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LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
LEED-EB Presentation
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LEED-EB Presentation

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The following presentation serves as an informative tools to help educate people on sustainability and LEED Exisiting Building/Operations & Maintenance projects

The following presentation serves as an informative tools to help educate people on sustainability and LEED Exisiting Building/Operations & Maintenance projects

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  • 1. Kevin Sneed, LEED AP, AIA, IIDA Partner, Director of Architecture; OTJ Architects sneed@otj.com, 202.621.1369 Kim Pexton, LEED AP Director of Sustainable Construction; HITT Contracting, INC [email_address] Steve Keppler, LEED AP Sustainable Design Consultant; Keppler & Associates [email_address] LEED-CI and LEED-EB Introduction for Facility Managers October 9 th , 2008 8-10 AM Presented By:
  • 2. <ul><li>LEED buildings command rent premiums of $11.24/sf </li></ul><ul><li>LEED buildings have a 3.8% higher occupancy rate </li></ul><ul><li>LEED buildings sell for an average $171/sf more than their non-LEED-rated competitors </li></ul>LEED buildings make good business and financial sense: LEED buildings are in demand, and the available supply is relatively low. Working to take advantage of the LEED supply/demand gap makes solid business sense now, and their lower operating costs will continue to make good business sense into the future. Two recent studies (one by the New Buildings Institute, the other by CoStar) have confirmed that: <ul><li>LEED building energy use is 25-30% lower, on average, than non-rated buildings </li></ul><ul><li>LEED gold and platinum building energy use can be as high as 50% lower </li></ul>
  • 3. Data taken from the national CoStar Realty Information Group study
  • 4. Data taken from the national CoStar Realty Information Group study
  • 5. Data taken from a joint study by Deloitte and Charles Lockwood, released July 2008 “ By and large, our respondents’ green retrofits achieved many of the stated objectives. 93 % of our respondents reported greater ability to attract talent, 81 % saw greater employee retention, 87 % reported an improvement in workforce productivity, 75 % saw an improvement in employee health, and 73 % reported that they had achieved cost reductions as a result of implementing green measures…” In a joint study released this summer by Deloitte and Charles Lockwood:
  • 6. LEED projects are becoming more common and numerous across the US:
  • 7. LEED projects are certified through several rating systems, to four certification levels:
  • 8. <ul><li>4 levels: certified, silver, gold, & platinum </li></ul><ul><li>6 prerequisites </li></ul><ul><li>57 total possible credits </li></ul><ul><li>21 credits, minimum, for certification </li></ul>LEED CI
  • 9. LEED CI: Prerequisites EA PR1: Fundamental Commissioning EA PR2: Minimum Energy Performance EA PR3: Fundamental Refrigerant Management MR PR1: Storage and Collection of Recyclables EQ PR1: Minimum IAQ Performance EQ PR2: Environmental Tobacco Smoke Control A project MUST adhere to ALL of the prerequisites listed to obtain ANY LEED-CI certification rating
  • 10. LEED CI: Prerequisites EA PR1: Fundamental Commissioning Can be performed by someone from the project’s MEP firm The only caveat is that that individual may not be part of the design team working on the project In essence, an effort to actively test all systems after they are installed to ensure that they are all functioning according to the design intent EA PR2: Minimum Energy Performance The project’s MEP systems must be designed to meet or exceed the standards set forth in ASHRAE 90.1-2004 This must be stipulated in the project drawings or proposal, as not all MEP firms automatically design to this standard EA PR3: Fundamental Refrigerant Management None of the HVAC&R systems in the project may use CFC based refrigerants This should also be stipulated in the project drawings or proposal, as the MEP firm must evaluate the base building components to ensure that they are not CFC based, as well as following this criteria in their own designs A project MUST adhere to ALL of the prerequisites listed to obtain ANY LEED-CI certification rating
  • 11. MR PR1: Storage and Collection of Recyclables Provide an easily accessible area that serves the entire building and is dedicated to the collection and storage of non-hazardous materials for recycling, including (at a minimum) paper, corrugated cardboard, glass, plastics and metals. LEED CI: Prerequisites Buildings which are able to provide tenants with pictures, floorplans, and etc. information of building recycling centers of a sufficient size to satisfy LEED requirements can include such an area as a marketing advantage when attempting to attract LEED tenants Commercial Building SF Minimum Recycling Area 0-5,000 SF 82 SF 5,001-15,000 SF 125 SF 15,001-50,000 SF 175 SF 50,001-100,000 SF 225 SF 100,001-200,000 SF 275 SF 200,001 SF + 500 SF A project MUST adhere to ALL of the prerequisites listed to obtain ANY LEED-CI certification rating EQ PR1: Minimum IAQ Performance The project’s MEP systems must be designed to meet or exceed the standards set forth in sections 4-7 of ASHRAE 62.1-2004
  • 12. LEED CI: Prerequisites EQ PR2: Environmental Tobacco Smoke Control This prerequisite is intended to limit tenant exposure to secondhand smoke, and has two options for compliance for non-residential buildings: Option 1: Prohibit all smoking in the building, AND Locate any exterior designated smoking areas at least 25 feet away from all building entrances, outdoor air intakes, and operable windows Option 2: Prohibit all smoking in the building except in designated areas, AND Locate any exterior designated smoking areas at least 25 feet away from all building entrances, outdoor air intakes, and operable windows, AND Locate designated smoking rooms to effectively contain, capture and remove ETS from the building. A project MUST adhere to ALL of the prerequisites listed to obtain ANY LEED-CI certification rating
  • 13. Up to 3 points are possible in this category <ul><li>SS CR 1.A: Brownfield Redevelopment </li></ul>The stormwater rate and quantity must be reduced to, or beyond, that which was generated on site before anything was built on the lot All 3 points are automatically granted to a project which is located in a LEED building Points may also be earned, piecemeal, by .5 – 1 point for each item (to a maximum of 3 points), for each item that can be documented about the building: <ul><li>SS CRs 1.B&C: Stormwater Management (by rate & quantity, &/or treating the stormwater) </li></ul>The building was developed on a site documented or classified as a brownfield The stormwater must be treated to remove 80% of TSS (total suspended solids) and 40% of the average TP (total phosphorous) LEED CI: Sustainable Sites
  • 14. LEED CI: Sustainable Sites, continued 1.1.D: On the roof: a building must have either a white/highly reflective surface (white pavers or a white membrane, typically), OR a green roof on at least 50% of the roof area, OR a combination of the two <ul><li>SS CRs 1.D&E: Heat Island Effect (on roof and/or non-roof surfaces) </li></ul>1.1.E: Off the roof: provide shade, and/or white/highly reflective surfaces, and/or open grid paving, for at least 30% of the site’s impervious surfaces (parking areas, walkways, fire lanes, etc.) OR place a minimum of 50% of parking spaces underground OR use open-grid paving for 50% of the parking lot area
  • 15. LEED CI: Sustainable Sites, continued Exterior/site lighting must not cross the site boundary, and light from site lighting fixtures must meet “full cutoff” requirements so that light generated by those luminaires is restricted from reaching the night sky and causing light pollution <ul><li>SS CR 1.F: Light Pollution Reduction </li></ul>Requires the use of high-efficiency irrigation technology, OR the use of captured rainwater for site irrigation, and in doing so reduces the use of potable water for irrigation by 50%, or eliminates its use completely <ul><li>SS CRs 1.G&H: Water Efficient Irrigation (reducing potable water consumption) </li></ul>This does not necessarily mean that a building or building site cannot have any landscaping. A building can use xeriscaping instead of traditional landscaping, which involves the use of plants native to the area which will do well without any irrigation. Use of these types of techniques, however, must be coupled with the knowledge that in the event of a drought, the building landscaping will suffer just as much as native vegetation in any other non-artificially-irrigated areas.
