• Save
ICT Literacy in Libraries
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

ICT Literacy in Libraries

on

  • 4,742 views

Overview of history of ICT literacy and modeling of uses of ICT in libraries -- focus on Higher Education.

Overview of history of ICT literacy and modeling of uses of ICT in libraries -- focus on Higher Education.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
4,742
Views on SlideShare
4,724
Embed Views
18

Actions

Likes
2
Downloads
0
Comments
0

4 Embeds 18

http://www.weebly.com 15
http://twitter.com 1
http://sppportfolio.weebly.com 1
https://twitter.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Blog benefits: Subscription distribution   Timely but fast , yet if written with longevity in mind, archived, categorized and searchable entries make old entries salient. Good way to get students to write/journal as part of e-portfolio Comment feature is a good way to get informal feedback Blog Pitfalls Creating/editing takes time Keeping them timely and interesting as well as instructional Spam on comments – to prevent must have users register
  • Blog benefits: Subscription distribution   Timely but fast , yet if written with longevity in mind, archived, categorized and searchable entries make old entries salient. Good way to get students to write/journal as part of e-portfolio Comment feature is a good way to get informal feedback Blog Pitfalls Creating/editing takes time Keeping them timely and interesting as well as instructional Spam on comments – to prevent must have users register
  • RefShare & Delicious benefits: Allows web access to favorite research/resources from anywhere, Allows “sharing” of resources with collaborators anywhere – also allows a librarian to generate a constantly updating pathfinder on a topic. increased communication between students & faculty and between scholars both within & among institutions. Natural segue for talking about Citing Sources & Avoiding Plagiarism Delicious & RefWorks pitfalls Delicious is mainly for websites, RefWorks for databases and catalogues. They don’t “communicate” well. RefWorks is proprietary, have to pay after graduation Both are potentially unwieldy if organizing tools not used
  • Skype benefits: Low technology   learning curve, makes participation outstanding ! Alternate formal communication channel, for when courseware is malfunctioning but also acts as an informal communication channel : IM service but also allow voice-in-real time for free History feature saves “chats” and serves as a good way to capture informal and formal feedback and a way to track requests over time; allows sending tutorial links at point of need, later accessible for rubric grading Allows attachments for documents and pictures – helps in troubleshooting Skype Pitfalls Unsolicited “callers” on SkypeMe mode – to prevent this, users register and must be accepted as a contact
  • Skype benefits: Low technology   learning curve, makes participation outstanding ! Alternate formal communication channel, for when courseware is malfunctioning but also acts as an informal communication channel : IM service but also allow voice-in-real time for free History feature saves “chats” and serves as a good way to capture informal and formal feedback and a way to track requests over time; allows sending tutorial links at point of need, later accessible for rubric grading Allows attachments for documents and pictures – helps in troubleshooting Skype Pitfalls Unsolicited “callers” on SkypeMe mode – to prevent this, users register and must be accepted as a contact
  • Skype benefits: Low technology   learning curve, makes participation outstanding ! Alternate formal communication channel, for when courseware is malfunctioning but also acts as an informal communication channel : IM service but also allow voice-in-real time for free History feature saves “chats” and serves as a good way to capture informal and formal feedback and a way to track requests over time; allows sending tutorial links at point of need, later accessible for rubric grading Allows attachments for documents and pictures – helps in troubleshooting Skype Pitfalls Unsolicited “callers” on SkypeMe mode – to prevent this, users register and must be accepted as a contact

