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Newsletter 2010 robert fisk
Newsletter 2010 robert fisk
Newsletter 2010 robert fisk
Newsletter 2010 robert fisk
Newsletter 2010 robert fisk
Newsletter 2010 robert fisk
Newsletter 2010 robert fisk
Newsletter 2010 robert fisk
Newsletter 2010 robert fisk
Newsletter 2010 robert fisk
Newsletter 2010 robert fisk
Newsletter 2010 robert fisk
Newsletter 2010 robert fisk
Newsletter 2010 robert fisk
Newsletter 2010 robert fisk
Newsletter 2010 robert fisk
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Newsletter 2010 robert fisk

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  • 1. “...a forum for scholarship & research on international and regional affairs...” CIRS Newsletter | Fall 2010 | No. 9Distinguished Lecture SeriesRobert FiskRobert Fisk lectured on the state of journalism in the Middle East.Robert Fisk, award-winning journalist and onymous with an apology for terrorist activity.Middle East correspondent for The Independent This is a challenge because it opens up a prob-newspaper, gave the annual faculty-appointed lematic discourse that questions the relationshipDistinguished Lecture on April 20, 2010, on the between the United States, the Arab world, andsubject of “State of Denial: Western Journalism Israel.and the Middle East.” Georgetown junior Amna In Western journalism, Fisk argued, “whatAl-Thani introduced Fisk to a capacity audience we were confronting, especially in the Unitedof 800 guests at the Four Seasons hotel in Doha. States, was the parasitic, osmotic relationship Fisk began by noting that on September 11, between journalists and power.” Because the2001, he was contacted by various news agencies United States administration refers to the Israeliwho repeatedly asked him “who did it?” This, “occupied territories” as “disputed territories” andhe said, was very telling of the state of Western the Israeli “wall” is referred to as a “security bar-journalism as they would not ask the obvious rier,” this language is picked up by the popularquestion of “why did this happen?” Fisk argued press and becomes the sanitized language ofthat “when you have an ordinary crime on the journalism. “By failing to use the real words, westreet, the first thing the police do is look for a de-semanticize the conflict,” said Fisk. “Throughmotive. But when we had an international crime our journalistic cowardice, we make it easier foragainst humanity in New York, Washington, and those who suffer to become the aggressors, andPennsylvania, the one thing journalists were not those who are the occupiers to become the vic-supposed to do was look for a motive.” tims,” he argued. Journalists become complicit In today’s terror driven discourse, Fisk said, in conflicts when they subscribe to this type ofdelving into the background historical reasons reporting.for why such attacks happen is considered syn- Continued on page 4 Fall 2010 | CIRS Newsletter 1
  • 2. Director’s Welcome Greetings from all of us at CIRS! role of Sovereign Wealth Funds (SWF), Islamic banking systems, the As the Georgetown campus in prospects of a monetary union among GCC states, and the diversifica- Qatar and CIRS enter into the tion of Gulf state economies. Each of the participants, a number of fifth year of operations, we begin whom were drawn from Georgetown’s Doha and DC campuses, was to welcome a new phase in our asked to work on an original, empirically-grounded paper that will institutional evolution. This is re- form an eventual chapter in a book on the topic. flected both in our organizational We have also launched a research initiative on “Food Security and set-up and also in our priorities Food Sovereignty in the Middle East.” The scarcity of data on this and objectives as we continue with topic means that academic work on the subject remains limited and in this year’s public affairs program- need of urgent research. In conjunction with the working group meet- ming and research initiatives. Ad- ings on this topic, CIRS will fund empirically-based, original research ditionally, Georgetown University projects to fill in the existing gap in the literature. We anticipate the in Qatar has moved into its new project will last approximately eighteen to twenty-four months. home – our newly completed Our public affairs programming, meanwhile, is speeding full steam building in Education City. We ahead, with our next panel presentation focusing on two decades of welcome our readers to visit the political upheaval in Iraq. campus and to attend our various We invite you to visit our website to look for more information onevents, which we will hold at this location in the near future. CIRS events, publications, and research opportunities. We have just concluded the third, and final, phase of our research Along the way, I and the rest of the CIRS team look forward to hear-initiative on the study of migrant labor in the Gulf region. The initia- ing from you and hopefully to seeing you at our various venues.tive covers a variety of disciplines including, anthropology, politicalscience, legal studies, public policy, and statistical demography. The Sincerely,scholars analyzed the broad historic origins of migrant labor to theGulf as well as issues related to the host and sending countries; ques-tions of identity and gender politics; remittances and nationalizationof local labor markets; among larger issues of long-term social change. In its multi-year, multi-disciplinary study of the subject, CIRS Mehran Kamravahopes to fill a glaring vacuum in the scholarship on the Gulf region. Director of CIRS For the coming year, we will continue work on “The Political Econ- Interim Deanomy of the Gulf ” research initiative. In December 2010, we will have Georgetown University School of Foreign Service in Qatarour second working group meeting, which will cover topics such as the About CIRS The Center for International and Regional Studies at the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service in Qatar is guided by the principles of academic excellence, forward vision, and community engagement. The Center’s mission revolves around five principal goals: • To facilitate the free flow of ideas and knowledge through • To provide a forum for scholarship and research on international publishing the products of its research, sponsoring conferences and regional affairs; and seminars, and holding workshops designed to explore the • To encourage in-depth examination and exchange of ideas; complexities of the twenty-first century; • To foster thoughtful dialogue among students, scholars, • To engage in outreach activities with a wide range of local, and practitioners of international affairs; regional, and international partners.2 CIRS Newsletter | Fall 2010
  • 3. Research and ScholarshipCIRS Launches Arabic Language PublicationsCIRS embarked upon a new project of publishing Arabic-languagematerials for distribution to its Arabic-speaking readership. The pub-lications are in the form of original research conducted in the Arabiclanguage as well as Arabic translations of existing research publishedby CIRS over the years. :‫أميركا، الشرق األوسط، واخلليج‬ ‫عــالقات اخللــيج الدولــية‬ ‫نظرة عربية إلى التحديات التي تواجه‬ ‫التقرير املوجز جملموعة العمل‬ ‫اإلدارة األميركية اجلديده‬ “International Relations of the “America, the Middle East, Gulf ” Summary Report. and the Gulf: An Arab View of Challenges Facing the New This Summary Report includes United States Administration” synopses of the papers deliv- ered at the two “International This paper was based on a Dis- Relations of the Gulf ” working tinguished Lecture Rami Khouri group meetings in June 2008 gave in Qatar. He discusses vari- and January 2009, as well as bi- ous options open to the United ographies of all the participants States government regarding who took part in the initiative. foreign policy initiatives devel- oped towards dealing with prob- lems in the Middle East region.Research and ScholarshipCIRS Welcomes Its Newest Member: Debra Shushan The Center for International and Regional Graduate Research Fellowship from the Na- Studies welcomes its 2010-2011 Post-Doctor- tional Science Foundation. al Fellow, Debra Shushan. Shushan comes to Shushan’s work (with Chris Marcoux) on CIRS from the College of William and Mary foreign aid by Arab states has garnered atten- in Williamsburg, Virginia, where she is an As- tion, with synopses of their findings published sistant Professor of Government and member on the website of Foreign Policy and forthcom- of the faculties of International Relations and ing in Norrag News. A full-length article is cur- Middle East Studies. The focus of her research rently under review. is the foreign policies of Middle East states. During her time at CIRS, Dr. Shushan is After receiving a bachelor’s degree, summa writing a book manuscript on the factors in- cum laude, in Government from Harvard Uni- fluencing foreign policy-making in autocratic versity, Shushan went on to earn an MPhil in regimes. The book is an empirical analysis of International Relations from Oxford University, the foreign policies of Egypt, Jordan, and Syria and an MA, MPhil, and Ph.D. in Political Sci- during the 1990-91 and 2003+ Gulf wars. In ad- ence from Yale University. She is a member of dition, she is conducting research on Qatari for- Phi Beta Kappa, and recipient of the Marshall eign aid within the context of its broader foreign Scholarship, the Truman Scholarship, and the policy agenda. Fall 2010 | CIRS Newsletter 3
