Giving effective feedback workbook

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This is a How to give effective workbook. I will be working through this guide and giving you tips and examples on how to use it on my free webinar that I will be hosting on Friday, Feb 10th, 1pm to 2pm 2012. I hope you can join me and here is the link to sign up http://keytalent-partners.com/feedback-webinar/

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Giving effective feedback workbook

  1. 1. Feedback WebinarTo Learn How to use this feedback workbook Join me on my Free WebinarFriday, Feb 10th, 1pm to 2pmIt’s a known fact that people who are open to feedback are more successful in their interpersonalrelationships than those who are closed. So if it’s important for you to manage, motivate and buildrelationships easily, find out what feedback really is and how to give it so that it makes a difference.Learn the difference between feedback and praise. What’s ‘feedforward’ and how is that best requested?How do you give constructive/negative feedback to someone about their performance so that they can takeresponsibility and act to make changes?Results you can trustEleanor has worked as a coach for more than 10 years having qualified as an NLP Coach and NLP Trainerin 2001. Since then she has run numerous team events and facilitated meetings helping teams to engagemore fully through being open and honest and building trust and support so that people feel able to give andreceive feedback.Good for You, Good for the Whole TeamThis type of webinar can also be used with whole teams who want to build greater self-awareness, understanding of others and having a common language within the team.Learn how to give feedback so that it’s not taken personally Open up the blind spots that you may have (we all have them) Engage more openly with others The Feedback Webinar is FREE Click Here to Find out More About my Feedback Webinarwww.keytalent-partners.com 01344 774 999 Giving Effective Feedback - Page 2 of 21
  2. 2. Eleanor Yearwood Executive Coach Eleanor is a business consultant specialising in executive coaching and leadership development, Eleanor is committed to working with individuals who want to grow, learn and develop themselves, their people and their business. As a certified NLP Coach and Trainer she works with board members, senior leaders and high potential managers to enable them to achieve measurable long-lasting change. As a member of the International Coaching Federation, Eleanor coaches from a position of compassion, strength and support. Whether coaching on a one to one basis or running a team event, Eleanor‟s clients benefit both professionally and personally from my wide range of skills, knowledge and experience. Coaching and training over the past nine years:  Board Member and Leadership Teams within large blue chip organisations to enable them to achieve long lasting and measurable change. Sectors including Finance, Risk, Marketing, Transaction banking and Public Sector.  Eleanor has also developed and delivered client focused programmes in leadership, team development and behavioural change. Qualifications: Certified Trainer and Coach of Neuro Linguistic Programming and licensed to administer a number of psychometric tools such as Myers Briggs Type Indicator®, FIRO-B® and DISC® Testimonials “Eleanor is a no-nonsense, practical executive coach. She sets tough goals - moving from individual assessment through to the real actions required very smoothly and quickly. Crucially, she helps you to understand potential issues and follows through with suggestions on how to tackle them.” Davy Deegan, C&B Manager at Dell "Eleanors coaching has had a profound effect on me; Ive worked with her for a number of years and throughout that time she has been warm, knowledgeable, patient and insightful. She has never hesitated to challenge assumptions or unhelpful behaviours when she saw them, and frequently made me re-examine my actions or beliefs when they were limiting my growth. While its true that I have walked along the path, it was definitely Eleanor who lit the way." Tony Smith, European Technical Director, Perforce Software Ltdwww.keytalent-partners.com 01344 774 999 Giving Effective Feedback - Page 3 of 21
  3. 3. Table of ContentsEleanor Yearwood .......................................................................................... 3Programme Outcomes ..................................................................................... 5Feedback ..................................................................................................... 6 What is it? ................................................................................................ 6 Why Give Feedback? .................................................................................... 6 When to Give Feedback ................................................................................ 6Giving Effective Feedback ................................................................................ 7 Feedback situations ..................................................................................... 7 Types of Feedback: ..................................................................................... 