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  • Knowledge society agenda Knowledge society is a human society, in which knowledge should bring justice, solidarity, democracy and peace; it is also a society which provides universal and equitable access to information (UNESCO). Knowledge society is integrated with ICT in order to build knowledge society and ICT changes knowledge itself through discipline, concepts, processes, methods and resources available.
  • Education in a networked societyEducation needs networks of knowledge and the links that contribute to the elaboration and acquisition of knowledge, which takes account the new knowledge, access to knowledge, new teaching profession, new tools, and etc.
  • Collective intelligence Collective intelligence has its own aims for education to build a collective intelligence. The role of teacher is to develop a collective intelligence for pupils, use collaborative work, collaborative learning, develop the capacity for collaborative work and collective intelligence and etc.
  • Internet is mainly a tool for perfecting our intelligence through cooperation and exchange; internet enhances our capacity for collective learning and intelligence, it also forces us to experiment new ways of being together. Collective intelligence, consisting in interlacing different points of view (Pierre LEVY, 2000)
  • The school in the knowledge society emphasizes that ICT confirms the essential and core role of a teacher as a mediator “the face to face relationship between the teacher and the pupil remains essential”. The variables and commands are attitudes and expectations towards schools, mission and objectives of school, organization and structures, geopolitical dimension and teachers. Being a teacher in the knowledge society has its ethical competences, which are ICT and “Education for all”, digital divide and divides in education, globalization, commercialization for education.
  • There are six majors areas will shape a beneficial use of ICT in education, the 1st is digital solidarity ‘that requires strong and joint actions of all stakeholders to guarantee the right of participation in the digital society for all students in the world”,2nd is learners and lifelong learning” every learner is a lifelong learner in the knowledge of society and ICT is a key tool for developing lifelong learning”, 3rd is decision making strategies “ bringing research, practice , experimentation and innovation with decision making is essential”, 4th is networking “ the knowledge society is networked, which offers opportunities for networking people and developing collaborative work and enhancing the collective intelligence”,5th is research “ the development of ICT –based education and training processes is about growing reality” and 6th is teachers” being a teacher in a knowledge society requires new specific competencies”.
  • ICTeTSA is progressive reflecting the progression expected of teacher’s as their professional knowledge, skills and attitudes develop and they demonstrate increasing effectiveness in their roles. In other words, ICTeTSA is based on the developmental view of teaching that recognizes teachers’ knowledge, skills and attitudes to develop throughout their Professional careers.
  • ICTeTSA is progressive reflecting the progression expected of teacher’s as their professional knowledge, skills and attitudes develop and they demonstrate increasing effectiveness in their roles. In other words, ICTeTSA is based on the developmental view of teaching that recognizes teachers’ knowledge, skills and attitudes to develop throughout their Professional careers.
  • The Research Basis for ICTeTSAA survey study (Farrel and Isaacs, 2007) on ICTs and education in 53 African countries in 2007 revealed that there is a great deal of variance in ICT policies for education among the African countries, with the largest group being made up of those countries that are in transition from a sustained period of conflict and economic instability. The UNESCO-IICBA (2008) study found that most of the universities and teacher training institutions (TTIs) in the 18 African countries had started to address the ICT infrastructure issues and had also introduced ICT curriculum standards. Teacher standards that integrate ICTare either non-existent or poorly developed to meet the needs and contexts of African countries. It is also found out that African countries within and among the regional communities are at various levels of ICT use in education
  • The structure and domains of ICTeTSA, has six broad standards, which are engaging in instructional design processes, facilitate and inspire student learning, innovation and creativity , create and manage effective learning environments, engage in assessment and communication f student learning , engage in professional development and model ethics responsibilities and lastly understand subject matter for use in teaching.
  • Education for all is about expanding early childhood care and education, provide free and compulsory primary education to all, promote learning and life skills for young people and adults, increase adult literacy by 50 percent, achieve gender parity by 2005, gender equality by 2015 and improve the quality of education. Education for all helps us to promote economic growth, which benefits countries with more educated population to enjoy higher rates of economic growth and less inequality
  • It also empowers women; improve health, better earnings, fragility and conflict that can play an important role in the emergency response to conflict and fragility, strengthened democracy, fight HIV and AIDS, and end poverty in our societies.