  • 4. Robert Fisk, continued from page 1 Audience at Robert Fisk’s Distinguished Lecture The worst example of this sanitization of conflict is television, where justice. Currently, the enemies of the Western world are predominantly Is-producers will not allow scenes of death or violence, thus concealing the lamist. He said that “we don’t even largely reflect upon what I suspect isreality of war from the public. Viewers of television in the West are not one of the principle frustrations that exist in this region: that Muslims havegiven the opportunity to see for themselves the effect of wars. Fisk argued kept their faith and we have not.” He continued by saying, “what has hap-that “our leaders, all of whom at the moment have zero experience of real pened is that a people who have kept their faith are now largely dominatedwar – the journalists do, but not our leaders in the West – they are able to socially, economically, politically, and, usually, militarily, by a people whopresent to the public war as a bloodless sandpit, war as something primarily have lost their faith. How do you explain that to yourselves?”to do with victory and defeat rather than death.” In conclusion, Fisk said: “I think the West should always be encouraged Currently, Fisk argued, there is a wall of fortresses that divide the world to send its teachers, and its educators, its builders, its engineers, its bridge-into West and East. There are British, US, and Western European mili- builders, and its scientists to the Muslim world, to learn as well as to helptary posts in Afghanistan, Iraq, Tajikistan, Turkey, Jordan, Egypt, Algeria, and teach. But, militarily, we have no business being in the Muslim world.”Yemen, Qatar, Bahrain, and Saudi Arabia, as well as in a variety of other Earlier in the day, Fisk was invited to the Georgetown Qatar campus tostrategically located regions. “It’s a kind of iron curtain across the Middle speak informally to a group of faculty, students, and staff. He answeredEast,” he said. questions related to the effects of technology on journalism. Robert Fisk has won numerous press awards for his work including being named the British International Journalist of the Year seven times “Through our journalistic and receiving the Amnesty International UK Press Award twice. He has cowardice, we make it lived in the Middle East for over thirty years, and has reported on the 1979 easier for those who suffer to Iranian revolution, the 1982 Israeli invasion of Lebanon and the Sabra and Chatila massacre, the 1991 Persian Gulf War, the 2003 invasion of Iraq, become the aggressors, and and the war in Afghanistan. He is one of the few western journalists to have those who are the occupiers interviewed Osama bin Laden, which he has done three times, and is also to become the victims.” a best-selling author, whose books include The Great War for Civilisation: The Conquest of the Middle East and Pity the Nation: Lebanon at War. Robert Fisk holds a PhD in politics from Trinity College Dublin and holds twelve Western governments say that they want to export democracy, but, honorary degrees from other universities.Fisk argued, the voices on the other side say they want nothing more than4 CIRS Newsletter | Fall 2010
  • 5. Focused DiscussionFred Lawson Gives Alternative Explanations for US Policy in the GulfOn May 13, 2010, Fred Lawson, Professor ofGovernment at Mills College and the 2009-2010 CIRS Visiting Scholar, gave a CIRS Fo-cused Discussion on the topic of “AlternativeExplanations for U.S. Policy in the Gulf ” to agroup of Qatar-based diplomats, embassy staff,and Georgetown faculty. The lunch talk was heldat the Four Seasons hotel in Doha. Lawson’s lecture delivered an academicoverview of American foreign policy toward theGulf region. He noted that while diplomats andpoliticians around the world “are busy carryingout the practice of diplomacy and the practiceof international relations, there is a whole armyof scholars sitting at colleges and universities inthe United States trying to understand what isgoing on and trying to explain international re-lations.” Lawson stated that “American foreign pol-icy toward the Gulf has changed dramaticallyover the last three decades.” From the 1940s tothe 1980s, the American presence, especiallyits military presence, in the region remainedminimal and unobtrusive, but during the 1990s,this situation was altered spectacularly and theAmerican military presence became a major Fred Lawson was the 2009-2010 CIRS Senior Fellow.feature of many Gulf states. The U.S. presencewas not only larger, but, also more overt, andculminated in large-scale military operations inAfghanistan and Iraq. military presence in the region. Lawson said The third, and final, outlook characterizes that a common explanation is that “during the America as an empire that is interested in ex- 1990s, both Iraq and Iran had the capability to panding territorial control and cultural influence “ From the 1940s disrupt oil supplies to the international market,” around the world. This is a notion of “empire” thereby threatening U.S. interests and prompt- that differs from the traditional one, Lawson to the 1980s, the ing greater military engagement in the region. said, in that, in the Gulf as in other areas of the American presence, But, he cautioned, there are far more compelling world, “the U.S. is invited to take responsibil- reasons for the activation of regional U.S. mili- ity” in order to establish regional orderliness. especially its military tary engagement, including the strategic rivalry The decentralized global U.S. military pres- presence, in the region between the United States and the People’s Re- ence reflects the peculiar command structure of public of China, India, and Japan for influence the American armed forces, which consists of remained minimal in Central Eurasia and the steady weakening of a “network of regional commands around the and unobtrusive. ” U.S. dominance in the international economy. world,” he said. The second explanation for U.S. policy em- phasizes the United States’s unique ideological and historical characteristics, or “strategic cul- “During the 1990s, American scholars, Lawson said, have tried ture.” This explanation, Lawson said, assumesto explain this dramatic shift by proposing three that “the U.S. respects the principles of limited both Iraq and Irandifferent theses. The first of these, and the most and representative government, values the in- had the capability towidely accepted, is that “the United States is try- dividual liberties of citizens, and believes thating hard to solve problems of security in a world the market offers the best way to organize the disrupt oil suppliesthat has no overarching authority structure,” and economy.” Therefore, policy toward the Gulf is to the internationalso acts in its own self interest. This explanation is fundamentally shaped by these concerns. Dur-often called a “realist perspective,” and assumes ing the 1980s and 1990s, both Iran and Iraq’s market”that most, if not all, aspects of U.S. foreign policy authoritarian governing structures representedrepresent a response to changes in the strategic forms of rule that were directly antithetical tocircumstances in which the country finds itself the United States’s liberal principles and values. In conclusion, Lawson argued that thesedue to changes in world affairs. From this per- As a result, Lawson argued, “the United States three explanations are not necessarily mutuallyspective, in order to understand American policy conceives of itself as having an obligation to exclusive, but that different aspects of Ameri-toward the Gulf, there needs to be an analysis of bring the advantages of limited government and can foreign policy can be linked to each of theseinternational events that have led to a larger U.S. market economies to others.” lines of argument. Fall 2010 | CIRS Newsletter 5
