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A virtual reality applications gallery
A virtual reality applications gallery
A virtual reality applications gallery
A virtual reality applications gallery
A virtual reality applications gallery
A virtual reality applications gallery
A virtual reality applications gallery
A virtual reality applications gallery
A virtual reality applications gallery
A virtual reality applications gallery
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A virtual reality applications gallery

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A Virtual Reality Applications Gallery: …

A Virtual Reality Applications Gallery:
Towards a More Concrete and Dynamic Relationship Between Architecture and Virtual Reality

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  • 1. A Virtual Reality Applications Gallery: Towards a More Concrete and Dynamic Relationship Between Architecture and Virtual RealityKhaled Ali, Christoph Anthes, Werner Putschögl,Günter Seiringer and Jens Volkert ARQUITECTURA 3000 Barcelona, June 30th to July 3rd , 2004 Slide 1/10
  • 2. AbstractThe recent interrelationship of Virtual Reality (VR)and Architecture, has created an enormous demandfor exploiting the capabilities of both fields to Virtual Reality Architecturesupport each other opening the door on unlimited other,opportunities, such as:• Improving virtual environments• Contributing the architectural profession g p Improving ContributingIn this paper, capabilities of Architecture have been Virtual Architecturalclosely integrated with those of VR in order to Environments: Profession:achieve a menu that houses the accumulation of • Cognition • Vis ali ation VisualizationCAVE applications. • Navigation • Communication • Way finding • The rise of VAAs a result, an architecturally designed gallery hasbeen proposed to be simulated and visited in theCAVE. The project incorporates the aspects of An architecturally designed gallery for VR applicationsArchitecture and VR to overcome the obstacles of to be simulated and visitedcurrent menus, aiming at better navigation, and a in the CAVEhigher degree of immersion immersion. A Virtual Reality Applications Gallery: Towards a More Concrete and Dynamic Relationship Between ARQUITECTURA 3000 Architecture and Virtual reality Slide 2/10
  • 3. Related Work In th I the paper, two main groups of related works have been introduced, emphasizing the t i f l t d k h b i t d d h i i th interrelationship of Architecture and VR. Group 1 Group 21-The ‘collaborative’ architectural design of the new Introducing a number of architectural elements andChemical laboratory building at Lund Institute of navigational tools that to reduce way-finding problemsTechnology, Lund University, Sweden. for CAVE visitors, such as:2 Incorporating2-Incorporating VR techniques into the architecturaldesign process, at the Human Interface TechnologyLaboratory, at the University of Washington, Seattle. • Signs, landmarks and architectural elements. • A map study before entering the virtual environment. • A dynamically-changing track-up maps that dynamically changing track up represent the visitor at the top of the map. •A 3D image of the VE that can be occupied by a user and held in a virtual hand. The CAVE become an updated version of Architectural elements seemed to enhance perspectives, and facilitated understanding the VE, supporting the demand for better spatial and communication cognition and higher degrees of immersionA Virtual Reality Applications Gallery: Towards a More Concrete and Dynamic Relationship Between ARQUITECTURA 3000 Architecture and Virtual reality Slide 3/10
  • 4. Aims and Motivations In Johannes Kepler University, Linz, the In general, four main approaches have been accumulation of VR applications was used to present VR applications: running at the following rates: 1- Command line or text-based menus, • 1999-2001, 2 applications a year. similar to the menu used at Kepler University • 2002-2003, 7-8 applications a year. 2- An extendable 2-D Graphics interface, • Further, about 5 free applications of such as: The SGI Buttonfly Tool Current other universities were available, raising 3- Abstract forms, such as the cube-menusSituations the overall accumulation rate to about: used in the Ars Electronica Center, Linz. The SGI 15 applications a year 4- External devices such as: the Palmist Buttonfly Tool •Rapidly increasing accumulation rates. All have proven well and served many purposes but 2 main challenges still exist: •VR applications are of various fields, types, scales and objectives. •Obstacles such as: poor orientation & Challenges Ch ll •The need to re-sort, re-order and re- Th d d d navigation, navigation and the low degree of immersion(Motivations) organize existing applications together with •Not exploiting neither the CAVE as a future ones. display, nor Architecture as contributing tool The Palmist The aim is to achieve a menu that integrates VR closely with Architecture, accomplishing the claimed demands, and reacting rationally to the imposed challenges The Aim A Virtual Reality Applications Gallery: Towards a More Concrete and Dynamic Relationship Between ARQUITECTURA 3000 Architecture and Virtual reality Slide 4/10
