photographer: M. Graham Camera: Canon EOS D5 Full Frame Digital with EF 50mm F/1.4 USM (Prime) Date: 25th January 2013 This photomontage is intended to represent the general concept and may not be accurate in every detail. View Location Two - Photomontage, Looking South From Tuhikaramea Road View Location Two - Existing Photograph, Looking South From Tuhikaramea Road
  • 91. View Locations and Photomontages Temple View Boys Dorm . March 2013 View Location Data Focal length: 50mm Photographer: M. Graham Camera: Canon EOS D5 Full Frame Digital with EF 50mm F/1.4 USM (Prime) Date: 25th January 2013 This photomontage is intended to represent the general concept and may not be accurate in every detail. View Location Three - Photomontage, Looking East From Tuhikaramea Road View Location Three - Existing Photograph, Looking East From Tuhikaramea Road
  • 92. 2013-008 Temple View S92 Response Page 14 of 24 View Location 4; Looking North from Tuhikaramea Road View location 4 is approximately 300m south of the application site and is representative of the view obtained by nearby residents, pedestrians and road users on Tuhikaramea Road within Temple View. This view is characterized by the buildings within the former CCNZ campus, the Teacher Housing, and the Tuhikaramea Road corridor itself. The view is dominated by street trees in the fore-ground, the asymmetrical tree canopy giving testimony to the proximity of the road carriageway adjacent to the relatively narrow footpath and grass verge. Immediately to the west, a cream coloured rail and masonry retaining wall separate the road corridor from where the landform steps down to the modest cream coloured masonry former CCNZ 'Teacher Houses'. Tuhikaramea Road rises and curves away to the west, with the former CCNZ campus buildings providing the mid and background to the view. The two storey colonnaded Wendell B Mendehall Library acts as a minor focal attraction due to its relative height and prominence in the mid ground. The lack of a delineating boundary feature along the eastern side of Tuhikaramea Road presents more expansive lawn areas to the fore of the buildings. Beyond the Library building, the screening curtain wall and associated walkway prevent low levels views into the Classroom blocks. This configuration extends across the balance of the view and in combination with the street trees, prevent views beyond to the application site. A small portion of the David O McKay building can be discerned above the Class Room Blocks in the mid background of the view between several palm trees. The overall character of the view is one of manicured urbanity, although the screening curtain wall along the Classroom block introduces a sense of introversion into the scene. From this view location the subject site is not visible and the removal of the buildings and associated introduction of additional roading and grass open space will have no effect on the view and negligible adverse affect the character of the surrounding area.
  • 93. View Locations and Photomontages Temple View Boys Dorm . March 2013 View Location Four - Existing Photograph, Looking North From Tuhikaramea Road View Location Data Focal length: 50mm Photographer: M. Graham Camera: Canon EOS D5 Full Frame Digital with EF 50mm F/1.4 USM (Prime) Date: 25th January 2013
  • 94. 2013-008 Temple View S92 Response Page 16 of 24 RELEVANT PLANNING MATTERS It is intended that this document be read in conjunction with the application for Resource Consent (Consent No:10/2013/6801). Planning documents that have been taken into consideration include the Resource Management Act, and the Operative Hamilton City District Plan. Resource Management Act 1991 The development must meet the requirements of this Act, and it is therefore important that the assessment of visual, landscape and amenity effects addresses the requirements of Part 2, of the Act. In particular: 6 Matters of national importance (b) the protection of outstanding natural features and landscapes from inappropriate subdivision, use, and development: 7 Other matters (c) the maintenance and enhancement of amenity values: (f) maintenance and enhancement of the quality of the environment: With regard to section 6(b), the application site is not contained within or adjacent to any identified outstanding natural features or landscapes. With regard to section 7(c), the adverse effect of the development on existing landscape character and amenity will range between low-moderate and negligible. The development will not cause an unacceptable change to existing landscape or character, or adversely affect the existing amenity values derived from the surrounding environment due primarily to its unobtrusive location, small size, and the existing context of campus development. Relevant sections of the Resource Management Act relating to visual, landscape and amenity effects have been canvassed in the original application and the reader is referred to that document. Operative Hamilton City District Plan This application site is zoned Community Facilities under the Operative District Plan and is contained within the Church College Character Overlay (CCCO). The purpose of the overlay is to protect the visual unity and coherence of buildings and space associated with development of the former Church College. The original application assessed the proposed development against the relevant standards for the CCCO. The following assessment addresses the relevant assessment criteria listed in 2.7.5 Assessment Criteria - Restricted Discretionary and Discretionary Activities; 2.7.5 ii) the extent to which the proposed buildings or structure is compatible with the scale, bulk, height and materials of surrounding buildings. The proposed development requires the removal of 6 buildings and a single accessory building, to construct a roundabout and road. The configuration of the roundabout and road will comply with Hamilton City Council design guidelines, is considered to be consistent with other roading within the vicinity, and therefore is considered to be of a scale and materiality that is compatible with surrounding buildings. 2.7.5 iv) Whether removal of any building and /or structure within the Character Area will affect the gateway appearance of the Character Area.