  • 6. Research and ScholarshipResearch Update: Migrant Labor in the GulfWithin the framework of the CIRS research where technically those with the best skills andinitiative on the topic of migrant labor in the abilities would be placed in the right jobs. Fur-Gulf, we hope to facilitate academic research on ther changes are still in the development phasedifferent aspects of the topic. while a new regulatory framework is being In May of last year, Bahrain became the first drafted, and mechanisms for more adequatelyGCC state to officially repeal the existing work- enforcing existing labor laws are being shaped.er sponsorship program. While not completely It is interesting to note that when the Bah-disbanding sponsored visas for foreign workers, raini authorities announced the changes to theBahrain has established a series of measures to existing sponsorship system, they clearly articu-reform its recruitment and contracting prac- lated that the aim was to reduce the country’stices, and has taken positive steps towards de- dependency on an expatriate workforce. By lim-veloping a new regulatory framework. Under iting the leverage and control that employers canthe previous “kafala” system, local employers hold over foreign employees, the implicit hope isdirectly sponsored expatriate workers. Under that local employers (particularly in the privatethe changes instituted, an independent body, the sector) will be motivated to be proactive in hir-Bahrain Labour Market Regulatory Authority ing amongst nationals. The Bahraini Minister of(BLMRA), has been given the responsibility to Labour when defending the move to abolish theoversee the changes to the sponsorship law and sponsorship system amidst an outcry from thehas in essence become the direct sponsor of all business community, responded by stating thatcontractual workers in the country. Further, the the on-going access to cheap and easily control-BLMRA has also been given the mandate to as- lable expatriate labor was distorting the Gulfsess the needs of nationals in the labor market. labor markets at the expense of nationals. From of assessing existing recruitment processes, andAs is the case in all the other GCC countries, the Bahraini government’s point of view, repeal- developing best practice guidelines for the pub-Bahrain suffers from the peculiar anomaly of ing the sponsorship system is a calculated move lic and private sectors.large volumes of foreign workers juxtaposed to free up the labor market and bring into place Questions remain as to how far these pro-with a high unemployment rate for nationals. an overall plan to reform both the labor and the posed moves will actually go, and whether the The employer sponsorship system, which educational systems of the country. These steps changes will remain to form rather than content.has been in practice throughout the Gulf region taken by the Bahraini government became a In policy terms, the GCC states have committedfor the past five decades, has been an increasing much debated political concern, testing as they themselves to develop strategies which reinforcesource of frustration for advocates of migrant do the fundamental relationship between the the protection of foreign workers and for fur-workers’ rights in the region. This system has state and the private sector. thering the interests of countries of destinationcome under international scrutiny and criti- Perhaps the most telling consequence of and origin. The degree to which the existing sys-cism as in practice it unfairly favors the rights Bahrain’s decision to reform its worker spon- tem can be reformed remains to be seen. In ad-of the employers at the expense of the workers. sorship program is the ripple effect it has had dition, domestic workers’ exclusion from GCCAbuse of the sponsorship system is assumed to within the region. Over the past year, reforma- national labor laws remains a grave concern.be rampant, and, as a result, migrant workers in tion of the kafala system has become part of a Specific attention must be given to reinforce thethe region have limited rights or access to the broader discussion amongst other states in the protection of the rights of domestic workers, yetprotection offered to nationals. Unsafe work en- region. A number of GCC countries including current changes to the sponsorship laws in thevironments, inadequate accommodation, wage Kuwait, Qatar, the UAE, and Saudi Arabia have region neglect this extremely vulnerable seg-disputes, and general human rights and work- started to publicly call for a reassessment of ex- ment of society.ers’ rights violations are said to exist in many dif- isting recruitment and contracting regulations as Through the grants component of the CIRSferent sectors across the region. A year down they relate to temporary contractual labor. research initiative we support original and em-the line since Bahrain’s pioneering decision to Kuwait is in the process of developing a pirically-based scholarship undertaken by fourrestructure the sponsorship system, it remains to new labor law which aims to do away with the awarded projects; through our working groupsbe seen whether the changes made have in fact sponsorship system. The new Kuwaiti labor law, we encourage dialogue and co-operative net-translated into determinable improvements on currently in draft form, suggests the need for working amongst academics; and through ourthe ground. establishing a non-profit entity which would be edited volume we aim to broadly disseminate Amendments to Bahrain’s visa sponsor- responsible for determining the labor require- the main conclusions arising out of the project.ship laws have meant an easing of restrictions ments of the Kuwaiti private and public sectors.imposed on workers who wish to move from The Saudi Ministry of Labour has recently car- Babar is Project Manager at CIRS. Previously,one place of employment to another. This is a ried out a five-year review of their sponsorship she worked in the international development andsignificant and welcome change as it lessens the system. One of the recommendations arising out humanitarian aid sector. She has served with thevulnerability and insecurity inherent under the of the Saudi study is the replacement of indi- International Labour Organisation and the Unitedemployer-sponsorship system. The changes to vidual employee sponsorship with sponsorship Nations Development Programme, where she man-the system, in theory at least, increase pressure through deputed private recruitment compa- aged a policy-oriented research center. She also spenton employers to compensate and treat their em- nies. The UAE government has undertaken a several years working for one of Pakistan’s largestployees on fairer terms, or else risk them mov- pilot project, involving the governments of two multisectoral rural development organizations. Hering on. Economists have also hailed this change, of the main countries of migrant workers’ origin, interests lie in economic empowerment, microfi-as it allows for a greater and freer labor market, namely India and the Philippines, with the aim nance, and gender development initiatives.6 CIRS Newsletter | Fall 2010