  • 16. LEED CI: Sustainable Sites, continued A building must reduce its water use by 20%, and have an on-going plan to require future residents to comply with this requirement as well <ul><li>SS CR 1.J: Water Use Reduction </li></ul>For base buildings, this will typically involve installing dual-flush units on all toilets, and aerators on faucets, and may additionally involve installing waterless urinals and low-flow showerheads
  • 17. LEED CI: Sustainable Sites, continued A building must supply at least 5% of the building’s total energy use (expressed as a fraction of the annual energy costs) from on-site renewable energy systems <ul><li>SS CR 1.K: On-Site Renewable Energy </li></ul>
  • 18. LEED CI: Sustainable Sites, continued Aimed at channeling urban development to urban areas with existing infrastructure, this requires that projects be located in areas with a minimum density of 60,000 sf/acre, and requires submission of a map that proves that the building is within ½ mile of a residential zone with a minimum of 10 units per acre, and has pedestrian access to at least 10 basic services(laundry, grocery, pharmacy, etc) within a half mile of the project site <ul><li>SS CR 2: Development Density and Community Connectivity </li></ul>DC Metro area buildings are typically able to meet these requirements easily, and often even qualify for exemplary performance, granting them an extra Innovation credit—a major marketing advantage This credit can easily be made a part of a LEED-friendly building’s marketing with research
  • 19. LEED CI: Sustainable Sites, continued Aimed at channeling urban development to urban areas with alternative transportation options (buses, subways, etc)—by being within a ½ mile of a commuter rail station or ¼ mile of 2+ major bus lines <ul><li>SS CR 3.1: Alternative Transportation: Public Transportation Access </li></ul>DC Metro area buildings are typically able to meet this requirement easily, and often even qualify for exemplary performance, granting them an extra Innovation credit—a major marketing advantage Intended to help reduce pollution and land development impacts from automobile use, it requires that a building, or a tenant, provide both secure bicycle storage, and convenient changing and showering facilities (within 200 yards of the building), for 5% or more of tenant occupants <ul><li>SS CR 3.2: Alternative Transportation: Bicycle Storage & Changing Rooms </li></ul>Many DC metro area buildings do not offer this as a building amenity, but could incorporate this relatively easy as a LEED-friendly renovation, and use it as a marketing advantage These credits can easily be made a part of a LEED-friendly building with only minor renovations & research
  • 20. LEED CI: Sustainable Sites, continued <ul><li>SS CR 3.3: Alternative Transportation: Parking Availability </li></ul>Case A: for projects occupying less than 75% of the gross building square footage Parking spaces provided to the tenant shall not exceed the minimum number required by local zoning regulations, AND Priority parking for car-pools or van-pools will be provided for 5% or more of the tenant occupants OR No parking will be provided or subsidized for tenant occupants Case A: for projects occupying less than 75% of the gross building square footage Parking spaces provided to the tenant shall not exceed the minimum number required by local zoning regulations, AND Priority parking for car-pools or van-pools will be provided for 5% or more of the tenant occupants OR No new parking will be provided for rehabilitation projects, AND Priority parking for car-pools or van-pools will be provided for 5% or more of the tenant occupants This credit is especially important to keep in mind during lease negotiations
  • 21. LEED CI: Water Efficiency Intended to maximize the water efficiency within a tenant space, these two credits build upon each other: CR 1.1 is obtained with a 20% reduction, and CR 1.2 is obtained with a 30% reduction over baseline values. <ul><li>WE CRs 1.1 & 1.2: Water Use Reduction </li></ul>This credit, under LEED-CI, only refers to those fixtures installed in the tenant space. However, a LEED-friendly building should also provide retrofits to flushometers, faucets, showerheads, and urinals.
  • 22. LEED CI: Energy & Atmosphere Intended to reduce lighting fixture energy use: CR 1.1 requires the reduction of lighting power density to 15%, 25%, or 35% below the ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2004 standard; CR 1.2 requires the use of daylight responsive controls in all regularly occupied spaces within 15 feet of windows, and under skylights <ul><li>EA CRs 1.1 & 1.2: Optimize Energy Performance: Lighting Power and Lighting Controls </li></ul>Building management can also decrease energy use from lighting by stocking and encouraging the use of T5, T5HO, and CFL lamps, or even requiring the use of these lamps for 90% of tenant fixtures
  • 23. LEED CI: Energy & Atmosphere, continued Aimed at achieving increasing energy consumption by HVAC systems, this credit has 2 options for compliance: <ul><li>EA CR 1.3: Optimize Energy Performance: HVAC </li></ul>Case A: implement one or both of the following: <ul><li>Equipment Efficiency: Install new HVAC systems which comply with the New Building Institute’s publication “Advanced Buildings: Energy Benchmark for High Performance Buildings:, sections 2.4-2.6 </li></ul><ul><li>AND/OR </li></ul><ul><li>Appropriate Zoning and Controls: every solar exposure must have a separate control zone, interior spaces must be separately zoned, and private offices and specialty occupancies (pantry, conference room, etc.) must have active controls which sense space use and modulates HVAC systems in response to that space’s demand </li></ul>Case B: reduce energy costs compared to ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2004: <ul><li>Demonstrate that the HVAC performance criteria for the tenant space is 15% below ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2004 (1 point) </li></ul><ul><li>OR </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstrate that the HVAC performance criteria for the tenant space is 30% below ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2004 (2 points) </li></ul>
  • 24. LEED CI: Energy & Atmosphere, continued Tenants can gain points by ensuring that most or all of their office equipment is Energy-Star Rated. This credit does not include any HVAC or building envelope products, but does include computers, monitors, refrigerators, freezers, copiers, fax machines, etc., etc. Some common equipment (microwaves, servers) has not yet been rated by Energy Star, but in order to gain points in this category, tenants must have 70-90% Energy Star equipment (by total non-HVAC equipment wattage on the project). <ul><li>EA CR 1.4: Optimize Energy Performance: Equipment & Appliances </li></ul>Following on the idea of the elements listed in the LEED-CI prerequisites, this category requires that all commissioning procedures, as well as various specific means of oversight over the design team’s MEP contingent, be conducted by a third party. <ul><li>EA CR 2: Enhanced Commissioning </li></ul>Building management can help support this effort by requiring, in the building rules and regulations, that all tenant appliances be energy-star rated.