  • 95. 2013-008 Temple View S92 Response Page 17 of 24 Rule 2.7 Church College Character Overlay; Rule Statement identifies the location of the gateway appearance within the first paragraph second sentence of the rule which states; The Character Area straddles Tuhikaramea Road and seeks to maintain the gateway appearance of the former Teacher Housing fronting onto Tuhikaramea Road that were constructed as part of Church College. The rule clearly associates the gateway appearance with the former Teacher Housing area. The application site is located some 250 metres north of this area. It does not affect the gateway appearance of the former Teacher Housing. It is noted however that the application site is on the threshold of the urban/rural transition for Temple View. It is considered, given the existing curvature of the road and the limitations on visibility around this location, that the removal of the dormitories, Medical Centre and associated structures and the introduction of a roundabout and internal road will provide a safer and more visually appropriate transition into Temple View. 2.7.5 vii) Whether the creation of additional private roads or car parking areas would adversely affect the consistency of design or the open, landscaped character of the Church College Character Area. The proposed road is intended as a public road and will be designed to Hamilton City Council Design Guide lines. The proposed road alignment will connect to an existing car park and as such will integrate with the balance of the road network internal to the former CCNZ campus. It is proposed as a condition that, after road construction the proposed development would be integrated into the existing site through grassing and specimen tree planting. This is anticipated to extend the open space and landscaped character of the Church College Character Area in a consistent manner and is not anticipated to result in any adverse effects to that character. 2.7.5 x) Whether it has been clearly demonstrated that demolition of any building is necessary, considering alternatives for the refurbishment or re-use of the building. Please refer to the original application regarding the rationale for the demolition of the buildings. This includes comment regarding their structural integrity. 2.7.5 xi) Any immediate or cumulative effects of the loss, alteration or removal of any buildings on the overall coherence of the Character Area. Due to the location of the application site within the wider Church College Character Area, it is not anticipated to affect the overall site coherence, but rather will coherently truncate the built extent of the former CCNZ. As the buildings are no longer utilised their function is limited to being one of the many visual points of reference within the sequence of experience of travelling to or past the former CCNZ campus. While their removal will be visually apparent as a change, it will facilitate an improved circulation route through the former campus enhancing the overall coherence of the site 2.7.5 xiii) The extent to which any excavation, modification or disturbance of the ground would adversely affect views of buildings and their intervening spaces within the Church College Character Area and its overall coherence. Beyond temporary effects associated with the construction phase, it is not anticipated that this development will adversely affect the views of those buildings remaining. Due to the location of the application site within the wider Church College Character Area, it is not anticipated to affect the overall site coherence, but will coherently truncate the built extent of the former CCNZ. 2.7.5 xv) The ability of the applicant to economically develop the site without demolition or alteration of any building. Please refer to the original application regarding the rationale for the demolition of the buildings.
  • 96. 2013-008 Temple View S92 Response Page 18 of 24 FINDINGS It was found that the location and a number of features in and around the application site influence the potential visual and landscape effects of the proposed development. These include: i. The extent of the development, within an unobtrusive location; ii. The removal of buildings and the development of a road which has low visual prominence; iii. The location of the application site at an urban /rural transition; and iv. The existing context of the former CCNZ campus. Analysis of the above factors within the context of the characteristics of the wider landscape found that: i. The location of application site, the low road profile and the presence of similar element within the area will prevent the development from being visually prominent or adversely affecting amenity derived from the existing environment to an unacceptable extent. ii. The development will not intrude or significantly alter views to or from surrounding publically accessible viewpoints. iii. Stands of specimen trees and shelter vegetation in the wider landscape notably enhance the visual absorption capacity of the surrounding area. iv. Due to the scale and nature of the proposed development, it is not likely to become a focal feature or affect the existing key attributes of the surrounding landscape that contribute to its character or the visual amenity derived from it. v. Given the high visual absorption capacity of the site it is considered that extensive mitigation of the development is not required. vi. It is noted that during site preparation and road construction, a higher level of effect may be temporarily experienced. It is considered that the proposed development meets the apparent overall intent of the relevant landscape and amenity objectives, policies and rules of the ODP especially with regard Rule 2.7.5, and is consistent with the requirements of sections 6 (b), and 7(c) of the RMA. In summary, the unobtrusive location of the application site, which is afforded screening by existing vegetation, topography and adjacent buildings, and the scale and low visual profile of the proposed road and roundabout will mean that the development can be absorbed by the landscape with less than minor effects on existing character or amenity values. Recommendations While it is considered that extensive mitigation measures are not required in the case of this application, it is recommended that an interim condition be imposed to ensure the proposed development visually integrates with the existing landscape and maintains a high quality environment, until such time as a further application is submitted, as signaled in the original application. 1. That upon completion of the final earth works associated with the road construction, grassing shall occur and a specimen tree planting plan be prepared, subject to approval by Council. The specimen tree planting shall remain in place, providing partial screening and integration of the development, until such time as any future developments render them unnecessary.
