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Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice
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Training Curriculum: Ethics in Case Management Practice

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  • 1. February 11, 2010 Kristina Hals and Marie Herb Technical Assistance Collaborative, Inc.
  • 2.
    • “ A system of moral principles”
    • “ That branch of philosophy dealing with values relating to human conduct ”
    Source: dictionary.com
  • 3.
    • “ The skill , competence , or standards expected of a member of a profession.”
    Source: dictionary.com
  • 4.
    • “ When an individual or organization involved in multiple interests , one of which could possibly corrupt the motivation for an act in the other.”
    Source: dictionary.com
  • 5.
    • Fundamental to our work
    • Not just what we do to help but how we do it
    • Most of our residents have histories with injustices
      • Inequality
      • Discrimination
      • Lack of opportunity
    • Protect us against conflict of interest
  • 6.
    • “ Agree or Disagree? Providing case management in supportive housing for people who are homeless sometimes gives rise to ethical dilemmas ?”
    • 90% Agree
  • 7.
    • “ Agree or Disagree? Providing case management in supportive housing for people who are homeless sometimes brings up questions as to how case managers can act professionally in every situation ?”
    • 90% Agree
  • 8.
    • Recognize the inherent P and E challenges in our field
    • Caution ourselves about conflicts of interest in our field
    • Learn national best practices and standards in our field
    • Understand how to foster a culture of P and E in PSH
    • Share our collective expertise on the topic
    • Know where to find national guidance about our field
  • 9.
    • Identifying Ethics & Professionalism Challenges
    • Improving Case Management Professional Practice
    • Bettering Case Management Planning and Structure *
    • Using National Standards and Tools
    * Most popular in the Pre-work Survey Monkey
  • 10.
    • Identifying Ethics/Professionalism Challenges
  • 11.
    • Sources of the Challenge
    • Examples of the Quandaries
    • Discussion
  • 12.
    • Identifying Ethics/Professionalism Challenges
  • 13.
    • Each PSH has a signature approach
    • The field of PSH has evolved
    • Best practices and principles are unevenly applied
    • Research is not widely shared
    • National training does not reach most PSH
    • PSH work is demanding and stressful
  • 14.
    • Staff are primarily paraprofessionals – on the job training
    • Staff are typically mobile and independent
    • Supervision varies and is limited by staff mobility
    • Staff operating “from their wits”
  • 15.
    • Challenge of retaining staff when salaries are low
    • Clinical staff (nurses, psych) = first cut from budgets
  • 16.
    • Common Tenant Characteristics
    • Under stress – economic, emotional, health issues (100%)
    • Have poor problem solving skills –prone to conflict (100%)
    • At-risk – can feel like life and death (89%)
    • Have symptoms impacting cognition/personality (89%)
    • Undiagnosed or inconsistently treated mental illness (78%)
    • Have symptoms producing confusing behaviors (78%)
    • Have serious illness HIV/AID, prematurely aged (67%)
  • 17.
    • Demanding jobs
    • Stress - encountering life and death situations
    • Feelings of helplessness, burn out, frustration
  • 18.
    • Hard to find middle ground between hoping residents stay clean and sober and regulating it (89%)
    • The fine line between “housing” and “program” (78%)
    • The vaguery as to whether services are voluntary or required (56%)
  • 19.
    • Small towns
    • Landlords have histories with staff and tenants
    • Lack of highly professional property owners/ managers
    • Staff time expended on travel
    • Wide geographic catchment area = staff spread out
    • Smaller organization = informality to CM practice
  • 20.
    • Identifying Ethics/Professionalism Challenges
  • 21.
    • Confused perceptions held by tenants of role of staff (100%)
    • Residents’ misinterpretations of aspects of the program (100%)
    • Inconsistent philosophical practice from one staff to next (78%)
    • Residents not making enough personal choices (68%)
    • Overstepping by staff stemming from unclear boundaries (68%)
    • Conflicts with tenants that become “personal” (56%)
    • Misunderstandings stemming from cultural differences (56%)
    • Staff have difficulty holding back in helping relationship (45%)
  • 22.
    • Ensuring confidentiality with property management (78%)
    • Property management played against case management (78%)
    • Knowing all arrangements with community partners are proper and do not create conflict of interest (68%)
    • Following directives of the funder (45%)
    • Avoiding public relations problems stemming from staff communications (34%)
    • Making sure record keeping meets standards (23%)
  • 23.
    • Guide for Peer to Peer Discussion of Identifying Challenges
    • As a group, review slides 21 and 22 together.
    • Answer these questions:
    • Which difficulties listed in the slides have we experienced most?
