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  • 1. REFLECTIVE PRACTICE ASSIGNMENT______________________________ ECEP 132: Guidance and the Individual Child Centennial College - Ashtonbee (Winter Semester) Submitted to: Priti Parikh Submitted by: Khiara Remedios G. Albaran Submitted on: April 4, 2012
  • 2. Guidance Log #1______________________________________________________ Date: March 5, 2012 Time: 9:00 - 10:00 A.M Name: "Tyler" Date of Birth: January 13, 2011
  • 3. Reflective Practice Guidance Logs Part 1 – Objective Observation (Clearly identify the problem. Examine the “context” of the problem)Date: March 13, 2012 (between 9:00 to 10:00 AM)Pseudonyms: Marie and Marlo; JacobSetting: The situation occurred during their morning free-play, which is thesuggested period where the observer can conduct her planned activity. Ithappened in one of the mat areas in the classroom – the observer and two otherchildren were seated on the mat. Observation: During the morning session in the centre the observer was conducting a planned activity with two children – Marlo and Marie. Marlo and Marie were holding on to a foam stick (each on one end) where they insert sponges with a hole in the middle. After 3 to 5 minutes of doing the activity, Jacob comes in, bent a little forward (standing) and grasp on the “stringing activity equipment” (foam stick and sponges with a whole in the middle). As Jacob pulled it towards him, the two other children just looked at him and the observer reached out her hand – attempting to stop it. The observer didn’t pull the toy back, then Jacob started touching the foams – trying to remove it from the stick, one-by-one. Context of the problem: Jacob intervenes in an activity without waiting for his turn – the child is yet to develop the concept of taking-turns. Part 2 – Decision (Clearly identify the guidance strategy and state why the chosen strategy is appropriate for this child and the situation) The observer chose redirection as the guidance strategy for the child. Redirection through diversion and/or distraction is believed to be effective for younger children (infants and toddlers). It is effective for younger children because of the concept of perception and attention. The perception skills of younger children are still in the developing stage, thus making it easier to distract them with a powerful stimulus. For example, one person can redirect an infant when he/she is crying by pointing to something even though it could mean nothing; but not only simply pointing, they alter their voice and their facial expressions and even their movements to make it look more exciting. Marion mentioned that “young children have difficulty ignoring irrelevant information (2011)” which makes it hard for them to control their attention. In this sense, in redirection we divert and distract the child with other things – this other things may not be connected with what the child is focusing as of that moment. Since it is
  • 4. effective to children, redirection can be considered as an immediateresponse and solution especially in this situation where there are otherchildren who are waiting for the activity to resume. This efficient responsealso indicated a positive guidance strategy where the observer was able toacknowledge a behavior without stepping into the child’s confidence andself-esteem.Aside from that, with all honesty, redirecting through diversion anddistraction can be considered as a typical response for caregivers orchildcare provider every time faced in a situation similar to this one. Also,the observer used verbal communication through reminders – teachingthem helpful or appropriate behavior. One may clearly assume that they arestill young for such a guidance strategy, but it is typical for an adult to saysomething and communicate. It doesn’t make sense to them yet, but onemust consider that they’re in their formation stage where they just absorb(for now) what they see, hear and learn, thus making modeling a greatinfluence to them. At that time, when the observer used the said strategy,she didn’t expect for the child to respond and understand the statementlike “it’s not yet your turn.” She just believes that by stating the word term,the child gets to experience the meaning of the concept which will soonhelp him to form his vocabulary words (when repeated or withconsistency). Part 3 – Actions (Clearly discuss your actions (what you did and said), the child’s response and the results of the guidance strategy)The observer, Marlo and Marie were all still seated on the mat while Jacobwas standing between the observer and Marie but not exactly in the middle– around two steps away (right side of the observer).Jacob remained standing as he pulled the sponges out of the stick, one-by-one. The observer placed her right hand on Jacob’s left shoulder (holding itjust in case he gets out of balanced) while her left hand was holding ontothe equipment. The observer then said, “Jacob, it’s not yet your turn …Marlo and Marie is still using the toy.” Jacob was not letting the toy go sothe observer wrapped her right arm on Jacob’s waist, while her left handwas placed in Jacob’s stomach area - she held him over to sit beside her.Once Jacob was seated right next to her, the observer held on to theequipment, and gave it to Marie (Marlo walked away since it took theobserver more than a minute to resolve the situation) who was waiting forit.