  • 7. Distinguished Lecture SeriesDean Kamrava Gives a 2020 Vision of the Middle EastIn its inaugural International Lecture, CIRS trav-elled to the Kingdom of Bahrain on April 26,2010, to offer insights and dialogue with peoplein the neighboring GCC state. In this uniquePublic Affairs Program, CIRS emphasized theobjective of providing a forum for exchange ofideas with other communities in the Gulf regionand beyond. The distinguished speaker, MehranKamrava, was introduced to the audience byGeorgetown alumna Haya Al Noaimi. Kamrava is Interim Dean of the George-town University School of Foreign Service inQatar and Director of the Center for Interna-tional and Regional Studies. He lectured on thetopic of “A 2020 Vision of the Middle East,”where he introduced and analyzed several keytrends that have the ability to shape the futureof the Middle East over the next ten years. Ka-mrava said that this was important because “asstudents of the Middle East, and as citizens ofthe region, often times we dwell on the past.” Outlining the evening’s lecture, the fourprimary areas that Kamrava focused on were re-lated to 1) the nature of the state that currently Mehran Kamrava spoke about the future of the Middle East.exists across the Middle East; 2) the role and thenature of the relationship between the UnitedStates and the region; 3) the Israeli-Palestinian might call them pseudo democracies,” of which the form of large and easy to mobilize mili-conflict; and 4) the trends occurring in the Gulf Turkey, Israel, and Lebanon are good examples, tary bases. To this effect, Kamrava said, “the bigregion, including the events unfolding in Iran Kamrava said. question is: does it look like, at any time in theand Iraq. The Middle East also has several states foreseeable future, even in the next ten years, the that are non-democratic as they attempt to ex- American military is going to disengage from clude the public from any political participation the Middle East?” through the instrumentalization of repressive These features of American foreign policy, “The big question is: does mechanisms. There are other political systems in Kamrava said, are instrumental to the discus- it look like, at any time the region that are thoroughly non-democratic, sion regarding the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. but try to appear democratic. Many of these “America’s alliance with Israel is certainly key in the foreseeable future, non-democracies, Kamrava argued, “try to be in the way that the Israeli-Palestinian conflict even in the next ten years, inclusionary and inclusive insofar as the popula- has unfolded historically and also currently,” he tion is concerned – the streets become demo- said. Projecting his views on the situation, Kam- the American military is cratic theaters.” rava said that “as we move forward, we can see going to disengage from Discussing the United States’ relationship to a continuation of this unending ‘peace process,’” the region, Kamrava argued that since WWII, especially in light of the encroachment of illegal the Middle East?” there have been four primary features that have Israeli settlements and rapidly increasing popu- guided American foreign policy towards the lation growth. With this knowledge in mind, Middle East. These include, guaranteeing the and by looking at the sobering facts on the Turning to the first area of discussion, or safety and security of the state of Israel; guaran- ground, he posed an uncomfortable question to“the state of the state” in the Middle East, Ka- teeing access to Middle Eastern oil at reasonable the audience by asking “does it still make sensemrava argued that there are a number of differ- prices; containing regional threats to American to talk about a Palestine?”ent political dynamics that are currently being interests across the region; and, “after the Cold Looking into the future, Kamrava posedplayed out in the international arena. There are War – or once Iraq invaded Kuwait – there was three possible models for what future politicala number of different state formations and gov- a fourth aspect and that was to station military turns Palestine might take. The first of theseernance models that range between the demo- forces in the region directly because regional is the “Tibetan model,” where Palestine’s ob-cratic, the non-democratic, and the many other allies, at least insofar as the United States saw jective to be an officially recognized sovereignmodels in between these two opposing spec- them, turned out to be unreliable for American state all but disappears as it becomes subsumedtrums. In the Middle East, there are democratic policy calculations,” Kamrava argued. Expound- under Israel. In this model, “although there is amodels of governance that vary in their viability ing upon American military presence in the Palestinian identity, there will not be a Palestin-and vibrancy; “some democracies are somewhat Middle East, he said that if one looks at a map, ian state,” Kamrava explained. The second andmore cosmetic, or, at least, have much more it becomes clear that “across the Middle East, opposite possibility is for Palestine to take onlimited political parameters around them – you there is a very strong American presence” in Continued on page 10 Fall 2010 | CIRS Newsletter 7
  • 8. Research and ScholarshipThe Nuclear Question in the Middle EastResearch scholars during the working group meetingDuring a two-day working group meeting on May 23-24, 2010, in Doha, session where the scholars discuss the parameters of the initiative, offerCIRS invited a group of scholars to discuss the subject of the “Nuclear themes and areas of research, and deliberate original questions and prob-Question in the Middle East.” The presentations took several different lems. The scholars then take the shared information and begin writingapproaches ranging from theoretical deliberations, to practical implica- draft research papers, which are circulated among the group prior to thetions, to historical narratives. During the course of the meeting, the schol- second meeting. At a subsequent meeting, scholars critique each other’sars noted that it was important to define the terms in use, including the papers and offer possible alternatives for research. Towards the conclusiondifference between nuclear exploration, nuclear acquisition, and nuclear of the project, the papers are revised and then collected into an editedenergy options, as there are fundamental differences between these various volume and submitted to a university press for publication.programs. Although alluding to the constant overshadowing threat of aweapons program, civilian nuclear energy programs do not directly imply Working Group Participants:such a drastic development. After giving situational and historical analysis, the scholars analyzed Zahra Babar, Georgetown University School of Foreign Service in Qatarpast, current, and future concerns regarding countries that have, or seek toacquire, nuclear capabilities. The participants talked about macro decision- Kai-Henrik Barth, Georgetown University School of Foreign Service in Qatarmaking in relation to securitization across borders, and also analyzed howthe individual characteristics of a state’s leader can influence a country’s Kayhan Barzegar, Center for Middle East Strategic Studies; Islamic Azadabstinence from, or embracing of, a nuclear weapons program. As such, the University; Harvard Kennedy Schools Belfer Center for Science and Interna-working group relayed a direct correlation between domestic politics and tional Affairsthe decision to go nuclear. In relation to regional politics, GCC states face a nuclear opponent Alvin Chew, Gulf Research Centerin Iran and so may acquire nuclear capabilities as a direct response to thisthreat. Apart from the issue of securitization, the GCC states, although Avner Cohen, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholarsrich in hydrocarbons, have presented a strong case for why there is need John T. Crist, Georgetown University School of Foreign Service in Qatarfor nuclear energy infrastructures, including the need to engage the globaleconomy. The petrochemical industry in the Gulf is an intensively high- Mehran Kamrava, Georgetown University School of Foreign Service in Qatarenergy one that needs sources other than hydrocarbon, and these countrieshave the capacity and capital costs to make this happen Mustafa Kibaroglu, Bilkent University Among other issues discussed during the meeting were matters re-lated to global security, regional mistrust, the prestige of gaining nuclear Thomas W. Lippman, Council on Foreign Relations and Middle East Institutecapabilities, and the role of NGOs and civil society groups in pressuring Giacomo Luciani, Gulf Research Center Foundationgovernments to abstain from nuclear energy initiatives. The scholars com-pared issues of domestic politics and international relations reasons for Mari Luomi, Finnish Institute of International Affairsnuclear weapons acquisition. The participants also questioned the extentto which the decisions of a single government can oversee such long-term Suzi Mirgani, Georgetown University School of Foreign Service in Qatarand multi-institutional projects over several decades. The format of CIRS working group research initiatives is to convene Maria Rost Rublee, University of Aucklandtwo or three working group meetings a year to complete a variety of re- Etel Solingen, University of California, Irvinesearch projects. The first meeting is an introductory and brainstorming8 CIRS Newsletter | Fall 2010