7Examples of Good Feedback - Exercise ................................................................. 8Poor Feedback - Exercise ................................................................................. 9Common Mistakes When Giving Feedback ............................................................ 10Why do we need Feedback?............................................................................. 11 The Johari Window .................................................................................... 11Tips on giving effective feedback: .................................................................... 12The Process of Giving Effective Feedback ........................................................... 13 Rapport – How to ensure your feedback is heard ................................................ 14Tips .......................................................................................................... 15 Your Delivery Technique ............................................................................. 15Behaviours that Demonstrate Open or Closed to Feedback ....................................... 16Six reasons to Try Feedforward ........................................................................ 17How to Get Feedforward ................................................................................ 18Notes ........................................................................................................ 19www.keytalent-partners.com 01344 774 999 Giving Effective Feedback - Page 4 of 21
  4. 4. Programme OutcomesAfter today you will be able to:  Give effective feedback to your boss, peers, and colleagues without blame or judgement.  Understand why Giving Effective Feedback is your most important management tool and skill.  Be prepared to receive feedback that you can use for your own growth and personal development. Want – Need - Expect ... and what we agree to do if / when we don’t get our needs metwww.keytalent-partners.com 01344 774 999 Giving Effective Feedback - Page 5 of 21
  5. 5. FeedbackWhat is it?Feedback is the process of giving data to someone about the impact that they makethrough their actions, attitude and words. In other words – it‟s information from theirperspective. The worst feedback is personal and judgemental The most effective feedback is subjective and descriptiveUsed effectively, feedback is a powerful ongoing development tool. The greatest impactcan be gained from creating self-generated feedback from your questions, as thisencourages people to self-correct over time. Once someone is self-correcting, they canreally grow and improve.Why Give Feedback?  It‟s your most powerful tool to accelerate learning  Without it, it‟s one of the top two reasons excellent performers leave their jobs  It is a highly respectful way to help others succeed  It helps to retain top performersWhen to Give Feedback  Frequently  On time  As an opportunity for development  To solve a performance problem Giving effective feedback requires the same attention to detail that you employ when solving a business or technical problemwww.keytalent-partners.com 01344 774 999 Giving Effective Feedback - Page 6 of 21
  6. 6. Giving Effective FeedbackIt should therefore be an exciting path to learning and growth. Unfortunately, manypeople dread any kind of feedback. We are accustomed to being „competent‟ adultsand want to do it right the first time. We can be hard on ourselves and take feedbackas a reflection of our personality faults.Feedback situations 1. In the corridor (causal situation) passing a comment 2. In a team meeting where your views are sought 3. Bi-lateral - weekly / fortnightly meetings 4. Appraisal reviews - monthly /quarterly/ annual 5. Structured coaching sessions 6. Constructive /negative feedback discussion 7. Disciplinary meetingsTypes of Feedback: 1. Feedback sandwich 2. Stop – Start – Continue 3. Constructive / negative feedback model 4. Feedforward 5. 4 Step Praise Modelwww.keytalent-partners.com 01344 774 999 Giving Effective Feedback - Page 7 of 21
  7. 7. Examples of Good Feedback - Exercisewww.keytalent-partners.com 01344 774 999 Giving Effective Feedback - Page 8 of 21
  8. 8. Poor Feedback - ExerciseMost of us will have received less-than-helpful/discouraging feedback at one time oranother. Below are some poor feedback habits that you should consciously avoid.  Making suggestions without asking  Trying to improve too many aspects of performance  Telling  Sweeping generalisations  Comparing performance with others  Not giving regular feedback  Telling people what their performance is  Asking them why their performance is at its current level (people get defensive)  Delving too deep – you are not asking questions for their own sake but to help the other person improve their performance.www.keytalent-partners.com 01344 774 999 Giving Effective Feedback - Page 9 of 21