ICT Literacy in Libraries ICT Literacy in Libraries Presentation Transcript

  • ICT Literacy in Libraries METRO Workshop December 7, 2009 Kathryn Shaughnessy, MA, MLS Assistant Professor Instructional Services Librarian Senior Fellow, Center for Teaching and Learning
  • Information & ICT Literacy : History & Overview
    • Who’s responsible for Information Literacy?
      • For teaching information literacy
    Library Instruction Classroom Instruction Librarian Teacher Information Literacy
  • Information & ICT Literacy : History & Overview
  • Information & ICT Literacy : History & Overview (’00)
    • Hallmarks of the “Information Literacy” include
    • Determine the extent of information needed
    • Access the needed information effectively and efficiently
    • Evaluate information and its sources critically
    • Incorporate selected information into one’s knowledge base
    • Use information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose
    • Understand the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information, and access and use information ethically and legally
      • From the ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education January 18, 2000
      • http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/standards/informationliteracycompetency.cfm#f2
  • Information & ICT Literacy : History & Overview (’00)
    • In this definition “Information Literacy” includes life long and task-oriented literacy
    • Examples:
      • buying an affordable and reliable car
      • getting information on a company for a job interview
      • researching a new neighborhood if you are moving
      • picking through information on a political candidate
      • incorporating education expenses into your tax return
      • From the ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education January 18, 2000
      • http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/standards/informationliteracycompetency.cfm#f2
  • Information & ICT Literacy : History & Overview (’00)
    • “ Information Literacy” broader than “IT Literacy” (2000)
      • “ Information literacy is related to information technology skills, but has broader implications for the individual, the educational system, and for society. Information technology skills enable an individual to use computers, software applications, databases, and other technologies to achieve a wide variety of academic, work-related, and personal goals. Information literate individuals necessarily develop some technology skills. “
      • From the ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education January 18, 2000
      • http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/standards/informationliteracycompetency.cfm#f2
  • Information & ICT Literacy : History & Overview (’00)
    • “ Information Literacy” broader than “IT Fluency” (2000)
      • “ ‘ Fluency’ with information technology may require more intellectual abilities than the rote learning of software and hardware associated with "computer literacy", but the focus is still on the technology itself. Information literacy, on the other hand, is an intellectual framework for understanding, finding, evaluating, and using information- -activities which may be accomplished in part by fluency with information technology, in part by sound investigative methods, but most important, through critical discernment and reasoning.
      • Information literacy initiates, sustains, and extends lifelong learning through abilities which may use technologies but are ultimately independent of them.” (emphasis added)
      • From the ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education January 18, 2000
      • http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/standards/informationliteracycompetency.cfm#f2
  • Information & ICT Literacy : History & Overview (’02)
    • “ Information Communications Technology Literacy” emerges
    • In 2002 , ETS convenes “The International ICT Literacy Panel was comprised of educators, technology experts, scholars and industry and labor representatives from Australia, Brazil, Canada, France, and the United States. Our deliberations resulted in the following definition:
      • ICT literacy is using digital technology, communications tools, and/or networks to access, manage, integrate, evaluate and create information in order to function in a knowledge society .
    • ETS, May 2002 Digital Transformation: A Framework for ICT Literacy
  • Information & ICT Literacy : History & Overview (’02)
    • “ ICT Literacy” as distinct from IT literacy (2002)
      • … [ICT] represents the set of activities and technologies that fall into the union of IT and communication technologies. Global industry, international media, and academics increasingly now use ICT to describe this union. The real benefit of adding “communication” doesn’t derive from including specific technologies, such as routers or servers, but from the dynamism implicit in interconnected social, economic, and information networks . ICT is characterized by unprecedented global flows in information, products, people, capital, and ideas. (emphasis added)
    • ETS, May 2002 Digital Transformation: A Framework for ICT Literacy
  • Information & ICT Literacy : History & Overview (’02)
    • Cognitive Proficiency — the desired foundational skills of everyday life at school, at home, and at work. Literacy, numeracy, problem solving, and spatial/visual literacy demonstrate these proficiencies.
