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  • 1. PowerPoint Presentation by Charlie CookThe University of West AlabamaPart 1OverviewMosley • Pietri© 2008 Thomson/South-WesternAll rights reserved.Chapter 1SupervisoryManagementRoles andChallenges
  • 2. © 2008 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 1–2Learning Objectives1. Explain why management is needed in allorganizations.2. Describe the different levels of management.3. Discuss what managers do.4. Explain the basic skills required for effectivemanagement.5. Explain where supervisors come from.6. Clarify the different relationships supervisorymanagers have with others.After reading and studying this chapter, you shouldbe able to:
  • 3. © 2008 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 1–3Learning Objectives (cont’d)7. Discuss the emerging position of supervisorymanagers.8. Discuss some trends challenging supervisors.After reading and studying this chapter, you shouldbe able to:
  • 4. © 2008 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 1–4EXHIBIT 1.1 Partial Organization Chart for AutoFin Southeast Division
  • 5. © 2008 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 1–5The Need for Management• Organization A group of people working together in a structuredsituation for a common objective.• Basic Organizational Activities1. Operations Producing an organization’s product or service.2. Marketing Selling and distributing an organization’sproduct or service.3. Financing Providing or using funds to produce anddistribute an organization’s product or service.
  • 6. © 2008 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 1–6What is Management?• Management Working with people to achieve objectives by effectivedecision making and coordinating availableresources.• Basic Resources Human resourcesThe people an organization requires for operations. Physical resourcesItems an organization requires for operations. Financial resourcesThe money, capital, and credit an organizationrequires for operations.
  • 7. © 2008 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 1–7EXHIBIT 1.2 How Management Combines the Organization’sResources into a Productive System
  • 8. © 2008 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 1–8Levels of Management• What the organization assigns to you: AuthorityThe right to tell others how to act to reachobjectives.• What the organization expects of you: ResponsibilityThe obligation of an employee to accept amanager’s delegated authority.
  • 9. © 2008 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 1–9EXHIBIT 1.3 How Management Authority and Responsibility Increase at Higher LevelsResponsible forthe entire or amajor segment ofthe organization.Responsible for asubstantial part ofthe organization.Controls operationsof smaller organiza-tional units
  • 10. © 2008 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 1–10What Do Managers Do?• Managerial Functions The broad classification of activitiesthat all managers perform1. Planning2. Organizing3. Staffing4. Leading5. Controlling
  • 11. © 2008 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 1–11EXHIBIT 1.4 The Management Functions in Action
  • 12. © 2008 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 1–12EXHIBIT 1.5 How the Management Functions Are Related
  • 13. © 2008 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 1–13Management: Key Pioneers• Frederick W. Taylor (1856–1915) Developed ―Scientific Management‖Focused on operational efficiencies in workmethods to increase worker output.• Henri Fayol (1841–1925) Published General and Industrial Management. Advocated the study of management. His ―principles‖ of management were precursors tomodern management functions of planning,organizing, staffing, and controlling.
  • 14. © 2008 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 1–14EXHIBIT 1.6 Roles Played by ManagersInterpersonal RolesFigureheadLeaderLiaisonInformational RolesMonitorDisseminatorSpokespersonDecision-Making RolesEntrepreneurDisturbance handlerResource allocatorNegotiatorSource: ―Roles Played by Managers,‖ adapted from The Nature of Managerial Work by HenryMintzberg. Copyright © 1973 by Henry Mintzberg. Reprinted by permission of Henry Mintzberg.
  • 15. © 2008 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 1–15Skills Required for Effective Management• Conceptual Skills Mental ability to become aware of and identifyingrelationships among different pieces of information.• Human Relations Skills Understanding other people and interactingeffectively.• Administrative Skills Establishing and following procedures to processpaperwork in an orderly manner.• Technical Skills Understanding and being able to supervise effectivelyspecific processes required.