  • 25. LEED CI: Energy & Atmosphere, continued The intent of this credit is to make tenants responsible for their own energy bills, therefore making them more aware of their energy use, and more apt to take measures to reduce it. Compliance with this credit is broken into two categories: <ul><li>EA CR 3: Energy Use: Measurement & Payment Accountability </li></ul>Case A: for projects occupying less than 75% of the gross building square footage <ul><li>Install sub-metering equipment for the tenant space, AND </li></ul><ul><li>Negotiate a lease where energy costs are paid by the tenant, and are not included in the base rent. </li></ul>Case A: for projects occupying more than 75% of the gross building square footage <ul><li>Install continuous metering equipment for a myriad of specific tenant energy-consuming equipment (lighting systems and controls, boiler efficiencies, indoor water riser and outdoor irrigation, VFD operation, etc), AND </li></ul><ul><li>Develop a Measurement and Verification plan that incorporates the monitoring information from all equipment required to be monitored, and is consistent with Option B, C, or D of the 2001 IPMVP Protocol for measuring energy and water savings </li></ul>Under this credit, the tenant must purchase green-e certificates, or directly purchase green power, for 50% of their electricity use, and contract to do so for a minimum of two years. <ul><li>EA CR 4: Green Power </li></ul>Energy Use Measurement is a credit that it is especially important to keep in mind during lease negotiations
  • 26. LEED CI: Materials & Resources This credit encourages conservation of natural resources by slowing the “churn” of tenant turnover, and rewards tenants with a credit simply for committing to remain in their location, by the lease, for a minimum of 10 years. <ul><li>MR CR 1.1: Tenant Space: Long-Term Commitment </li></ul>Aimed at reducing the environmental impact of new tenant construction projects, this credit rewards those tenants who re use 40% of the non-shell, non-structural components in a space. <ul><li>MR CR 1.2 : Building Reuse: Maintain 40% Non-Structural Interior Components </li></ul>Building management can improve the likelihood of this credit’s utility by maintaining, or hiring an architectural firm to create, accurate building “as-builts” for not only the shell, but the tenant spaces as well. Encouraging the diversion of recyclable components from the building construction waste stream, these credits reward tenants and design teams who redirect 50% or 75% of construction waste from landfills. <ul><li>MR CRs 2.1 & 2.2 : Construction Waste Management: Divert From Landfill </li></ul>Building management can increase the ability of design and construction teams to obtain this credit by ensuring that there is adequate space for the placement of multiple dumpsters or other waste collection receptacles.
  • 27. LEED CI: Materials & Resources In order to reduce demand on virgin materials, and to reduce waste, these credits encourage design and construction teams to use salvaged, refurbished, or reused materials for 5-10% of construction materials (excluding furniture). <ul><li>MR CRs 3.1 & 3.2 : Resource Reuse </li></ul><ul><li>MR CRs 4.1 & 4.2: Recycled Content </li></ul>In order to reduce demand on virgin materials, these credits encourage the use of materials, including furniture, with 10-20% recycled content (post consumer recycled content + ½ pre-consumer recycled content) Post consumer recycled content consists of materials that have already been made, and used by consumers, in one form, and are now entering the recycling stream. Pre-consumer recycled content consists of scrap from the manufacturing process—material that has not yet been used by consumers. <ul><li>MR CR 5.1: Recycled Content: 20% Manufactured Regionally </li></ul>This credit aims to reduce the “carbon footprint” of the construction process, as well as support the local economy, by encouraging the use of materials and components (including furniture) which have been manufactured within a 500 mile radius of the project site, totaling 20% of the construction+furniture budget.
  • 28. LEED CI: Materials & Resources, continued <ul><li>MR CR 5.2: Recycled Content: 10% Manufactured & Extracted Regionally </li></ul>A more strict version of the credit listed above, this credit requires that the materials for materials & components are extracted, harvested, or recovered, as well as manufactured, within a 500 mile radius of the project site, totaling 10% of the construction+furniture budget <ul><li>MR CR 6: Rapidly Renewable Materials </li></ul>This credit encourages the increased use of virgin materials which can be quickly replenished, by rewarding construction & design teams which use materials and products made from plants that are typically harvested within a 10-year or shorter cycle, for a total of 5% of the value of all building materials and construction products used on the project.
  • 29. LEED CI: Indoor Environmental Quality <ul><li>EQ CR 1: Outdoor Air Delivery Monitoring </li></ul>Aimed at sustaining long-term occupant comfort, this credit requires the installation of CO 2 monitoring and alarm systems, with monitors for densely occupied spaces (those with a density of more than 25 people per 100 sq. ft.); and for natural ventilation systems, a sensor must be within each naturally vented space. In addition, for all other mechanical ventilation systems, an outdoor airflow measurement device must be installed to help maintain operating conditions within 15% of the design minimum outdoor air rate. <ul><li>EQ CR 2: Increased Ventilation </li></ul>Requires that the constructed HVAC system provide additional air ventilation to improve indoor air quality. For mechanically ventilated spaces, the ventilation rate for all occupied spaces must be at least 30% above ASHRAE 62.1-2004 minimums, and either calculations & diagrams or a multi-zone analytic model to prove the design of the system will meet these requirements. The possibilities for compliance with these credits depends heavily on base building system capabilities
  • 30. LEED CI: Indoor Environmental Quality, continued <ul><li>EQ CRs 3.1 & 3.2: Construction IAQ Management </li></ul>These credits aim to prevent indoor air quality problems after construction, by requiring: 3.1: Monitoring during construction (to ensure that the contractor is following SMACNA IAQ guidelines, protecting on-site absorptive construction materials, using MERV-8 filters during construction, and replacing all of those filters post construction and prior to tenant occupancy), AND/OR 3.2: Conducting a flush-out, or conducting indoor air quality testing, of the space after construction has concluded, and prior to occupancy by the tenant. <ul><li>EQ CRs 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4, & 4.5: Low Emitting Materials </li></ul>The intent of these credits is to reduce the irritating, odorous, and/or potentially harmful indoor air contaminants exposure of both construction workers and tenants. These credits cover requirements for adhesives & sealants, paints & coatings, carpet, composite wood & laminate adhesives, and systems furniture & seating. Building management can help support this effort by requiring, in the building rules and regulations, that all tenant build outs use low-voc paints, adhesives, and sealants.