    • Technical Proficiency — the basic components of digital literacy. It includes a foundational knowledge of hardware, software applications, networks, and elements of digital technology.
    • ICT Proficiency — the integration and application of cognitive and technical skills. ICT proficiencies are seen as enablers; that is, they allow individuals to maximize the capabilities of technology. At the highest level, ICT proficiencies result in innovation, individual transformation, and societal change.
    • May 2002 Digital Transformation: A Framework for ICT Literacy Page 26
    • image & text copyright ETS
  • Information & ICT Literacy : History & Overview (’02)
    • Cognitive Proficiency — the desired foundational skills of everyday life at school, at home, and at work. Literacy, numeracy, problem solving, and spatial/visual literacy demonstrate these proficiencies.
    • Technical Proficiency — the basic components of digital literacy. It includes a foundational knowledge of hardware, software applications, networks, and elements of digital technology.
    • ICT Proficiency — the integration and application of cognitive and technical skills. ICT proficiencies are seen as enablers; that is, they allow individuals to maximize the capabilities of technology. At the highest level, ICT proficiencies result in innovation, individual transformation, and societal change.
    • May 2002 Digital Transformation: A Framework for ICT Literacy Page 26
    • image & text copyright ETS
  • Information & ICT Literacy : History & Overview (’06)
    • “ ICT s” begin to be recognized as larger factors in IL
    • 2006 Information Literacy Summit produces American Competitiveness in the Internet Age Report   which explored “the urgent need to address and correct America’s information-literacy deficits.”
    • “ More than a hundred people participated in the Summit. At the conclusion of the Summit, the establishment of a National ICT Literacy Policy Council to develop national standards for information literacy was announced: “The National Forum on Information Literacy announced today that 16 influential education and business leaders have formed a policy council that will determine national standards for information and communication technology (ICT) literacy.”
      • http://infolit.enktesis.net/Documents/InfoLitSummit16Oct2007B.pdf
  • Information & ICT Literacy : History & Overview (’07)
    • ETS’s ICT Literacy Assessment test debuts in 2006 .
    • Working from the ACRL “Information literacy competency standards for higher education” and other key documents, ETS and education partners identified seven ICT literacy skill areas that the assessment should measure: defining, accessing, managing, evaluating, integrating, creating and communicating information
    • Preliminary findings 2007: while students may be tech savvy when it comes to entertainment, they may not have the critical thinking skills to perform the kinds of information management and research tasks necessary for academic success.“
    • From Katz, I.R. (2007). Testing information literacy in digital environments:
    • The ETS iSKILLS ™assessment. Information Technology and Libraries 26(3), 4-13 ]
  • Information & ICT Literacy : History & Overview (’07)
    • DEFINE: Understand and articulate the scope of an information problem in order to facilitate the electronic search for information,
    • ACCESS: Collect and/or retrieve information in digital environments. Information sources might be web pages, databases, discussion groups, email, or on-line description of print media.
    • EVALUATE: Judge whether information satisfies an information problem by determining authority, bias, timeliness, relevance, and other aspects of materials.
    • MANAGE: Organize information to help you or others find it later
    • INTEGRATE: Interpret and represent information, such as by using digital tools to synthesize, summarize, compare, and contrast information from multiple sources
    • CREATE: Adapt, apply, design, or construct information in digital environments,
    • COMMUNICATE: Disseminate information tailored to a particular audience in an effective digital format
    • From Katz, I.R. (2007). Testing information literacy in digital environments: The ETS iSKILLS ™assessment.
    • Information Technology and Libraries 26(3), 4-13
  • Information & ICT Literacy : History & Overview (’09)
    • ICT has its origin in teaching people how to use computers and has only more recently entered the world of information acquisition and evaluation. While it covers many of the goals of information literacy, ICT does not really have a foundation in an understanding of information itself--where it comes from, what its varied natures are, and so on. Media literacy is great for evaluation, particularly of audiovisual materials, but it has no real grounding in information literacy.
    • Information literacy; coming from a background of libraries, has a comprehensive understanding of information in many formats within a high-tech environment.
    • Badke, William. "Media, ICT, and Information Literacy." Online 33.5 (2009): 47-9.
  • Information & ICT Literacy : History & Overview (’09)
    • ICT has its origin in teaching people how to use computers and has only more recently entered the world of information acquisition and evaluation. While it covers many of the goals of information literacy, ICT does not really have a foundation in an understanding of information itself--where it comes from, what its varied natures are, and so on. Media literacy is great for evaluation, particularly of audiovisual materials, but it has no real grounding in information literacy.
