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  • 2. China initiative
  • [show next slide]
  • [show next slide]
  • [show next slide]
  • [show next slide]
  • 2. China initiative
  • 2. China initiative
  • 2. China initiative
  • All of this then comes out very neatly in a report the program generates. [show next slide]
  • All of this then comes out very neatly in a report the program generates. [show next slide]
  • [show next slide]
  • All of this then comes out very neatly in a report the program generates. [show next slide]
  • Just to highlight a few things here: Many students get stuck on industry choice. They know they want to be in marketing, or in finance, but don’t know where they want to do it. These sketches are like getting a taste of a flavor at an ice cream parlor. Just enough to tell you, “Hmm, not bad. I want to learn more,” or “You could not pay me enough to work in that industry—ever!” Regarding culture, the last way to learn about an organization’s culture is to ask. You know what they’ll tell you: “Well, we really care about our people, they’re our most important asset...” Which may be true. Or may not. This section gives you ideas for how to be a careful observer, like being an anthropologist. That’s how you learn about culture. You should definitely read the section on interviewing. The developers of this assessment taught the class on interviewing for many years, and their advice is 100% rock solid. Finally, it’s really OK to have weaknesses—lots of them! As long as they don’t get in the way of your succeeding in your career. So if you’re weak in an area that won’t interfere, fine. But if you have a weakness that could potentially undermine you, the section on strengthening your weaker abilities is a good place to start. So, that’s enough about career assessment. Please do go through the assessment—think about how many hours you’re spending on your MBA. One or two more is a “rounding error.” and please do print your Professional Reports and bring them with you if you come in for a coaching session. Now, moving right along… [end of presentation]
  • Just to highlight a few things here: Many students get stuck on industry choice. They know they want to be in marketing, or in finance, but don’t know where they want to do it. These sketches are like getting a taste of a flavor at an ice cream parlor. Just enough to tell you, “Hmm, not bad. I want to learn more,” or “You could not pay me enough to work in that industry—ever!” Regarding culture, the last way to learn about an organization’s culture is to ask. You know what they’ll tell you: “Well, we really care about our people, they’re our most important asset...” Which may be true. Or may not. This section gives you ideas for how to be a careful observer, like being an anthropologist. That’s how you learn about culture. You should definitely read the section on interviewing. The developers of this assessment taught the class on interviewing for many years, and their advice is 100% rock solid. Finally, it’s really OK to have weaknesses—lots of them! As long as they don’t get in the way of your succeeding in your career. So if you’re weak in an area that won’t interfere, fine. But if you have a weakness that could potentially undermine you, the section on strengthening your weaker abilities is a good place to start. So, that’s enough about career assessment. Please do go through the assessment—think about how many hours you’re spending on your MBA. One or two more is a “rounding error.” and please do print your Professional Reports and bring them with you if you come in for a coaching session. Now, moving right along… [end of presentation]
  • Just to highlight a few things here: Many students get stuck on industry choice. They know they want to be in marketing, or in finance, but don’t know where they want to do it. These sketches are like getting a taste of a flavor at an ice cream parlor. Just enough to tell you, “Hmm, not bad. I want to learn more,” or “You could not pay me enough to work in that industry—ever!” Regarding culture, the last way to learn about an organization’s culture is to ask. You know what they’ll tell you: “Well, we really care about our people, they’re our most important asset...” Which may be true. Or may not. This section gives you ideas for how to be a careful observer, like being an anthropologist. That’s how you learn about culture. You should definitely read the section on interviewing. The developers of this assessment taught the class on interviewing for many years, and their advice is 100% rock solid. Finally, it’s really OK to have weaknesses—lots of them! As long as they don’t get in the way of your succeeding in your career. So if you’re weak in an area that won’t interfere, fine. But if you have a weakness that could potentially undermine you, the section on strengthening your weaker abilities is a good place to start. So, that’s enough about career assessment. Please do go through the assessment—think about how many hours you’re spending on your MBA. One or two more is a “rounding error.” and please do print your Professional Reports and bring them with you if you come in for a coaching session. Now, moving right along… [end of presentation]
  • It tells you what careers you’re likely to be happiest and most successful in—and why. It tells you what kinds of group culture you’re likely to thrive in—and which you’re not. And it tells you about those potential rough spots in your personality that you may need to smooth out and buff up. And finally, it give you the “raw data” from your assessments. Part of this last part is the results of the 360 degree feedback you got regarding your abilities, which we strongly recommend that you do. It’s easy to set up, it doesn’t take a lot of time for your “raters” to do, and it can be very valuable to you. Even if you’ve already gone through the assessment and didn’t use this function, you can easily go back and use it now (without re-taking the tests, of course). So the Professional Report is about you, specifically. But there’s a lot more to the program that lives on-line (otherwise that Report would be about 200 pages long!). For example: [show next slide]
  • Transcript

    • 1. CareerLeader ® - College Training: February, 2008
    • 2. Why Career Assessment?