  • 31. LEED CI: Indoor Environmental Quality, continued <ul><li>EQ CR 5: Indoor Chemical & Pollutant Source Control </li></ul>In an attempt to minimize exposure of tenants to potentially hazardous materials, this credit requires the use of permanent entryway systems (grilles, grates, etc), at all high volume entryways; and where there are hazardous gases or chemicals may be used, (including housekeeping, copy rooms, etc), provide deck to deck partitions and particular exhaust systems; provide separately plumbed contaminant drains for hazardous liquid materials, and provide regularly occupied areas of the tenant space with new air filtration media of MERV 13 or better. <ul><li>EQ CRs 6.1 & 6.2: Controllability of Systems </li></ul>Aimed at providing a high level of control for building occupants, fostering greater workplace satisfaction and productivity, these credits require: 6.1: The provision of lighting controls for at least 90% of occupants, and the provision of lighting controls for all shared multi-occupant spaces where transient groups must share controls. 6.2: The provision of thermal & ventilation controls for at least 50% of the space occupants, and the provision of thermal & ventilation controls for all shared multi-occupant spaces where transient groups must share controls.
  • 32. LEED CI: Indoor Environmental Quality, continued <ul><li>EQs CR 7.1 & 7.2: Thermal Comfort </li></ul>Aimed at providing a high level of control for building occupants, fostering greater workplace satisfaction and productivity, these credits require: 7.1: The provision of a thermally comfortable environment, by designing a space that complies with ASHRAE Standard 55-2004. 7.2: In addition to complying with 7.1, tenants must provide a permanent monitoring system to ensure that the systems are performing in accordance with ASHRAE Standard 55-2004. <ul><li>EQs CR 8.1, 8.2, & 8.3: Daylight & Views </li></ul>In order to ensure that all building occupants have a connection to the outdoors, with access to daylight and views in all or most of the regularly occupied tenant spaces. For 75-90% of spaces (or, most stringently in 8.3, for 90% of seated spaces: <ul><li>Provide a minimum Daylight Factor of 2% (excluding direct sun) </li></ul><ul><li>OR </li></ul><ul><li>Using a computer simulation model, achieve at least 25 footcandles, AND </li></ul><ul><li>Provide daylight redirection and/or glare control devices </li></ul>
  • 33. LEED CI: Innovation & Design To encourage innovative thinking from all design teams, LEED-CI rewards that thinking with additional credits under this category. Up to 5 points may be garnered under this heading, and some common innovation points include: <ul><li>Instituting green housekeeping programs </li></ul><ul><li>Engaging in/instituting green education </li></ul>Many credits (though not all) also offer extra exemplary performance credits under this category. Some which can be targeted are: <ul><li>Density & Community Connectivity </li></ul><ul><li>Alternative Transportation, Public Transportation Access </li></ul><ul><li>Water Use Reduction </li></ul><ul><li>Green Power </li></ul><ul><li>Building Reuse </li></ul><ul><li>Regional Materials </li></ul><ul><li>Reuse of Furniture & Furnishings </li></ul><ul><li>Heat Island Effect, Non-Roof </li></ul>Every project which can claim a LEED Accredited Professional among its members also receives one credit under this category
  • 34. <ul><li>4 levels: certified, silver, gold, & platinum </li></ul><ul><li>13 prerequisites </li></ul><ul><li>92 total possible credits </li></ul><ul><li>34 credits, minimum, for certification </li></ul><ul><li>3 month “performance period” </li></ul><ul><li>12 month occupancy minimum required </li></ul><ul><li>2 year old buildings (and older) </li></ul>LEED EB
  • 35. A project MUST adhere to ALL of the prerequisites listed to obtain ANY LEED-EB certification rating LEED EB: Prerequisites SS PR1: Erosion & Sedimentation Control SS PR2: Age of Building WE PR1: Minimum Water Efficiency WE PR2: Discharge Water Compliance EA PR1: Existing Building Commissioning EA PR2: Minimum Energy Performance EA PR3: Fundamental Refrigerant Management MR PR1: Source Reduction and Waste Management MR PR2: Toxic Material Source Reduction EQ PR1: Outside Air Introduction and Exhaust Systems EQ PR2: Environmental Tobacco Smoke Control EQ PR3: Asbestos Removal or Encapsulation EQ PR4: Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) Removal
  • 36. LEED EB: Prerequisites SS PR1: Erosion & Sedimentation Control Develop & implement a site erosion and sedimentation plan, conforming to the EPA 832/R-92-005 (1992), or local standards and controls, preventing during construction the loss of soil to stormwater runoff and wind erosion, preventing soil from entering streams or sewers, and preventing air pollution from soil dust. A project MUST adhere to ALL of the prerequisites listed to obtain ANY LEED-EB certification rating SS PR2: Age of Building Buildings seeking certification under LEED-EB must be at least two years old. WE PR1: Minimum Water Efficiency Reduce potable water use to a level equal to or below the water use baseline, provide at least one meter for the overall building water use, and (it is encouraged, but not required) provide metering for cooling towers and other process water uses. WE PR2: Discharge Water Compliance If regulated by the EPA National Pollution Discharge Elimination System Clean Water Act requirements, demonstrate such NPDES compliance (oil separators, grease interceptors, disposal of such wastes, etc.)
