Social & Emotional NeedsofThe Underachiever
• Welcome• Review Agenda• Norms• Icebreaker
PURPOSE Identify types of GT students with social andemotional characteristics. Address how to nurture social and emotio...
TAGT CORE KNOWLEDGE AREAS ANDTEACHER COMPETENCIES3.1 Identifies individuals (family members, teachers, peers, and others)a...
I-10 Builds a positive and respectful classroom enI-10 Builds a positive and respectful classroomenvironment
“…People are different from each other…noamount of getting after them is going to changethem. Nor is there any reason to c...
Ten Myths in Gifted Education Videohttp://msde.state.md.us/GT/GT_Myths.mov
Ten Myths in Gifted Education Videohttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4wOWEGyO60o
After viewing Top Ten Myths in Gifted EducationVideo, answer the following question:What happens when we do notaddress the...
WHAT IS SOCIAL & EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT(K. Reinsber, 2007)Where a child is able to:• have self-confidence and empathy.• dev...
Social-Emotional Needs of Gifted StudentsDevelopmental stages occur for gifted studentsat a younger age (Webb & Klein, 199...
Causes of Problems• The environmental setting (e.g., family, school,or cultural milieu).• Intellectual and personality att...
Possible Problems Associated withStrengths of Gifted Children
POSSIBLE PROBLEMS THAT MAY BEASSOCIATED WITH GT STUDENTS(CREATED BY JAMES T. WEBB 2000 (KID SOURCE)
POSSIBLE PROBLEMS THAT MAY BE ASSOCIATEDWITH GT STUDENTS(CREATED BY JAMES T. WEBB 2000 (KID SOURCE)SensitiveManipulativeBo...
Types of Gifted StudentsThere are 6 different types gifted individuals:Type I-SuccessfulType II-ChallengingType III-Underg...
Type of GT Student DefinitionTYPE I: SUCCESSFUL THESE CHILDREN ARE USUALLYSUCCESSFUL ACADEMICALLY, ANDIDENTIFIED AS GIFTED...
Type of GT Student DefinitionTYPE IV: DROPOUT THESE STUDENTS ARE ANGRY THESCHOOL DOES NOT RECOGNIZE THEIRABILITIES AND DOE...
Common Characteristics ofThe Gifted Underachiever• Low self-esteem• Negative attitude toward school/learning• Reluctance t...
The UnderachieverGifted underachievers fail in some areas but tend toexhibit two general behavior problems:① aggressive(st...
5 Types of UnderachieversLow grades,high test scoresLow testscores, highgradesLowperformance inall subjectsLowperformance ...
Strategies Teachers Can Use To HelpGifted Underachievers• Accept the fact that students are gifted• Students do not want t...
OVEREXCITABILITIES
OVEREXCITABILITIESOverexcitabilities are:heightened abilities used to receive and respond tostimulifound to a greater de...
OVEREXCITABILITIESPsychomotor excess of energy that may be expressedas a love of movement, rapid speechimpulsiveness & res...
"Overexcitabilities" Used to Predict GiftednessQuestion: What can you do in yourclassroom to accommodate the“overexcitabil...
Strategies for Gifted Learners with overexcitabilities• Allow time for your child to express his or heroverexcitability in...
Strategies for Gifted Learners with overexcitabilities• Teach your child skills to manage his or heroverexcitabilities eff...
20 Tips For Nurturing Gifted ChildrenBY BERTIE KINGORE, 2008QUESTIONS:1. Do you use any of these strategies? Whichones?2. ...
Kristi's s&e revisionsjune24,2013
Kristi's s&e revisionsjune24,2013
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Kristi's s&e revisionsjune24,2013

  1. 1. Social & Emotional NeedsofThe Underachiever
  2. 2. • Welcome• Review Agenda• Norms• Icebreaker
  3. 3. PURPOSE Identify types of GT students with social andemotional characteristics. Address how to nurture social and emotionalproblems of GT students. Provide strategies that will help social and emotionalGT students become successful. Identify individuals and environments that influencethe social and emotional development of giftedstudents.
  4. 4. TAGT CORE KNOWLEDGE AREAS ANDTEACHER COMPETENCIES3.1 Identifies individuals (family members, teachers, peers, and others)and environments (school, home, and community) that influence thesocial and emotional development of gifted and talented students.3.2 Identifies how characteristics of under-represented groups ofgifted and talented students influence their social and emotionaldevelopment.3.3 Uses strategies for nurturing the social and emotional developmentof gifted and talented students at home and in school.3.4 Understands approaches for educating and involving parents, thecommunity, and other professionals in supporting gifted and talentedchildren.
  5. 5. I-10 Builds a positive and respectful classroom enI-10 Builds a positive and respectful classroomenvironment
  6. 6. “…People are different from each other…noamount of getting after them is going to changethem. Nor is there any reason to change them,because their differences are probably good.”-David Keirsey, Ph.D.
  7. 7. Ten Myths in Gifted Education Videohttp://msde.state.md.us/GT/GT_Myths.mov
  8. 8. Ten Myths in Gifted Education Videohttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4wOWEGyO60o
  9. 9. After viewing Top Ten Myths in Gifted EducationVideo, answer the following question:What happens when we do notaddress the needs of giftedstudents?
  10. 10. WHAT IS SOCIAL & EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT(K. Reinsber, 2007)Where a child is able to:• have self-confidence and empathy.• develop social skills with friends or peers.• have a sense of importance and value to thosearound them.• form and sustain positive relationships.• manage and express emotions.• explore and engage with the environment.
  11. 11. Social-Emotional Needs of Gifted StudentsDevelopmental stages occur for gifted studentsat a younger age (Webb & Klein, 1993).Gifted children may face, but not limited to:• Family poverty• Substance abuse• alcoholism
  12. 12. Causes of Problems• The environmental setting (e.g., family, school,or cultural milieu).• Intellectual and personality attributes of giftedchildren can be associated with potentialproblems (Clark, 1992; Seagoe, 1974).
