Tata Group (disambiguation).<br />The lists in this article may contain items that are not notable, not  HYPERLINK "http:...
54424593 tata
54424593 tata
54424593 tata
54424593 tata
54424593 tata
54424593 tata
54424593 tata
54424593 tata
54424593 tata
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54424593 tata

  1. 1.  Tata Group (disambiguation).<br />The lists in this article may contain items that are not notable, not  HYPERLINK "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:NOT" o "Wikipedia:NOT" encyclopedic, or not helpful. Please help out by removing such elements and incorporating appropriate items into the main body of the article. (June 2009)<br />This article is in a list format that may be better presented using prose. You can help by converting this article to prose, if appropriate. Editing help is available. (June 2009)<br />Tata GroupTypePrivateIndustryConglomerateFounded1868Founder(s)Jamshetji TataHeadquartersMumbai, IndiaArea servedWorldwideKey peopleRatan Tata(Chairman)[1]ProductsSteelAutomobilesTelecommunicationsSoftwareHotelsConsumer goodsRevenue US$ 67.4 billion (2009-10)[2]Total assets US$ 52.8 billion (2009-10)Employees396,517 (2009-10)SubsidiariesTata SteelTata Steel EuropeTata MotorsTata Consultancy ServicesTata TechnologiesTata TeaTitan IndustriesTata PowerTata CommunicationsTata TeleservicesTata AutoComp Systems LimitedTaj HotelsWebsiteTata.co.in<br />The Tata Group (Hindi: टाटा समूह) is a multinational conglomerate company headquartered in Mumbai, India. In terms of market capitalization and revenues, Tata Group is the largest private corporate group in India. It has interests in  HYPERLINK "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steel" o "Steel" steel,automobiles, information technology, communication, power, tea and hospitality. The Tata Group has operations in more than 85 countries across six continents and its companies export products and services to 80 nations. The Tata Group comprises 114 companies and subsidiaries in seven business sectors, HYPERLINK "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tata_Group" l "cite_note-2" [3] 27 of which are publicly listed. 65.8% of the ownership of Tata Group is held in charitable trusts.[4] Companies which form a major part of the group include Tata Steel (including Tata Steel Europe), Tata Motors (including Jaguar and Land Rover), Tata Consultancy Services, Tata Technologies, Tata Tea (includingTetley), Tata Chemicals, Titan Industries, Tata Power, Tata Communications, Tata Teleservices and the  HYPERLINK "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taj_Hotels" o "Taj Hotels" Taj Hotels.<br />The group takes the name of its founder,  HYPERLINK "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jamsedji_Tata" o "Jamsedji Tata" Jamsedji Tata, a member of whose family has almost invariably been the chairman of the group. The chairman of the Tata group is  HYPERLINK "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ratan_Tata" o "Ratan Tata" Ratan Tata, who took over from J. R. D. Tata in 1991 and is one of the major international business figures in the age of  HYPERLINK "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Globality" o "Globality" globality.[5] The company is currently in its fifth generation of family stewardship.[6]<br />The 2009 annual survey by the Reputation Institute ranked Tata Group as the 11th most reputable company in the world.[7]The survey included 600 global companies.<br />Contents [hide]1 History2 Engineering3 Energy4 Chemicals5 Services6 Consumer Products7 Information systems and communications8 The Tata logo9 Philanthropy and nation building10 Tata acquisitions and targets10.1 Targets11 Revenue12 Controversies and Criticisms12.1 Kalinganagar, Orissa12.2 Dow Chemicals, Bhopal Gas Disaster12.3 Supplies to Burma’s military regime12.4 Land acquisition in Singur12.5 Dhamra Port12.6 Soda extraction plant in Tanzania13 See also14 References15 External links<br />[edit]History<br />The beginnings of the Tata Group can be traced back to 1868,[8] when  HYPERLINK "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jamsetji_Nusserwanji_Tata" o "Jamsetji Nusserwanji Tata" Jamsetji Nusserwanji Tata established a trading company dealing in cotton in Bombay (now Mumbai), British India.[9] This was followed by the installation of Empress Mills inNagpur in 1877.  HYPERLINK "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taj_Mahal_Hotel" o "Taj Mahal Hotel" Taj Mahal Hotel in Bombay (now Mumbai) was opened for business in 1903. Sir Dorab Tata, the eldest son of  HYPERLINK "http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Jamsetji&action=edit&redlink=1" o "Jamsetji (page does not exist)" Jamsetji became the chairman of the group after his fathers death in 1904. Under him, the group ventured into steel production (1905) and hydroelectric power generation(1910). After the death of  HYPERLINK "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorab_Tata" o "Dorab Tata" Dorab Tata in 1934,  HYPERLINK "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nowroji_Saklatwala" o "Nowroji Saklatwala" Nowroji Saklatwala headed the group till 1938. He was succeeded by  HYPERLINK "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jehangir_Ratanji_Dadabhoy_Tata" o "Jehangir Ratanji Dadabhoy Tata" Jehangir Ratanji Dadabhoy Tata. The group expanded significantly under him with the establishment of Tata Chemicals (1939), Tata Motors and Tata Industries (both 1945), Voltas (1954), Tata Tea (1962), Tata Consultancy Services (1968) and Titan Industries (1984).  