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Project management for instructional designers
 

Project management for instructional designers

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A presentation on project management principles and use in instructional design and how the project management phases and activities sync with the ADDIE Model. Presentation given by Kim Mckee and ...

A presentation on project management principles and use in instructional design and how the project management phases and activities sync with the ADDIE Model. Presentation given by Kim Mckee and Kimberly Klotz at the Teaching with Technology Conference at UAMS.

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    Project management for instructional designers Project management for instructional designers Presentation Transcript

    • PROJECT MANAGEMENT FOR INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGNERS A Pocket Guide for Project Management Presented by: Kimberly McKee and Kimberly Klotz, University of Central Arkansas Instructional Technology Graduate Program
    • Kimberly Klotz (kklotz@uca.edu)      Bachelor of Arts ‘06 (Art, Journalism) Master of Science ‘13 (Instructional Technology/Distance Education) 7 years of design/marketing experience in higher education 48 hours of Project Management professional development Employed in the Division of Outreach and Community Engagement, University of Central Arkansas
    • Kimberly McKee (kmckee@uca.edu)       Bachelor of Arts (English, Writing, Journalism) Master of Science ‘13 (Instructional Technology/Distance Education Emphasis) 17 years of technical writing experience for a technology company Grant writing contractor 48 hours of Project Management professional development Employed in the Division of Outreach and Community Engagement, University of Central Arkansas
    • What is Project Management? Like a Map, a project management plan helps get you where you want to be. Applying Project Management principles increases the success of a project.  The application of knowledge, skills, tools and techniques to project activities to meet the project requirements. (PMI)
    • What is a project?  HAS A GOAL Achieves the purposes and goals of an organization, institution or business  GOALS DEFINED BY STAKEHOLDERS Purpose and goals are defined by stakeholders  INCREASE ORGANIZATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS AND/OR EFFICIENCY (such as incorporating new technologies and updating/ improving processes)  NOT PART OF DAILY TASKS Major activities outside the normal work of an organization’s department or functional units or major activities that cross functional boundaries
    • Project Characteristics  TEMPORARY Projects have a defined beginning and end. (Even if they don’t feel like they will ever end!)  MAKES SOMETHING! Creates a product, service or result that is unique
    • Who can manage a project? So, who gets to drive the car?     Outside contractors Internal group in a Project Management Office (PMO) Internal team Instructional Designer
    • Core Competencies of the Project Manager
    • Key Skills of the Project Manager A Project Manager is goal directed and milestone oriented!  Develops a plan to meet project goals  Monitors plan to ensure project stays on track  Energizes the team around the success of the project  Maintains organization  Establishes priorities  Communicates clear goals and expectations Photo by Patrick Hajzler
    • Project Management and ADDIE Instructional Design Model
    • PHASE 1
    • PHASE 1 Project Management: Initiate ADDIE: Analyze  Recognizes a project or the next phase of an existing project  Recognizes that resources should be committed to the project Activities: 1. Conduct Needs Analysis 2. Develop Project Charter 3. Identify and Document Stakeholders
    • Needs Analysis     Feasibility study to determine performance gaps at the individual and business levels Presents alternatives and possible solutions Prepared by the designer, team, outside agency Approved by leadership
    • Conducting a Needs Analysis WHY? Answers Who, What, When, Where, Why, How questions Locates the root cause of the performance gap Compares what is expected to what is actually achieved Understand the learner (job experiences, motivation, aptitude, learning style, etc.) HOW?  Conduct a survey  Walk thru current processes  Talk to customers, if possible and needed  Review previous training efforts  Review sales records and customer feedback forums  Conduct interviews  Facilitate focus groups  Facilitate workshop sessions  Conduct group brainstorming  Observations  Prototype – working model to obtain feedback before proceeding with project
    • Project Charter Before we take a trip and plan our route, do we really need to go?        Provides structure to the Project Plan Justifies the project Documents the need being addressed Includes a description of the project Documents proposed result of the project Includes input from stakeholders Leadership responsible for obtaining sign-off by the project sponsor (person financing the project), senior management, stakeholders