  13. 13. Possible Problems Associated withStrengths of Gifted Children
  14. 14. POSSIBLE PROBLEMS THAT MAY BEASSOCIATED WITH GT STUDENTS(CREATED BY JAMES T. WEBB 2000 (KID SOURCE)
  15. 15. POSSIBLE PROBLEMS THAT MAY BE ASSOCIATEDWITH GT STUDENTS(CREATED BY JAMES T. WEBB 2000 (KID SOURCE)SensitiveManipulativeBoredPerfectionisticDepressedDisruptiveStubbornnessImpatientBossyFrustratedHyperactiveDisorganizedScatteredHumorous (class clown)MisunderstoodStrong-willed
  16. 16. Types of Gifted StudentsThere are 6 different types gifted individuals:Type I-SuccessfulType II-ChallengingType III-UndergroundType IV-DropoutsType V-Double-LabeledType VI-Autonomous
  17. 17. Type of GT Student DefinitionTYPE I: SUCCESSFUL THESE CHILDREN ARE USUALLYSUCCESSFUL ACADEMICALLY, ANDIDENTIFIED AS GIFTED AT SCHOOL.TYPE II: CHALLENGING THESE STUDENTS PROCESS A HIGHDEGREE OF CREATIVITY AND MAYAPPEAR TO BE OBSTINATE, TACTLESS,OR SARCASTIC. THEY QUESTIONAUTHORITY AND CHALLENGES THETEACHER IN FRONT OF THE CLASS.TYPE III: UNDERGROUND THESE STUDENTS HIDE THEIRTALENTS, RESIST CHALLENGES ANDDROP OUT OF GIFTED SCHOOLPROGRAMS BECAUSE OF THEIRSHYNESS.
  18. 18. Type of GT Student DefinitionTYPE IV: DROPOUT THESE STUDENTS ARE ANGRY THESCHOOL DOES NOT RECOGNIZE THEIRABILITIES AND DOES NOT ADDRESSTHEIR ACADEMIC NEEDS.TYPE V: DOUBLE-LABEL THIS GIFTED CHILD IS OVERLOOKEDBECAUSE THEY HAVE PHYSICAL,EMOTIONAL, OR LEARNINGDISABILITY.TYPE VI: AUTONOMOUS LEARNER THESE ARE SELF-CONFIDENTSTUDENTS THAT ARE ACADEMICALLYSUCCESSFUL, MOTIVATED, GOAL-ORIENTED, AND RESPONSIBLE.
  19. 19. Common Characteristics ofThe Gifted Underachiever• Low self-esteem• Negative attitude toward school/learning• Reluctance to take risks or apply one’s self• Discomfort with competition• Lack of perseverance• Lack of goal-directed behavior• Social isolation• Weaknesses in skill areas/organization• Classroom disruption in class and resistanceto class activities
  20. 20. The UnderachieverGifted underachievers fail in some areas but tend toexhibit two general behavior problems:① aggressive(stubbornly refuses to comply with requests, disrupting others,reject drill activities, alienating peers, and lack of self direction indecision making)② withdrawn(lack of communication, working alone, little attempt to justifybehavior, and little classroom participation (Sousa, 2003).
  21. 21. 5 Types of UnderachieversLow grades,high test scoresLow testscores, highgradesLowperformance inall subjectsLowperformance incertain subjectsUnnoticed
  22. 22. Strategies Teachers Can Use To HelpGifted Underachievers• Accept the fact that students are gifted• Students do not want to underachieve or fail• Help students learn coping skills• Students have low self-esteem• Teacher should be skilled in guidance techniques• Have an accurate understanding of the nature ofgiftedness• Possess a positive attitude towards working withthese types of students
  23. 23. OVEREXCITABILITIES
  24. 24. OVEREXCITABILITIESOverexcitabilities are:heightened abilities used to receive and respond tostimulifound to a greater degree in gifted individuals.
  25. 25. OVEREXCITABILITIESPsychomotor excess of energy that may be expressedas a love of movement, rapid speechimpulsiveness & restlessness.Sensual heightened sensory awareness (ex. touch,taste, smell)Imaginational vivid imagery, use of metaphor,visualizations, & inventiveness.Intellectual persistence in asking probing questions,love of knowledge, discovery, theoreticalanalysis and synthesis, independence ofthought.Emotional expressions might include deeprelationships, concern with death, feelingsof compassion & responsibility,depression, need for security, self-evaluation, shyness, & concern for others.
  26. 26. "Overexcitabilities" Used to Predict GiftednessQuestion: What can you do in yourclassroom to accommodate the“overexcitabilities” of a gifted student?
  27. 27. Strategies for Gifted Learners with overexcitabilities• Allow time for your child to express his or heroverexcitability in a safe environment. Forexample, make time for physical activity ordaydreaming.• Educate your child and others involved in yourchilds life on overexcitabilities.• Encourage your child to focus on his or herstrengths and to use his or heroverexcitabilities to an advantage.
  28. 28. Strategies for Gifted Learners with overexcitabilities• Teach your child skills to manage his or heroverexcitabilities effectively like emotionregulation techniques (e.g., deep breathingexercises for dealing with stress or anger.• Emphasize your childs differences as a positiveand not a negative. Help your child to understandthat being different is okay and should becelebrated as such.
  29. 29. 20 Tips For Nurturing Gifted ChildrenBY BERTIE KINGORE, 2008QUESTIONS:1. Do you use any of these strategies? Whichones?2. Which of these strategies will you use in yourclassroom? How would you incorporate theminto into your lesson plan?

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