  • 5. Planning and Implementation Proposing a number of alternatives of menusStep 1 that can do the job Investigating and evaluating the proposed alternativesStep 2 (a comparative analysis) The winning alternative; An architecturally designed galleryStep 3 that to be visited in the CAVE Room D i R Design Application D i A li ti Design •Negotiating the concept of the building •Proposing the hierarchy of the gallery •Paper drawings •Converting the gallery building into •Room-design details primary components via C++ and •Sketches are modeled via 3DS Max 5.1 OpenGL Performer O GL P fStep 4 •Adding textures and lights •Further details are discussed •Discussing the final manifestation The gallery building was initially tested in the CAVEStep 5 environment, and f i d further discussions took place i i k lA Virtual Reality Applications Gallery: Towards a More Concrete and Dynamic Relationship Between ARQUITECTURA 3000 Architecture and Virtual reality Slide 5/10
  • 6. Room Design Within the room design, three main objectives have been of central importance: Expandability To ensure displaying future works of students Flexibility y To ensure re-arranging rooms to house more VR applications g g ppObjectives Regularity To support the demanded human cognition and optical qualities Classifying current VR applications into 6 groups; and therefore 6 functional areas (rooms) Proposing a rectangular modular system to be the grid on which the plan cab be sketched Layout design: a walkway serving 6 rooms, each houses in average 5 VR applicationsProcedures Interior design: 6 different interiors are proposed, to support the demanded cognition 3 2 1 4 5 6 Results 6 Room 1 3 4 2 5 A Virtual Reality Applications Gallery: Towards a More Concrete and Dynamic Relationship Between ARQUITECTURA 3000 Architecture and Virtual reality Slide 6/10
  • 7. Future ExpansionsTo house more VR applications (future expansions), 3 main possibilities are available: Possibility No: 1 Possibility No: 2 Possibility No: 3 Adding one, or more, 2D picture, Adding more rooms to current Adding more wings to current or 3D sculpture to the room; and p ; g gallery building to house new y g g gallery building to house new y g therefore one, or more, application groups of VR applications groups of VR applications 3 2 1 3 2 1 4 5 6 4 5 6 3 2 1 3 2 1 4 5 6 4 5 6 A Virtual Reality Applications Gallery: Towards a More Concrete and Dynamic Relationship Between ARQUITECTURA 3000 Architecture and Virtual reality Slide 7/10
  • 8. Application DesignObjectives Within the room design, two main objectives have been of central importance: Flexibility To ensure the re-configuration, by re-editing the configuration file Easiness E i To T easily handle th corresponding 2D graphic or the 3D sculpture il h dl the di hi th l tHierarchy In the light of the mentioned objectives , the tree structure is developed Gallery: the top element of the scene, y p , Gallery that consists of several rooms. Rooms: organized as a matrix structure to allow flexible configuration, having no graphical representation of their own.Abstract Room Room Room Room Room RoomStructure Walls: Using a Boolean value walls value, can be visible or invisible, having the function of grouping 2D graphics, 3D sculptures, and decorative elements. Wall Wall Wall Wall Sculptures and pictures: used to represent applications by simplyVisible grabbing the corresponding 2D pictureElements Sculpture Picture Decoration or 3D sculpture. Decorative elements: used to support the overall manifestation, and improveApplications Application pp Application pp human cognition. From the software g engineering aspect, they do not have any functionality A Virtual Reality Applications Gallery: Towards a More Concrete and Dynamic Relationship Between ARQUITECTURA 3000 Architecture and Virtual reality Slide 8/10
  • 9. Testing the Gallery• The gallery building was initially tested in the CAVE environment.• Some shots have been taken:• Further discussions about the manifestation of the gallery and other details took place A Virtual Reality Applications Gallery: Towards a More Concrete and Dynamic Relationship Between ARQUITECTURA 3000 Architecture and Virtual reality Slide 9/10
  • 10. Future Work • Additional rooms can be designed to house more VR applications, especially when taking the rapidly increasing accumulation rate into account p y g Upgrading the current • Landscape elements can be added to enhance the gallery building architectural manifestation (optical quality of the gallery) promoting a higher degree of immersion • A multi-level architecturally designed gallery that can Designing house more applications, simulating physically built galleries, a new gallery building would be the next step to have a gallery of high optical quality similar to real ones.A Virtual Reality Applications Gallery: Towards a More Concrete and Dynamic Relationship Between ARQUITECTURA 3000 Architecture and Virtual reality Slide 10/10

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