Profiting From Green   How To Make Your Business More Energy Efficient   Sitka Presentation   Abbreviated Version
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Profiting From Green How To Make Your Business More Energy Efficient Sitka Presentation Abbreviated Version

on

  • 348 views

Recent presentation to a combined Chamber of Commerce group

Recent presentation to a combined Chamber of Commerce group

Statistics

Views

Total Views
348
Views on SlideShare
328
Embed Views
20

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0

2 Embeds 20

https://www.linkedin.com 18
http://www.linkedin.com 2

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Profiting From Green How To Make Your Business More Energy Efficient Sitka Presentation Abbreviated Version Presentation Transcript

  • 1. “Profiting From Green: How to make your business more energy efficient” February 22nd, 2012 Kevin I. Baker©Sitka Enterprises Inc, 2012
  • 2. Electricity is ~40% of EnergyU.S. Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector, 2007 (Quadrillion 1015 Btu)Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Review 2007©Sitka Enterprises Inc, 2012
  • 3. Making Electricity is Very Inefficient!©Sitka Enterprises Inc, 2012
  • 4. More site electricity is consumed for lighting than for any other end use. ~40 % of electrical use Energy Information Administration, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey©Sitka Enterprises Inc, 2012
  • 5. Typical Building $$$ Opportunities • Lighting upgrades – Upgraded Retrofit or New Technology – New Controls • Building management – Daylight harvesting – HVAC integration • Motor replacements • Utility systems – Compressed air • Power factor improvements©Sitka Enterprises Inc, 2012
  • 6. Types of Lighting • Standard fluorescent – Mixture of low pressure mercury vapor and inert gas (such as argon) in tube. Phosphor powder coating on tube fluoresces excited by UV emitted by mercury vapor when current applied. Current controlled by a ballast. • Compact fluorescent – Same technology as above • Incandescent – Nitrogen and or argon filled, ~5-10% of power converted to light • High intensity discharge (HID) – Mercury vapor, metal halide, and high pressure sodium lamps • Halogen – Halogen gas-filled (iodine or bromine) quartz capsule operated at high temperature • Light Emitting Diode (LED) – Semiconductor diode that emits light when electrical current passes through it, solid state device.©Sitka Enterprises Inc, 2012
  • 7. Lighting Technology Revolution 2008 2006 2005 High Power 2002 LED Question: White LED When are Incandescent 2001 T5 Fluorescents light bulbs phased out? 1981 LED efficiency>incandescent 1974 CFL efficiency>incandescent Energy savingT8 Fluorescents T8 Fluorescents 1962 First CFL first introduced in US 1959 Energy saving fluorescent 1938 Practical LED’s 1934 First quartz halogen lamp1879 First Fluorescent Lamp First HID Mercury Lamp 1) GE Lighting 2) Revolution in Lamps, Raymond Kane, Heinz Sell, NetLibrary, IncFirst Incandescent lamp 3) Wikepedia ©Sitka Enterprises Inc, 2012
  • 8. Nearly All Floorspace in Commercial Buildings is Illuminated and Fluorescent Lighting Dominates Energy Information Administration, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey©Sitka Enterprises Inc, 2012
  • 9. Process to Economically Retrofit Older Buildings • Identify facilities with older lighting installations – T12 or T8 fluorescent and halogen or incandescent spot based • Carefully audit the facility – Listen to occupant and review lighting and lighting control design – Measure light levels vs. recommended and statutory requirements – Collect operational cost and building use information – Identify opportunity! • Model and develop an improved overall lighting strategy – GOAL: Deliver the highest quality people environment while optimizing operational costs • Propose a new lighting solution, conducting a trial if appropriate – Identify key benefits and ROI • Help Customers secure federal, state and other rebate funding to make improvements even more affordable. • Manage effective turnkey installation and commissioning. • Verify Savings and Benefits – Sometimes needed to secure rebates • Manage recycle of old lamps.©Sitka Enterprises Inc, 2012
