Olgivy branding quote From Premium Pricing to Brand Ecology:   The Growing Influence of PR On Branding Kevin Read Managing...
Defining a Brand  <ul><li>“ A brand is the proprietary visual, emotional, rational and cultural image that you associate w...
Spot the Difference?
Special not Cheap <ul><li>“ The primary focus of your brand message must be on how special you are, not how cheap you are....
Three Dimensional Branding  <ul><li>Marketers used to succeed by providing the best car, perfume etc, at a given, premium ...
Antes Strong features but supplied by all competitors Drivers Important features and strongly differentiated Neutrals Irre...
Preference & Premium  <ul><li>“Our research shows strong brands drive higher product preference and command a price premiu...
Emphasising the Premium  <ul><li>“ Turn your clients into premium brands, make them a first class ticket.” </li></ul><ul><...
Premium Caution  <ul><li>“ Your premium brand had better be delivering something special, or it's not going to get the bus...
PR and the Premium Brand  <ul><li>For many years … </li></ul><ul><ul><li>An ad man’s afterthought  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul>...
Recognising the Power of PR  <ul><li>“ It has been found that the less an advertisement looks like an advertisement, and t...
The Challenger Psyche  <ul><li>“Being a challenger brand is all about being nimble and quick and taking risks.  </li></ul>...
PR and the Challenger  <ul><li>PR practitioners can work more nimbly with challengers because they can:   </li></ul><ul><u...
The Sensory Dimensions  “ A brand that captures your mind gains behaviour.  A brand that captures your heart gains commitm...
<ul><li>“ Vision is our best developed sense:  </li></ul><ul><li>about half of the cortex (convoluted grey </li></ul><ul><...
Applying the Physiology <ul><li>“ On average, five times as many people read the headline as read the body copy.” </li></u...
Physiological Expressive Behavioural Cognitive Experiential Psychological Components of Emotion
Emotional Branding Source: Mark Gob é Relationship  Service  Dialogue  Communication  Presence Ubiquity Feel  Function  Pe...
PR: Corporate Pathos  <ul><li>‘ Corporate pathos’ - the act of identifying, managing, delivering and assessing emotional a...
Corporate Pathos Checklist  Part One: E vs R Assessment % Rational arguments % Emotional arguments Part Two: Road Map Dyna...
Sticky Messages  <ul><li>Simplicity </li></ul><ul><li>Unexpectedness </li></ul><ul><li>Concreteness </li></ul><ul><li>Cred...
Social Media and PR 2.0  <ul><li>“ Social media is anything that uses the Internet to facilitate conversations between peo...
Publish-Then-Filter  <ul><li>“ It used to be hard to move words, images and sounds from creator to consumer, and most medi...
Brand Rankings: New and Traditional Impact  Source: Immediate Future, June 08
Drive to Integration  <ul><li>“ Long-term brand equity and growth depends on our ability to successfully integrate and imp...
Multiple Touch Points
Brand Ecology  <ul><li>“ A key focus in developing strategies to connect with the consumer is on understanding the brand e...
Apple’s iPod <ul><li>Apple avoided positioning it as another MP3 player </li></ul><ul><li>Instead it was framed as part of...
Wider Alignment: Nike+  <ul><li>The Nike+ ecology consists of several physical products: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>a bioteleme...
Nike+ iPod Brand Ecology New  technology Leading brand  adaptation New  usage Unrivalled  data   Global community  of runn...
PR Tips  <ul><li>2.0 is here to stay - so use it to research, monitor, engage and evaluate  </li></ul><ul><li>Deliver info...
Summary <ul><li>The desire for premium brands, and the use of PR to support them remains  </li></ul><ul><li>Challenger bra...
<ul><li>Kevin, a former political speech writer and management lecturer, is managing director of Bell Pottinger Business &...
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The growing influence of PR on branding: From premium pricing to brand ecologies

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A guide to how PR has becoming increasingly influential on shaping brands

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The growing influence of PR on branding: From premium pricing to brand ecologies

  1. 1. Olgivy branding quote From Premium Pricing to Brand Ecology: The Growing Influence of PR On Branding Kevin Read Managing Director, Bell Pottinger Business & Brand 30 October, 2008
  2. 2. Defining a Brand <ul><li>“ A brand is the proprietary visual, emotional, rational and cultural image that you associate with a company or product.” </li></ul><ul><li>Charles R. Pettis III, Brand Solutions </li></ul>
  3. 3. Spot the Difference?