  9. 9. Common Mistakes When Giving Feedback  The feedback judges the individual, not the behaviour (eg You are very abrasive in meetings)  The feedback is too vague (eg You are a good leader)  The feedback is second hand – heard from someone else (eg John said you are confused about the project and your role.)  The feedback is exaggerated with generalities (eg You always show up late for meetings)  The feedback analyses motives (eg You were inconsiderate by being late for our meeting)  The feedback goes on too long (eg blah, blah, blah...)  The feedback implies a threat (eg Do you want to succeed in this organisation or not?)  The feedback is a question, not a statement (eg Do you think you could listen next time I give instructions)  Bringing your own experiences (eg I used to have the same problem)  Cushioning the feedback (eg You‟re not going to like this)  Delaying the feedback (eg Four years ago when we attended the trade show in Las Vegas...)  Giving advice with your feedback (eg Let me tell you what you need to do to have a successful team meeting)www.keytalent-partners.com 01344 774 999 Giving Effective Feedback - Page 10 of 21
  10. 10. Why do we need Feedback?Based on self-disclosure and feedback, the Johari Window is a communication tool thatcan be used to improve understanding among individuals in working groups or teams.Developed by Joseph Luft and Harry Ingram (the word “Johari” comes from Joseph Luftand Harry Ingram), there are two key ideas behind the tool: 1. Individuals can build trust with others by disclosing information about themselves 2. Individuals can learn about themselves with the help of feedback from others.The Johari WindowQuadrant 1: Open AreaWhat is known by the person about him/herself and is also known by others. The Open Area is the“space” where good communications and co-operations occur, free from confusion, conflict andmisunderstandingQuadrant 2: Blind Area or “Blind Spot”What is unknown by the person about him/herself but which others know. This can be simpleinformation, or can involve deeper issues that are difficult for individuals to face directly, and yet can beseen by others.Quadrant 3: Hidden or Avoided AreaWhat the person know about him/herself that others do not.Quadrant 4: Unknown AreaWhat is unknown by the person about him/herself and is also unknown by others.www.keytalent-partners.com 01344 774 999 Giving Effective Feedback - Page 11 of 21
  11. 11. Tips on giving effective feedback:  Ask permission to give feedback.  Use your observations, and be specific and objective.  Avoid emotive language.Rather than offering your own observations, you could ask the other person for theirs. Inother words, encourage them to generate their own feedback.Ask the other person:  What worked?  What didn‟t work?  What might they have done differently that they could use next time?This self-generated feedback is likely to lead to self-learning and development.www.keytalent-partners.com 01344 774 999 Giving Effective Feedback - Page 12 of 21
  12. 12. The Process of Giving Effective Feedback Situation – Behaviour – Impact (SBI) Simple - Direct - Effective 1. Capture the Situation: Where or when did the behaviour occur? Yesterday morning while we were inspecting the building... Last week, during our regular staff meeting... Today when you and I were talking in your office... Last weekend at the staff party... 2. Describe the Behaviour: What were the specific actions that were observed? What can you see What can you hear What the person did or did not do Words and non-verbal behaviours 3. Deliver the Impact: What were the consequences of the behaviour? Make a statement about the person’s behaviour: “When you turned in the report two days early, I felt as though you understood the pressures I am under right now.” “When you ended the conversation after only 5 minutes I wondered if you were interested in my opinion.” OR acknowledge the emotional affect the behaviour had on you: “When you asked my opinion this morning I felt included and like a full member of the team.” “When you told me my concerns were overblown, I felt belittled.”www.keytalent-partners.com 01344 774 999 Giving Effective Feedback - Page 13 of 21
  13. 13. How to Build the Feedback Relationship  Strike a balance between positive feedback (specific comments on a job well done) and feedback about problematic behaviour that needs to be addressed. Ideally feedback is 4:1, positive to negative.  Leverage strength. Give people credit for everything they do right.Rapport – How to ensure your feedback is heardwww.keytalent-partners.com 01344 774 999 Giving Effective Feedback - Page 14 of 21
  14. 14. TipsYour Delivery Technique  Remember your only reason for giving feedback is to help another person succeed  Find a private setting and give your undivided attention  Soften the opening. (eg “Mary, may I share an observation with you?”)  Acknowledge the uneasiness or discomfort you might feel. “I am aware that I am uncomfortable”  Be prepared to offer suggestions and support for changing behaviour in case of a performance problem.  Recognise that people process information differently.  Your choice of words might be the least important part of the feedback  After you‟ve given the feedback, reflect on how it went and if it did not go as planned, decide what you will do differently next time.  Recognise that you do not have to be “comfortable” to give feedback; it‟s your job.www.keytalent-partners.com 01344 774 999 Giving Effective Feedback - Page 15 of 21
