Mcs Hospital

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  • Similar to the plan-do-check act cycle in continuous improvement, But focuses on setting quantitative goals for continues improvement. Four basic steps:1. Planning: Identify the product, service, or process to be benchmarked and the firm(s) to be used for comparison, determine the measures of performance for analysis, and collect the data, 2. Analysis: Determine the gap between the firm's current performance and that of the benchmark firm(s) and identify the causes of significant gaps,3. Integration: Establish goals and obtain the support of managers who must provide the resources for accomplishing the goals,4. Action: Develop cross-functional teams of those most affected by the changes, develop action plans and team assignments, implement the plans, monitor progress, and recalibrate benchmarks as improvements are made. Simply, stated Collect the data, analyse the data, set targets to achieve best processes, develop an action plan, communicate, implement the action plan, re-measure benchmark in the light of progress.
  • There are four levels of benchmarking.i. Internal benchmarking: Comparing similar processes performed in different parts of the same Organization or service. This can be advantageous for firms that have several business units or divisions.ii. Competitive benchmarking: Comparing the performance (or an aspect) of an Organization with that of a competitor,iii. Functional benchmarking: Comparison of performance of the same function for all of those in the same sector,iv. Generic benchmarking: Comparing functions at a generic level. This is often the only approach available to Government organizations.
  • Mcs Hospital