    • Stakeholders Find out who is riding in the car with you and paying for your gas.  Includes practitioners or groups of people with specialized knowledge or skills in a particular area  Interests should be considered throughout the project
    • PHASE 2
    • Phase 2 Project Management: Plan ADDIE: Design   40% of time allocated to complete the project should be spent in planning Size and complexity of project determines the processes to be included Activities: 1. Instructional Design Document 2. Project Management Plan 3. Components of Project Management Plan 4. Project Scope Statement 5. Work Breakdown Structure (WBS)
    • Step 3: Instructional Design Document   Outlines the framework of the instructional plan Provides high-level overview of the product content and how it will be treated  Enables stakeholders to validate the program’s objectives, architecture, content and concepts before development  Identifies learning strategies (learning styles and adult learning principles)
    • Step 4: Project Management Plan    Components of Plan Overall approach used to plan and manage a project  Project Scope Statement  Cost and Budget  Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Consists of subsidiary  Schedule Management plans that detail how  Issues Management specific areas of the  Change Management project will be managed  Quality Management  Human Resource Management  Procurement Management Documents cost, time,  Risk Management quality, risk, and resources to complete the  Communications Plan project
    • Project Scope Statement Define deliverables. Be sure to include cost and time as well. Lastly, get everyone on the same page.   Documents initial planning efforts for the project Used to reach agreement among managers, stakeholders and teams before resources are allocated
    • Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Who is the driver? The navigator? Who pumps the gas?    Comprehensive review of the project scope Subdivides major project deliverables and project work into smaller, more management components called work packages The lowest level tasks should have durations between 2 and 22 days and effort should not take more than one person more than one week to complete
    • Cost and Budget So, how much is this going to cost? Cost of the resources needed to complete project activities
    • Schedule Management  Analyzing activity sequences, duration, resource requirements and schedule constraints to create the project schedule  Approved schedule becomes the baseline for the remainder of the project  Project progress is monitored and tracked against the baseline, which determines if the project is on track
    • Issues Management Houston, we have a problem. Okay let’s solve it. And then record it.  A log to document the issue, the owner, resolution and status
    • Change Management Sometimes, we have to take detours Deviations from the project management plan
    • Quality Management What quality is acceptable? How do we make sure that we meet the standards set?   Identifies the quality standards adopted for the project Describes how the quality will be implemented and managed
    • Human Resource Management   Process for organizing and managing the team Size of team influenced by duration of the project
    • Procurement Management   Process of documenting project purchasing decisions, specifying the approach and identifying potential sellers. Identifies project needs that must be met by purchasing products, services or results outside the organization
    • Risk Management Plan Dealing with the unexpected.  Processes necessary to increase the probability and impact of positive events and decrease probability and impact of negative events
    • Communication Plan   Processes required to ensure timely and appropriate collection, retrieval and dissemination of project information Ensures that stakeholder needs are met
    • PHASE 3
    • PHASE 3 ADDIE: Develop and Implement Project Management: Execute   Design document is moved to development Communication is key to the success of the project Activities: 1. Preview instructional product 2. Validate instructional product 3. Deliver instructional product
    • Communication Elements       Create a positive environment Know your audience Project credibility Listen Awareness of verbal and nonverbal Response to feedback
    • Communication Barriers  Perceptions (How individuals make sense of information)  Beliefs (True/false or probable/improbable)  Attitudes (Positive/negative responses)  Values (Good/bad or preferred/rejected)  Noise (Internal/external disruption to the communication process)
    • Validating Product Content  Was learning content relevant to the tasks to be performed? Process  Did the presentation method help you learn the content? Materials  Were the manuals, job aids, etc., adequate, useful and applicable?