  15. 15. Behaviours that Demonstrate Open or Closed toFeedback Open Closed Look interested; demonstrate an Show polite interest, while inwardly+1 -1 open posture preparing your rebuttal Summarize key points without Explain how the person+2 -2 interjecting your ideas misperceived the situation Express your appreciation for the Justify and excuse the situation by+3 message regardless of the tone of -3 providing a “logical” reason delivery Express genuine curiosity about ways Interpret what the person says and+4 -4 to resolve the issue an undeserved attack Openly wonder about your role in+5 -5 Interrupt to give your perspective creating the issue Request information and examples in Make snippy replies and non-verbally+6 an effort to understand (not to -6 show your irritation defend what you did) Take full responsibility for the results+7 -7 Blame someone or something else that were created Think out loud, making new+8 -8 Intimidate or attack the messenger associations about the issue Show genuine enthusiasm about Complain about the decision and+9 -9 making a change criticise people not present Implement (plan action, request Comply with no real commitment to+10 -10 support and follow-up) do what you say you‟ll doTaken from ‘Radical Change Radical Results’ written by Kate Ludeman and Eddie Erlandsonwww.keytalent-partners.com 01344 774 999 Giving Effective Feedback - Page 16 of 21
  16. 16. Six reasons to Try FeedforwardBy Marshall Goldsmith 1. We can change the future. We can’t change the past. Feedforward helps people envision and focus on a positive future, not a failed past. By giving people ideas on how they can be even more successful we can increase their chance of achieving this success in the future. 2. It can be more productive to help people be “right” than prove they were “wrong” Even constructively delivered feedback is often seen as a negative as it necessarily involves a discussion of mistakes, shortfalls and problems. Feedforward on the other hand, is almost always seen as a positive because it focuses on solutions – not problems. 3. Feedforward is especially suited to successful people Successful people like getting ideas that are aimed at helping them achieve their goals. We all tend to accept feedback that is consistent with the way we see ourselves. 4. Feedforward can come from anyone who knows about the task. It does not require personal experience with the individual One very common positive reaction to feedforward is that participants are amazed by how much they can learn. For example, if you want to be a better listener almost any fellow leader can give you ideas on how you can improve. Feedforward just requires having good ideas for achieving the task. 5. People do not take feedforward as personally as feedback If not delivered well, feedback can be taken personally. Successful people‟s sense of identity is highly connected with their work. Feedforward cannot involve a personal critique, since it is discussing something that has not yet happened. 6. Feedforward can cover almost all of the same “material” as feedback. Imagine you have just made a terrible presentation in front of the executive committee. Your manager is in the room. Rather than make you “relive” this experience, your manager might help you prepare for future presentations by giving you suggestions for the future. These suggestions can be very specific and still delivered in a positive helpful way.www.keytalent-partners.com 01344 774 999 Giving Effective Feedback - Page 17 of 21
  17. 17. How to Get FeedforwardFeedback is important for growth and development. However it focuses on what hasalready occurred in the past not on the vast possibilities of the future. Feed-forwardgives suggestions for the future in a helpful and supportive manner – focusing on makinga positive difference going forwardWho to ask for it  A person whose opinion you respect  Someone with credibility and integrity  Someone with a different work style  Someone you trust  Someone with whom you must interact in order for you both to be successful  Someone who has had the opportunity to observe you in actionWhen to ask for it After you‟ve identified a development goal (through reflection, a 360 survey and another assessmentHow to ask for it  Start with one goal. Be specific about the goal.  State your goal and ask another person for his or her observationsWhat to do with it  Be curious!  Consider accuracy (eg On what is the information based?)  Consider importance (Is it helpful? Relevant? Do you want to know more?)  Decide what you will do with it. (anything? Not all information should be acted upon. Even if you don‟t like it, some feedback cannot be ignored)  Do not make excuses or try to explain. Simply listen  Thank the person for his or her contribution.www.keytalent-partners.com 01344 774 999 Giving Effective Feedback - Page 18 of 21
  18. 18. Noteswww.keytalent-partners.com 01344 774 999 Giving Effective Feedback - Page 19 of 21
  19. 19. Noteswww.keytalent-partners.com 01344 774 999 Giving Effective Feedback - Page 20 of 21
  20. 20. Noteswww.keytalent-partners.com 01344 774 999 Giving Effective Feedback - Page 21 of 21

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