  • Education makes a powerful difference to people’s lives. It holds the key to unlocking the human potential needed to secure a more peaceful, prosperous and greener future for us all. Ensuring that all children receive quality basic education is not only a moral duty. It is an essential investment in our common future.
  • This strategy outlines three strategic priorities that will help us realize this vision: (1) access to a basic cycle of primary and lower secondary education, particularly in fragile and conflict affected states;(2)quality of teaching and learning, particularly for basic literacy and numeracy;(3)skills so that young people benefit from opportunities, jobs and growth.
  • The key challenges to education for all is that investing in education will be a central to address 21st century challenges including global competitiveness, climate change, insecurity and conflict. The 1st major challenge is that learning outcomes should be monitored” the main assessments ( PIRLS 2001, PISA 2003 and PISA 2006) shows low learning, especially in developing countries. 2nd is that learning environment must be improved by having access to learning resource, first and foremost textbook is the key factor. Lastly is attracting more and better teachers is paramount, the teachers shortage is a major problem, particularly in the Developing world
  • This Strategic Plan outlines the over-arching goal of improving the quality of learning and learner achievement and sets out the key strategic priorities of the Department. The focus of all our education and quality improvement strategies is the learner and the quality of learning attained for effective and lifelong growth, development and well-being. This focus clearly guides our thinking as to what has to be done to ensure that we are creating an enabling environment for effective teaching and learning so that all our citizens are empowered to participate effectively in society and the economy.
  • The strategic planning processes This Strategic Plan should be read in conjunction with the plan titled Action Plan to 2014: Towards the realization of Schooling 2025 (published as Government Notice 752 of 2010), referred to as the Action Plan in this document, and the Delivery Agreement for Outcome 1. Both the Action Plan and the Delivery Agreement, which are the outcome of consultations with stakeholders, are envisaged as the Department of Basic Education’s primary vehicle for communicating key sectorial strategies to stakeholders. In many ways this Strategic Plan addresses key issues contained in the Action Plan and the Delivery Agreement. Government has agreed on twelve outcomes as a key focus of work between now and 2014 and has made Education the apex priority. It has placed education and skills development at the centre of this administration’s priorities. The achievement of Outcome 1: Improved quality of basic education is therefore central to this Strategic Plan Output 2: Undertake regular assessment to track progress. Output 3: Improve early childhood development. Output 4: Ensure a credible outcomes-focused planning and accountability system.
  • Strategic outcome oriented outputs A number of challenges were identified as barriers to improving the system of quality basic education. The key challenges that have been identified as barriers include:• Quality learner outcomes are not optimal across all grades.• The quality and quantity of learner and teacher support materials are not adequate to support quality learning.• The quality of school-based tests and examinations is not of the required standard and is not being moderated or benchmarked
  • There are seven conditional grants on strategic plan, which are national school nutrition programme conditional grant, HIV and AIDS ( Life Skills Education) conditional grant, technical secondary school recapitalization grant, dinaledi schools conditional granT, education infrastructure conditional grant to provinces and schools infrastructure backlogs grants
  • . There are three public entities, which are ELRC – which Strive towardsContinuous maintenance and promotion of labour peace and contribute towards theTransformation and development of a quality South African Public Education Sector and its current annual budget is R 68 659, 2nd the SACE, which regulate, protect and promote the teaching profession and is annual budget is R 53 420 and lastly is UMalusiThe Council is the quality council for general and further education and training as contemplated in the National Qualifications Framework Act and has the functions contemplated in section 28 of that Act and the current annual budget is R 78 861.
  • Highlight the broad aims of the various national and international initiatives regarding continuous professional development of teachers with regard to teacher competency standards relating to ICTs and professional aptitude
  • The White Paper on e-Education, published in 2004, guides the Department of Education's approach to e-education and the integration of information and communication technologies, ICT is to be used to create greater access to learning opportunities, redress inequalities, improve the quality of teaching and learning, and provide personalised learning experiences.
  • The White Paper characterises schools that implement e-Education as institutions that have:• Learners who utilise ICT to enhance learning;• Qualified and competent leaders who use ICT for planning and management;• Qualified and competent teachers who use ICT to enhance teaching and learning;• Access to ICT resources that support the curriculum; and• Connections to ICT infrastructure.