    • What are specific real examples of the kinds of difficulties listed on the slides?
    • Which of these problems pose the greatest risk to our work?
    • Which of these problems do we need new tools to solve?
  • 24.
    • Improving Case Management Professional Practice
  • 25.
    • Elevating Supervision Quality
    • Promoting Best Practice/Principles in Case Management
    • Improving Staff Training
  • 26.
    • Improving Professional Practice
  • 27.
    • PSH housing is demanding work
    • Paraprofessionals carry out much of the CM work
    • Many staff have no academic/professional preparation
    • Staff negotiate their supportive/advocacy role with each new tenant
    • Staff makes judgment calls all day long.
    • Complex diagnosis are common in tenants:
      • Substance abuse
      • HIV
      • Mental illness
      • Cognitive impairments
      • Head injury
      • Co-occurring diagnosis
      • Trauma
    Reasons:
  • 28.
    • Norms of the Field
    • One supervisor per six staff
    • Clinical skills, degrees, certifications desired
    • Management experience desired
    • Strong supervision in helping professions background
  • 29.
    • Categories
    • Support
    • Education
    • Accountability
    Source: Corporation for Supportive Housing, Toolkit for Developing and Operating Supportive Housing, New York,
  • 30.
    • Tips
    • Meet weekly with staff
    • Use individual and group modalities
    • Provide clinical insight and the big picture
    • Coach staff to be effective with tenants
    • Support staff in sustaining morale, managing stress
    • Offer concrete resource information
    • Keep open door policy for staff
    • Be available and highly accessible to staff
    Source: Kaduchin, A., Supervision in Social Work, Columbia University Press, 2002
  • 31.
    • Tips
    • Train and orient new staff thoroughly
    • Use case conferences as teachable moments
    • Conduct scheduled trainings on special topics
    • Offer in-service trainings by outside specialists
    • Teach principles and best practices of PSH
  • 32.
    • CM Performance Review
      • Effectiveness with tenants
      • Effectiveness with colleagues on the team
      • Job satisfaction and self-care
      • Meeting of the program goals
    Source: CUCS, New York, NY www.cucus.org
  • 33.
    • Improving Professional Practice
  • 34.
    • Features
    • Work with housing retention itself as primary objective
    • Think of “Housing as Healthcare”
    • Know that more complex cases do not correlate with poorer housing outcomes
        • Coming from street
        • Coming from incarceration
        • Co-occurring diagnosis
    • Engage the most mentally ill or most complex
    Sources: Burt and Anderson, Program Experiences in Housing Homeless People with Serious Mental Illness
  • 35.
    • Features
    • Case Managers give tenants freedom in choice making
    • Tenants allowed to make bad choices
    • Choices considered the path to self-direction and learning, recovery
    • Derived from national Mental Health consumer movement
    Source: Barrow, Soto, and Cordova; Final Report on the Evaluation of the Closer to Home Initiative
  • 36.
    • Reasons
    • Can be interpreted as voluntary services
    • Research demonstrates better outcomes
    • Frees CM staff of burden of service compliance
    • Residents participate at higher rates
    • Assures you are serving those most in need
    • Gets your program out of the “gray area”
    • Normalizes housing arrangements
    Source: Barrow, Soto, and Cordova; Final Report on the Evaluation of the Closer to Home Initiative
  • 37.
    • Tips
    • Put aside personal judgments and biases
    • Respect residents’ different value systems than those of staff
    • Use “nonjudgmental” as compass to guides CM work
    • The practice of cultural competence
    Sources: CSH and CUCS, Case Management Services Curriculum; Supportive Housing Series; U.S. Department of HUD Sponsored
  • 38.
    • CM Skills
    • How to help set goals resident wants
    • How to partner rather that direct the resident
    • How to help define small steps leading to larger goal
    • How to see the progress in failures
    Source: CSH and CUCS, Case Management Services Curriculum; Supportive Housing Series; U.S. Department of HUD Sponsored
  • 39.
    • What the Theory Teaches Us
    • Contemplation – Preparation – Action - Maintenance
    • Early period = great loss and sense of vulnerability
    • Many feel constantly at risk to relapse - AA for decades
    • What helps in PSH
      • Altering daily routines
      • Finding new social groups
      • New activities
    Sources: Encyclopedia of Homelessness
  • 40.
    • Elements of the Approach
    • Build trust over time
    • Know the person
    • Assist in cognitive restructuring
    • Teach visualization
    • Provide support
    • Establish an agreement
    Sources: CSH and CUCS, Case Management Services Curriculum; Supportive Housing Series; U.S. Department of HUD Sponsored
  • 41.