  • 9. Spotlight on the FacultyReligious Institutions and the Political Order in the Middle East Birol Başkan is Visiting Assistant Professor of Government at the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service in Qatar. His research looks at how religious institutions play a pivotal role in shaping the political order of the Middle East.The big question driving my research is, My alternative narrative goes against the all, the book shows that secularization of thewhat roles do religion, religious institutions, standard arguments, which portray Ottoman/ state was nothing more than a state projectand grass-root religious communities play in Republican reformers as typical Easterners, taking different forms in different contexts.creating, maintaining, undermining, and de- passive, uncritical, blind obedient, but all- However, in all cases, it aims at empoweringstroying political order in the Middle East? powerful, ruling over a politically passive so- the state. I have just completed a book manuscript, ciety. My account shows, however, that the re- Currently, I am working on several proj-titled Crescent and the State: Religion in the formers were more active and critical learners, ects. One of them tackles the robust empiricalMaking of the Modern State in Turkey, Iran, not blindly imitating the Western model, but relationship that several studies have found toand Russia. Contracted to Syracuse Uni- rationally crafting their own models accord- exist between Islam and authoritarianism.versity Press, the manuscript challenges the ing to the circumstances surrounding them. The field is filled with ideational and struc-paradigm still dominant in Turkish studies As such, my book will be a direct chal- tural approaches that shed critical light onon state-religion relations, and proposes an lenge to two long standing and now classical the relationship. My project instead takes analternative narrative, which avoids the pitfalls texts on Turkish modernization: Niyazi Ber- institutional approach and argues that theof the associated paradigm and accounts bet- kes’s The Secularization of Turkey and Bernard changing nature of institutional relations be-ter for the anomalies that the standard argu- Lewis’s The Emergence of Modern Turkey. tween the state and religion provides the keyments fail to explain and simply ignore. The way I interpret and portray the evo- to understanding the relationship between The dominant paradigm basically reduces lution of state-religion relations in Turkey Islam and authoritarianism. In another re-the whole Ottoman structure to religion in has direct implications for the burgeoning lated project, I seek to explain the origin andessence. It naturally follows that moderniza- literature on contemporary religious revival- survival of a rather strange coalition betweention necessarily entails getting rid of religion ism in Turkey. Without any exception, this the Islamists and the Liberals in Turkey. Onand its associates. My alternative narrative literature takes the Berkes-Lewis portrayal the shoulders of this coalition, Recep Tayyipsuggests that the secularization of the state of Turkish modernization as given. Therefore, Erdoğan and his party rose to power and heldin Turkey was not a radical rupture from the for this literature, religious revivalism in Tur- onto it. In fact, the existence of that coalitionpast, but was rather another stage in the Ot- key becomes nothing but a reaction against sets Turkey apart from the Arab world, wheretoman state’s relationship to religion and reli- Atatürk’s project. This literature as a result such a coalition has, so far, failed to come intogious institutions; more specifically, it was an misses the critical link between the nature of being. Finally, I have a two other occasionaladaptation, driven by the state rulers’ desire to religious revivalism in Turkey and the whole paper projects. The first looks at Turkey-GCCget the best use of religion and religious insti- Ottoman-Republican modernization project. relations and assesses the potential roles Tur-tutions in empowering the state. The studies The way contemporary religious revivalism key can play in Gulf security and the secondon state-religion relations take it for granted unfolded in Turkey is really an organic out- examines the transformation of the Turkishnow that Ottoman-Turkish reformers indeed come rather than an unwanted child of the state and relates it to the ongoing liberaliza-got rid of Islam, Atatürk giving the final touch secularization of the state in Turkey. tion of Turkish democracy.to the modern state in Turkey. My narrative To sharpen the argument, my book visits Methodologically, I am eclectic. I believesuggests quite the opposite: neither modern two other historical cases, Russia and Iran, in the utility of employing multiple method-state building nor nation building in Turkey, where secularization of the state was pur- ologies. In general, however, the sort of ques-hence modernization was directed against Is- sued as vehemently as it was in Turkey. Such tions I study lead me toward employing com-lam, Atatürk reforms included. The reformers a comparative approach helps us to see that, parative historical methods more often thanin both the Ottoman and Republican period first, similar structural and strategic factors other methods. In employing this method Iin fact skillfully employed religious teach- drive historical state-religion relations in dif- pay particular attention to gathering what Iings, symbols, and vocabulary and secured the ferent countries with quite different cultural call “anthropological data.” I seek to trace so-cooperation of religious institutions in their settings, and, second, secularization of the cieties’ macro histories by examining the mi-state and nation building projects. state has never been a uniform process. Over- cro histories of groups and individuals. Fall 2010 | CIRS Newsletter 9
  • 10. Research and ScholarshipCIRS Publishes Research on E-Learning in Qatar and the GCC StatesCIRS has published the fifth paper in its Oc- In the face of declining hydrocarbon re-casional Paper Series. This contribution by Dr. serves in some Gulf nations, this paper ana-Alan S. Weber, surveys the historical develop- lyzes the ways in which e-learning initiativesment and current state of e-learning in Qatar have been designed to help create the post-oiland the GCC states, including the educational, knowledge economies, which Gulf rulers hopepolitical, social, and financial factors that led to will propel GCC countries into the top tier ofthe adoption and development of current sys- technologically advanced societies in the world.tems and initiatives. Alan S. Weber joined the Weill Cornell Although significant challenges have arisen Medical College in Qatar (WCMC–Q) as ain the use of e-learning technologies, such as faculty member in the Pre-medical Program ingeneral computer literacy; interoperability and 2006. His research interests include language,cross-platform issues associated with the flood history, and the social and cultural dimensionsof learning objects on the market; the lack of of science and medicine.Arabic language learning objects; and Internetbandwidth and reliability, e-learning is poised to For more information, or to receive free copiesusher in considerable educational changes in the of all CIRS materials, please visit:learning populations of the Gulf region. http://cirs.georgetown.edu/publications/.Dean Kamrava Gives a 2020 Vision of the Middle East, Continued from page 7the “East European” or “Central Asian” model,which is for it to emerge as a distinct state in thefuture. The third, and final, model is for