    • PHASE 4
    • PHASE 4 ADDIE: Evaluate Project Management: Close      Ensure that your customer is content with the project deliverables Obtain sign off by customer that project is complete Hold a “lessons learned” meeting with project team and appropriate stakeholders Create a Final Report Celebrate success
    • Project Management Institute (PMI) www.pmi.org PMI is one of the world’s largest not-for-profit membership associations for the Project Management profession, with more than 650,000 members and credential holders in more than 185 countries. PMI Offers Two Certification Levels: Project Management Professional (PMP) Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM) – Entry Level Certification
    • Project Management Certification Requirements Project Management Professional (PMP) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Bachelor’s degree 3 years of Project Management experience 4500 hours of leading projects 35 hours of Project Management education 2. 3. 4. 5. 1. 2. 3. High school degree 5 years of Project Management experience 7500 hours of leading projects 35 hours of Project Management education Pass the test High school diploma or equivalent 1500 hours of Project Management experience Pass the test OR Pass the test OR 1. Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM) 1. 2. 3. High school diploma or equivalent 23 hours of Project Management instruction Pass the test
    • Project Management Tools Desktop Microsoft Project Sales Force Free - Open-Source ProjectPier Redmine Web-Based Wrike Podio Team Box Pivital Tracker Open workbench – free Plan box Basecamp Projectmanager.com Zoho Fengoffice.com
    • Questions? Thank you. Download the presentation at uca.edu/outreach or email us. Kimberly Mckee kmckee@uca.edu Kimberly Klotz kklotz@uca.edu
    • References & Resources Cox, D. (2009). Project management for instructional. designers: a practical guide. Bloomington, Indiana: iUniverse Wiley, D. Project management for instructional designers. Brigham Young University: Creative Commons license. Retrieved from http://pm4id.org/(2013). A guide to the project management body of knowledge. (4th ed.). project management institute. Swaim, T. (2013). Project management fundamentals. Ed To Go, Retrieved from http://www.ed2go.com/ CourseDetails.aspx?tab=detail&course=pmf Swaim, T. (2013). Pmp certification prep 1. Ed To Go, Retrieved from http://www.ed2go.com/CourseDetails.aspx?
    • Needs Analysis Format Use this format to develop a Needs Analysis Report. 1. Training requested 2. Job, tasks, duties to be performed 3. Expected performance 4. Data collection method 5. Actual performance 6. Cause of performance gap 7. Cost estimate of training 8. Benefit of training 9. Training proposal 10. Management support recommendations (feedback, measurement) Narrative 11.
    • Project Charter Format Use this format to develop a Project Charter. 1. 2. Purpose Description of Work 3. 4. Objectives In-scope deliverables (what the project includes) 5. 6. 7. 8. Out-of-scope deliverables (what the project does not include) Roles and responsibilities Milestones Major known risks Assumptions and Constraints 9. Constraints 10. External dependencies 11. 12. Summary of budget Vendors
    • Stakeholder Log Format Use this format to develop a Stakeholder Log. 1. Name 2. Role on Project 3. Department 4. Interest 5. Knowledge level 6. Expectation 7. Level of influence on the project
    • Instructional Design Document Format Use this format to develop an Instructional Design Document. Learning Objectives 1. Describe what the learner is expected to achieve when performing the task 2. Task statement 3. Conditions under which the task is performed Key Points – Content and Concept 1. Product information, concepts and criteria to be covered in each module Process and Activity 1. 2. Summary of the types of learning activities that will be completed in the respective modules Describe how presentation and application methods are distributed throughout the learning program
    • Project Management Plan Input & Output Documents Input:  Project charter  Instructional design document  Process outputs that will be used for the project  Environmental factors outside the organization  Specific information about what may influence success, organizational policies, guidelines, procedures, plans, and/ or standards for conducting work  Stakeholder input, if skills and knowledge warrant Output:  Project Management Plan
    • Project Scope Statement Format Use this format to develop a Project Scope Statement. 1. 2. Purpose and justification 3. Objectives 4. Project description (Includes: deliverables breakdown. Do not include: completion criteria, external dependencies, assumptions, constraints.) 5. Milestones and target dates 6. Project approach (describes the plans included, scheduled meetings, scheduled status reports, issues management, change management, communications plan, procurement plan, resource management) 7. 8. Approvals Product description Version history
    • Work Breakdown Structure Input:  Project scope statement  Organizational policies, guidelines, procedures, plans and or standards for conducting work  Activity Lists (outlines all the scheduled activities to be performed for the project within the scope of work description of each activity and identification code or number)  Activity Attributes (characteristics of the activities)  Milestone Lists (major accomplishments that signal completion of a major deliverable)  Requirements documentation that describe the connection between individual requirements and the business need for the project
    • Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Output:   WBS in deliverables WBS dictionary that includes details for work attached to each component, milestones, person responsible, etc.