  • 5. As Jacob sat right next to her, the observer stretched her right arm and pointed towards the toy that was placed across them (north-east) and said “Oh what’s that Jacob?” – With eyes wide open and with a smile. The observer pulled the toy and started pressing the buttons and said, “Look Jacob! What do we have here?” She continued to press the buttons, producing a sound, and then she offered ot to Jacob. “Do you want to try it Jacob? You can have it” said the observer, still pressing the buttons and moving her head from right to left. The Jacob took it and started pressing the buttons – he also slightly moved his head sideways (left to right, right to left) while still sitting. The observer said, “da … da …” following the tone of the toy while looking at Marie as she continued with the activity. Part 4 – Reflection(Clearly discuss your strengths and needs and the changes that you would make if needed) Strengths Needs For this guidance log I consider Even though I was successful in the following as my strengths: redirecting the child, I can the ability to attract the child to admit that I still need to form proceed with the activity where more confidence with regards to he/she is being redirected to guidance strategies especially and the ability to control one’s when the ECEs are around. I emotion. First is the ability to feel so shy whenever they’re attract the child with a different around but I believe that I am activity. If I didn’t take much getting more and more effort with my facial expression, confident as time passes by and movement and tone there could given the fact that I was told be a possibility that the child that I can act as an ECE with the won’t even look at me, or look children (thus, requiring me to at me but find it unattractive be confident). and continue to focus with what he is doing. Second is the ability to control my emotions (esp. from getting upset). Even though it was an important activity, since the other two children were giving me a good response, I did control my tone of voice and
  • 6. facial expression which can immediately translate my emotions as of that moment. Sometimes, in situations like this, we tend to say no with conviction and just pull the toy away from the child. In this situation, I took my time to gently redirect him in a different activity and patiently waited until he settles down.Discuss the changes that you would make and why you would make them. If I am to change something with the redirection that I have performed, I think I would go for more available materials that are similar to each other instead of redirecting him to a different one. I feel so bad that the child wasn’t able to experience the activity because I feel his interest - him, interfering, makes me think that he is indeed interested with the activity but I was not able to cater to him.
  • 7. Supervising ECE SignatureDear ECE Supervising Teacher: Please read and review the guidance log.Select the appropriate box below. o This log is accurate based on your observations. o This log is somewhat accurate. Please explain : _______________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ o This log is not accurate based on your observations.Agency Name: _____________________________________Phone Number: _____________________________________Name of ECE: (Please Print) _____________________________________ECE Signature: _____________________________________Date of Signature: ________________________________ Thank-you!
  • 8. Guidance Log #2______________________________________________________ Date: March 13, 2012 Time: 9:00 - 10:00 A.M Name: "Jacob" Date of Birth: March 18, 2011
  • 9. Reflective Practice Guidance Logs Part 1 – Objective Observation (Clearly identify the problem. Examine the “context” of the problem)Date: March 20, 2012 (between 11:30 am to 12:30 pm)Pseudonyms: Mark and MarySetting: It happened after having their lunch and while they were having theirfree-play. This period seems like their cooling down time, while they wait for theirturn for diaper change and/or check - which is part of their daily routine beforethey head to their sleeping time. Observation: The observer and three of the children were sitting on the mat and on the floor, playing with tambourines and singing songs. After 5 minutes the observer was reminded of the day’s program plan which aims to explore and play with the telephone set. Two of the other children walked away and played in a different area of the room. The observer took hold of one of the telephone toys and played with it and pretended to talk to the child (Mary) in front of her. When she caught Mary’s attention, she gave it to her and then they started playing. Pretending to talk to each other. The observer at that time was using her left hand, placed it on her left ear and pretended that it was a telephone. After a minute or two, Mark walked towards the observer and Mary. He was walking directly towards Mary who was playing with the telephone. At that point the headpiece of the phone was on Mary’s ear. He stretched his arm, getting hold of the telephone. The two children both held on to the telephone and pulled it towards their side but without too much force. Context of the problem: Mark attempted to take hold of the telephone toy while Mary was still playing with it. They both held unto the toy, pulling it towards their side. Part 2 – Decision (Clearly identify the guidance strategy and state why the chosen strategy is appropriate for this child and the situation) Before the actual response of the observer, it is only appropriate to indicate that there was also a present indirect guidance in the environment per se – having two toys of the same kind available for the children to explore. As mentioned in the observation, the telephone exploration was part of the centre’s planned activity for the day, which is why (what they usually do) the ECEs brought out ample amount of toys for children to explore the same type of toy, all at the same time. Duplicating the toy can be considered as a prevention strategy to decrease the occurrence of fighting behavior over a toy. It was mentioned by Bullard (2010) that having the few