Pales-tine to become a disparate amalgam of reserva-tions and entities that are landlocked and iso-lated from one another with little economic andpolitical power. “I don’t think there is going to be a wave of democracy sweeping across the region and that is because oil-based economies will continue to exist Dean Kamrava lectured to the intellectual community in Manama, Bahrain. throughout the region.” ascendance in the economics of the Gulf region, of U.S. military bases, as well as “a continued particularly smaller countries like Bahrain and domination of Israel.” He also noted that “I Finally, turning to the Gulf region, Kamrava Qatar.” The region will see a new set of powers don’t think there is going to be a wave of de-projected that, politically, “I don’t think much that, because of their economic wealth, policy mocracy sweeping across the region and that isis going to change, at least insofar as states are agility, and elite cohesion, will become more because oil-based economies will continue toconcerned” in the GCC, but it is very difficult to prominent in shaping the future of the GCC, exist throughout the region.” As a final thought,predict what will happen in Iran over the next the Middle East, and beyond. Dean Kamrava said that he was optimistic thatfew years. He added that “the regional super- In conclusion, Kamrava summed up his we will see “the continued enrichment of humanpowers [Iran, Saudi Arabia, and Egypt] are not prognosis for the Middle East of 2020 by say- capacity and human capital in every country ofgoing to be as dominant in dictating regional ing that “what we will continue to see in the the Middle East.”foreign policy.” Indeed, “we will see a continued region are American ‘footprints,’” in the form10 CIRS Newsletter | Fall 2010
  • 11. Focused DiscussionImam Feisal Lectures on Moderate IslamImam Feisal Abdul Rauf, a prominent Muslimleader in the United States and Chairman ofthe Cordoba Initiative, visited Qatar during atrip to the region sponsored by the U.S. Depart-ment of State. He was invited to Georgetown’sQatar campus on August 24, 2010, to talk about“Moderate Islam, the Muslim Community inAmerica, and Inter-Faith Dialogue.” InterimDean Mehran Kamrava introduced the Imamas a “peace-builder” and welcomed the audience“in the spirit of dialogue, discussion, and dis-course;” pillars of Georgetown University’s mis-sion in Washington, DC, and Qatar. “Bridging the divide between Islam and the West involves unpack- Imam Feisal is a prominent Muslim leader in the United States and Chairman of the Cordoba Initiative. ing the sources of the problem, and looking at the opportunities that sense that the identity make-up of the society tertainment media – also tend to emphasize can be made.” is undergoing some permanent shift.” Thirdly, there are fundamental problems that arise as a negative factors that generate equally negative reactions among audiences. result of theological interpretation and juris- In conclusion, in order to solve these divi- prudence, where the West believes in secular- sive issues, Imam Feisal argued that the resolu- The Imam said that the Cordoba Initiative ism in direct opposition to how Muslim politi- tions must be “context specific” and that therewas a means of bridging U.S.-Muslim rela- cal communities are formed. is an urgent “need to look at the architecture oftions. He noted that a major initial task was power” as Muslims living in the United Statesto unpack these binary oppositional terms to need to improve their understanding regard-reveal complexities at the heart of the prob- “I am convinced that the ing how the country is structured. Therefore, he argued, “it is important to understand howlem between the “West” and the “Muslimworld.” The “West,” he said, is much more than so-called tension and po- decisions are made, and to be engaged in thata geographical location; it is a political and larization between the process.” Imam Feisal is the chairman of the Cor-ideological projection that has very real andlong-lasting impacts on the world. As such, West as the United States, doba Initiative, an independent, non-partisan“bridging the divide between Islam and the or the West at large and and multi-national project that works with state and non-state actors to improve Mus-West involves unpacking the sources of theproblem, and looking at the opportunities that the Muslim world, can be lim-West relations. In this capacity, he directscan be made.” The Imam argued that there is fixed in a ten-year time- projects that aim to heal conflict between Is-a misperception that Islam-West relations will lamic and Western communities by develop-take generations to fix, but, he said, “I am con- span if there is the will to ing youth leadership, empowering women, andvinced that the so-called tension and polariza- do it and the resources put engaging Islamic legal scholars in addressingtion between the West as the United States, or the implications of contemporary Islamic gov-the West at large and the Muslim world, can behind it.” ernance. In 1997, he founded the Americanbe fixed in a ten-year time-span if there is the Society for Muslim Advancement (ASMA),will to do it and the resources put behind it.” the first Muslim organization committed to The causes of the divide can be analyzed Further, there are fundamental differences bringing American Muslims and non-Mus-in different ways, but the Imam identified four related to gender relations. These issues pres- lims together through programs in academia,basic sources of the problem. The first of these ent challenges in the United States as well as policy, current affairs, and culture. As Imamis rooted in global political conflicts such as Europe. Fourthly, the Imam argued that there of Masjid al-Farah, a mosque located twelveIsrael-Palestine, U.S.-Iran relations, and the are general misrepresentations of the ‘other.’ blocks from Ground Zero in New York City,presence of U.S. troops in Afghanistan and “The perception of each side is another issue he preaches a message of understanding be-Iraq. The second revolves around a rapidly where the media plays a profound role.” In tween people of all creeds. Additionally, Imamchanging demographic occurring primarily in the interest of a perceived fairness, the media Feisal sits on the Board of Trustees of the Is-Europe, where Muslim populations are rapidly usually polarizes issues further by insisting on lamic Center of New York and serves as an ad-increasing. Imam Feisal argued that “because two opposing sides to each issue. Not only this, visor to the Interfaith Center of New York.the native populations are declining, there is a the media – both the news media and the en- Fall 2010 | CIRS Newsletter 11
  • 12. Distinguished Lecture SeriesMichael Nelson Lectures on the Future of TechnologyIn partnership with ictQatar, on April 12, 2010,CIRS organized a Distinguished Lecture fea-turing Michael Nelson, Visiting Professor ofInternet Studies in Georgetown University’sCommunication, Culture, and Technology pro-gram. Nelson, an expert in the areas of business,culture, and technology, lectured to an audienceof 450 people on “The Cloud, the Exaflood, andthe Internet of Things – Preparing for the NextDigital Revolution.” Nelson gave an overviewof the future of the internet by delving into thepolicy, technology, and business decisions thatare shaping how the technology will be used. Nelson drew on his experiences working forthe United States government, and his contri-bution to the Obama campaign specifically, byhighlighting the strategic use of words in orderto make or break certain initiatives. Language,he said, can be used tactically to shape policydecisions. In order to think about the future ofcomputing and the internet, Nelson shared withthe audience, eleven key words that sum up thediscourse. The first word that he offered was“people,” and this, he said, “is the most important Michael Nelson is Professor of Internet Studies at Georgetown University.word because it is what defines how technologydevelops.” The development of new hardwareand software used in computing is growing at evolves and how it is used,” Nelson argued. Im- fifth phrase: “Many-to-many.”an accelerated rate and is surpassing the pace at portantly, decisions made in the business sector Nelson’s sixth offering was the wordwhich people are learning to use these technolo- will