  • 37. LEED EB: Prerequisites EA PR1: Existing Building Commissioning This prerequisite requires engaging an MEP firm to verify that building systems and assemblies are performing efficiently, including developing a comprehensive building operation plan to meet the requirements of current building usage, testing all systems against this operation plan, repairing or upgrading systems as needed to meet these operational needs, and re-testing until compliance has been achieved. A 1-5 year plan for achieving compliance may also be submitted, where all low & no-cost measures are implemented in the first year, and continuous improvement will be made every year of the submitted plan. EA PR2: Minimum Energy Performance Buildings pursuing LEED-EB certification must demonstrate that the building has achieved a minimum rating of 60 under the EPA Energy Star rating system. EA PR3: Fundamental Refrigerant Management None of the HVAC&R systems in the building may use CFC based refrigerants, unless a third party audit shows that system replacement or conversion is not economically feasible (if the simple payback of the replacement of a chiller would not be achieved within 10 years). A project MUST adhere to ALL of the prerequisites listed to obtain ANY LEED-EB certification rating
  • 38. LEED EB: Prerequisites MR PR1: Source Reduction and Waste Management Under this prerequisite, the team must: 1.1: Conduct a “waste stream audit”, identifying a current building baseline for waste types and amounts (including paper, glass, plastics, cardboard, and metals). The team must then identify opportunities for waste source reduction, by weight, and diversion into recycling streams, and submit documentation of a “performance period” wherein the building implements these strategies. 1.2: Provide an easily accessible area that serves the entire building dedicated to the separation, collection, and storage of materials for recycling (including paper, glass, plastics, cardboard, and metals), of a capacity designed to accommodate (at a minimum) the volumes identified during the waste stream audit. A project MUST adhere to ALL of the prerequisites listed to obtain ANY LEED-EB certification rating
  • 39. LEED EB: Prerequisites MR PR2: Toxic Material Source Reduction This prerequisite requires that building management establish and maintain a program to reduce the amount of mercury brought into the building in light bulbs. This program requires that mercury content of all mercury-containing light bulbs must be maintained below 100 picograms per lumen hour, on a weighted average. A project MUST adhere to ALL of the prerequisites listed to obtain ANY LEED-EB certification rating
  • 40. LEED EB: Prerequisites EQ PR1: Outside Air Introduction and Exhaust Systems Existing building outside air ventilation and distribution systems must supply the air at the ventilation rate specified under ASHRAE 62.1-2004 under this prerequisite. If this is not feasible due to the physical constraints of the existing system, that system must be modified to supply at least 10 CFM per person. A program/plan to maintain these systems, and test all building exhaust to ensure compliance, must be outlined and implemented. A project MUST adhere to ALL of the prerequisites listed to obtain ANY LEED-EB certification rating EQ PR2: Environmental Tobacco Smoke Control This prerequisite is intended to limit tenant exposure to secondhand smoke, and has two options for compliance for non-residential buildings: Option 1: Prohibit all smoking in the building, AND Locate any exterior designated smoking areas at least 25 feet away from all building entrances, outdoor air intakes, and operable windows Option 2: Prohibit all smoking in the building except in designated areas, AND Locate any exterior designated smoking areas at least 25 feet away from all building entrances, outdoor air intakes, and operable windows, AND Locate designated smoking rooms to effectively contain, capture and remove ETS from the building.
  • 41. LEED EB: Prerequisites EQ PR3: Asbestos Removal or Encapsulation Under this prerequisite, buildings must have in place an asbestos management program (which shall identify all applicable regulatory requirements), and have survey records which identify where asbestos is located in the building and on the site. A project MUST adhere to ALL of the prerequisites listed to obtain ANY LEED-EB certification rating EQ PR4: Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) Removal Under this prerequisite, buildings must have in place an PCB management program (which shall identify all applicable regulatory requirements), and have survey records which identify where PCB is located in the building and on the site.
  • 42. LEED EB: Sustainable Sites <ul><li>To earn these credits, a building must have in place over the performance period a low-impact site and green building exterior management plan that addresses: </li></ul><ul><li>(one point earned for every (4) items addressed) </li></ul><ul><li>Maintenance Equipment </li></ul><ul><li>Plantings </li></ul><ul><li>Animal and Vegetation Pest Control </li></ul><ul><li>Landscape Waste </li></ul><ul><li>Irrigation Management </li></ul><ul><li>SS CRs 1.1 & 1.2: Green Site and Building Exterior Management </li></ul><ul><li>Fertilizer Use </li></ul><ul><li>Snow Removal </li></ul><ul><li>Cleaning of the Building Exterior </li></ul><ul><li>Paints and Sealants used on the Building Exterior </li></ul><ul><li>Other Maintenance of the Building Exterior </li></ul>A narrative overview, and quarterly reports over the performance period, must be provided as part of the submittal to USGBC LEED-Online.
  • 43. Aimed at channeling urban development to urban areas with alternative transportation options (buses, subways, etc)—by being within a ½ mile of a commuter rail station, or ¼ mile of 2+ major bus lines, or the building occupants are provided with a shuttle to take them to these public transportation lines. <ul><li>SS CR 3.1: Alternative Transportation: Public Transportation Access </li></ul>Intended to help reduce pollution and land development impacts from automobile use, it requires that a building provide both secure bicycle storage, and convenient changing and showering facilities (within 200 yards of the building), for 5% or more of tenant occupants <ul><li>SS CR 3.2: Alternative Transportation: Bicycle Storage & Changing Rooms </li></ul>These credits can easily be made a part of a LEED-friendly building with only minor renovations & research LEED EB: Sustainable Sites, continued This credit relates to buildings which have a density of at least 60,000 sq. ft. of building floor space per acre, which is also located within an area with the same density (generally met by two-story downtown developments). <ul><li>SS CR 2: High Development Density Building and Area </li></ul>
  • 44. <ul><li>SS CRs 3.3 & 3.4: Alt. Transportation: Alternative Fuel Vehicles, Carpools, Telecommuting </li></ul>LEED EB: Sustainable Sites, continued 3.3: Promoting the use of alternative fuel vehicles: Option 1: Provide alternative fuel refueling stations for 3% of parking capacity Option 2: Provide alternative fuel or hybrid vehicles for 3% of building occupants AND Provide parking for those vehicles Option 3: Provide preferred parking programs for alternative fuel or hybrid vehicles for at least 3% of parking capacity, and increase, as necessary, the amount of preferred parking to meet demand for such parking for up to 10% of parking capacity 3.4: Carpooling and telecommuting: Option 1: Provide preferred parking and implement programs for car pools or van pools serving 5% of building occupants and add no new parking Option 2: Operate an occupant telecommuting program that reduces commuting frequency by 20% for 20% or more of the building occupants, and provide the necessary communications infrastructure in the building to accommodate such telecommuting