    • The Basics
    • Know the need for boundaries in helping professions
    • Develop Transference Awareness
    • Set guidelines for boundaries between staff – residents
    • Discuss impropriety of overstepping relationship
    • Maintain focus on resident
    • Limit CM staff from sharing personal information
    • LUNCH BREAK
  • 42.
    • Improving Professional Practice
  • 43.
    • Tips
    • Have new CM staff shadow experienced staff
    • Offer weekly case conferences – peer to peer learning
    • Have CM learn some skills and practices on the job
  • 44.
    • Case management overview
    • Basic counseling skills
    • Cognitive behavioral strategies
    • Cultural competence
    • Motivational interviewing
    • Reducing job-related stress
    • Stages of Change model of recovery
    • Trauma and its aftermath
    • Conflict resolution
    • From incarceration to community
    • Helping tenants develop skills for independent living
    • Understanding chronically homeless people
    • Creating a culture of moving on
    • The 1st year in supportive housing
    Recommended Topics Source: Center for Urban Community Services, PSH training series topics; www.cucs.org
  • 45.
    • Recommended Topics
    • Overview of psychiatric disorders
    • Psychosis
    • Understanding Borderline Personality Disorder
    • Psych Crisis and Suicide Prevention
    • Mental Health Treatments
    • Dual diagnosis
    • Recovery Process
    • Recovery
  • 46.
    • To Know
    • Expectations for behavior (bad stuff stemming from SA)
    • Focusing on behavior (noise, visitors that violate lease etc.)
    • Relapse (time of opportunity – engage, identify trigger)
    • Rule Violations (help understand mistake, plan future)
    • Address Drug Dealing (monitor – brings on other crimes)
    • Stages of Change Principles (Protroshaka, DiClemente, Norcrosse)
    Sources: CSH, Substance Use Services and Supportive Housing
  • 47.
    • Guide for Peer to Peer Discussion of Professional Practice
    • As a group, review the topics of Segment Two (slides 26-46):
    • Elevating Supervision Quality
    • Promoting Best Practice Case Management
    • Improving Staff Training
    • Answer these questions:
    • In which of the segment topics does my organization excel?
    • In which of these areas do we most need growth or improvement?
    • What are the needed first steps to foster needed growth in these areas ?
  • 48.
    • Bettering Organizational Planning and Structure
  • 49.
    • Dividing CM from Property Management
    • Establishing Staff Roles and Structure
    • Establishing Resident Involvement and Community
  • 50.
    • Bettering Organizational Planning and Structure
  • 51.
    • Reasons
    • Two different roles performed by different people
    • Residents should see the roles as separate and distinct
  • 52.
    • Tips
    • Define role distinctions in Job Descriptions
    • Practice confidentiality in communications
    • Schedule cross-trainings between parties
    • Use Releases of Information between the parties
    • Use Communications Logs
    • Have method for Incident Review
  • 53.
    • Bettering Organizational Planning and Structure
  • 54.
    • Tips
    • Ratio of CM to residents = 1:10 to 1:25
    • Use General Case Managers for foundation
    • Include Specialist Case Managers as compliments
      • Public Benefits Specialist
      • Employment Specialist
  • 55.
    • Options
    • Supervisor/ Director
    • Case Managers
    • ACT team (assertive community treatment)
    • Peer specialist
    • Substance Abuse Counselor
    • Resident Aides
    • ADL (Act of Daily Living) Specialists
    • HIV Specialists
    • Benefits Specialists
  • 56.
    • Tips
    • Frequency of CM contacts – 1-2 contacts/week
    • More frequent contacts to newer residents
    • More frequent contacts for at risk residents
    • By 3rd month, plan gradual reduction in service
    • Anticipate spikes in need for services
    • Plan for residents “stepping down” from services
  • 57.
    • Skills Needed
    • Showing empathy
    • Being trustworthy
    • Being respectful
    • Demonstrating flexibility
    • Active listening
    • Effective communication
    Source: CUCS, New York, NY; www.cucus.org
  • 58.
    • Bettering Organizational Planning and Structure
  • 59.
    • Reasons
    • Counteracts power imbalances of the PSH model
    • Skill building for residents
    • Reframes residents as contributors not takers
  • 60.
    • Techniques
    • Resident Advisory Board
    • Resident Peer Mentors (may be paid/certified)
    • Resident as Employees
    • Speakers’ Bureau of Residents as public relations
    Source: Corporation for Supportive Housing, Toolkit for Developing and Operating Supportive Housing, New York
  • 61.
    • Events
    • Community meetings
    • Social events –outings, holiday parties etc.