      • Distinguish “signal” from “noise”: Find the right path(s), avoid the wrong ones
      • Find the right culture
      • A focused, efficient, effective search
      • Succeed in interviews
      • Succeed on the job
    • 3. How CareerLeader ® Is Different From Other Tools
      • Business career specific (broadly speaking)
      • Assesses all of the “big three”
      • Both prescriptive and informative
      • Careers, culture, cautions
    • 4. Select Users
      • MBA Programs—U.S.
      • Harvard University University of Pennsylvania—Wharton
      • Stanford University U.C. Berkeley—Haas
      • Cornell—Johnson Carnegie-Mellon University—Tepper
      • MIT—Sloan University of Chicago
      • Duke—Fuqua Northwestern—Kellogg
      • Dartmouth—Tuck UCLA—Anderson
      • Columbia University Boston College—Carroll
      • Emory—Goizueta University of Texas—McCombs
      • Yale University University of Michigan—Ross
    • 5. Select Users
      • MBA Programs—International
      • INSEAD Cheung Kong Business School
      • Shanghai Fudan Nanyang Technological Institute
      • IMD (Lausanne) Indian School of Business
      • HKUST Shanghai Jiaotung
      • Cambridge University Universidad Austral (Santiago)
      • Sun Yat Sen Lingnan Chinese University of Hong Kong
      • University of Oxford Melbourne University
      • Kaist (Korea) HEC (Paris, Montreal)
      • Tsinghua University CEIBS
    • 6. Select Users
      • Undergraduate Programs—U.S.
      • Indiana University University of Texas at Austin
      • Ohio State University Southern Methodist University
      • University of Michigan Texas Christian University
      • Columbia University Washington University
      • University of Colorado California State University—Fresno
      • Wellesley College Colorado State University
      • Babson College University of Illinois (2)
      • Emory University Georgia State University
    • 7. Select Users
      • Undergraduate Programs—International
      • HEC (Montreal) Tecnologico de Monterey
      • University of Victoria Nanyang Technological University
      • York University University College of Dublin
      • University of Toronto Australian National University
      • Concordia University Catholic University of Portugal
      • McGill University National University of Singapore
      • Nottingham University University of Western Ontario
    • 8. Select Corporate Users
      • America Online Microsoft
      • Novartis Booz Allen Hamilton
      • Becton Dickinson VISA International
      • EF Education Lee Hecht Harrison
      • Marico India Bain and Company
      • Manpower, Inc. Boston Consulting Group
    • 9. What It’s Good For
      • Mission
      • Culture
      • Career “Achilles’ heels”
    • 10. What It’s Not
      • Questions about strategy
        • Too many starting points
        • Too many end points
    • 11. Who It’s Good For
      • Business students
      • Pre-law students
      • Many liberal arts and engineering students
    • 12. Who It’s Not
      • Pre-med students
      • Pure science students
      • Other specialty students (e.g. music, performing arts)
    • 13. Theory and Science
    • 14. Career Assessment: Context
      • 1920s: E.K. Strong and the scientific study of careers
      • Strong Vocational Interest Blank
      • 1970s: John Holland and the “RIASEC” model
      • Strong-Campbell Interest Inventory
    • 15. Why Focus on Interests?
      • Stability
      • Energy
      • Competitive advantage
    • 16. Interests Seek Expression Rewards/Motivators Abilities Interests
    • 17. Even in the Face of Skill Deficits Rewards/Motivators Abilities Interests
    • 18. Even Despite Reward Deficits Rewards/Motivators Abilities Interests
    • 19. Expression: Become an artist Financially secure Talented Interest in art
    • 20. Expression : Teach art history Financially secure Not talented Interest in art
    • 21. Expression : Open a gallery Not financially secure Not talented Interest in art
    • 22. In the Beginning…
      • Twenty-plus years of research into the match between people and careers
      • Specifically, discovering the core interests of people in business careers
    • 23. Periodic Table of Elements
    • 24. How are Chemical Elements and Core Interests Alike?