  • 45. Provide native or adapted vegetation, or other ecologically appropriate features (for example, water features, exposed rock, or other features that are part of the historic natural landscape and provide habitat value), which cover 50-75% of the site area, excluding the building footprint <ul><li>SS CRs 4.1 & 4.2: Reduced Site Disturbance: Protect or Restore Open Space </li></ul>LEED EB: Sustainable Sites, continued Have measures in place on site which mitigate at least 25%-50% of the annual stormwater falling on the site <ul><li>SS CRs 5.1 & 5.2: Stormwater Management, Rate and Quantity Reduction </li></ul>When planting native vegetation, those which provide habitat or food for native species are preferred
  • 46. <ul><li>SS CR 6.1: Heat Island Reduction: Non-Roof </li></ul>LEED EB: Sustainable Sites, continued Provide (existing or within 5 years of landscape installation) shade, and/or white/highly reflective surfaces, and/or open grid paving, for at least 30% of the site’s impervious surfaces (parking areas, walkways, fire lanes, etc.) OR place a minimum of 50% of parking spaces underground OR use open-grid paving for 50% of the parking lot area 6.2: On the roof: Have in place over the performance period an energy-star compliant white/highly reflective material with at least 0.9 emissivity for a minimum of 75% of the roof (white pavers or a white membrane, typically), OR a green roof on at least 50% of the roof area; and quarterly inspections and records over the performance period that document compliance <ul><li>SS CR 6.2: Heat Island Reduction: Roof </li></ul>
  • 47. <ul><li>SS CR 7: Light Pollution Reduction </li></ul>LEED EB: Sustainable Sites, continued Option 1: Shield all outdoor luminaires that are 50 W or more so that they do not emit light to the sky, OR Provide calculations showing that less than 5% of light emitted by outdoor lighting reaches the night sky on an annual basis Measure light trespass on the property perimeter by measuring, at at least eight locations, the lighting levels at the perimeter and ensure that light levels are raised from these levels no more than 10% when the lights are on Option 2: Provide the same shielding and emission calculations, and measure light trespass by determining that the maximum candela value of all interior lighting falls within the building, and the maximum candela value of exterior lighting falls within the property boundary
  • 48. LEED EB: Water Efficiency Requires the use of high-efficiency irrigation technology, OR the use of captured rainwater for site irrigation, and in doing so reduces the use of potable water for irrigation by 50%-95%, or eliminates its use completely <ul><li>WE CRs 1.1 & 1.2: Water Efficient Irrigation (reducing potable water consumption) </li></ul>This does not necessarily mean that a building or building site cannot have any landscaping. A building can use xeriscaping instead of traditional landscaping, which involves the use of plants native to the area which will do well without any irrigation. Use of these types of techniques, however, must be coupled with the knowledge that in the event of a drought, the building landscaping will suffer just as much as native vegetation in any other non-artificially-irrigated areas. Reduce the use of potable water for sewage conveyance by 50% under baseline, or treat 100% of wastewater on site to tertiary standards <ul><li>WE CR 2: Innovative Wastewater Technologies (reducing potable water consumption) </li></ul>Buildings pursuing this credit may use low-flow or composting toilets and waterless urinals, and may also use greywater or collected rainwater for sewage conveyance. <ul><li>WE CRs 3.1 & 3.2: Water Use Reduction (reducing potable water consumption) </li></ul>Reduce the use of potable water by 10-20% under baseline This will typically involve installing dual-flush units on all toilets, and aerators on faucets, and may additionally involve installing waterless urinals and low-flow showerheads
  • 49. LEED EB: Energy & Atmosphere Demonstrate the EPA Energy Star energy performance rating that the building star has achieved. This credit provides a potential for 1-10 points in the LEED-EB rating system (1 point for a 63 rating, 2 for 67, 3 for 71, 4 for 75, et cetera) <ul><li>EA CR 1: Optimize Energy Performance </li></ul>Over the performance period, meet some or all of the building’s total energy use through on-site or off-site (green-e certified power certificates) renewable energy sources. Points are provided thusly: <ul><li>EA CRs 2.1-2.4: On-Site and Off-Site Renewable Energy </li></ul>LEED-EB points on-site energy off-site energy 1 2 3 4 3% 6% 9% 12% 15% 30% 45% 60% When purchasing hydropower certificates, it is important to purchase from low-impact hydropower installations
  • 50. LEED EB: Energy & Atmosphere, continued In order to ensure that the building continues to deliver target performance over the long term, provide: 3.1: building operations and maintenance staff education program that provides each staff person working on the building at least 24 hours of education per year (training must be of high quality and relevant to the building being maintained); 3.2: a comprehensive Best Practices Equipment Preventative Maintenance Program that provides in-house or contractual services to provide post-warranty maintenance; 3.3; a system for continuous tracking and optimization of systems that regular indoor comfort (temperature, humidity, and CO2) in occupied spaces. The system must include: <ul><li>EA CRs 3.1-3.3: Building Operation & Maintenance </li></ul><ul><li>Continuous monitoring of system equipment performance and indoor conditions </li></ul><ul><li>Alarms for performance or conditions that require repair </li></ul><ul><li>A system which delivers prompt repair to problems, once identified </li></ul>
  • 51. Support early compliance with the Montreal Protocol: <ul><li>EA CR 4: Additional Ozone Protection </li></ul>Option 1: Do not operate base building HVAC, refrigeration, or fire supression systems using CFCs, HCFCs, or halons LEED EB: Energy & Atmosphere, continued Option 2: Do not operate base building fire supression systems using CFCs, HCFCs, or halons, AND Reduce omissions from base building HVAC and refrigeration systems no les than 3% per year, using the EPA Clean Air Act, Title VI, Rule 608 procedures, and reduce leakage over the remainder of unit life below 25
  • 52. <ul><li>EA CR 5.1-5.3: Performance Measurement: Enhanced Metering </li></ul>LEED EB: Energy & Atmosphere, continued <ul><li>Electric metering that allows aggregation of loads </li></ul><ul><li>Gas metering that allows aggregation of loads </li></ul><ul><li>Water metering that allows aggregation of occupant loads </li></ul><ul><li>Water metering that allows aggregation of process loads </li></ul><ul><li>Water metering that allows aggregation of irrigation loads </li></ul><ul><li>Air and water economizer and heat recovery cycle operation </li></ul><ul><li>Building process and equipment efficiency </li></ul><ul><li>Air distribution, static pressure, and ventilation air volumes </li></ul><ul><li>Lighting systems and controls </li></ul><ul><li>Chilled water system efficiency </li></ul><ul><li>Cooling load </li></ul><ul><li>Boiler efficiencies </li></ul><ul><li>Constant and variable motor loads </li></ul><ul><li>VFD operation </li></ul>One point is earned for every 4 actions implemented and maintained: A narrative overview, and quarterly reports over the performance period, must be provided as part of the submittal to USGBC LEED-Online.
  • 53. <ul><li>EA CR 5.4: Performance Measurement: Emission Reduction Reporting </li></ul>LEED EB: Energy & Atmosphere, continued This credit involves identifying building performance parameters that reduce energy use and emissions, track and record those emission reductions, report the emission reductions using a third-party certification program, retire at least 10% of the reported emission reductions, and ask the suppliers of goods and services for the building to do the same. <ul><li>EA CR 6: Documenting Sustainable Building Cost Impacts </li></ul>Document the overall building operating costs for the previous five years (or the length of the building occupancy, if shorter), and track changes in the overall building operation costs, and all LEED-EB financial impacts, over the performance period.