  • 16. © 2008 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 1–16EXHIBIT 1.7 The Relative Importance of Managerial Skills at Different Managerial Levels
  • 17. © 2008 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 1–17The Transition:Where Supervisors Come From• Internal Promotion Advantages in choosing aninternal candidateCurrent knowledge ofoperationsA known performerProvides rewards andincentive for performance DisadvantagesLack of management skillsUnprepared for position
  • 18. © 2008 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 1–18EXHIBIT 1.8 The Supervisor’s Network of Relationships123Supervisors are linking pins who are members of, and link orlock together, independent groups within an organization.—Rensis Likert
  • 19. © 2008 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 1–19EXHIBIT 1.9 The Flow of Supervisors’ Organizational RelationshipsA union member elected byother members to representtheir interests to management.An experienced managerwho acts as an advocateand teacher for ayounger, lessexperienced manager.
  • 20. © 2008 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 1–20EXHIBIT 1.10 Changing Views of Supervisor’s JobTraditional View of Supervisor’s JobSupervisor-focused work unitDominant roleTechnical skills emphasisSeeking stabilityTelling, selling skillsPersonal responsibility for resultsPersonal problem solvingNarrow, vertical communicationFear, pressure used to motivateemployeesAutocratic decision styleEmerging View of Supervisor’s JobTeam-focused work unitSupportive roleFacilitation skills emphasisEncouraging changeListening skillsShared responsibility for resultsTeam problem solvingBroader, horizontal, externalcommunicationPride, recognition, growth used tomotivate employeesParticipative decision style
  • 21. © 2008 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 1–21Characteristics of “Exceptional” Supervisors• Were competent, caring, and committed both to getting the job doneand to supporting their employees.• Pushed for high quality, provided clear direction, and motivatedemployees with timely, accurate feedback.• Willingly shared information with personnel.• Were committed to teamwork and employee participation in thedepartment’s decisions.• Shared skills and knowledge willingly and saw their role as one ofcoach rather than driver.• Understood what was involved beyond their own units, from thebroader perspectives of the plant.• Took the initiative in implementing changes and new approaches.
  • 22. © 2008 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 1–22Characteristics of “Average” Supervisors• Set narrowly defined goals and had more specificperformance standards.• Were less attuned to the plant’s overall goals andfocused more narrowly on their own unit.• Provided less information or feedback aboutperformance to their work groups.• Were less flexible, less innovative, and less willing tochange.• Maintained tighter controls and were uncomfortablepracticing participative management.
  • 23. © 2008 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 1–23Trends Challenging Supervisors• Dealing with a more diverse workforce.• Emphasizing team performance.• Coping with exploding technology.• Adjusting to occupational and industry shifts.• Meeting global challenges.• Improving quality and productivity.• Improving ethical behavior.• Responding to crises.
  • 24. © 2008 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 1–24Dealing with a More Diverse Workforce• Diversity The wide range of distinguishing employeecharacteristics, such as sex, age, race,ethnic origin, and other factors.• Glass Ceiling The invisible barrier that limits women fromadvancing in an organization.
  • 25. © 2008 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 1–25Emphasizing Team Performance• Empowerment Granting employees authority to make key decisionswithin their area of responsibility.• Team Advisors Supervisors who share responsibility with team forcost, quality, and prompt delivery of products.
  • 26. © 2008 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 1–26Adjusting to Occupationaland Industry Shifts• Reinvention Organizations dramatically changing such elementsas their size, organizational structure, and markets.• Reengineering Rethinking and redesigning processes to dramaticallyimprove cost, quality, service, and speed.• Downsizing Striving to become leaner and more efficient byreducing the workforce and consolidatingdepartments and work groups.
  • 27. © 2008 Thomson/South-Western. All rights reserved. 1–27Important Terms• administrative skills• authority• conceptual skills• controlling• diversity• downsizing• empowerment• ethical dilemmas• financial resources• financing• glass ceiling• human relations skills• human resources• leading• management• managerial functions• marketing• mentoring• middle management• operations• organization• organizing• physical resources• planning• reengineering• reinvention• relationshipsnetwork• responsibility• roles• staffing• supervisorymanagement• team advisors• technical skills• top management• union steward

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