either open up new possibilities or curtail “things,” which refers to the sharp increase ingies. Currently, there is a growing gap between existing ones. technological applications and gadgets. He saidthe progress of new technologies and the people Through the third word, “Cloud,” the cost that “it’s not just about computers and peopleable to operate them. of technologies has been lowered significantly. anymore; it’s about a hundred billion devices.” “The ‘cloud,’” Nelson said, “is really a different Indeed, Nelson said “today, about one and a half way of doing computing” that developed out of million PCs and a few hundred million smart “We all know what academia and research institutions that needed phones plug into the internet.” Because of these to store large quantities of data remotely. Cloud tools, we are now dealing with an “exaflood.” a megabyte is, and computing involves outsourcing to a third par- This is the seventh prominent word in Nelson’s a gigabyte, but if ty or provider. Organizations like Microsoft, lecture, and refers to the huge increase in the you take a billion Google, and Amazon are at the leading edge of amount of data available on the internet. “We all the development of this technology. know what a megabyte is, and a gigabyte, but if gigabytes, you get Nelson’s fourth word was “game changer,” you take a billion gigabytes, you get an ‘exabyte,’ an ‘exabyte.’” which emphasizes how these new cloud com- Nelson remarked. puting services will radically change the way This increase in the amount of raw data led computing is done. The first phase of computing to Nelson’s eighth word “collaboration,” which The second word Nelson offered was “vi- was based on the notion of individual computers refers to how people can work together to makesion,” and this referred to what kind of future working independently of others based on soft- sense of it. “Social media is, of course, one ofpeople foresee for technology. He argued that ware and data, the second phase developed when the leading edge applications for enabling new“we are entering the third phase in the develop- computers were plugged into the web giving types of collaboration. For a lot of people in theirment of the internet, and this phase is as pro- access to the world, and the third and current teenage years, Twitter and Facebook are actu-found, revolutionary, and transformational as the phase is the cloud, which means that individual ally replacing e-mail,” he said. This is inspiringWorld Wide Web was ten or fifteen years ago.” computers do not have to be tied down to their ‘crowd sourcing,’ which is a means of rallyingThis next phase is only just now being defined; own software and data, but can operate remotely people from all over the world to sort data. “In“over the next two or three years, we are going to by accessing data from other computers. This the last twenty years, we have gone from havingmake critical decisions about how the internet new mode of operation is defined by Nelson’s Continued on page 1412 CIRS Newsletter | Fall 2010
  • 13. Monthly Dialogue SeriesEducation and Market Transition in Viet NamDaniel Westbrook, Visiting Professor of Eco-nomics at the Georgetown University School ofForeign Service in Qatar, delivered the AugustCIRS Monthly Dialogue lecture on the topicof “Education and Market Transition in VietNam.” Westbrook first traveled to Viet Nam in1993 to spend a semester teaching at the Na-tional Economics University in Hanoi undera program sponsored by the Ford Foundation;he returned to the Ford Foundation programduring the 1995-1996 academic year. Profes-sor Westbrook also spent a year at the FulbrightEconomics Training Program in Ho Chi MinhCity during 2001-2002. More recently, heworked on Viet Nam as a “case study for look-ing at the effects of marketization on returns toeducation.” This is an ongoing research projectthat centers on the question: “How has the pay- Daniel Westbrook during his Monthly Dialogueoff to education evolved during Viet Nam’s mar-ket transition?” economic growth the Asian tiger economies ex- markets sophisticated enough to compensate perienced in the latter part of the 20th century. workers for their educational attainments. “The traditional At the beginning of its transition period, Viet Nam’s market transition experience Viet Nam was on the verge of starvation. Even provides an opportunity to examine the effect view of economic though Viet Nam has enjoyed GDP growth of improving markets on the returns to educa- development rates of 7-8% per year for over two decades, it tion. At the beginning of the transition period, describes a process remains very poor and there is much room for jobs were administratively allocated and market economic development to occur. Viet Nam’s returns to education were weak. During the late where labor moves education policies have been advancing along 1980s, Viet Nam gradually began its transition from agricultural ambitious goals to support further development. to a market-oriented economy. Professor West- activities to “In order for people to invest in education,” Pro- brook documented the degree to which greater fessor Westbrook explained, “they have to have labor market depth generated higher returns to industrial activities.” an incentive.” education. Westbrook’s statistical work indicates that the impact of education in Viet Nam is sub- stantial and significant. Moreover, the impact To provide context for his research, West- “Education pays off is larger where labor market depth is greatest.brook explained the role of education in theeconomic development process. “The tradi- in a big way and Thus, he concluded, “education pays off in a big way and this indicates a very strong incentive totional view of economic development,” he said this indicates a very acquire additional schooling or to invest in the“describes a process where labor moves from strong incentive to schooling of one’s children.”agricultural activities to industrial activities.”Historically, policies based on this view tended acquire additional Professor Westbrook received his Ph.D. from The Ohio State University in 1978 andto focus on heavy industry. Westbrook also de- schooling or to invest joined the faculty at Georgetown Universityscribed a more modern definition of economic in the schooling of during that time. He joined the School of For-development which gives a central role to hu-man capital and “acquisition of increasingly so- one’s children.” eign Service in Qatar in 2008. His current re- search interests focus on applied micro-econo-phisticated and productive ways of competing.” metrics in economic development and on VietThis model, he said, “envisions a world where Nam. Professor Westbrook regularly teachesdeveloping countries’ abilities to compete in It is generally understood that “educa- micro-economic principles, international trade,world markets depend very much on their ac- tion gives you access to better jobs and higher globalization, environmental economics, eco-quisition of human capital.” Westbrook cited wages,” but this assumes the existence of labor nomic statistics and econometrics.the role education played in producing the rapid Fall 2010 | CIRS Newsletter 13
