Retooling your Math Class for 21st C

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Keynote Presentations for CFF Math Collaboration day at CCIU
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  • Focuses on 21st century skills, content knowledge and expertise. Builds understanding across and among core subjects as well as 21st century interdisciplinary themes Emphasizes deep understanding rather than shallow knowledge Engages students with the real world data, tools, and experts they will encounter in college, on the job, and in life--students learn best when actively engaged in solving meaningful problems Allows for multiple measures of mastery VISION21st Century ContentGlobal awarenessFinancial, economic, business, and entrepreneurial literacyCivic literacyHealth and wellness awarenessCORE CONCEPTSCore subjectsLanguage artsMathematicsScienceWorld languagesCivic and governmentEconomics HistoryGeography
  • Relax school rules about email, IM, cell phone and online use
  • Are used to receiving information really fastLike to parallel process and multitaskPrefer graphics before their textPrefer random access (like hypertext)Function best when networkedThrive on instant gratification and frequent rewardsPrefer games to “serious” work
  • http://www.nmc.org/horizon/2007/user-created-contentConfronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st CenturyHenry JenkinsA growing body of scholarship suggests potential benefits of these forms of participatory culture, including:opportunities for peer-to-peer learning, a changed attitude toward intellectual property, the diversification of cultural expression, the development of skills valued in the modern workplace, and a more empowered conception of citizenship. Participatory culture shifts the focus of literacy from one of individual expression to community involvement.The new literacies almost all involve social skills developed through collaboration and networking.These skills build on the foundation of traditional literacy, research skills, technical skills, and critical analysis skills taught in the classroom.
  • http://www.nmc.org/horizonproject/2007/mobile-phonesTurning point technologies Iphone ap for student response systemhttp://www.businesswire.com/portal/site/home/permalink/?ndmViewId=news_view&newsId=20090105005770&newsLang=enhttp://www.nmc.org/horizonproject/2007/virtual-worlds
  • Nontraditional forms are emerging that call for new ways of evaluating and disseminating work. Increasingly, scholars are beginning to employ methods unavailable to their counterparts of several years ago, including prepublication releases of their work, distribution through nontraditional channels, dynamic visualization of data and results, and new ways to conduct peer reviews using online collaboration. These new approaches present a new challenge: to protect the integrity of scholarly activity while taking advantage of the opportunity for increased creativity and collaboration. http://graphs.gapminder.org/http://www.nmc.org/horizonproject/2007/massively-multiplayer-educational-gamingidentifying games that are goal-oriented and those that are more social in nature; games that are easy to construct and play, and those that are more complex and time-consuming; and games developed expressly for education versus commercial games that are appropriated for educational use. One genre that offers interesting potential for education is massively multiplayer online (MMO) games, which bring many players together in activities that are sometimes collaborative and sometimes competitive, generally goal-oriented, and often tied to a storyline or theme.
  • Society is changingThe skills and knowledge required for work and civic life in the 21st century are shiftingEducational systems need to adapt to meet the needs of the digital natives in the 21st centuryCritical thinkingReflectionEvaluationCommunicationConnectivenessConnectivityCollaborationOrganizationResearchCreative Expression
  • The Agricultural Age and Industrial Age? Or the Communication Age, the Biotechnology Age and the NanotechnologyAge? Do we prepare them for the world of tomorrow, or the farms andfactories of yesterday?
  • The Agricultural Age and Industrial Age? Or the Communication Age, the Biotechnology Age and the NanotechnologyAge? Do we prepare them for the world of tomorrow, or the farms andfactories of yesterday?
  • The Agricultural Age and Industrial Age? Or the Communication Age, the Biotechnology Age and the NanotechnologyAge? Do we prepare them for the world of tomorrow, or the farms andfactories of yesterday?
  • The Agricultural Age and Industrial Age? Or the Communication Age, the Biotechnology Age and the NanotechnologyAge? Do we prepare them for the world of tomorrow, or the farms andfactories of yesterday?
