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First meeting First meeting Presentation Transcript

  • REFERENCES
    • Leech, Geoffrey N. 2005. A Linguistic Guide to English Poetry. London: Longman
    • Alexander, L.G. 1973. Poetry and Prose Appreciation for Overseas Students. London: Longman
    • Kennedy, X.J. 1971. An Introduction to Poetry. Boston: Little, Brown & Co.
    • Perrine, Lawrence. 1969. Sound and Sense. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World Inc.
    • Chatman, Seymour. 1968. An Introduction to the Language of Poetry. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company.
    • Steinmann, Martin et al. 1967. Literature for Writing. Belmont: Wadsworth Publishing Company, Inc.
    • Volpe, N. 1967. Poetry: An Introduction. New York: Random House
    • Maline, Julian et al (editors). 1967. Studies in Poetry. New York: The L.W. Singer Company, Inc.
    • Summers, Hollis and Edgar Whan. 1960. Literature: An Introduction. New York: McGraw Hill Book Co., Inc.
    • Reaske, Christopher Russel. Nd. Hoe to Analyze Poetry. London: Monarch Press
  • POETRY I (SSE220) DISCUSSING ENGLISH POEMS FROM VICTORIAN PERIOD TO TWENTIETH CENTURY, AND AMERICAN ONES FROM NINETEENTH TO TWENTIETH CENTURY THROUGH ELEMENTS AND VALUES COVERING CONTENTS AND PROSODY
  • LECTURE CONTRACT
    • Rules of attending the subject:
    • 13 meetings
    • students should attend 75% = 3 times absence
    • ● Percentage of scoring:
    • midterm test 30%
    • final test 40%
    • assignments 30%
    • Tolerable lateness: 10 minutes
  • LECTURE CONTRACT
    • Assignments weekly
    • in groups
    • individual
    • Quiz: once in each mid-semester
    • Presentation: twice in each mid-semester
  • REFERENCES
    • Alexander, L.G. 1973. Poetry and Prose Appreciation for Overseas Students. London: Longman.
    • Perrine, Lawrence. 2000. Structure, Sound and Sense. New York: Harcourt, Brace & World Inc.
    • Kennedy, X.J. and Dana Gioia.1994. An Introduction to Poetry. New York: Harper Collins College.
    • Volpe, N. 1967. Poetry: An Introduction. New York: Random House.
    • Reaske, Christopher R. Nd. How to Analyze Poetry. London: Monarch Press.
    • Chatman, Seymour. 1968. An Introduction to the Language of Poetry.
    • Boulton, Marjorie. 1970. The Anatomy of Poetry. London: Routledge and Keagan Paul Ltd.
    • Summers, Hollis and Edgar Whan. 1960. Literature: An Introduction. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc.
    • Maline, Julian L. and James Berkley. 1967. Studies in Poetry. New York: The L.W. Singer Company Inc.
    • Leech, Geoffrey N. 2004. A Linguistic Guide to English Poetry . London: Longman.
    • Gill, Richard. 1995. Mastering English Literature . London: Macmillan.
  • WHAT IS POETRY
    • Says more and says it more intensely than does ordinary language
    • Language is to communicate information
    • Language is an instrument of persuasion
    • Brings us a sense of life
    • Brings us a perception of life
    • Widens and sharpens our contact with existence
    • Concerns with experience
    • VERSE
    • BLANK VERSE FREE VERSE
    • . iambic pentameter . no syllabic stress pattern
    • . unrhymed/blank . irregular line length
    • . lack of rhyme
  • THE EAGLE Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1809 – 1892)
    • He clasps the crag with crooked hands;
    • Close to the sun in lonely lands,
    • Ringed with the azure world, he stands.
    • The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls;
    • He watches from his mountain walls,
    • And like a thunderbolt he falls.
  • LOVELIEST OF TREES, THE CHERRY NOW A.E. Housman (1859 – 1936)
    • Loveliest of trees, the cherry now
    • Is hung with bloom along the bough,
    • And stands about the woodland ride
    • Wearing white for Eastertide.
    • Now, of my threescore years and ten,
    • Twenty will not come again,
    • And take from seventy springs a score,
    • If only leaves me fifty more.
    • And since to look at things in bloom
    • Fifty springs are little room,
    • About the woodlands I will go
    • To see the cherry hung with snow.
    • (1896)