  4. 4. Special not Cheap <ul><li>“ The primary focus of your brand message must be on how special you are, not how cheap you are.” </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Kerry Light, Brand Strategist </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Three Dimensional Branding <ul><li>Marketers used to succeed by providing the best car, perfume etc, at a given, premium price </li></ul><ul><li>No longer the case as many functional benefits are very easy to imitate </li></ul><ul><li>Therefore marketers must now also emphasise: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>process benefits (making transactions easier, quicker, cheaper, more pleasant) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>relationship benefits (rewarding the willingness of consumers to reveal their purchasing behaviour). </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Function. Process. Relationship </li></ul>
  6. 6. Antes Strong features but supplied by all competitors Drivers Important features and strongly differentiated Neutrals Irrelevant features to the consumer Fools gold Strong features but they do not promote brand loyalty Differentiation Low High High Relevance Identifying the Brand Drivers Source: Aufreiter, Elzinga, Gordon
  7. 7. Preference & Premium <ul><li>“Our research shows strong brands drive higher product preference and command a price premium.” </li></ul><ul><li>Shelly Lazarus, Ogilvy & Mather </li></ul>
  8. 8. Emphasising the Premium <ul><li>“ Turn your clients into premium brands, make them a first class ticket.” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>David Ogilvy </li></ul></ul>
  9. 9. Premium Caution <ul><li>“ Your premium brand had better be delivering something special, or it's not going to get the business.” </li></ul><ul><li>Warren Buffett </li></ul>
  10. 10. PR and the Premium Brand <ul><li>For many years … </li></ul><ul><ul><li>An ad man’s afterthought </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Focused on finding ways to get an extra burst of coverage </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Often seen as a low cost extra boost of awareness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Required to reinforce values and positioning rather than contribute to shaping or creating a brand </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Recognising the Power of PR <ul><li>“ It has been found that the less an advertisement looks like an advertisement, and the more it looks like an editorial, the more readers stop, look and read.” </li></ul><ul><li>David Ogilvy </li></ul>
  12. 12. The Challenger Psyche <ul><li>“Being a challenger brand is all about being nimble and quick and taking risks. </li></ul><ul><li>“It's more fun being the little guy stealing customers from BT than the other way round.” </li></ul>Charles Dunstone, founder Carphone Warehouse
  13. 13. PR and the Challenger <ul><li>PR practitioners can work more nimbly with challengers because they can: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Be more spontaneous </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Constantly seek coverage opportunities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Carefully manage a variety of messages </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Piggy-back existing media trends </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Get into greater depth on issues to help educate and shift attitudes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Work easily with other media </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Benefit enormously from third party endorsement </li></ul></ul><ul><li>And avoid being constrained by the advertising creative and the media plan </li></ul>
  14. 14. The Sensory Dimensions “ A brand that captures your mind gains behaviour. A brand that captures your heart gains commitment.” Scott Talgo, Brand Strategist
  15. 15. <ul><li>“ Vision is our best developed sense: </li></ul><ul><li>about half of the cortex (convoluted grey </li></ul><ul><li>matter in the brain) is related to vision.” </li></ul><ul><li>Butler and McManus </li></ul>Power of the Visual
  16. 16. Applying the Physiology <ul><li>“ On average, five times as many people read the headline as read the body copy.” </li></ul><ul><li>David Ogilvy </li></ul>
  17. 17. Physiological Expressive Behavioural Cognitive Experiential Psychological Components of Emotion
  18. 18. Emotional Branding Source: Mark Gob é Relationship Service Dialogue Communication Presence Ubiquity Feel Function Personality Identity Aspiration Notoriety Preference Quality Trust Honesty Experience Product People Consumers Emotional Branding Brand awareness New concept Old idea
  19. 19. PR: Corporate Pathos <ul><li>‘ Corporate pathos’ - the act of identifying, managing, delivering and assessing emotional appeals, which form part of an organisation’s corporate communications </li></ul><ul><li>It involves being able to identify how both verbal and non-verbal communication can be used to create a mood or reaction without necessarily any specific rational argument being made </li></ul>
  20. 20. Corporate Pathos Checklist Part One: E vs R Assessment % Rational arguments % Emotional arguments Part Two: Road Map Dynamics To be encouraged Friendly Open Attentive Lasting impression To be discouraged Disregarding Over-dramatic Contentious Part Three: Tone and Language Type of appeal Positive Psychological Negative (usually avoided) Device Repetition Self-reflection Amplification External plea Part Four: Sequencing Emotional then rational Rational then emotional (to avoid) Part Five: Connective Approaches Visual Auditory Audio-digital Kinaesthetic Source: Kevin Read
  21. 21. Sticky Messages <ul><li>Simplicity </li></ul><ul><li>Unexpectedness </li></ul><ul><li>Concreteness </li></ul><ul><li>Credibility </li></ul><ul><li>Emotions </li></ul><ul><li>Stories </li></ul>Source: Chip Heath, Stanford University