  • 54. <ul><li>MR CRs 1.1 & 1.2: Construction, Demolition, & Renovation </li></ul>LEED EB: Materials & Resources For this credit, a Waste Management Policy must be implemented (which covers any future building retrofit, renovation, or modification on the site) which quantifies the diversions of construction, demolition, and land-clearing debris from landfill and incineration disposal (by weight or volume). Diversion must reach at least a 50% or 75% diversion level. <ul><li>MR CRs 2.1-2.5: Optimize Use of Alternative Materials </li></ul>In order to achieve this credit, the building must establish a sustainable purchasing program, covering at least office paper, office equipment, furniture, furnishings, and building materials for use in the building and on the site. One point (to a max. of 5) will be awarded for each 10% of total purchases (on a dollar basis) that achieve at least one of the following: <ul><li>Contains at least 70% salvaged material from outside sources </li></ul><ul><li>Contains at least 70% salvaged material from internal building sources </li></ul><ul><li>Contains 10% post-consumer or 20% post industrial material </li></ul><ul><li>Contains at least 50% rapidly renewable material </li></ul><ul><li>Is FSC certified wood </li></ul><ul><li>Contains at least 50% materials harvested & processed, or extracted & processed, within 500 miles of the building site </li></ul>
  • 55. <ul><li>MR CRs 3.1 & 3.2: Optimize Use of IAQ Compliant Products </li></ul>LEED EB: Materials & Resources, continued This credit concerns the development of a policy to use materials with low IAQ emissions. This shall include all materials used for upgrades, retrofits, renovations, or modifications inside the building. These policies must include, at a minimum, paint & coatings, adhesives, sealants, carpet, composite panels, and agrifiber products. One point shall be awarded (up to a max. of 2) for each 45% (by cost of total purchases) of annual purchases that conform with the following criteria: <ul><li>Adhesives and sealants with a VOC less than that described in SCAQMD rule #1168 </li></ul><ul><li>Paints and coatings with VOC emissions not exceeding the limits of Green Seal GS-11 requirements </li></ul><ul><li>Carpet or carpet cushion that meets the requirements of the CRI Green Label Plus Carpet Testing Program </li></ul><ul><li>Composite panels and agrifiber products that contain no added urea-formaldehyde resins </li></ul>
  • 56. <ul><li>MR CRs 4.1 – 4.3: Sustainable Cleaning Products and Materials </li></ul>LEED EB: Materials & Resources, continued Implement sustainable purchasing for cleaning products, disposable janitorial paper products, and trash bags. The percentage of total sustainable cleaning product and material purchases determine the number of points earned, up to 3 points. One point will be awarded for each 30% of the total annual purchases of these products (on a cost basis) that meet one of the following: <ul><li>Cleaning products that meet the Green Seal GS-37 standard, if applicable </li></ul><ul><li>If GS-37 does not apply, use cleaning products that comply with the California Code of Regulations maximum allowable VOC levels </li></ul><ul><li>Disposable janitorial paper products and trash bags that meet the minimum requirements of the US EPA’s Comprehensive Procurement Guidelines </li></ul><ul><li>MR CRs 5.1 – 5.3: Occupant Recycling </li></ul>Have in place a building occupant waste reduction and recycling program, addressing the collection, separation, and storage of paper, glass, plastics, cardboard, metals, batteries, and fluorescent bulbs diversion from incineration or landfill by 30%, 40%, or 50%, by weight or volume (batteries and fluorescent bulbs must be to 95%)
  • 57. <ul><li>MR CR 6: Toxic Material Reduction: Reduced Mercury in Light Bulbs </li></ul>LEED EB: Materials & Resources, continued Building on the prerequisite for this rating system, this credit requires that building management establish and maintain a program to reduce the amount of mercury brought into the building in light bulbs. This program requires that mercury content of all mercury-containing light bulbs must be maintained below 80 picograms per lumen hour, on a weighted average. The prerequisite requires only maintaining mercury levels below 100 picograms per lumen hour
  • 58. <ul><li>EQ CR 1: Outdoor Air Delivery Monitoring </li></ul>LEED EB: Indoor Environmental Quality This credit requires the base building installation of permanent monitoring systems that provide feedback on ventilation system performance and CO2 levels to maintain minimum ventilation rates, and sound alarms for high CO2 levels. <ul><li>EQ CR 2: Increased Ventilation </li></ul>Under this credit, in mechanically ventilated spaces, the outdoor air ventilation must be increased for all occupied spaces by at least 30% above the minimum required by ASHRAE 62.1-2004. <ul><li>EQ CR 3: Construction IAQ Management Plan </li></ul>Develop and implement an Indoor Air Quality Management Plan for the construction and occupancy phases of the building as follows: <ul><li>During occupied construction, meet or exceed the relevant SMACNA 1995 sheet metal guidelines </li></ul><ul><li>Protect stored on-site or installed absorptive materials from moisture damage </li></ul><ul><li>If air handlers are used during construction, use MERV 8 filters at each return grille </li></ul><ul><li>Replace all filtration media immediately prior to occupancy </li></ul><ul><li>Remove contaminants that may be remaining at the end of the construction period by conducting a minimum 2-week flush out with 100% outside air prior to occupancy of the affected space; OR after construction, and prior to occupancy, conduct a baseline indoor air quality testing procedure, and then for each sampling point where the maximum concentration levels are exceeded, conduct a 2-week partial flush-out, then retest and repeat until the proper levels have been met </li></ul>
  • 59. <ul><li>EQ CR 4.1: Absenteeism & Health Care Cost Impacts </li></ul>LEED EB: Indoor Environmental Quality, continued Document the history of absenteeism and healthcare costs for building occupants for the previous 5 years (or length of building occupancy, if less, for a minimum of 12 months), and track changes in these levels relative to sustainable building performance improvements. <ul><li>EQ CR 4.2: Other Productivity Impacts </li></ul>Address and document changes in the productivity, error incidence, or other productivity levels for building occupants for the previous 5 years (or length of building occupancy, if less, for a minimum of 12 months), and track changes in these levels relative to sustainable building performance improvements. <ul><li>EQ CR 5.1: Non-Cleaning System: Reduce Particulates in Air Distribution </li></ul>Install MERV 13 or greater filters for all outside air intakes and for the returns for the re-circulation of inside air. Establish and follow a regular schedule for maintenance and replacement for these filters. <ul><li>EQ CR 5.2: Isolation of High-Volume Copying/Print Rooms/Fax Stations </li></ul>Have structural deck-to-deck partitions, with separate outside exhausting, no air re-circulation, and negative pressure to contain and isolate high volume copying/print rooms/fax stations. (This includes any of these machines with a monthly usage of more than 40,000 pages)
  • 60. <ul><li>EQ CR 6.1: Controllability of Systems: Lighting </li></ul>LEED EB: Indoor Environmental Quality, continued Provide lighting controls, for at least 50% of building occupants, enabling adjustment to suit individual task needs and preferences, or those of a group sharing a multi-occupant space or workgroup area. <ul><li>EQ CR 6.2: Controllability of Systems: Temperature and Ventilation </li></ul>Provide individual temperature and ventilation controls for at least 50% of the building occupants, enabling adjustments to suit individual needs and preferences, or those of a group sharing a multi-occupant space or workgroup area. <ul><li>EQ CRs 7.1 & 7.2: Thermal Comfort: Compliance and Monitoring </li></ul>Comply with ASHRAE Standard 55-2004, Thermal Comfort Conditions for Human Occupancy, and provide a permanent monitoring system to ensure building performance to this standard.