    • Information literacy; coming from a background of libraries, has a comprehensive understanding of information in many formats within a high-tech environment.
    • Badke, William. "Media, ICT, and Information Literacy." Online 33.5 (2009): 47-9.
  • Information & ICT Literacy : History & Overview
    • Who’s responsible for ICT Literacy?
    • Following Badke (with ICT Literacy is under the umbrella of information literacy) and the ICT framework…I propose that a new ICT model may look like this.
    Librarian: Cog & ICT Proficiency Teacher: Cog & Tech Proficiency Information Literacy ICT Literacy Self taught technology IT workshops Technical Proficiency
  • ICT Literacy, Technical Proficiency & Social Web
    • To date, IL in Libraries
    • have focused
    • primarily on
    • “ Cognitive
    • Proficiency”
    • In addressing
    • the “Technical Proficiency”
    • element of ICT literacy:
    • IT departments and Tech Librarians,
    • Faculty, or the user themselves
    • (and all early adopters) might learn
    • how to use any particular ICT program,
    • but librarians specifically need to understand (cognitively) and
    • to model use of ICT and Social Web Technology, especially
    • noting how they impact on the Information Cycle
    Librarian: Cog & ICT Proficiency Teacher: Cog & Tech Proficiency Information Literacy ICT Literacy Self taught technology IT workshops Technical Proficiency
  • ICT Literacy & Social Web : InfoCycle
    • Hallmarks of the “Social Web” include the entire info cycle:
      • Ease of web-based content creation
      • Ease of web-based distribution: RSS / subscription
      • Ease of communication among self-selected members
      • Comments & Feedback
      • Sharing, Bookmarking, podcasting
      • Tagging
      • Preservation
      • For all Libraries: Development in the way information is created, distributed, cited, stored, archived, repurposed; has impact on privacy, legal and educational issues in libraries
      • Academic & Special Libraries: Specific development in the process of Scholarly Communication and Open Access movements
  • ICT Literacy & Social Web : InfoCycle
    • RSS and the Social Web… mass disemination  info portal creation
    • 1997-1999: scriptingNews format, designed by Dave Winer
    • 2000 : RSS 1.0 format is developed by Rael Dornfest at O’Reilly independently
    • January 2001 : Wikipedia launches (now 2,827,861 articles)
    • March 2002: “MetaWeblog powerful blogging API. “
    • September 2002: Winer Develops RSS 2.0, MetaWeblog updates
    • May 2003 : LinkedIn launches (33 million members as of 2008)
    • July 2003 : RSS 2.0 spec, Winer “released CC license “ thru Harvard
    • February 2004: Flickr launches, Facebook debuts (Undergrads only)
    • August 2004: “iPodders” RSS (Winer& Curry) – podcasting begins
    • July 2005: iTunes supports podcasts , get 1 million subscribers in first 2 days; 8,000 podcasts & 6 million listeners in one month
    • August 2006: Public Launch of Twitter
    • January 2008: Library of Congress uploads collections to Flickr
    • Hobson and Holtz Report, 8/4/2005 http://forimmediaterelease.biz/index.php/weblog/2005/08/05/ )
    • RSS 2.0 at Harvard Law website, http:// cyber.law.harvard.edu/rss/rssVersionHistory.html
  • ICT Literacy & Social Web : InfoCycle
    • Hallmarks of the “Social Web” include
    • Ease of web-based content creation
    RSS: notifies editor of changes to wikis
  • ICT Literacy & Social Web : InfoCycle
    • Hallmarks of the “Social Web” include : Comments & Feedback
    RSS: allows subscriptions for new channel content & comments/feedback
  • ICT Literacy & Social Web : InfoCycle
    • Hallmarks of the “Social Web” include Ease of web-based distribution of information -- RSS of text
    RSS: notifies reader of new blog entries
  • ICT Literacy & Social Web : InfoCycle
    • Hallmarks of the “Social Web” include Ease of web-based distribution of information -- RSS of audio and video podcasts
    RSS: notifies reader of new audio & video files
  • ICT Literacy & Social Web : InfoCycle
    • Hallmarks of the “Social Web” include :
      • Ease of communication among self-selected members
    RSS: is what allows the “newsfeeds” from “groups” & “fan pages” in social networks to show up on your profile page
  • ICT Literacy & Social Web : InfoCycle
    • Hallmarks of the “Social Web” include :
      • Sharing, Bookmarking
    RSS: “Grabs” xml to make content quickly shareable and re-displayable
  • ICT Literacy & Social Web : InfoCycle
    • Hallmarks of the “Social Web” include: tagging
    RSS: allows “subscriptions” to metadata, & social “tags”
  • ICT Literacy & Social Web : InfoCycle
    • Hallmarks of the “Social Web” include: tagging
    RSS: allows “subscriptions” to metadata
  • ICT Literacy & Social Web : InfoCycle
    • Hallmarks of the “Social Web” include: Preservation: TwapperKeeper
    • Internet Archive
    • MirrorServers
  • ICT Literacy, RSS & Social Web: Overview
    • ICT Literacy and the Social Web:
    • Librarians: Personal/Professional growth: Need to keep on top of Changing Information Cycle, and how Social web changes the way information is created, distributed, cited, stored, archived, repurposed; has impact on privacy, legal and educational issues in libraries