    • Staff-tenant team building activities
    • Coffee hours, entertainment, guest speakers
  • 62.
    • Guide for Peer to Peer Discussion of
    • Organizational Planning & Structure
    • As a group, review the topics of Segment Three (slides 49-61):
    • Dividing CM from Property Management
    • Establishing Staff Roles and Structure
    • Establishing Resident Involvement and Community
    • Answer these questions:
    • In which of the segment topics does my organization excel?
    • In which of these areas do we most need growth or improvement?
    • What are the needed first steps to foster needed growth in these areas ?
  • 63.
    • Using National Standards and Tools
  • 64.
    • Improving Policies and Procedures
    • Properly Protecting Confidentiality
    • Practicing Needed Record Keeping
    • Ensuring Propriety in Resident Admissions
  • 65.
    • Using Standards and Tools
  • 66.
    • Tips
    • Create a Policies and Procedures Manual
    • Train new staff in Policies and Procedures
    • Update manual regularly
  • 67.
      • Eligibility determination procedures
      • Tenant selection process
      • Intake and lease-up procedures
      • Supervision procedures
      • Case management procedures
      • Record keeping procedures
      • Confidentiality procedures
      • Emergency procedures
      • Grievance procedures
      • Incident procedure
      • Staff impropriety procedures
      • Property management functions and procedures
      • HUD funding compliance information
    Contents Source: AIDS Housing Corporation, The Program Director’s Workbook: Tools for Implementing Supportive Housing
  • 68.
    • Using Standards and Tools
  • 69.
    • Rules to Develop
    • To whom CM can share information about residants
    • What can and cannot be shared outside PSH program
    • Role of the Release of Information
    • Confidentiality standards in resident groups
    • Protocol for a breach of confidentiality
  • 70.
    • Standards
    • Never left in public space or view
    • Maintained in secured location or record system
    • Reviewed in privacy
    • Not transmitted electronically without protections
  • 71.
    • Contents
      • Tenant’s full name, signature, date
      • Entity to whom disclosure is authorized
      • Type of information being disclosed
      • Time period during which release is effective
      • Statement of voluntary nature of release
      • Statement that release can be revoked anytime
      • Staff signature and date
    Source: AIDS Housing Corporation, The Program Director’s Workbook: Tools for Implementing Supportive Housing
  • 72.
    • Using Standards and Tools
  • 73.
    • Standards
    • Fulfills all funders’ requirements
    • Use social work voice – nonbiased reporting style
    • Includes verifications of eligibility and case progress record
    • Clinical mental health records maintained separately by licensed provider
    • Objective language - accounts of fact and behavior
    • Use of a universal language common to all entries
    Source: AIDS Housing Corporation, Achieving Excellence
  • 74.
    • Income Verification
    • Homelessness Status Documentation
    • Intake Documentation
    • Individualized Service Plan
    • Emergency Contacts
    • Individualized Crisis Plan
    • Provider Contacts
    • Signed Release of Information Forms
    • Signed Grievance Procedure
    • Signed Residents’ Rights
    Contents Source: AIDS Housing Corporation, Achieving Excellence
  • 75.
    • Using Standards and Tools
  • 76.
    • Definition
    • A person is considered homeless only when he/she resides in one of the three places described below. For new and renewal Permanent Housing projects, persons assisted must be homeless and come from:
    • Living in a place not meant for human habitation, such as cars, parks, sidewalks, and abandoned buildings;
    • An emergency shelter; or
    • Transitional housing for persons and who originally came from streets or shelter.
    Source: HUD HRE website. Frequently Asked Questions, November, 2009.
  • 77.
    • Caveats
    • If a person is in one of the three categories listed above, but most recently spent less than 90* days in a jail or institution, he/she continues to qualify as coming from one of these categories. (2009 NOFA)
    • In addition to coming from the above three categories, projects providing Transitional Housing, Safe Havens, or Supportive Services Only may also serve populations experiencing the following circumstances:
    • Eviction within a week from a private dwelling unit and no subsequent residence has been identified and the person lacks the resources and support networks needed to obtain housing; or
    • Discharge within a week from an institution in which the person has been a tenant for 30 or more consecutive days and no subsequent residence has been identified and he/she lacks the resources and support networks needed to obtain housing.
    Note: For Permanent Housing projects renewed after 2005, the stricter screening criteria applies to units as they become vacant.
  • 78.