  • The Agricultural Age and Industrial Age? Or the Communication Age, the Biotechnology Age and the NanotechnologyAge? Do we prepare them for the world of tomorrow, or the farms andfactories of yesterday?
  • The Agricultural Age and Industrial Age? Or the Communication Age, the Biotechnology Age and the NanotechnologyAge? Do we prepare them for the world of tomorrow, or the farms andfactories of yesterday?
  • The Agricultural Age and Industrial Age? Or the Communication Age, the Biotechnology Age and the NanotechnologyAge? Do we prepare them for the world of tomorrow, or the farms andfactories of yesterday?
  • Around what enduring understandings, essential questions, and standards should our programs be built to better prepare our students for their future? “This is a story about the big public conversation the nation is not having about education… whether an entire generation of kids will fail to make the grade in the global economy because they can’t think their way through abstract problems, work in teams, distinguish good information from bad, or speak a language other than English.”“How to Build a Student for the 21st Century”, TIME Magazine, December 18, 2006
  • Teach kids how to access informationUse tools for collaboratingUse tools to communicate on the webDevelop their own learning networksUnderstand social network implicationsHave fun
  • Are they ready to workReleased October 2, 2006, by The Conference Board, Corporate Voices for Working Families, Partnership for 21st Century Skills, and the Society for Human Resource Management groups.GlobalizationTransformative technologiesShifting demographicsChanging values and attitudes
  • Ask participants to put name and contact information and an innovative thing they have done or something they want to LearnMake a paper airplane out of it…Ask the participants to make another paper airplane, this timeimproving the design and performance. While they’re making theirsecond airplane, pick up many of the first round planes and put them ona table to display.When they’re finished, have them all fly together again. Often times,the second round of flights is worse than the first because theymodify the existing design by adding more elements to the plane.Collect the second planes and put on another nearby table.Now it's time to talk. We look at the first planes - everyone isdifferent (paper, size, folds etc...) yet they all are based on the sameparadigm on how to build planes...and they don't fly well. It's just theway we do it.I make the point that teachers are required to do more and morethese days, that curriculum is piling on but the planes design does notchange...we just add more to it.
  • Then I go to the second table to look at the new improved planes...theylook interchangeable with the first planes...just more added on andoften fly worse.The key moment occurs when I talk about the flawed paradigm we useto design our planes. Then I take a plane, crumple it into a ball andthrow it. This crumpled ball is inevitably a farther flying, moreaccurate plane then the complex ones they made.The point: sometimes as educators \"unlearning\" is more important thandoing more to or for students. We need to keep it simple and focus onwhat really counts. How students learn, not how we teach oradministrate.
  • Net Speak up day dataOver half of the teachers say that technology has had the largest impact on their teaching…that technology helps them engage students…that their lesson plans are richer and timelier…TODAY HEAR from teachers who are doing thatOpportunity to share
  • Creativity and Innovation Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology. a. apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes. b. create original works as a means of personal or group expression. c. use models and simulations to explore complex systems and issues. d. identify trends and forecast possibilities.Communication and Collaboration Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others. a. interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts or others employing a variety of digital environments and media. b. communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats. c. develop cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with learners of other cultures. d. contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems.Research and Information Fluency Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information. a. plan strategies to guide inquiry. b. locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media. c. evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness to specific tasks. c. process data and report results. Digital Citizenship Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior.a. advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology. b. exhibit a positive attitude toward using technology that supports collaboration, learning, and productivity. c. demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning. d. exhibit leadership for digital citizenship. Critical Thinking, Problem-Solving & Decision-Making Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources. a. identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation. b. plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project. c. collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions. d. use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions. Technology Operations and Concepts Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations.a. understand and use technology systems. b. select and use applications effectively and productively. c. troubleshoot systems and applications. d. transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies.
