Cua lsc 888 cataloging in special libraries

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Cua lsc 888 cataloging in special libraries

  1. 1. CATALOGING AND ACCESS ATTHE SMITHSONIAN LIBRARIESReality and Possibilities July 30, 2012 Polly Khater, Discovery Services Manager
  2. 2. July 30, 2012ABOUT SIL
  3. 3. ABOUT SIL July 30, 2012 Reports to Deputy Under Secretary for Collections and Interdisciplinary Support 20 libraries Total volumes: over 2 million 40,000 rare books, 10,000 manuscripts About 95 staff
  4. 4. SIL’S STRATEGIC PLAN July 30, 2012 http://www.sil.si.edu/PDF/Focus_on_Service.pdf Service emphasis
  5. 5. SIL’S STRATEGIC PLAN, CONT. July 30, 2012 GOAL 1 COLLABORATING ACROSS BOUNDARIES SIL creates a compelling environment for connecting, collaborating and exploring across disciplines and information boundaries STRATEGY 1.1 SIL connects users to people, information, and programs STRATEGY 1.2 SIL exchanges information and fosters interdisciplinary research nationally and internationally
  6. 6. SIL’S STRATEGIC PLAN, CONT. July 30, 2012 GOAL 2 DISCOVERING INFORMATION SIL enhances and eases the discovery of information in our collections for SI scholars, researchers, scientists, and the larger world of learners STRATEGY 2.1 SIL builds partnerships with other individuals and departments in the Institution who are developing an SI-wide digitization strategy STRATEGY 2.2 SIL increases awareness of SIL content and expertise through rapid prototyping of discovery tools and new technologies STRATEGY 2.3 SIL builds, sustains, protects, and shares world class collections, making decisions about acquisitions and preservation of print and digital collections informed by a deepening understanding of users’ current and future needs
  7. 7. SIL’S STRATEGIC PLAN, CONT. July 30, 2012 GOAL 3 CONNECTING WITH USERS SIL understands and meets user needs, serving users where they live and work STRATEGY 3.1 SIL looks to user generated evidence for its decision-making framework
  8. 8. SMITHSONIAN LIBRARIES July 30, 2012 “Traditional cataloging”  Standards  AACR2  AAT  CONSER  LCSH, LC Thesaurus for Graphic Materials  MARC21  NACO  Tools  MacroExpress  MarcEdit  OCLC  SIRSI/DYNIX Horizon
  9. 9. SMITHSONIAN LIBRARIES July 30, 2012 “Metadata”  Standards  AAT  Dublin Core  MARCXML  MODS  RIS (RefWorks)  Tools  DSpace  RefWorks  SIRSI/DYNIX Horizon  Zotero  Excel!!
  10. 10. SIL’S CATALOGS AND DATABASES July 30, 2012 SIL Catalog  http://siris-libraries.si.edu/ipac20/ipac.jsp?profile= Smithsonian Research Online  SRO is a set of services to the research community both within and outside the Smithsonian Institution. Managed by the Smithsonian Institution Libraries, the program assists in capturing the research output of Smithsonian scholars and making it available to Institutional management as well as scientists and historians world-wide.  http://research.si.edu/ Smithsonian Digital Repository  http://si-pddr.si.edu/dspace/
  11. 11. SIL’S CATALOGS AND DATABASES July 30, 2012 Art and Artist Files  The Smithsonian Institution Libraries artists files are an exceptional resource for art historical research. Often these files are the only obtainable sources of information on emerging regional and local artists. Until now, the files were largely unavailable to those who did not travel to Washington DC. In 2004, several efforts were combined to produce a searchable database of artist names as the first step toward universal accessibility to these valuable file  http://www.sil.si.edu/digitalcollections/art-design/artandartistfiles/ Galaxy of Images  The Smithsonian Institution Libraries’ New Media Office provides reproductions from preexisting digital files or new digital photography of material from its collections to students, academics and creative professionals in publishing, design, broadcast and other media. This collection currently contains 1,745 books/collections and 15,778 images.  http://www.sil.si.edu/imagegalaxy/ Trade Catalogs  The trade literature collection of the Smithsonian is internationally known as an important source for the history of American business, technology, marketing, consumption, and design. Manufacturers issued trade catalogs to promote and sell their products. The present collection contains more than 500,000 catalogs, technical manuals, advertising brochures, price lists, company histories and related materials representing more than 30,000 companies. The Smithsonian Libraries acquires trade literature through gifts and purchases.  http://www.sil.si.edu/tradeliterature/index.cfm
  12. 12. SIL’S CATALOGS AND DATABASES July 30, 2012Biodiversity Heritage Library  consortium of natural history and botanical libraries that cooperate to digitize and make accessible the legacy literature of biodiversity held in their collections and to make that literature available for open access and responsible use as a part of a global “biodiversity commons.” BHL also serves as the foundational literature component of the Encyclopedia of Life (EOL).  http://biodiversitylibrary.org/