    • Recommendations
    • All persons that may be eligible can apply
    • Clear, written tenant selection criteria
    • Selection distinct different step from intake
    • Tenant Selection limited to:
    • Fits eligibility as defined by funding source
    • Is able to comply with the lease agreement and obligations as tenant
    Source: AIDS Housing Corporation, Achieving Excellence: Standards of Care and Best Practices in Supportive Housing, Boston
  • 79.
    • Recommendations
    • Denials limited to:
    • Does not fit eligibility as defined by the funder
    • Not suitable for upholding the lease agreement
    • Scrutiny to ability to uphold the lease applied consistently
    • If you run CORI, do so on all applicants
    • If you check references, do so on all applicants
    Source: AIDS Housing Corporation, Achieving Excellence: Standards of Care and Best Practices in Supportive Housing, Boston
  • 80.
    • Recommendations for Notice
    • Explains the reason applicant is denied
    • Includes contact name and phone for an appeal
    • Contains a contact information for local Fair Housing
    • Contains HUD Fair Housing Discrimination Line
    • Conveys that Reasonable Accommodations are offered
    Source: AIDS Housing Corporation, Achieving Excellence: Standards of Care and Best Practices in Supportive Housing, Boston
  • 81.
    • Develop fair practice for waiting lists
      • Chronological
      • Lottery at periodic intervals
    • Avoid sobriety as a requirement for admissions
    • Have tenant selection method reviewed by housing law attorney
    • Know that in assessing ability to uphold a lease, may request
    • Previous landlords
    • Credit companies
    • Employers
    • Probation officers
    • Social workers
    • Past residential programs (if and when there is question of ability to uphold lease)
    Source: AIDS Housing Corporation, The Program Director’s Workbook: Tools for Implementing Supportive Housing Recommendations
  • 82.
    • Guidelines
    • Illegal to ask about nature/severity of a disability during tenant selection.
    • Illegal to make decisions about eligibility based on the nature/severity of a disability.
    • The Reasonable Accommodation law applies
    • Local and national fair housing laws apply
    Source: AIDS Housing Corporation, Achieving Excellence: Standards of Care and Best Practices in Supportive Housing, Boston
  • 83.
    • Guide for Peer to Peer Discussion of Professional Practice
    • Review the topics related to Standards and Tools (slides 66-83):
    • Improving Policies and Procedures
    • Properly Protecting Confidentiality
    • Practicing Needed Record Keeping
    • Ensuring Propriety in Tenant Admissions
    • Answer these questions:
    • In which of the segment topics does my organization excel?
    • In which of these areas do we most need growth or improvement?
    • What are the needed first steps to foster needed growth in these areas ?
  • 84.
  • 85.
    • AIDS Housing Corporation, Achieving Excellence: Standards of Care and Best Practices in Supportive Housing, Boston, www.aidshousing.org
    • AIDS Housing Corporation, The Program Director’s Workbook: Tools for Implementing Supportive Housing, www.aidshousing.org
    • Corporation for Supportive Housing, Toolkit for Developing and Operating Supportive Housing, New York, www.csh.org/publications
    • Corporation for Supportive Housing, Developing the Supportive Services Program. New York, www.csh.org/publications
    • CUCS, Supportive Housing Workbook for Mental Health Program Leaders, New York, www.cucs.org
    • National Center for Family Homelessness; What about You? A Workbook for Those who Work with Others, Newton, MA, www.familyhomelessness.org
  • 86.
    • HUD Homeless Resource Exchange website: www.hud.hre.gov
    • Corporation for Supportive Housing website: www.csh.org/publications
    • CUCS, New York website: www.cucs.org  
    • AIDS Housing Corporation website: www.ahc.org
    • National Center for Family Homelessness: www.familyhomelessness.org
    • Building Changes: www.buildingchanges.org
  • 87.
    • 1. Do Voluntary Case Management Services Work?
    • Final Report on the Education of the Closer to Home Initiative
    • Program Experiences in Housing Homeless People with Serious Mental Illness
    • California’s Supportive Housing Initiative Act Program Evaluation Report
    • 2. How can we Case Managers help SA PSH residents who are not complying with treatment?:
    • Substance Use Services and Supportive Housing
    • Developing the Support in Supportive Housing
    • 3. How do we separate Case Management from Property Management roles?
    • Coordination of Property Management and Supportive Services in Permanent Supportive Housing
  • 88.
    • Annual End Homelessness Conference: July every year. www.endhomelessness.org
    • Annual End Family Homelessness Conference: March www.endhomelessness.org
  • 89.
    • Center for Urban and Community Services, New York, NY
    •  
    • Technical Assistance Collaborative, Boston, MA
    • National Center for Family Homelessness, Newton, MA
    • Corporation for Supportive Housing, New York, NY

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