  • 10. Core Lighting Retrofit Strategies • Replace T12 with T8 or even better go to T5 – ~50% of the power consumption for same lumen output – Longer useful light output (lumen maintenance) – Reduced phosphor, mercury (< 3 mg) and recycle content • Replace T8 with T5 – ~13-17% energy saving with same lumen output – Reduced phosphor, mercury (< 3 mg) and recycle content – Small lamp uses fewer resources and energy in manufacture • Retrofit MIH with HO T5 (typical 465 W MIH fixtures retrofit with 234W HO T5) – ~50% energy savings with similar lumen output – Long lamp life (20,000 hours) minimizes maintenance cost – Reduced warm-up time • Retrofit Incandescent, Halogen and CFL Spot with LED and dimmable LED – ~50-80% energy savings – Light Quality – Reduced halogen and other gas, heavy metal and recycle content • Deploy occupancy sensors in low traffic areas – Warehouses, Storage • Consider “Daylight Harvesting” techniques in suitable buildings – Shade control, intelligent dimmers©Sitka Enterprises Inc, 2012
  • 11. Typical Warehouse and Processing Area Retrofit Fixture Key Benefits Fixture Features©Sitka Enterprises Inc, 2012
  • 12. High Bay Lighting Retrofit Example 400 watt 4 Lamp Fixture Metal Halide T-5 High Bay Electric Cost per kWh $0.10 $0.10 Hours per year 3600 3600 # of Fixtures 100 100 Watts per Fixture 460 220 kW 46 22 Annual kWh 165,000 79,000 Annual Electric Power Cost $16,500 $7,900 => Pays back in ~ <2-years with rebates©Sitka Enterprises Inc, 2012
  • 13. Unique Solution for T12/8 Retrofit to T5 Fixture Features Key Benefits • Refit existing fixtures with minimal disruption • Reduced energy up to 50% • Improved environment – No high frequency flicker • Quality light – Enhanced color rendition – Minimal lumen loss • Low future maintenance cost – Lamp’s lifetime 20,000 hrs – Low installation cost • Short payback period©Sitka Enterprises Inc, 2012
  • 14. Office Lighting Retrofit Example T12 x 4 lamp T5 x 2 lamp Fixture Electromagnetic Ballast Electronic Ballast Electric Cost per kWh $0.08 $0.08 Hours per year 3600 3600 # of Fixtures 100 100 Watts per Fixture 144 56 kW 14.4 5.6 Annual kWh 51,840 20,060 Annual Electric Power Cost $4,147 $1,612 => Pays back in ~ <2-years with rebates©Sitka Enterprises Inc, 2012
  • 15. Pharmaceutical Packaging Example • Reduced total power consumption: – From 595 MWh/yr to and estimated 132 MWh/yr, saving approximately $32,000/yr in operating costs from lighting and a further $4,000/yr from HVAC. – Reduce facility Carbon footprint by ~300 tons CO2 equivalent/year • Reduced maintenance expenditures (not estimated) due to: – Longer lamp life – Simpler stocking for entire facility – Lower skill labor for tube replacement • Comparable to today lighting levels in all key areas with lighting output sustained at a higher output for the life of the bulb when compared to existing MH units • Occupancy sensors for maximum efficiency (selected areas) • Improved employee satisfaction due to enhanced workplace light levels • Proposed implementation plan for minimal disruption of operations • Annual power savings alone implementing the Sitka solution of: ~$32,000/year  Simple payback for this project is <24 months based on 2010 power rates©Sitka Enterprises Inc, 2009
  • 16. Thank You Contact Sitka at: • Tel - 484 433 0052 or 610-393-6708 • Web - www.sitkaenterprises.com • Facebook - Planet Saving Lighting • Follow us on Twitter - @TheOnlySitka©Sitka Enterprises Inc, 2012