  13. 13. SI’S CATALOGS AND DATABASES July 30, 2012 Natural History Collections  Museum collection records  http://www.mnh.si.edu/rc/db/collection_db_policy1.html  The National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution (NMNH) captures electronic data about its collections to:  enhance access to, and ability to do research on its collections;  meet the Smithsonian’s mission and stewardship responsibility to preserve its collections and the information inherent in them;  enhance informational integrity and value of collections as the foundation for research, exhibitions, publications, and educational programs;  facilitate legal, physical, and intellectual control over collections; and  improve public access to the collections.
  14. 14. NATURAL HISTORY COLLECTIONS July 30, 2012  The National Museum of Natural History will make data in the following fields freely available on the “Natural History Web” for collections that have been electronically recorded, with certain exceptions (see below):  Catalogue number (USNM number)  Name (for biological and paleontological specimens this includes at least the scientific name (binomial) and author(s) and may also include year published, identifier and year identified; for rocks, minerals, gems, etc. the name(s) and sometimes the chemical composition; for anthropological specimens the object name  Original collection locality including:  Country and/or Ocean  State or equivalent primary political and/or geographical unit within country  County or equivalent secondary political and/or geographical unit within country, if available  Depth and/or Elevation (if available)  Geographic coordinates (if available, and sometimes rounded to the nearest degree)  Collector(s)  Collector’s number (if available)  Date collected  Numbers of specimens (if appropriate)  Type Status (if appropriate)  Low resolution thumbnail photo (when available)
  15. 15. NATURAL HISTORY COLLECTIONS, CONT. July 30, 2012 http://collections.mnh.si.edu/search/ A total of 5,443,341 specimen records are currently available from this facility. Of these, approximately 292,000 represent all of the museums available extant biological primary type specimen records. Approximately 139,000 are paleobiological type specimen records and 560 are mineral type specimen records. EMu (KE Software, http://www.kesoftware.com/emu)
  16. 16. NMNH COLLECTION RECORDS July 30, 2012
  17. 17. NMNH COLLECTION RECORDS, CONT. July 30, 2012
  18. 18. NMNH COLLECTION RECORDS, CONT. July 30, 2012
  19. 19. NMNH COLLECTION RECORDS, CONT. July 30, 2012
  20. 20. NMNH COLLECTION RECORDS, CONT. July 30, 2012
  21. 21. SI COLLECTIONS SEARCH CENTER July 30, 2012 The Smithsonian Collections Search Center is an online catalog containing most of Smithsonian major collections from our museums, archives, libraries, and research units. There are 7.7 million catalog records relating to areas for Art & Design, History & Culture, and Science & Technology with 568,100 images, video clips, sound files, electronic journals and other resources. http://collections.si.edu/search/about.htm
  22. 22. SI COLLECTIONS SEARCH CENTER, CONT. July 30, 2012
  23. 23. SI COLLECTIONS SEARCH CENTER, CONT. July 30, 2012
  24. 24. SI COLLECTIONS SEARCH CENTER, CONT. July 30, 2012
  25. 25. SI COLLECTIONS SEARCH CENTER, CONT. July 30, 2012
  26. 26. BACK TO THE LIBRARIES … July 30, 2012 Biodiversity Heritage Library  Picklist, bidding on titles with member libraries  Reusing our MARC data  Exporting into BHL, along with scanned materials  Linked by barcode data – all scanned materials must be barcoded and linked to full bib records in SIRIS
  27. 27. July 30, 2012BHL
  28. 28. July 30, 2012BHL
  29. 29. July 30, 2012BHL
  30. 30. July 30, 2012BHL
  31. 31. SHAC (SMITHSONIAN HISTORY ANDCULTURE DIGITIZATION PROJECT) July 30, 2012 Internet Archive  Scanning rare, requested materials in our History and Culture Libraries  Reusing our MARC data  Exporting into Internet Archive, along with scanned materials  Linked by barcode data – all scanned materials must be barcoded and linked to full bib records in SIRIS
  32. 32. SHAC (SMITHSONIAN HISTORY & CULTUREDIGITIZATION PROJECT), CONT. July 30, 2012
  33. 33. SHAC (SMITHSONIAN HISTORY & CULTUREDIGITIZATION PROJECT), CONT. July 30, 2012
  34. 34. SHAC (SMITHSONIAN HISTORY & CULTUREDIGITIZATION PROJECT), CONT. July 30, 2012
  35. 35. SHAC (SMITHSONIAN HISTORY & CULTUREDIGITIZATION PROJECT), CONT. July 30, 2012
  36. 36. SPECIAL LIBRARIES & CATALOGING July 30, 2012 Take aways  Collaboration  Creativity  MS Excel  Flexibility  Possibilities  Recycle  Get out there!
  37. 37. July 30, 2012Andō HiroshigeTōkaidō Gojūsantsugi [Fifty-threeStations of the Tokaido]
  38. 38. July 30, 2012Maria Sibylla MerianRaupen wunderbareVerwandelung und sonderbareBlumennahrung , 1730
  39. 39. July 30, 2012John Lloyd StephensIncidents of Travel in Egypt,Arabia Petræa and the HolyLand , 1856
  40. 40. ENDINGS … July 30, 2012 Polly Khater, Discovery Services Manager  khaterp@si.edu SIL’s catalog: http://siris-libraries.si.edu SIL’s home page: http://www.sil.si.edu/ SIL’s page for researchers: http://www.sil.si.edu/research/ SIL’s blog: http://blog.library.si.edu/

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