  • 61. <ul><li>EQ CRs 8.1 & 8.2: Daylight </li></ul>LEED EB: Indoor Environmental Quality, continued Achieve a minimum daylight factor of 2% in space occupied for critical visual tasks (not including copy rooms, storage areas, mechanical areas, laundry, and other low-occupancy support areas, and areas whose function would be impeded by the introduction of daylight). Achieving this 2% daylight level in 50-75% of spaces will earn 1-2 points. <ul><li>EQ CRs 8.3 & 8.4: Views </li></ul>Develop and adopt a space churn renovation plan and policy that specifies the goal of achieving direct line of sight to vision glazing for building occupants from 90% of all regularly occupied spaces, AND <ul><li>Achieve direct line of sight to vision glazing for 45% of regularly occupied spaces, AND/OR </li></ul><ul><li>Achieve direct line of sight to vision glazing for 90% of regularly occupied spaces </li></ul><ul><li>EQ CR 9: Contemporary IAQ Practice </li></ul>Develop and implement on an ongoing basis an IAQ Management Program based on the EPA document “Building Air Quality: A Guide for Building Owners and Facility Managers”.
  • 62. <ul><li>EQ CR 10.1: Green Cleaning: Entryway Systems </li></ul>LEED EB: Indoor Environmental Quality, continued Utilize entryway systems (grills, grates, mats, etc.) to reduce the amount of dirt, pollen, etc. entering the building, and develop the associated cleaning strategies to maintain those entryway systems, as well as the exterior walkways. <ul><li>EQ CR 10.2: Green Cleaning: Isolation of Janitorial Closets </li></ul>Provide structural deck-to-deck partitions, with separate outside exhaust, no air re-circulation, and negative pressure in all janitorial closets. Provide hot and cold water, and drains plumbed for appropriate disposal of liquid are stored. <ul><li>EQ CR 10.3: Green Cleaning: Low Environmental Impact Cleaning Policy </li></ul>Have a Cleaning Policy addressing: <ul><li>Sustainable cleaning systems </li></ul><ul><li>Use of sustainable cleaning products </li></ul><ul><li>Proper training of maintenance personnel in the hazards, use, and disposal of cleaning chemicals, dispensing equipment, and packaging </li></ul><ul><li>Use of hand soaps without antimicrobial agents (except where required by health codes) </li></ul><ul><li>Use of cleaning equipment that reduces impacts on IAQ </li></ul><ul><li>EQ CRs 10.4 &10.5: Green Cleaning: Pest Management Policy </li></ul>Develop, implement, and maintain a low impact integrated indoor pest management policy, which reduces exposure of personnel and occupants to harmful chemical, biological, and particle contaminants.
  • 63. <ul><li>EQ CR 10.6: Green Cleaning: Cleaning Equipment Policy </li></ul>LEED EB: Indoor Environmental Quality, continued Develop and implement a cleaning equipment policy that specifies the use of: <ul><li>Vaccuum cleaners that meet the Carpet & Rug Institute Green Label Plus Program requirements </li></ul><ul><li>Hot water extraction equipment for carpet cleaning efficient enough that carpets dry in 24 hours </li></ul><ul><li>Powered maintenance equipment which capture fine particulates and operate at less than 70dBA </li></ul><ul><li>Propane-powered equipment with high-efficiency, low-emission engines </li></ul><ul><li>Automated scrubbing machines with variable speed feed pumps </li></ul><ul><li>Battery-powered equipment with environmentally preferable gel batteries </li></ul><ul><li>Active microfiber technology to reduce chemical consumption and prolong life of disposable pads </li></ul><ul><li>Powered equipment ergonomically designed to minimize vibration, noise, and user fatigue </li></ul><ul><li>Equipment with rubber bumpers to reduce damage to building finishes </li></ul><ul><li>A log for all housekeeping equipment purchase and repair, containing equipment cutsheets </li></ul>
  • 64. LEED EB: Innovation & Design To encourage innovative thinking from all design teams, LEED-EB rewards that thinking with additional credits under this category. Up to 5 points may be garnered under this heading, and some common innovation points include: <ul><li>Engaging in/instituting green education </li></ul><ul><li>Monitoring radon levels </li></ul>Many credits (though not all) also offer extra exemplary performance credits under this category. Some which can be targeted are: <ul><li>Use of Alternative Materials </li></ul><ul><li>Reduced Site Disturbance </li></ul><ul><li>Stormwater Management </li></ul><ul><li>Heat Island Reduction </li></ul><ul><li>Water Use Reduction </li></ul>Every project which can claim a LEED Accredited Professional among its members also receives one credit under this category
  • 65. LEED CI: Gold: Union of Concerned Scientists <ul><li>Maximized the use of existing construction and furniture </li></ul><ul><li>Building management was cooperative and supportive, adding bike racks, upgrading building core with water-conserving measures, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Very high energy light fixtures with a very low overall wattage/SF consumption </li></ul><ul><li>Many recycled and locally manufactured materials and resources </li></ul><ul><li>Low VOC paints and adhesives throughout </li></ul><ul><li>Greenguard certified furniture </li></ul><ul><li>On time, within a (very restrictive) budget </li></ul>Has been awarded a USBGC LEED-CI Gold Rating
  • 66. LEED CI: Gold: The American Wind Energy Association <ul><li>Indoor air quality management, both during construction, and after (prior to occupancy) </li></ul><ul><li>Building management was cooperative and supportive, and is actually pursuing LEED-EB </li></ul><ul><li>Very high energy light fixtures with a very low overall wattage/SF consumption </li></ul><ul><li>Many recycled and locally manufactured materials and resources </li></ul><ul><li>Low VOC paints, adhesives, carpet, and furniture throughout </li></ul><ul><li>Daylight and views for 90% of regularly occupied spaces </li></ul><ul><li>75% Energy Star appliances and equipment </li></ul><ul><li>Double the requirement for Green Power </li></ul>Currently submitted to the USBGC LEED Online site with a LEED-CI Gold Rating (under review)
  • 67. LEED NC: Gold: The American Legacy Foundation Winner of the AIA DC Chapter Presidential Citation for Sustainable Design <ul><li>Heat island effect mitigation at the roof level, with a combination of highly reflective white roof pavers and sections of green roof </li></ul><ul><li>Water efficient landscaping </li></ul><ul><li>Very high energy light fixtures with a very low overall wattage/SF consumption </li></ul><ul><li>Many recycled and locally manufactured materials and resources </li></ul><ul><li>Increased ventilation and outdoor air delivery monitoring </li></ul><ul><li>Thermal comfort design and compliance monitoring </li></ul><ul><li>Certified woods </li></ul><ul><li>Diversion of construction wastes from landfills </li></ul>

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