    • Student ICT Literacy: (in addition to above) requires critical thinking skills to perform the kinds of information management and research tasks necessary for academic success and future work with Information and Communication Technologies
    • All Patrons ICT Literacy: (in addition to above) RSS marks the major difference between old “static” web content and dynamic web resources; Social web  complication of IP and privacy issues. Life-long learning!
  • ICT Literacy & Social Web : Library models
    • Social-Web facilitates creation through WYSIWYG interfaces that allow for easy publishing of web-based resources.
    • (Pictured: blog for program support)
    • Examples include:
    • Wikis
    • Blogs
    • YouTube
    • Flickr, Picasa
  • ICT Literacy & Social Web : Library models
    • Social-Web facilitates distribution through RSS feeds that allow users to subscribe to audio, video and text content on web-based resources using readers/catchers
    • Examples include:
    • iGoogle
    • iTunes
    • BlogLines
    • Juicer
    • NewsGator
    • (Pictured: Feeds from Universities’ LIBlog)
    • Browsers: FireFox, Safari and Chrome
  • ICT Literacy & Social Web : Library models
    • Social-Web facilitates sharing text and sites
    (Pictured: Share icons from LibGuides)
  • ICT Literacy & Social Web : Library models
    • Social-Web facilitates discovery of specific or like resources through folksonomy/tagging
    • Delicious
    • StumbleUpon
    • CiteULike
    • Library Thing
    • Flixster
    (Pictured: Scientific Inquiry Resources tagged by Title III faculty )
  • ICT Literacy & Social Web : Library models
    • Social Networking Sites allow members to gather/create/share a variety of social web resources (like photos, links, audio files, books, films etc) within the same interface
    • FaceBook
    • MySpace
    • Ning
    • ELGG
    • Orkut
    • LinkedIn
    • Idealist.org
    (Pictured: Libraries’ Facebook Page )
  • Modeling ICT Literacy in Library Instruction
    • Libraries should “Model” use of ICTs in instruction:
    • Explore new ICTs to see what they are capable of
    • (even if you never actually use it!)
    • 2. Take advantage of ICTs to increase library-related information
    • 3. Create/find tutorial on how to use ICT resources for research
    • 4. Create/find tutorial how to create an ICT resource
    • EXAMPLES: http://stjohns.campusguides.com/Social_web
  • Modeling ICT Literacy in Library Instruction Explore new ICTs to see what they are capable of
  • Modeling ICT Literacy in Library Instruction
    • ICTs used for Creation of Tutorials:
    • Tutorials  Captivate (WINK is OS version)
    • Podcasts  Audacity and/or Olympus recorder
    • … and for Enhancing distribution / communication
    • Blogs (WordPress, Blogger)
    • Wikis (PBWiki, WikiSpaces)
      • RSS: (RefWorks & iGoogle)
      • LibGuides
      • Skype / Facebook / Twitter
      • Del.icio.us tagging & RefShare
      • Portal Group / Courseware
  • ICT Literacy, RSS & Social Web: Library Uses Display the uses of RSS (then point to ICT Literacy tutorials for more info)
  • ICT Literacy, RSS & Social Web: Library Resources Instructions: tutorials cover 1) how to use the resource, 2) how to create a resource
  • ICT Literacy, RSS & Social Web: Library Resources Cross reference to tutorials at every “model” point
  • LibBlog: points faculty to resources & tutorials
    • Blog benefits:
      • Subscription distribution
      • Timely but archive list
      • write/journal as part of e-portfolio
      • Comment/feedback
    • Blog Pitfalls
      • Creating/editing takes time
      • Timely and interesting
      • Spam
  • BLOG: Auto-syndicate text, tutorials, podcasts in Courses
    • Blog benefits:
      • Subscription distribution
      • Timely but archive list
      • write/journal as part of e-portfolio
      • Comment/feedback
    • Blog Pitfalls
      • Creating/editing takes time
      • Timely and interesting
      • Spam
  • WIKIS: DLIS assignment: collaborate with professionals Cross reference to tutorials at every “model” point
  • Del.icio.us: T3 faculty share web-resources informally…. Cross reference to tutorials at every “model” point
  • Facebook: getting the word out, ICT to model IL issues Use ICT vehicle to demonstrate ICT literacy lesson: (ex: privacy issues regarding 3 rd party software – here Facebook “quizzes”)
  • Twitter: getting the word out, ICT to model IL issues Use ICT vehicle to demonstrate ICT literacy lesson: (ex: phishing and privacy issues of 3 rd party software – here “foursquare,” via “bit.ly”)
  • YouTube: getting the word out, ICT to model IL issues Use ICT vehicle to demonstrate ICT literacy lesson: (ex: linking to and/or embedding an “illegal” YouTube posting as “contributory infringement”
  • “ ICT Literacy Models” are always in Beta
    • All of these content-creation and content-delivery technologies are “in Beta,” especially given that we are always getting feedback and always tweaking/ expanding/ instructing, and the technologies are changing quickly.
    • Many thanks to our GDSJ Masters’ students for being my patient and enthusiastic Beta-testers. Many thanks also to the faculty and steering committee of the GDSJ Masters’ programs, as well as my very energetic, early-adopter colleagues in Title III, CTL, DLIS, Library, and the Distance Learning Pedagogy course for their generous collaboration.
  • ICT Literacy in the Library
    • Thank you for your time!
    • Kathryn Shaughnessy
    • Instructional Services Librarian
    • [email_address]