  • 10. materials, or in this case (if ever) having only one telephone available, doesnot only increase fighting behavior, it may also reflect that “children havelimited choices and may waste time waiting for materials to becomeavailable. … Additionally, children’s ability to reach their full potential maybe hindered.”On the other hand, given that there was already a preventive strategy thatwas present in the environment, the observer also chose to applyredirection to the child. The difference this time is that, the observer wasable to redirect the child towards the same toy – thus, still providing theappropriate material for his interest which supports his exploration and fullpotential. Aside from mentioning that it is the most effective strategies forinfants, it can also be said that it is the most appropriate during that timesince you want to get the attention of the child and show him that you havethe another (same) toy available for him. Marion (2011) mentions thatredirection is a technique that “may involve distracting a very young childwith a more appropriate activity” – which in this case, the observer wasdistracting the child towards an available toy to prevent the occurrence offurther behavioral issues. Part 3 – Actions (Clearly discuss your actions (what you did and said), the child’s response and the results of the guidance strategy)Still sitting on the mat – the children and the observer are all in the samelevel. Mary was sitting on the right side of the observer and Mark waswalking in front of them (towards them and is directed to Mary).Once the observer saw that Mark stretched out his hand towards the toy,she immediately said “Look Mark, I have another telephone here.” She firsttried to catch his attention hoping that the child won’t pull further. As soonas Mark looked at her while still holding on the phone she immediatelylooked from behind – twisting her body instead of standing up and movingaway. She searched for the other telephone on top of the cubby behind her(where it is normally found), and then she immediately grab it as soon asshe saw it and placed the head piece on her right ear and said, “HelloMark!” while looking directly at the child – hoping that she gets hisattention once again. The child looked back at her let go of the othertelephone and stretched his arm towards the observer. The observer did thesame by stretching her arm, giving other telephone to the child. The childpicked it up from her hands and the observer then said, “Hi Mary, its Mark!How was your lunch?” … “Hello Mark! My lunch was really yummy!” The
  • 11. pretend conversation went on repeatedly. After a minute or two, Mary stood up and placed her telephone’s headpiece on the observer’s right side of the face and the observer pretended to have a conversation with Mary. Mark looked at them and he stood up and followed what Mary did and placed his telephone’s headpiece on the left side of the observer’s face. Part 4 – Reflection(Clearly discuss your strengths and needs and the changes that you would make if needed) Strengths Needs For this guidance log I consider What I thought of at first, as the following as my strengths, one of my needs is the which led to the success of the accessibility of the materials. chosen strategy. First is the But then as I look back, I accessibility to the duplicate remembered that this need was material. If we were not situated covered by the environment. near the area where I can get The environment per se, guided the duplicate telephone, I may and supported not only the assume that redirecting the children, but also me as the child to a different equipment facilitator of the experience won’t be that easy because the (planned or spontaneous). The child could have or might insist environment fosters an indirect of wanting the telephone and guidance strategy that lessens that getting his interest to the the direct intervention that the new one (where he is facilitator needs to perform in redirected) might not work such cases. immediately, which may result to a loud cry and negotiation. With this in mind, on the other This situation may also affect hand, I consider ``foresight`` as the other child’s interest to the a need. When I say foresight, I activity. should have gotten the cue that Mark was showing right in front Second is the power and of me – I already saw him enthusiasm of my action and walking towards us. I should voice that enabled me to get his have invited him to come over, attention and persuade him with the phone in my hand and towards the desired direction. not wait for him to stretch his Without this, I suppose, I failed arm – aiming for the telephone. to become an effective ECE since I wasn`t able to provide an experience that catered to the child`s interest.