    1. 1. Management Control Systems in Hospital<br />Presented by,<br />Dr. MatinRaje(8308)<br />PrashantNarayane(8310)<br />ChetanPhulpagar(8316)<br />SheetalBhandare(8338)<br />
    2. 2. CLASSIFICATION OF HOSPITALS<br />Basis of OBJECTIVE :<br />Teaching cum research<br />General hospital<br />Special hospitals<br />
    3. 3. CLASSIFICATION OF HOSPITALS<br />Basis of OWNERSHIP :<br />Government hospital<br />Semi-government hospital<br />Private hospital<br />Voluntary organisations<br />
    4. 4. CLASSIFICATION OF HOSPITALS<br />Basis of PATH OF TREATMENT<br />Allopathy<br />Ayurved<br />Homeopathy<br />Unani<br />Others<br />
    5. 5. CLASSIFICATION OF HOSPITALS<br />Basis of SIZE:<br />Teaching hospitals<br />District hospital<br />Taluka hospital<br />Primary health centers<br />
    6. 6.
    7. 7. `<br />
    8. 8. Management Model<br />Higher Management <br />Strategy, Education & Quality<br />Clinical Care Processes Medical, Nursing, Pharmacy, etc…<br />Patient Care Processes Patient Affairs,Hospitality, etc…<br />Support Processes HR, IT, Bio-Med, Marketing, etc…<br />Financial Processes <br />
    9. 9.
    10. 10. Pressure<br />
    11. 11.
    12. 12. ENTER HOSPITAL<br />FLOWCHART-PATIENTPerspective<br />TAKES APPOINTMENT<br />UNDERGO DIAGNOSIS<br />TAKES TREATMENT<br />NOT CURED<br />UNDERGO LAB TEST AND BUY MEDICINES<br />GETS CURED<br />
    13. 13. FLOWCHART- DOCTOR<br />DIAGNOSE PATIENT<br />GIVES TREATMENT<br />PRESCRIBES MEDICINES AND TESTS<br />CURES THE PATIENT<br />
    14. 14. FLOWCHART-RECEPTIONIST<br />TAKES DETAILS OF PATIENT<br />CHECKS AVAILABILITY OF DOCTOR<br />GIVES APPOINTMENT<br />GIVES BILLS<br />TAKES BILL AMOUNT<br />
    15. 15.
    16. 16. Content<br />USECASE DIAGRAM<br />
    17. 17. Content<br />CLASSIFICATION OF HOSPITALS<br />BENCHMARKING PROCESS<br />BENCHMARKING IN HEALTHCARE<br />LEVELS OF BENCHMARKING<br />CLASS DIAGRAM<br />
    18. 18.
    19. 19.
    20. 20.
    21. 21.
    22. 22.
    23. 23. Balance <br />Score Card<br />
    24. 24. BENCHMARKING PROCESS<br />Similar to the plan-do-check act cycle in continuous improvement, <br /> But focuses on setting quantitative goals for continues improvement. <br /> Four basic steps:<br />
    25. 25. LEVELS OF BENCHMARKING<br />Three levels of benchmarking.<br />i. Internal benchmarking: Comparing similar processes performed in different parts of the same Organization or service. This can be advantageous for firms that have several business units or divisions.<br />ii. Competitive benchmarking: Comparing the performance (or an aspect) of an Organization with that of a competitor,<br />iii. Functional benchmarking: Comparison of performance of the same function for all of those in the same sector,<br />
    26. 26. BENCHMARKING IN HEALTHCARE<br />1. Managerial areas:<br />
    27. 27. BENCHMARKING IN HEALTHCARE<br />2. Clinical areas:<br />
    28. 28. BENCHMARKING IN HEALTHCARE<br />3. Process areas in an operation theatre.<br />
    29. 29. BENCHMARKING IN HEALTHCARE<br />4. Process areas<br />
    30. 30.
    31. 31.
    32. 32. PHARMACY<br />
    33. 33. Goals<br />Assure the quality and consistency of the service;<br />Ensure that good practice is achieved at all times;<br />Delegate and free up time for other activities;<br />Role clarification;<br />Training new members of staff;<br />Provide a contribution to the audit process.<br />
    34. 34. Scope<br />Sale of OTC medicines and the provision of information to customers on symptoms and products<br />Prescription receipt and collection<br />The assembly of prescribed items (including the generation of labels)<br />Ordering, receiving and storing pharmaceutical stock<br />The supply of pharmaceutical stock<br />Preparation for the manufacture of pharmaceutical products (including aseptic products)<br />Manufacture and assembly of medicinal products (including aseptic products)<br />
    35. 35. General principles<br />be pharmacy specific;<br />be dependent on the competence of the staff working in that pharmacy;<br />under normal circumstances, it should be applicable at all times, i.e. not dependent on the presence of the pharmacist under whose authority the procedure was prepared.<br />
    36. 36. SOP’s role<br />define the process<br />specify which activities must be carried out personally by a pharmacist (pharmaceutical assessment) <br />which activities can be delegated <br />to identified competent support staff and <br />how the checks for accuracy are to be carried out. <br /> It is good practice for SOPs to incorporate an audit trail so that the pharmacist can determine who is responsible for each aspect of the process.<br />
    37. 37. OUTLINE<br />
    38. 38. Example of SOP-Dispensing procedure<br />Every prescription must be professionally assessed by a pharmacist to determine its suitability for the patient.<br />A pharmaceutical assessment of a prescription (professional check) does not eliminate the risk of a dispensing error occurring and dispensing accuracy checks should always be undertaken. Wherever possible the accuracy check should be carried out by a second person.<br />Pharmacist will undertake a pharmaceutical assessment of every prescription presented for dispensing and, once the prescription has been assembled, someone other than the person who assembled it will perform an accuracy check.<br />“Accredited checking technicians” (ACTs)<br />
    39. 39. Pharmacy Process Stages<br />Prescription handling<br />Assessment of prescription validity, safety and clinical appropriateness<br />Making interventions and problem solving<br />Assembly and labelling<br />Accuracy checking procedure<br />Transfer of the medicine or product to the patient<br />
    40. 40. Patient details are checked and confirmed;<br />The patient or representative has signed the reverse of the form;<br />Prescription charges are collected promptly and correctly or patient<br />exemptions are checked, as applicable;<br />The prescription is passed on for pharmaceutical assessment and assembly;<br />Patients/representatives are advised of waiting times and procedures for collection or delivery, including opening hours where appropriate;<br />Necessary documentation is completed;<br />Legal and professional requirements for record keeping, records management, endorsement and, where appropriate, submission for pricing are upheld.<br />1. Prescription handling<br />
    41. 41. Legally valid;<br />Prescribable under health policy;<br />Includes an appropriate dosage form and appropriate route of administration;<br />Appropriateness according to patient’s condition;<br />Dosage within therapeutic range;<br />Duration of treatment;<br />Appropriateness according to patient’s parameters (age, weight, etc.) and previous medication. This is particularly important for treatments with a narrow therapeutic index, oncology preparations, or for babies and young children;<br />Compatibility with other medication;<br />Consistency with formularies, clinical guidelines and protocols (including shared care protocols, patient group directions);<br />Possible side effects;<br />Risk of adverse drug reactions;<br />Potential for non-concordance, inappropriate use and misuse by patient;<br />Contra-indications.<br />2. Assessment of the prescriptionfor validity, safety and clinical appropriateness<br />
    42. 42. A procedure for dealing with interventions should be specified, as should circumstances in which other members of staff may perform certain tasks, for example, to clarify details with a prescriber, and at what stage this should occur, i.e. before or after discussion with the pharmacist. SOPs should also include procedures for liaison with other health professionals and/or patients as appropriate.<br />3. Interventions and problem solving<br />
    43. 43. The medicine or product matches the prescription and is in date;<br />It is assembled using correct equipment and processes;<br />It is packed and labeled appropriately;<br />Appropriate records are made;<br />Health, hygiene and safety procedures are followed at all times.<br />4. Assembly and labeling of required medicine or product<br />
    44. 44. There should be an accuracy check within the procedure.<br />Additional competence assessment and/or training is required to assure appropriate checking.<br />The SOP should be clear about which persons are competent and authorized to check.<br />Wherever possible the check should be undertaken by a second person.<br />Self-checking is not recommended other than in exceptional circumstances in which procedures are in place to assure patient safety and where it is in the patient’s best interest to do so.<br /> Incorporate boxes on the pharmacy label to accommodate the initials of the person who has dispensed the prescription and the person who has performed the professional check. An additional box may be required for the accuracy check.<br />5. Accuracy checking procedure<br />
    45. 45. Completed prescriptions are received by the correct person;<br />Appropriate information is provided to the patient or the patient’s representative and, where possible, understanding of this information is checked;<br />Measuring spoons and oral syringes are provided where appropriate;<br />Provision is made for transfer of dispensed items to patients’ representatives.<br />6. Transfer of the medicine or product to the patient<br />
    46. 46. <ul><li>Label generation.</li></ul>• The use of child resistant containers (CRCs);<br />• Appropriate packaging, for example, re-packaging of parallel import packs;<br />• Inclusion of the appropriate patient information leaflet;<br />• Recording interventions;<br />• Queries from other healthcare professionals;<br />• Expiry dates;<br />• Pre-packing in anticipation of dispensing;<br />• Dispensing into monitored dosage systems;<br />Other issues<br />
    47. 47. Thank You!!!<br />

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