  • 97. 2013-008 Temple View S92 Response Page 19 of 24 APPENDIX 1: METHODOLOGICAL FLOW CHART
  • 98. 2013-008 Temple View S92 Response Page 20 of 24 APPENDIX 2: GENERAL ARRANGEMENT PLAN & LONG SECTION
  • 99. 2013-008 Temple View S92 Response Page 22 of 24 APPENDIX 3: EFFECTS RATING DEFINITIONS Landscape and Visual Amenity Effect ‐ Rating System  Effects Rating  Use and Definition  Extreme  Use  The development/activity would:   Result  in  an  extreme  change  on  the  characteristics  or  key  attributes  of  the  receiving  environment and/or the vista within which it is seen; and/or   Have an extreme effect on the perceived amenity derived from it.  Oxford English Dictionary Definition   Extreme: adjective 1 utmost. 2 reaching a high or the highest degree.  Very High  Use  The development/activity would:   Have a very high level of effect on the character or key attributes of the receiving environment  and/or the vista within which it is seen; and/or   Have a very high level effect on the perceived amenity derived from it.  Oxford English Dictionary Definition  Very:  adverb 1 in a high degree. 2 with superlative or own without qualification: the very best  quality.   High:  adjective 1 extending above the normal level. 2 great in amount, value, size, or intensity.  3 great in rank or status. 4 morally or culturally superior.  High  Use  The development/activity would:   Have  a  high  level  of  effect  on  the  character  or  key  attributes of  the  receiving  environment  and/or the vista within which it is seen; and/or   Have a high level of effect on the perceived amenity derived from it.  Oxford English Dictionary Definition  High:  adjective 1 extending above the normal level. 2 great in amount, value, size, or intensity.  3 great in rank or status. 4 morally or culturally superior.  Moderate  Use  The development/activity would:   Have a moderate level of effect on the character or key attributes of the receiving environment  and/or the vista within which it is seen; and/or   Have a moderate level of effect on the perceived amenity derived from it.  Oxford English Dictionary Definition  Moderate:  adjective 1 average in amount, intensity, or degree.  “More Than Minor” Threshold Under s104D of the RMA  Low    Use  The development/activity would:   Have an low level of effect on the character or key attributes of the receiving environment  and/or the vista within which it is seen; and/or   Have a low level of effect on the perceived amenity derived from it.  Oxford English Dictionary Definition  Low:  adjective 1 below average in amount, extent, or intensity. 2 lacking importance, prestige,  or quality; inferior.  Very Low  Use  The development/activity would:   Have an very low level of effect on the character or key attributes of the receiving environment  and/or the vista within which it is seen; and/or   Have a very low level of effect on the perceived amenity derived from it.  Oxford English Dictionary Definition  Very:  adverb 1 in a high degree. 2 with superlative or own without qualification: the very best  quality.  Low:  adjective 1 below average in amount, extent, or intensity. 2 lacking importance, prestige,  or quality; inferior.  Negligible  Use   The development/activity would:   Have  an  negligible  effect  on  the  character  or  key  attributes  of  the  receiving  environment  and/or the vista within which it is seen; and/or   Have a negligible effect on the perceived amenity derived from it.  Oxford English Dictionary Definition  Negligible: adjective that need not be considered.  Detectable Effect Threshold  No Effect  The development/activity would have no effect on the receiving environment.  Note: Ratings may be positive (e.g. high level of enhancement) or negative (e.g. high adverse effect). 