  • 12. Lastly, even though it is not my strength per se, I consider the availability of a duplicate of the equipment as strength because it only shows that the environment is developmentally appropriate and that it fosters to the full potential of the children. I also consider it as a strength because i t only shows that the environment is prepared to prevent fighting behaviours to occur. It was mentioned in one of our discussions before and in one of the videos that we used, that prevention is the key strategy for the ECEs, in terms of handling difficult behaviours inside the classroom.Discuss the changes that you would make and why you would make them. If I am to change something in my strategy, I can say that I would apply ``foresight`` like what I have mentioned in my needs. To effectively do this, I should have used the duplicate toy instead of using my hands as a pretend phone – knowing that it is available. This for me, is considered as a prepared tool, so by the time comes that a child joins into the activity I could apply an immediate response by offering or giving it to him and at the same time including him or her directly to the experience. To better illustrate the change, I choose to apply it to the given situation in this log. If, let`s say, I was using the duplicate toy and Mark comes into the activity, I could have (might have) provided a spontaneous action or response to him and at the same time, I could have or might have provided continuity to Mary`s exploration – without interruptions. Such interruptions could have caused Mary`s interest to decrease, given that in some cases, as explained by my ECE, children tend to move away once you don`t give them the attention that they need and at the same time, your actions (looking for the toy, standing up or turning your back) might also be seen by the children as a redirection as they watch you. For example, during an experience, I stood up and went to look for a toy on a bin. I successfully saw the toy that I was looking for, and the child sees that I was able to get a toy on that bin; there`s a possibility that the child will also stand up and move towards that bin leaving the experience that you are providing.
  • 13. Supervising ECE SignatureDear ECE Supervising Teacher: Please read and review the guidance log.Select the appropriate box below. o This log is accurate based on your observations. o This log is somewhat accurate. Please explain : _______________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ o This log is not accurate based on your observations.Agency Name: _____________________________________Phone Number: _____________________________________Name of ECE: (Please Print) _____________________________________ECE Signature: _____________________________________Date of Signature: ________________________________ Thank-you!
  • 14. Guidance Log #3______________________________________________________ Date: March 20, 2012 Time: 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM Name: "Mark" Date of Birth: March 18, 2011
  • 15. Reflective Practice Guidance Logs Part 1 – Objective Observation (Clearly identify the problem. Examine the “context” of the problem)Date: March 5, 2012 (between 9:00 to 10:00 AM)Pseudonym(s): TylerSetting: The situation occurred during their morning free-play, which is thesuggested period where the observer can conduct her planned activity. Ithappened inside the classroom after the child performed an activity with a watertable and a few pieces of balls of different makes and textures. Observation: During the closing part of the planned activity, the observer asked Tyler to place the balls, one-by-one, on the bin that she was holding. The child picked up a ball from the water table using both of his hands and dropped it on the bin on his left. He did this for four times, getting all the remaining balls into the bin (some of the balls were on the floor, because the child threw some during his exploration). After the water table was cleared with all the balls, the child started to play with the water by pounding on it with his right hand and then both of his hands. The observer started singing, “wash our hands, wash our hands…”, bent down and held on to the child’s left arm. The child pulled away and pounded on the water using his right hand. The child cried and pounded more times on the water when the observer tried to take him away from the water table. Context of the problem: The child refused to be taken away from the activity that he seems to be interested with (the planned activity was based on the child’s cues and interests). Part 2 – Decision (Clearly identify the guidance strategy and state why the chosen strategy is appropriate for this child and the situation) The observer chose to apply redirection and at the same time, limits. Redirection, particularly diversion and distraction, is said to be very effective for young children because they are still developing their ability to control their attention – knowing what to ignore and where to focus on. One of the major factors that one must consider in guiding children is the development of their perception. Marion mentioned perception as “one part of the whole process of cognitive development (2011).” He defined it as the “process of organizing information obtained through seeing, listening, touching and smelling (2011).” Children’s perception of things greatly affects their attention, most especially for young children. When faced with intense stimulus (bright colors, loud sounds and powerful emotions), young