  • All teachers will require knowledge, skills, values and attitudes as well as the necessary support to integrate ICT into necessary and learning. Principles for ICT in teacher development, the following are key principles to be followed in the professional development programmes for teachers: Educational goals should be primary. The focus should not be on providing technical ICT skills only, but on the use of ICT to achieve learning outcomes. Teacher development programmes should provide teachers with situated/contextualised learning experiences. Programmes should be subject-specific and relevant to the learning areas.
  • The White Paper on e-Education outlines the following ICT development levels that are to be included in the framework is the entry level, Adoption level, Adaptation level, Appropriation level and the Innovation level. The specific objectives of the ICT model are to be enable teacher educators to become aware of ICT and support work performance, learn how to use ICt and enhance traditional teaching, understand how and when to use ICT and facilitate learning and specialize In the use of ICT and create innovative learning environments

Transcript

  • 1. 1. • Knowledge society agenda2. • Pervasiveness of technology3. • “Education for All” goals4. • Present future national strategic objectives5. • Highlight the broad aims of the various national andinternational initiatives regarding continuous professionaldevelopment of teachers with regard to teacher competencystandards relating to ICTs and professional aptitude
  • 2. A. Knowledge societyB. Networked societyC. Collective intelligenceD. The school in the knowledge societyE. Being a teacher in the knowledge society
  • 3. Knowledge society is a human society, in which knowledge should bringjustice, solidarity, democracy and peaceKnowledge society is integrated with ICT in order to build knowledgesociety through:• discipline• concepts• processes• methods• and resources availablev
  • 4. Education needs networks of knowledge and the links that contribute to theelaboration and acquisition of knowledge.which takes into account of the following• the new knowledge• access to knowledge• new teaching profession• new tools and• Communication in a network
  • 5. Collective intelligence hasits own aims for educationto build a collectiveintelligence Developing collectiveintelligence of pupils use collaborative work collaborative learning, develop the capacity forcollaborative work andcollective intelligence
  • 6. It emphasizes that ICTconfirms the essential andcore role of a teacher as amediator “the face to facerelationship between theteacher and the pupilremains essential’. Attitudes and expectationstowards schools, Mission and objectives ofschool, Organization andstructures, Geopolitical dimension and Teachers
  • 7.  Digital solidarity Learners and life longlearning Decision making strategies Networking Research Teachers
  • 8. Is progressive reflecting the progression expected of teacher’s as theirprofessional knowledge, skills and attitudes develop and theydemonstrate increasing effectiveness in their roles.It is based on the developmental view of teaching that recognizesteachers knowledge, skills and attitudes to develop throughout theirProfessional careers
  • 9.  A survey study (Farrel and Isaacs, 2007) on ICTs and education in 53 Africancountries in 2007 revealed that there is a great deal of variance in ICT policiesfor education among the African countries, with the largest group being madeup of those countries that are in transition from a sustained period of conflictand economic instability. Teacher standards that integrate ICT are either non-existent or poorlydeveloped to meet the needs and contexts of African countries. It is alsofound out that African countries within and among the regional communitiesare at various levels of ICT use in education. The study also forwarded recommendations, the most relevant being thefollowing:• Use a consultative and participatory method in developing and promoting ICTstandards. This would increase awareness and chances of adoption of thestandards.• Develop ICT pedagogy standards. In addition, introduce ICT pedagogy coursesfor lecturers or tutors of TTIs, particularly the university-based TTIs in eachcountry.
  • 10. Structureof ICTeSA1 . Engaging ininstructionaldesignprocesses2. Facilitate andinspire studentlearning6. Engage inprofessionaldevelopment andmodel ethicsresponsibilities4. Create andmanage effectivelearningenvironments3. Innovation andcreativity5. Engage inassessment andcommunication fstudent learning
  • 11. EDUCATION FORALL
  • 12.  Education for all is about expanding early childhood care andeducation, provide free and compulsory primary education to all,promote learning and life skills for young people and adult. Education for all helps us to promote economic growth, whichbenefits countries with more educated population to enjoyhigher rates of economic growth and less inequality.