  • Retooling your Math Class for 21st C

    1. 1. Retooling your Math Classes for the 21st Century QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
    2. 2. Traditional view of knowledge Learners are empty vessels to be filled
    3. 3. Humor http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7WMi5TUJDso QuickTimeª and a mpeg4 decompressor are needed to see this picture.
    4. 4. 21st C Skills
    5. 5. Why?
    6. 6. Today information is changing so rapidly its hard to see what’s happening
    7. 7. The Digital Native…
    8. 8. Who are these 21st Century Learners? QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
    9. 9. Who are these 21st Century Learners? QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
    10. 10. Who are these 21st Century Learners? QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
    11. 11. Who are these 21st Century Learners? QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
    12. 12. Who are these 21st Century Learners? QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
    13. 13. Who are these 21st Century Learners? QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTimeªand a a QuickTimeª and decompressor decompressor are needed to to seethispicture. are needed see this picture. QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
    14. 14. 21 Century Learner Profile st Students’ #1 request regarding technology use at their schools Relax school rules about email, IM, cell phone and online use QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. Data from Kaiser Family Foundation Study, 2005 Speak Up 2006 (www.tomorrow.org)
    15. 15. 21 Century Learner Profile st Favorite communications device (K-12)? Cell phone (73% in grades 9-12 use a cell phone daily) QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. Data from Kaiser Family Foundation Study, 2005 Speak Up 2006 (www.tomorrow.org)
    16. 16. 21 Century Learner Profile st Percentage of middle schoolers who have online friends from other schools, states or countries? 54% QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. Data from Kaiser Family Foundation Study, 2005 Speak Up 2006 (www.tomorrow.org)
    17. 17. Our Students just the start... This is • Make Phone Calls • Send Text Messages • Download Music • Play Music • Surf the Web • Take Photos • Send Photos QuickTimeª and a decompressor • Play Games are needed to see this picture.
    18. 18. Trends Horizon Report 2007 Key trends affecting higher education – One year or less • Social Networking • User-Created Content QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
    19. 19. TrendsHorizon Report 2007 Key trends affecting higher education – Two-Three Years • Mobile Phones • Virtual Worlds QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
    20. 20. TrendsHorizon Report 2007 Key trends affecting higher education –Four-Five Years •New Scholarship and Emerging Forms of Publication •Massively Multiplayer Educational Gaming
    21. 21. Realizations QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
    22. 22. For what world should today's schools be designed to prepare our students?
    23. 23. For what world should today's schools be designed to prepare our students?
    24. 24. QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. For what world should today's schools be designed to prepare our students?
    25. 25. QuickTimeª and a decompressor QuickTimeª and a are needed to see this picture. decompressor are needed to see this picture. For what world should today's schools be designed to prepare our students?
    26. 26. For what world should today's schools be designed to prepare our students?
    27. 27. QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. For what world should today's schools be designed to prepare our students?
    28. 28. QuickTimeª and a QuickTimeª and a decompressor decompressor are needed to see this picture. are needed to see this picture. QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. For what world should today's schools be designed to prepare our students?
    29. 29. Educational Implications
    30. 30. Create relevant learning opportunities http://www.learner.org/interactives/dailymath/index.html
    31. 31. Create authentic opportunities for problem solving QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
    32. 32. QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. Learning Requires Reflection
    33. 33. Learning vs Testing
    34. 34. Learning to Fly QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
    35. 35. QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. it’s not about searching t’s about finding new ways of applying knowledge and creating
    36. 36. It is easier to change the location of a cemetery than to change the QuickTimeª and a school curriculum. decompressor are needed to see this picture. Woodrow Wilson
    37. 37. QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. “The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn.” - Alvin Toffler
    38. 38. T h e  Me d iu m  is  th e   Me s s a g e QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. What new medium are you using in your classroom to change your message?
    39. 39. The Bottom Line The value is in the content and how you use it. Not in the technology itself.
    40. 40. Building as we go QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.

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