  • 16. children experience the difficulty of ignoring it most especially when thatcertain “stimulus” captures their attention. With this in mind, diverting anddistracting infants becomes an effective guidance strategy.Another guidance strategy that was used by the observer was to help thechild accept limits particularly through decreasing the distance between herand the child and through getting the child’s attention politely. We are allaware that these strategies won’t mean that much to the infants since theyare still developing (esp. their language), but with all honesty that was oneof the natural responses that the observer was able to apply. In decreasingthe distance between the educator and the child, the observer bend downto be able to talk to the child directly – giving eye contact. Also throughthis, the observer was able to convey her actual message through a visibleexpression that the child can actually/clearly see. In getting the child’sattention the observer used a nonthreatening verbal cue and physicalcontact that she assumes to be helpful in stating the limit to the child. Asmentioned by Marion, “using nonthreatening verbal or nonverbal cues andappropriate physical contact is essential with toddlers and is highlyrecommended with preschoolers, especially those who have not learned tolive with reasonable boundaries and limits (2011).” Though it was notmentioned that it is effective for infants, one cannot consider this as auseless strategy; instead, this could serve as an introduction for the child ashe is about to enter toddlerhood and at the same time, the observerthought that this won’t do harm for him. Part 3 – Actions (Clearly discuss your actions (what you did and said), the child’s response and the results of the guidance strategy)Still beside the water table – the observer was kneeling down, while thechild was standing on her right, facing the water table.The observer started singing “wash our hands, wash our hands [Mr.Thumbkin tone]” again and said, “Tyler, let’s go and wash our hands” whileholding on to his left arm. The child pulled away – moving his body awayfrom the observer. The observer didn’t pull against it or Tyler might fall tothe side. She replaced his left hand on the child’s arm and used her right tohold the other side of the child’s body. The observer moved her bodybehind the child – now like squatting (legs fully bent, sitting on theground). The observer is now holding both the sides of the child. Theobserver pulled the child away from the water table, then his body startedmoving against the pull. The observer stood up, bent over the child andheld his left hand with her left hand, and his right hand with her right
  • 17. hand. The observer raised both hands away from the water table and said, “Tyler, it’s time to wash our hands.” Let go of the child’s left hand and stretched her arm and pointed to the sink behind the gate – 10-15 steps away from them, “look Tyler! There’s water there, remember? Water! Water! Yes, there’s water! (tone of excitement)” while the child pounded again to the water table. The child stopped and looked up (instead of looking down to the water table) the observer held on to the child’s left hand again and then they started walking towards the sink. Part 4 – Reflection(Clearly discuss your strengths and needs and the changes that you would make if needed) Strengths Needs For this guidance log, I consider With all honesty, the need that the following as my strengths: I’m thinking of right now is not patience & determination, yet that effective for infants – composure and ability to show limits. When the time comes excitement, thus attracting the that I move to the other level, I child. First is patience. One can realized that truly, limits, feel like giving up since it shows transitions, boundaries and the that there could be no way to like are a must to make things stop the child without actually easier not only for the teacher pulling him physically away but also for the child. from the water table. But I was so patient and determined to persuade the child to proceed to the next activity without actually making him feel different as I pull him away. I don’t actually want to do it since I don’t want to intervene to the activity that he wants to do – but we had to. Second is composure. As the facilitator, we are told not to show our emotions to children since this will greatly affect them. While the child doesn’t want to leave the water table and that when he kept on
  • 18. pounding on the water table – water splashing on both of our faces, I must hold on to myself and remain calm ( don’t get pissed off). Even though in some way, it could be frustrating we should not show it to the child. We should always remain our calmness, still act positive whenever possible and respect the child. We are here to protect the child, which is why, as how Marion puts it, “we are obligated to reject any strategy that is ‘disrespectful, degrading, dangerous, exploitative, intimidating, psychologically damaging, or physically harmful to children (2011).” Third is the ability to attract the child with a new object or new activity. Since we know that children can easily be redirected because of their developing perception, it is still a task for us to think of ways on how to redirect them. We have to create an “intense stimulus” to attract them. With this in mind, we result to excited expressions, excited tones and the like – acting out that the other one (where we are redirecting them) is more fun!Discuss the changes that you would make and why you would make them.If I can only change something, it will be the location of the water table – putting itsomewhere where the sink is close and really visible. The gate at the time wascovering the sink – preventing Tyler to see it fully. Redirecting Tyler to the sinkcould have been easier if he can see it in the first place. Changing the setting couldalso be considered as a preventive strategy which is essential for guiding children –
  • 19. “prevention is (always) better than cure” as how some people will say it.