  • 100. 2013-008 Temple View S92 Response Page 23 of 24 APPENDIX 4: VISUAL ABSORPTION CAPABILITY RATING DEFINITION The Visual Absorption Capability rating (VAC) is an indicator of a landscape’s ability to absorb visual change, i.e. how well a landscape can either screen or hide a development or how well a development integrates with the surrounding landscape without changing its essential character and qualities. VAC ratings are not effect laden. This means that a very poor rating does not necessarily correspond with an extreme adverse effect.   Visual Absorption Capability Definition Ratings VAC Rating  Use  Very Good   The  proposed  development/activity  would  be  completely  screened,  almost  completely  screened  or  completely  absorbed  by  existing  landscape  features.    Any  views  of  the  development would be either unidentifiable or at a great distance, and/or;   The development/activity would not affect the existing character of the surrounding landscape  or view in which it is seen, and/or;   The development/activity would introduce a visual element into the landscape or view which  may be viewed very frequently or continuously in that or similar landscape types.  Good   The proposed development/activity would be mostly screened or visually absorbed by existing  landscape features, but still be identifiable.  The development/activity may act as a tertiary  focal attraction within the landscape or view in which it is seen, and/or;   The development/activity would not affect the existing character of the surrounding landscape  or view in which it is seen, and/or;   The development/activity may introduce a visual element into the landscape or view which  may be viewed frequently in that or similar landscape types.  Neutral   The proposed development/activity would neither be screened nor become a visual intrusion  or  focal  attraction  within  the  landscape  or  view  in  which  it  is  seen.  The  proposed  development/activity may act as a minor focal attraction from some locations, and/or;   The development/activity would alter the existing character of the surrounding landscape or  view in which it is seen, and/or;   The development/activity would introduce a visual element into the landscape or view which  may be viewed occasionally in that or similar landscape types.  Poor   The proposed development/activity would be clearly visible but would not act as a primary  focal attraction, and/or;     It  would  be  expected  that  the  proposed  development/activity  would  alter  the  existing  character of the surrounding landscape or view in which it is seen, and/or;   The development/activity may introduce a new visual element into the landscape or view.  The  development/activity may be viewed infrequently in that or similar landscape types.  Very Poor   The  proposed  development/activity  will  be  highly  visible  and  may  act  as  a  primary  focal  attraction or feature.  It would also be expected that the proposed development/activity will  significantly alter the existing character of the  surrounding landscape or view  in which  it is  seen, and/or;   The  development/activity  will  introduce  a  new  visual  element  into  the  landscape  or  view,  which  will  be  significantly  different  in  appearance,  or  scale  from  the  landscape  elements  surrounding it, and/or;   The development/activity would be found very rarely in that or similar landscape types. 
  • 101. 2013-008 Temple View S92 Response Page 24 of 24 APPENDIX 5: MGLA VIEW LOCATIONS AND RATINGS   VL   Name  Type  VAC Ratings and Notes  Key Attributes of View  Potential Effects  Effect Rating   1    Tuhikaramea  Road   300m North  of Study Area    Public/  Private  Very Good     VAC increased due to distance.   Partial screening provided by  foreground vegetation and landform.   Similar to existing open space within  view     Foreground view of pasture and  playing fields.   Clustered stands of specimen trees  on embankment.   Limited extent of study area visible.   Buildings and stands of trees  contribute skyline.   Reduction in extent of buildings seen.   Opens up views to buildings behind.   Increase in extent of roadway visible.   Change in ratio of elements but does  not introduce new elements.    Very Low   2  Tuhikaramea  Road   50m North  East of Study  Area    Public  Good     Partial screening provided by  foreground vegetation and landform.   Development is similar to the existing  landscape.   Close proximity view.     Transition of rural/urban edge.   Stands  of specimen trees in  foreground;   Two building within study are  partially visible.   Balance screened due to existing  building orientation;     Notable  reduction  in  extent  of  buildings seen.   Opens up views to buildings behind.   Increase in extent of roadway visible.   Increase in manicured open space.   Change  in  ratio  of  elements  but  does  not introduce new elements.    Low‐moderate  3  Tuhikaramea  Road   50m South  East  of Study  Area  Public  Good     limited screening by foreground  elements.   Development is similar to the existing  landscape.   Close proximity view       Transition of rural/urban edge.   limited screening by foreground  elements.   three buildings within study are  visible.   context provided by Cowley  building and entrance development   Notable  reduction  in  extent  of  buildings seen.   Opens up views to open space beyond.   Increase in extent of roadway visible.   Increase in manicured open space.   Change  in  ratio  of  elements  but  does  not introduce new elements.    Low‐ moderate  4  Tuhikaramea  Road   300m South  of Study Area  Public  Very Good     Fully screened from view due to fore  ground buildings, vegetation and  topography;   intermediate proximity view.   Urban Character contributed by  former CCNZ Campus and former  Teacher Housing.   Similar colour palette and masonry  construction lends coherence to  disparate elements .   small portion of David O McKay  building visible in background.      No effect as development not visible in  this view in spite of relative proximity.    Negligible