  • 14. Spotlight on the FacultyGeorgetown University Libraries Project Receives QNRF Funding Frieda Wiebe is the Library Director at the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service in Qatar. Doris M. Goldstein is the Director of Bioethics Research Library (BRL) Department at the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University. Frieda Wiebe Doris M. GoldsteinFrieda Wiebe and Doris Goldstein are the of the Kennedy institute compiled the Bioeth- cell research have raised ethical concerns andPrincipal Investigators working on a Qatar Na- ics Thesaurus which consists of the controlled posed important questions to ethical systems,tional Research Fund (QNRF) awarded proj- vocabulary or keywords used for indexing and both religious and secular. The project focusesect that aims to develop a bibliographic data- searching the world’s first library dedicated to on ethical discussions either originating in thebase on Islamic Medical and Scientific Ethics the study of bioethics. The Kennedy Institute Muslim world or reflecting Islamic perspectives(IMSE) and to establish an International Is- also publishes the highly-regarded Kennedy In- on these issues. Work on the project involveslamic Bioethics Information Resource (IIBIR). stitute of Ethics Journal. three main dimensions: survey of relevant re-The project is a collaborative one between two The main goal of this research project is to sources, acquisition, and finally indexing andof Georgetown University’s research libraries: reflect the growing interest in the field of Is- integration into the database. Very early resultsthe Bioethics Research Library of the Kennedy lamic bioethics and to facilitate access to infor- can already be seen. The homepage for the proj-Institute of Ethics and the library of the School mation resources dealing with this subject. The ect is at:of Foreign Service in Qatar. It builds on more past few years have witnessed the expansionthan thirty years of experience in the field of of interdisciplinary discussions addressing the http://bioethics.georgetown.edu/collections/bioethics and comes as the latest in a series of various ethical implications of recent advances islamic/index.html.ethics databases, all developed by the staff of the in medical and genetic sciences. Issues suchKennedy institute of Ethics. The bibliographers as cloning, organ transplantation, and stemMichael Nelson, continued from page 12a scarcity of data to having an overwhelming amount of data,” Nelson changes to happen there needs to be substantial changes in technologicalexplained. In fact, “the reason President Obama is in the White House usage, cultural shifts, and policy implementations.is because of these technologies and because of the ‘cloud’ […] The cam- These necessary changes led to Nelson’s eleventh, and final, word,paign used social media to mobilize hundreds of thousands of people to “policy.” He argued that “policy is often fifteen to twenty years behind theget them involved in the campaign and to get millions of people to give technology, and if that policy is not well designed, it can hold everythingmoney,” he said. back. So, governments have a critically important role to play and I am “Consumerization” was Nelson’s ninth word, and defines the upgrade very glad that Qatar, and the Qatari government, is focused on this.”of digital technologies in the workplace as people blend their work and Concluding the lecture, Nelson gave three possible scenarios for thehome technologies. “This is the trend we see now where people are bring- future of computing. The first of these is the ‘clouds scenario’ wherein aing into the workplace incredibly sophisticated tools and software appli- variety of organizations operate different forms of ‘clouds,’ using differentcations that they use at home,” such as social media capabilities, he said. technologies that are purposefully incompatible. The second is the ‘cloudy The tenth word was “predictions,” and refers to a vision of what the skies’ scenario where different organizations operate different technolo-internet will make possible in the near future. One of the predictions that gies, but agree upon methods of interoperability. The third, and most desir-Nelson offered was that “within five years, 80% of all computing and stor- able, possibility is the ‘blue skies’ scenario where different clouds, run byage done worldwide could happen ‘in the cloud,’” but it is more likely that different organizations, all use common standards that make flexibility andit will take a decade. Another prediction he suggested was that “within interoperability the norm. Finally, Nelson said that “we are now less thanfive years, 100 billion devices and sensors could be connected to the net,” 15% of the way through this incredible change” and so it is up to the usersbut this too will most probably happen within ten years’ time. For these to demand the changes that they would like to see happen in the future.14 CIRS Newsletter | Fall 2010
  • 15. The Season in EventsCIRS HighlightsPaula Newberg addresses lunch guests. Georgetown alumna Haya Al Noaimi introduces Dean Kamrava at the CIRS International Lecture. Researchers at the “Nuclear Question in the Middle East” Working Group Dan Stoll during his Monthly Dialogue lectureA Georgetown University student asks a question. Imam Feisal interacts with a Georgetown University student. Fall 2010 | CIRS Newsletter 15
  • 16. CIRS Staff Directory Call for Occasional PapersMehran Kamrava, Director Georgetown University’s Center for International and Regional Studiesmk556@georgetown.edu (CIRS) is pleased to announce a call for contributions to its Occasional Paper series. CIRS publishes original research in a broad range of issuesZahra Babar, Project Managerzb36@georgetown.edu related to the Gulf region in the areas of international relations, political science, economics, and Islamic studies. Other topics of current signifi-John T. Crist, Associate Director of Research cance also will be considered.jtc33@georgetown.eduJibin Koshy, Publications Intern Papers should be a maximum of 10,000 words and cannot have been previ-jgk32@georgetown.edu ously published or under consideration for publication elsewhere. PapersSuzi Mirgani, Publications Coordinator must adhere to the Chicago Manual of Style (15th edition) and all trans-sm623@georgetown.edu literations must adhere to the International Journal of Middle East Studies.Doaa Osman, Research Intern All submissions are subject to a double-blind review process. Any copy-do66@georgetown.edu right concerns are the full responsibility of the author. Please submit man- uscripts to cirsresearch@georgetown.edu. Inquiries about the OccasionalNaila Habiby Sherman, Associate Director forAdministration and Finance Paper series or other related questions may be directed to Suzi Mirgani,nhs2@georgetown.edu CIRS Publications Coordinator, at sm623@georgetown.edu.Debra Shushan, Post-Doctoral Fellowdls74@georgetown.edu Post-Doctoral FellowshipMaha Uraidi, GU-Q Events Managermu29@georgetown.edu Georgetown University’s Center for International and Regional Studies (CIRS) awards Post-Doctoral Fellowships. The fellowship supports a re- cent Ph.D. recipient in any discipline working on the area of the Middle East with priority given to those working on the Gulf. The Fellowship is for a period of one academic year. Compensation, benefits and other termsCIRS Advisory Board of employment are highly competitive.Dr. Sheikha Abdulla Al-Misnad, President, Qatar University Interested candidates should visit the website for more information: http://cirs.georgetown.edu/research/fellowships/114126.htmlMr. Alexander Dodds, President and General Manager,ExxonMobil QatarDr. Robert Gallucci, President, John D. and Catherine T. Visiting Scholar/ResearcherMacArthur Foundation Georgetown University’s Center for International and Regional StudiesDr. Michael Hudson, Director, Center for Contemporary Arab (CIRS) awards nonresidential Visiting Scholar Fellowships. The position isStudies, Georgetown University open to scholars in all disciplines working on any area of the Middle East,Dr. Stanley N. Katz, Director, Woodrow Wilson School of Public with priority given to those working on the Gulf. This position is ideal forand International Affairs, Princeton University mid- and senior-level academics. Compensation, benefits and other termsDr. Carol Lancaster, Dean, School of Foreign Service, Georgetown of employment are highly competitive.UniversitySir Timothy Lankester, Former President, Corpus Christi Col- Interested candidates should visit the website for more information:lege, Oxford University http://cirs.georgetown.edu/research/fellowships/114127.htmlDr. James Reardon-Anderson, Senior Associate Dean andDirector of Undergraduate Programs (BSFS), School of ForeignService, Georgetown UniversityDr. Gary Sick, Senior Research Scholar, School of Internationaland Public Affairs, Columbia University CIRS Newsletter ISSN 2072-6961 © 2010 Center for International and Regional Studies Georgetown University School of Foreign Service in Qatar Education City, Qatar Foundation P.O. Box 23689 Doha, State of Qatar For event inquiries: cirsevents@georgetown.edu For research and publications inquiries: cirsresearch@georgetown.edu http://cirs.georgetown.edu | Tel +974 4457 8400 | Fax +974 4457 8401 Unless otherwise noted, all articles written by Suzi Mirgani, CIRS Publications Coordinator.16 CIRS Newsletter | Fall 2010

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