      • Elements can’t be divided
      • The periodic table comprises all the ingredients for entire universe
      • Core interests can’t be divided
      • They comprise all the ingredients for any job, any function, any industry, any level, anywhere in the world
    • 25. The Eight Core Business Interests
    • 26. The Core Business Interests
      • Application of Technology
    • 27. The Core Business Interests
      • Application of Technology
      • Creative Production
    • 28. The Core Business Interests
      • Application of Technology
      • Creative Production
      • Theory Development and Conceptual Thinking
    • 29. The Core Business Interests
      • Application of Technology
      • Creative Production
      • Theory Development and Conceptual Thinking
      • Quantitative Analysis
    • 30. The Core Business Interests
      • Application of Technology
      • Creative Production
      • Theory Development and Conceptual Thinking
      • Quantitative Analysis
      • Counseling and Mentoring
    • 31. The Core Business Interests
      • Application of Technology
      • Creative Production
      • Theory Development and Conceptual Thinking
      • Quantitative Analysis
      • Counseling and Mentoring
      • Managing People and Relationships
    • 32. The Core Business Interests
      • Application of Technology
      • Creative Production
      • Theory Development and Conceptual Thinking
      • Quantitative Analysis
      • Counseling and Mentoring
      • Managing People and Relationships
      • Influence through Language and Ideas
    • 33. The Core Business Interests
      • Application of Technology
      • Creative Production
      • Theory Development and Conceptual Thinking
      • Quantitative Analysis
      • Counseling and Mentoring
      • Managing People and Relationships
      • Influence through Language and Ideas
      • Enterprise Control
    • 34. Application of Expertise
      • Application of Technology
      • Creative Production
      • Theory Development and Conceptual Thinking
      • Quantitative Analysis
    • 35. Working with People
      • Counseling and Mentoring
      • Managing People and Relationships
    • 36. Power and Influence
      • Enterprise Control
      • Influence through Language and Ideas
    • 37. Assessing the Eight Core Interests
    • 38. Measuring Core Interests
      • “ Be a mayor” “Study physics” “Design a bridge”
      • 0 = I would not like this…
      • 1 = I would like this…to a limited extent
      • 2 = I would like this…
      • 3 = I would very much enjoy this…
    • 39.  
    • 40.  
    • 41.  
    • 42.  
    • 43.  
    • 44.  
    • 45.  
    • 46.  
    • 47. Standard Scores and Percentiles
      • 70=98 th percentile 45=32 nd percentile
      • 65=94 th percentile 40=16 th percentile
      • 60=84 th percentile 35=6 th percentile
      • 55=68 th percentile 30=2 nd percentile
      • 50=50 th percentile
    • 48. The “Bell Curve” (Normal Distribution)
    • 49. Accounting
    • 50. Sales and Sales Management
    • 51. Management of Information Systems
    • 52. Public Relations and Communications
    • 53. Human Resources Management/ Corporate Training
    • 54. Investment Management
    • 55. Investment Banking
    • 56. Commercial Banking
    • 57. Productions and Operations Management
    • 58. Finance In Corporate Settings
    • 59. Validity Data
      • Discovering Your Career in Business
      • Journal of Career Assessment, Vol. 12, No. 3 (August, 2004)
      • Journal of Career Assessment (in press)
    • 60. Cross-Cultural Validity
      • 100,000 business professionals in 84 countries
      • η 2 =0.014 for males, 0.015 for females: 1.5% of variance
    • 61. Nationalities Studied
      • Australia
      • Brazil
      • Canada
      • China
      • France
      • Germany
      • India
      • Japan
      • Mexico
      • South Korea
      • United Kingdom
      • United States
    • 62. Reliability Data Core Business Interest Consistency over Time Application of Technology .66 Quantitative Analysis .85 Theory Development .82 Creative Production .83 Counseling and Mentoring .86 Managing People and Relationships .77 Enterprise Control .74 Influence through Language and Ideas .81
    • 63. More on the Interest Assessment
      • Personal highs
      • General Business Interest Index
      • Gender
      • Insufficient items
    • 64. Core Business Interests: George
      • Application of Technology 34
      • Creative Production 42
      • Theory Development 48
      • Quantitative Analysis 36
      • Counseling and Mentoring 63
      • Managing People 57
      • Influence—Language and Ideas 63
      • Enterprise Control 40
    • 65. Core Business Interests: Martha
      • Application of Technology 65
      • Creative Production 41
      • Theory Development 54
      • Quantitative Analysis 69
      • Counseling and Mentoring 39
      • Managing People 46
      • Influence—Language and Ideas 39
      • Enterprise Control 60
    • 66. Assessing 13 Core Motivators
    • 67. Motivators
      • Financial Gain Managing People
      • Variety Intellectual Challenge
      • Lifestyle Autonomy
      • Altruism Prestige
      • Security Affiliation
      • Recognition Power and Influence
      • Positioning
    • 68.  
