How your learning Outcomes, Syllabus and Outline Effect Students.
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How your learning Outcomes, Syllabus and Outline Effect Students.

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You Had Me at Hello. ...

You Had Me at Hello.
How your learning Outcomes, Syllabus and Outline Effect Students.
Learn how to create student learning outcomes, a course syllabus and outline that attract students and improve their perceptions of your online course. Engage students and improve performance in your online courses

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How your learning Outcomes, Syllabus and Outline Effect Students. How your learning Outcomes, Syllabus and Outline Effect Students. Presentation Transcript

  • You had me at hello. How to construct learning outcomes, syllabus and course outline for an online course. Kimberly K. Klotz University of Central Arkansas 2012
  • The first impression students have of your course comes before the first assignment, the first synchronous session, or first discussion posting. It comes from your learning outcomes, course syllabus and outline. This is your opportunity to speak to the students and to introduce them to the course and instructor. Your learning outcomes, syllabus and course outline must speak for you. So, how do we make sure we have them at hello? You had me at hello. What does that mean anyway?
  • Learners will construct learning outcomes. Learners will recognize the areas of an online syllabus. Learners will recognize the steps to structure an online course from a course outline. Learners will compare the learning outcomes of the course to the learning outcomes of lessons and sections. How do we have them at hello? Presentation Objectives
  • Learning Outcomes wordle created from learning outcomes of ITEC Graduate Program
  • Learning Outcomes What are learning outcomes? Video was not exported from SlideRocket
  • Learning Outcomes How do we create learning outcomes? 1. Understand the levels of Blooms Taxonomy. Vai, M. & Sosulski, K. (2011). Essentials of online course design: A standards-based guide. New York, NY: Routledge., pages 147-154
  • Learning Outcomes How do we create learning outcomes? 2. Use action verbs. http://edorigami.wikispaces.com/Bloom%27s+Digital+Taxonomy Vai, M. & Sosulski, K. (2011). Essentials of online course design: A standards-based guide. New York, NY: Routledge., pages 147-154
  • Learning Outcomes How do we create learning outcomes? 3. Use the formula: Vai, Sosulski, Essentials of Online Course Design, pages 182-189 BEHAVIOR + CONDITION + MEASURABLE CRITERIA = LEARNING OUTCOME Be clear and concise when writing outcomes. Vai, M. & Sosulski, K. (2011). Essentials of online course design: A standards-based guide. New York, NY: Routledge., pages 147-154
  • Learning Outcomes Why are learning outcomes important? Video was not exported from SlideRocket
  • Let's practice creating learning outcomes. Go to: http://wallwisher.com/wall/itec_ch9 Then post 3 learning outcomes. (These can be on any topic you choose.) Vai, M. & Sosulski, K. (2011). Essentials of online course design: A standards-based guide. New York, NY: Routledge. Let's Practice Learning Outcomes.
  • Syllabi for online courses contain many elements of traditional courses: Course Title Course Name Course Description Course Objectives Evaluation Plan Grading Required Readings Recommended Readings Course Outline Say Hello. Creating a syllabus for an online course. Vai, M. & Sosulski, K. (2011). Essentials of online course design: A standards-based guide. New York, NY: Routledge., pages 147-154
  • Say Hello. Creating a syllabus for an online course. Elements specific to an online course syllabus: Communication strategy Description of course time frame & format Guidelines for class participation Technical requirements & support Detailed course outline (with start & end dates) For example, see: http://www.marjorievai.com/B-Chapter_9.html Vai, M. & Sosulski, K. (2011). Essentials of online course design: A standards-based guide. New York, NY: Routledge., pages 147-154
  • Say Hello. Creating a syllabus for an online course. Communication Strategy Should contain: Email Phone Chat Time frame for returning communication ie. office hours, time returning emails, etc. It is important to have a clear communication strategy. Vai, M. & Sosulski, K. (2011). Essentials of online course design: A standards-based guide. New York, NY: Routledge., pages 147-154
  • Say Hello. Creating a syllabus for an online course. Description of course time frame & format Should contain: Format Synchronous/Asynchronous/Hybrid Time-Frame Due Dates Remember to include the Time Zone Vai, M. & Sosulski, K. (2011). Essentials of online course design: A standards-based guide. New York, NY: Routledge., pages 147-154