  22. 22. Social Media and PR 2.0 <ul><li>“ Social media is anything that uses the Internet to facilitate conversations between people. It’s about listening, and in turn, engaging people on their level. </li></ul><ul><li>“ It forces PR to stop broadcasting and start connecting.” </li></ul><ul><li>Deidre Breakenridge </li></ul>
  23. 23. Publish-Then-Filter <ul><li>“ It used to be hard to move words, images and sounds from creator to consumer, and most media business involved expensive and complex management of that pipeline. </li></ul><ul><li>“ The same idea published in dozens or hundreds of places can have an amplifying effect that outweighs the verdict from the smaller number of professional outlets. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Yet, mass amateurisation has created a filtering problem vastly larger than we had with traditional media. </li></ul><ul><li>Filter-then-publish, whatever its advantages, rested on a scarcity of media that is a thing of the past. The expansion of social media means that the only working system is publish-then-filter.” </li></ul><ul><li>Clay Shirky </li></ul>
  24. 24. Brand Rankings: New and Traditional Impact Source: Immediate Future, June 08
  25. 25. Drive to Integration <ul><li>“ Long-term brand equity and growth depends on our ability to successfully integrate and implement all elements of a comprehensive marketing program.” </li></ul><ul><li>Timm F Crull, Chairman & CEO of Nestle </li></ul>
  26. 26. Multiple Touch Points
  27. 27. Brand Ecology <ul><li>“ A key focus in developing strategies to connect with the consumer is on understanding the brand ecology </li></ul><ul><li>... consider not just the attitudinal, emotional and behavioural aspects of brand consumption </li></ul><ul><li>(and) explore how this brand-related behaviour integrates with wide social and cultural experience in the life-world of the active consumer…” </li></ul><ul><li>Richard Elliott, Larry Percy </li></ul>
  28. 28. Apple’s iPod <ul><li>Apple avoided positioning it as another MP3 player </li></ul><ul><li>Instead it was framed as part of a larger and much more ambitious experience that began when you opened the box </li></ul><ul><li>The purchase of an iPod was the gateway to a new world, that was uniqely integrated across multiple channels, providing desirable content and allowing for diverse and on-going interactions </li></ul><ul><li>Apple understood that a product is no longer an isolated entity, but a way of gaining access to content, which might ultimately live elsewhere. </li></ul>
  29. 29. Wider Alignment: Nike+ <ul><li>The Nike+ ecology consists of several physical products: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>a biotelemetric transponder </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>a range of Nike sneakers compatible with it </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>an iPod nano </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>an online environment where the results of one’s uploaded runs are subjected to a variety of mappings, visualisations and analyses. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The desktop iTunes application mediates the flow of data between device and website. </li></ul>
  30. 30. Nike+ iPod Brand Ecology New technology Leading brand adaptation New usage Unrivalled data Global community of runners A new, unique, rewarding double-brand experience that has on-going, demonstrable, individual, social and health rewards: a truly three-dimensional brand ecology
  31. 31. PR Tips <ul><li>2.0 is here to stay - so use it to research, monitor, engage and evaluate </li></ul><ul><li>Deliver information in a way that can be gathered, organised and shared in on-line communities </li></ul><ul><li>Establish and provide for ‘2.0 savvy’ journalists relevant material in new media formats and with easy access </li></ul><ul><li>But don’t neglect the old hacks </li></ul><ul><li>Think RSS, webcast, podcast, wikis </li></ul><ul><li>Remember websites are gateways that must be easily found, accessible, engaging and interactive </li></ul><ul><li>View 2.0 as an opportunity to interact and build relationships with journalists, bloggers and customers </li></ul><ul><li>Seek out the views of influencers and protagonists as early as possible </li></ul><ul><li>Look for relevant partnerships that create multi-brand ecologies </li></ul>
  32. 32. Summary <ul><li>The desire for premium brands, and the use of PR to support them remains </li></ul><ul><li>Challenger brands have used PR to great effect to upset and misbalance leading brands </li></ul><ul><li>Sensory appeals and connecting with the consumers’ emotions is critical and can be greatly aided by PR wordsmiths who now focus on ‘sticky’ messages and establishing ‘corporate pathos’ </li></ul><ul><li>Top ‘traditional’ brands are now in a scramble to understand and make use of social media with many focused on integrated (multi-touchstone) approaches that give a stronger, more central role to PR </li></ul><ul><li>Whereas the ‘social media brand pioneers’ recognise the need to yield control over one-way conversations in favour of generating new, dynamic brand ecologies </li></ul><ul><li>The challenge for PR practitioners is to understand how to help create, promote and sustain these new, emergent ecologies </li></ul>
  33. 33. <ul><li>Kevin, a former political speech writer and management lecturer, is managing director of Bell Pottinger Business & Brand </li></ul><ul><li>His main focus is on resolving complex communications problems, shaping fresh, modern strategies and implementing integrated solutions that are typically spearheaded by PR </li></ul><ul><li>Recent work includes: advising Madrid on their 2016 summer Olympic bid, shaping global communications strategies for HSBC Insurance and working with the Nuclear Association to make the case for new nuclear build </li></ul><ul><li>He is a member of the CIPR and the Chartered Institute of Marketing, and a fellow of the Royal Society of Arts </li></ul>Kevin Read Kevin Read Managing Director Email: [email_address]

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