    • 69.  
    • 70.  
    • 71. More on Motivators
      • Stability over time
      • Conflict between motivations
      • Insufficient items
    • 72. Assessing 41 Core Abilities
    • 73. Analytical Problem Solving
      • Critical Thinking Quick Thinking
      • Quantitative Analysis Creativity
      • Strategic Thinking
    • 74. Taking Initiative
      • Leadership Action Orientation
      • Flexibility Political Skill
      • Persistence Delegating
      • Resilience Multiple Focus
      • Work ethic Power Orientation
    • 75. Taking Initiative (2)
      • Decisiveness Comfort with Risk
      • Influence Time Management
      • Day-to-Day Responsibility
      • Recognition of Opportunity
    • 76. Interpersonal Effectiveness
      • Comfort with Differences Sociability
      • Conflict Tolerance Teamwork
      • Motivational Ability Empathy Skills
      • Organizational Priority Self-Control
      • Written Communication Assertiveness
    • 77. Interpersonal Effectiveness (2)
      • Openness to Criticism Listening Skills
      • Sensitivity/Tact Merit Orientation
      • Projection of Confidence Respect for Others
      • Ability to Compromise Gaining Trust
      • Oral Communication Ability to Teach
    • 78.  
    • 79.  
    • 80. More on Abilities
      • Message if responses are generally too negative (or positive)
      • Confidence item adjustment
      • Insufficient items
    • 81. After the Assessments
    • 82. Careers Matched (Beacons)
      • Accounting
      • Advertising account management
      • Commercial banking
      • Entrepreneurship
      • Finance in a corporate setting
      • Financial planning and stock brokerage
      • General management
      • Human resources management
    • 83. Careers Matched
      • Information systems management
      • Institutional securities sales
      • Investment banking
      • Investment management
      • Management consulting
      • Management in science and engineering
      • Marketing management
      • New product development
    • 84. Careers Matched
      • Non-profit management
      • Private equity investing
      • Production and operations management
      • Public relations and communications
      • Real estate development
      • Real estate finance
      • Research and development management
      • Retail management
    • 85. Careers Matched
      • Sales and sales management
      • Securities trading
      • Strategic planning and business development
      • Supply chain management
      • Training and organizational development
      • Venture capital
    • 86. CultureMatch ™ Dimensions
      • Social Assertiveness
      • Structure and Attention to Detail
      • Openness and Imagination
      • Cooperation and Harmony
    • 87. Results and Resources
      • Personalized Professional Report
      • Online information (common to all users)
    • 88. Online Resources
      • Information about each career measured, and why user came up (or didn’t) as a “high match”
      • “ Sketches” of a variety of industries
      • Tips on how to assess an organization’s culture
    • 89. Online Resources (2)
      • Other aspects of culture to consider
      • Tips on how to have great interviews
      • Advice about how to strengthen weaknesses
      • Information about career “Achilles’ heels”
    • 90. Online Resources (3)
      • A way to compare the user’s interests with those of successful people in a variety of careers
      • Advice about how to choose an industry
    • 91.  
    • 92. Key Career Characteristics
      • Interests and their implications
      • Strongest motivators
      • Strengths and weaknesses
      • Cultural tendencies
      • Career “Achilles’ heels”
    • 93.  
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    • 167. The Administrators’ Site (careerleader.com/cf/univ/add)
      • User name: add
      • Password: minister
    • 168.  
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    • 186. Using CareerLeader ® with Students
    • 187. “ But…”
      • “ I already know what I want to do. Why should I use CareerLeader?”
    • 188. “ But…”
      • “ I already know what I want to do. Why should I use CareerLeader?”
      • “ I already know what I’m interested in and motivated by and good at. Why should I use CareerLeader?”
    • 189. “ But…”
      • “ CareerLeader said I should be a [career X], which is totally wrong !”
      • “ CareerLeader didn’t show a good match between me and [career Y], and I know that’s what I want and what I’d be great at!”
    • 190. “ Nuts and Bolts”
      • No fee for set-up
      • $20 per student for first 500 (annually)
      • $10 for students 501-…
      • Students have full access until graduation
    • 191. Need Help?
      • Your questions: Your account manager (or dave@careerleader.com)
      • Your students’ questions: [email_address]
    • 192. The End

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