  • Say Hello. Creating a syllabus for an online course. Guidelines for class participation Should contain: How students will participate- ie. discussion forums Frequency of participation Rubric for evaluation For an example, see page 149 of the Vai & Sosulski text. Vai, M. & Sosulski, K. (2011). Essentials of online course design: A standards-based guide. New York, NY: Routledge., pages 147-154
  • Say Hello. Creating a syllabus for an online course. Technical requirements & support Should contain: How to access the course Contact information for technical support Course overview tutorials How to access any other technologies needed for course participation. For an example, see page 150 of the Vai & Sosulski text. Vai, M. & Sosulski, K. (2011). Essentials of online course design: A standards-based guide. New York, NY: Routledge., pages 147-154
  • Course Outline The course outline covers: Class sessions Due dates Readings Assignments Activities Any other deliverables for the course For an example, see page 151 of the Vai & Sosulski text. https://docs.google.com/document/d/1_PSbRjSBAPCTSO16cwKwrUaf8IqJNh5oi- vii047yGQ/edit?hl=en# Vai, M. & Sosulski, K. (2011). Essentials of online course design: A standards-based guide. New York, NY: Routledge., pages 147-154
  • Steps to structure your course: Start by using your learning outcomes. Each unit should contain a learning outcome. Plan your assessments of learning outcomes. Use the assessments to plan out modules to help students succeed. Putting it all together. Creating a course from the course outline. Vai, M. & Sosulski, K. (2011). Essentials of online course design: A standards-based guide. New York, NY: Routledge., pages 147-154
  • Lessons and Sections Units and lessons are really just organizing structures (Vai & Sosulski, p. 155) Learning Outcomes of lessons and units should contribute to the learning outcomes of the course. Units should have introductions and summaries. Students should understand what they will be learning in the unit and the learning outcomes of each lesson. Knowing exactly what they will be learning will help them prepare. Vai, M. & Sosulski, K. (2011). Essentials of online course design: A standards-based guide. New York, NY: Routledge., pages 147-154
  • Let's Recap. Student Learning Outcomes (SLO) are important to course creation. SLOs should be specific and measurable. A course syllabus and outline is how you will introduce students to the course. This must speak for the instructor. A course outline should be specific and contain all dates for all deliverables and class meetings. To structure your course, start with the SLO and work backwards using the course outline. All assessments units and lessons should contribute to the SLO. Vai, M. & Sosulski, K. (2011). Essentials of online course design: A standards-based guide. New York, NY: Routledge., pages 147-154
  • Resources http://www.park.edu/cetl/quicktips/syllabus.html http://it.usu.edu/fact/files/uploads/OSTT2.pdf www.park.edu/cetl/quicktips/syllabus.html http://ux1.eiu.edu/.../UT_Creating%20an%20Online%20Syllabus.pdf http://afbh.uaa.alaska.edu/CafeModules/Syllabus.htm Quigley, D. (1994). The Evolution of an Online Syllabus. Computers And Composition, 11(2), 165-72. Sparnon, D. (2004). Online at Midnight. Knowledge Quest, 33(1), 38-39. Ford, M. L. (2002). Preparing Students for Assessment in the On-Line Class. New Directions For Teaching & Learning, (91), 77. Vai, M. & Sosulski, K. (2011). Essentials of online course design: A standards-based guide. New York, NY: Routledge., pages 147-154
  • Resources Vai, M. & Sosulski, K. (2011). Essentials of online course design: A standards-based guide. New York, NY: Routledge., pages 147-154 http://www.calstatela.edu/academic/english/assess.htm http://www.go2itech.org/HTML/TT06/toolkit/design/outcomes.html Lizano-DiMare, M. (2009). Best Practices for Online Instructional Communication. Journal Of Instruction Delivery Systems, 23(3), 17-22. Learning Outcomes Videos http://youtu.be/2ihVQs5-Ipk http://youtu.be/dcQCS9NBE2g http://youtu.be/Sp5lZdi0OsE http://youtu.be/Sp5lZdi0OsE http://youtu.be/WWCaNzgwn9k
  • Resources Vai, M. & Sosulski, K. (2011). Essentials of online course design: A standards-based guide. New York, NY: Routledge., pages 147-154 http://www.learningoutcomeassessment.org/TFComponentSLOS.htm http://edorigami.wikispaces.com/Bloom%27s+Digital+Taxonomy http://chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/planning-a-class-with-backward-design/33625 http://www.marjorievai.com/B-Chapter_9.html Vai, M. & Sosulski, K. (2011). Essentials of online course design: A standards-based guide. New York, NY: Routledge