  • 13.  It also empowers women Improve health Better earnings fragility and conflict Strengthened democracy Fight HIV and AIDS and End poverty in our societies
  • 14.  Make a powerful difference to people’s lives. Unlocking the human potential needed to secure a morepeaceful, prosperous and greener future for us all. Ensuring that all children receive quality basic education.
  • 15. (1) access to a basic cycle of primary and lower secondaryeducation, particularly in fragile and conflict affected states.(2) quality of teaching and learning, particularly for basic literacyand numeracy.(3) skills so that young people benefit from opportunities, jobs andgrowth.
  • 16. Education challenges Globalcompetitiveness Climate change Insecurity and conflict.
  • 17. 1st major challenge is that learning outcomes should bemonitored” the main assessments ( PIRLS 2001, PISA 2003 andPISA 2006) shows low learning, especially in developingcountries.2nd is that learning environment must be improved by havingaccess to learning resource, first and foremost textbook is thekey factor.3rd is attracting more and better teachers is paramount, theteachers shortage is a major problem, particularly in theDeveloping world.
  • 18.  Improving the quality of learning and learner achievement. sets out the key strategic priorities of the Department. focus of all our education and quality improvement strategies. Improving the quality of learning attained for effective andlifelong growth, development and well-being.
  • 19. 1. Improved quality of basic education is therefore central to thisStrategic Plan2. Undertake regular assessment to track progress.3. improve early childhood development.4. Ensure a credible outcomes-focused planning andaccountability system.
  • 20. A number of challenges were identified as barriers of improving thesystem of quality basic educationo • Quality learner outcomes are not optimal across all grades.o • The quality and quantity of learner and teacher supportmaterials are not adequate to support quality learning.o • The quality of school-based tests and examinations is not ofthe required standard and is not being moderated orbenchmarked
  • 21. National school nutrition programme conditional grantHIV and AIDS ( Life Skills Education) conditional grantTechnical secondary school recapitalization grantDinaledi schools conditional grantEducation infrastructure conditional grantProvinces infrastructure backlogs grantsSchools infrastructure backlogs grants
  • 22. which Strive towardsTYPE OF PUBLIC ENTITIES1. ELRC2. SACE3. UMalusi
  • 23. The White Paper on e-Education, published in 2004, guides theDepartment of Educations approach to e-education and theintegration of information and communication technologiesThe use of ICT in education• ICT is to be used to create greater access to learningopportunities,• Redress inequalities,• Improve the quality of teaching and learning,• Provide personalised learning experiences.
  • 24. The White Paper characterises schools that implement e-Educationas institutions that have:• Learners who utilise ICT to enhance learning• Qualified and competent leaders who use ICT for planning andmanagement• Qualified and competent teachers who use ICT to enhance teachingand learning• Access to ICT resources that support the curriculum and• Connections to ICT infrastructure
  • 25. Teachers willrequire thefollowingwhen usingICT in learningKnowledgeskillsvaluesAttitudes
  • 26.  Educational goals should be primary. The focus should not be on providing technical ICT skills only,but on the use of ICT to achieve learning outcomes. Teacher development programmes should provide teacherswith situated/contextualised learning experiences. Programmes should be subject-specific and relevant to thelearning areas.
  • 27.  Adoption level Adaptation level Appropriation level Innovation level
  • 28.  support work performancelearn how to use ICT andenhance traditional teachingunderstand how and when to use ICTfacilitate learningspecialize In the use of ICT andcreate innovative learning environments
  • 29. D.o.E, (2007). Guidelines for teachers Training and professional Development inICT: South Africa.UNESCO, (2012). ICT-enhanced Teacher Standard for Africa (ICTeTSA): TheStructure Domains of ICTeTSA: EthiopiaCoinu, B. (2005) Being a Teacher in Knowledge Society: StellenbochDepartment of Presidency, (2011). National Development Plan: vision 2030;South AfricaDepartment of Basic Education, (2011). strategic Plan 2011-2014: strategicObjectives: PretoriaUNESCO,(2011). Teacher Competency Framework: ParisGovernment Gazerte, (2004). White paper 7 on e-document: Transformingteaching and learning through information and communication Technology(ICT): South AfricaDepartment of Education(2008). Education Internat
  • 30. THANK YOU