    • WBS Steps Define Project Deliverables 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Define scheduled activities to complete project Define tasks for scheduled activities Sequence activities and tasks Identify related dependencies Estimate resources needed/available Estimate duration resources will be required Define milestones and expected target dates Document details for the WBS dictionary
    • WBS Sequencing Methods Precedence Diagramming Method  Finish-to-start (FS): predecessor activity must finish before successor activity can start  Start-to-finish (SF): predecessor activity must start before the successor activity can finish  Finish-to-finish (FF): predecessor activity must finish before the successor activity finishes  Start-to-finish (SS): predecessor activity must start before the successor activity can start
    • WBS Sequencing Methods Dependency Determination  Mandatory dependencies: inherent to the nature of the work being done  Discretionary dependencies: established based on best practices within a particular industry or aspect of the project where an unusual sequence is desired Appling Leads and Lags  Lags delay successor activities and require time to be added to start or finish date. Leads speed up successor activity and require time to be taken off either start or finish date of scheduled activity.
    • Schedule Management Input:  Project scope statement  Activity list  Activity attributes (characteristics of activity, assumptions, constraints)  Diagram of project activities and dependencies  Activity resource requirements  Resource calendars  Activity duration estimates Output:  Project schedule  Schedule data  Schedule baseline  Project document updates
    • Schedule Management Scheduling Methods     Schedule Network Analysis Calculate early and late start dates, and early and late finish dates for project activities. Critical-Path Method Identifies tasks that must be completed on time for the project to be completed by the end date. This data keeps project on track. Schedule Compression Using mathematical calculations to shorten the schedule without changing the scope. Allows related activities to be accomplished sooner than estimated. What-if Scenario Analysis Series of what if questions to present activity assumptions to determine project duration.
    • Schedule Management Scheduling Methods  Resource Leveling Under-allocated resources can be assigned to multiple tasks.  Critical-Chain Method Schedule high risk tasks early in project so problems are identified and addressed as soon as possible.  Applying Leads and Lags Start and finish dates are adjusted.  Automated Scheduling Tools Speeds up scheduling process based on data input.
    • Schedule Management Plan Format Use this format to develop a Schedule Management Plan. 1. Task 2. Responsible 3. Estimated duration to complete 4. Start date 5. Finish date 6. Delays 7. Reason for delay 8. Action steps
    • Issues Management  A log to document the issue, the owner, resolution and status Use this format to develop an Issues Management Log. 1. How issues are tracked 2. How issues are assigned 3. How issues are prioritized 4. How issues are resolved 5. How issues are communicated
    • Change Management Deviations from the project management plan Use this format to develop a Change Management Process Log. 1. How a change request will be managed 2. How a change request will be reviewed 3. How a change request will be tracked 4. How a change request will be resolved 4. What are possible alternatives and cost 5. Sign off
    • Quality Management Identifies the quality standards adopted for the project  Describes how the quality will be implemented and managed Input:  Customer definition of quality  Overview of schedule, cost, scope  Quality assurance activities (testing, audits, reviews)  Measurements (within scope, budget, schedule) Output:  Quality Management Plan 
    • Quality Management Plan Format Use this format to develop a Quality Management Plan. 1. Organization’s quality policy 2. How the customer defines quality 3. Deliverables - acceptable criteria and standards 4. Steps to ensure that quality is part of the product 4. Measurements 5. Scheduled audits 6. Sign off
    • Human Resource Management Use this format to develop a Human Resources Management Plan. 1. Roles 2. Responsibilities 3. Reporting relationships
    • Procurement Management Plan Format Use this format to develop a Procurement Management Plan. 1. Procurement statement (products or services being considered) 2. Estimated cost 3. Vendor selection (RFI/RFP/etc.) 4. Procurement definition (what items will be procured and under what conditions) 5. Selection process criteria 6. Procurement team with contact information and defined roles 7. Contract type and actions required to initiate 8. Standards for each contract 9. Vendor management (steps to ensure everything is received) 9.. Sign off
    • Human Resource Management Process for organizing and managing the team  Size of team influenced by duration of the project Input:  Factors outside the project that influence project success  Organizational policies, guidelines, procedures, plans and/or standards for conducting work  Activity resource requirements Output:  Human Resource Plan 
    • Procurement Management   Process of documenting project purchasing decisions, specifying the approach and identifying potential sellers. Identifies project needs that must be met by purchasing products, services or results outside the organization Input:  Factors outside of the project that impact success  Organizational policies, guidelines, plans and/or standards for conducting work  Scope baseline  Requirements documentation  Teaming agreements  Risk information  Activity-resource requirements  Project schedule  Activity cost estimates  Cost baseline Output:  Procurement Management plan
    • Risk Management Plan Processes necessary to increase the probability and impact of positive events and decrease probability and impact of negative events Input:  Factors outside of the project that influence success  Organizational policies, guidelines, procedures, plans and/or standards for conducting work  Scope statement  Cost Management plan  Schedule Management plan  Communications Management plan Output:  Risk Management plan 
    • Risk Management Plan Format Use this format to develop a Risk Management Plan. 1. Risk identification (based on discussions with key stakeholders) 2. Risk categorization 3. Risk probability and impact assessment 4. Risk prioritization 5. Risk response planning 6. Risk management strategy 7. Risk monitoring (build reviews into project schedule) 8. Risk control 9. Assumptions with significant impact on project risk 10. Roles and responsibilities unique to the risk function
    • Risk Management Plan Format Risk Management Plan - Continued 11. Risk management milestones 12. Risk rating score technique 13. 14. Risk thresholds (high, medium, low – based on impact and probability) Risk communication 15. Risk tracking process 16. Sign off
    • Communication Plan Processes required to ensure timely and appropriate collection, retrieval and dissemination of project information  Ensures that stakeholder needs are met Input:  Factors outside the project with significant influence  Organizational policies, guidelines, procedures, plans and standards for conducting work  Project Charter  Procurement documents Output:  Communication Plan 
    • Communication Plan Format Use this format to develop a Communication Plan. 1. Purpose 2. Need 3. Communication Principles (ensure consistency and tone in messages and communication efforts) 4. Communication objectives 5. Target audience 6. Key messages (who, what, when, where, why, how) 7. Change implications (impact of the organizational changes as a result of the project) 8. Challenges and opportunities (Factors that help or hinder such as past situations, rumors, trust, etc.) 9. Sign off
    • Communication Resources The communication methods chosen should be driven by the needs of the project.        Email Text Message Video conferencing and chat services, like Skype Blogs and wikis (WordPress) Calendar sharing (Google Docs) Postal and shipping services Desktop software tools     Microsoft Office or Open Office Suite Visual design and mockup software Project management software (Microsoft Project or OpenProject) Online project management software (Wrike, TeamBox, ManyMoons)
    • Cost and Budget So, how much is this going to cost? Cost of the resources needed to complete project activities Input: Scope statement  Work breakdown structure  Defined activities  Sequenced activities  Resource estimates  Schedule  Risks Output:  Cost baseline 
    • Final Project Report Format Use this format to develop a Final Project Report. 1. Compare project outputs to project objectives 1. Identify what went right or wrong 2. Document weaknesses and strengths 3. Include original project plan 4. Include meeting minutes 5. Include project journals 6. Obtain customer feedback 7. All project documents for archives 8. Accounting documentation 9. Sign off