HYPERLINK "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ratan_Tata" o "Ratan Tata" Ratan Tata, the incumbent chairman of the group succeeded JRD Tata in 1991.[10]<br />[edit]Engineering<br />The Tata Nano, world's cheapest car<br />TAL Manufacturing Solutions exports titanium-composite floor beams that are installed in the Boeing 787 aircraft.[11]<br />Tata AutoComp Systems Limited (TACO) and its subsidiaries, auto-component manufacturing<br />Tata Motors (formerly Tata Engineering and Locomotives Company Ltd (TELCO)), manufacturer of commercial vehicles(largest in India) and passenger cars<br />Jaguar and Land Rover<br />Tata Projects<br />Tata Consulting Engineers Limited<br />Telco Construction Equipment Company<br />TRF Bulk Material Handling Equipment and Systems, and Port and Yard Equipments.<br />Voltas, consumer electronics company<br />Voltas Global Engineering Centre<br />[edit]Energy<br />Tata Power is one of the largest private sector power companies. It supplies power to Mumbai, the commercial capital of India and is the retailer of electricity in the northern suburbs of New Delhi.<br />[edit]Chemicals<br />Rallis India<br />Tata Pigments<br />Tata Chemicals, headquartered in Mumbai, India, Tata Chemicals has the largest single soda ash production capacity plant in India. Since 2006 Tata Chemicals has owned Brunner Mond, a United Kingdom-based chemical company with operations in Kenya and the Netherlands.<br />Advinus Therapeutics, headquartered in Bangalore, Indian, a Contract research organization focused on drug discovery and development for Pharmaceutical, Agro and Biotech industries.<br />[edit]Services<br />The Indian Hotels Company<br />Tata Housing Development Company Ltd. (THDC)<br />TATA AIG General Insurance<br />TATA AIG Life Insurance<br />Tata Advanced Systems Limited<br />Tata Asset Management<br />Tata Financial Services<br />Tata Capital<br />Tata Investment Corporation<br />Tata Quality Management Services<br />Tata Share Registry<br />Tata Strategic Management Group (TSMG) is one of the largest consulting firms in South Asia.<br />Tata Services<br />Tata Consulting Engineers Limited<br />[edit]Consumer Products<br />Tata Salt, i-Shakti Salt, Tata Salt Lite<br />Tata Swach water purifier<br />Eight O'Clock Coffee<br />Tata Ceramics<br />Infiniti Retail<br />Tata Tea Limited is the world's second largest manufacturer of packaged tea and tea products. It also owns the Tetley brand of tea sold primarily in Europe.<br />Titan Industries manufacturers of Titan watches<br />Trent (Westside)<br />Tata Sky<br />Tata International Ltd - Leather Products Division<br />Tanishq jewellery<br />Star Bazaar<br />[edit]Information systems and communications<br />Computational Research Laboratories<br />INCAT<br />Nelco<br />Nelito Systems<br />Tata Business Support Services (formerly Serwizsol)<br />Tata Consultancy Services Ltd. (TCS) is Asia's largest software company with 2008-09 revenues being over US$ 6 bn.<br />Tata Elxsi is another software and industrial design company of the Tata stable. Based in Bangalore and Trivandrum.<br />Tata Interactive Systems<br />Tata Technologies Limited<br />Tata Teleservices<br />Tata Communications, formerly VSNL, the Indian telecom giant, was acquired in 2002. Tata-owned VSNL acquired Teleglobe in 2005.<br />CMC Limited<br />TATANET, Managed connectivity and VSAT service provider<br />[edit]The Tata logo<br />The Tata logo was designed by the Wolff Olins consultancy. The logo is meant to signify fluidity; it may also be seen as a fountain of knowledge; maybe a tree of trust under which people can take refuge.<br />[edit]Philanthropy and nation building<br />The Tata Group has helped establish and finance numerous quality research, educational and cultural institutes in India.[12][13] The Tata Group was awarded the Carnegie Medal of Philanthropy in 2007 in recognition of the group's long history of philanthropic activities.[14] Some of the institutes established by the Tata Group are:<br />Tata Institute of Fundamental Research<br />Tata Institute of Social Sciences<br />Indian Institute of Science<br />National Centre for Performing Arts<br />Tata Management Training Centre<br />Tata Memorial Hospital<br />Tata Football Academy<br />Tata Trusts, a group of philanthropic organizations run by the head of the business conglomerate Tata Sons[15]<br />The JRD Tata Ecotechnology Centre<br />The Energy and Resources Institute (earlier known as Tata Energy and Research Institute) - which is an NPO completely committed to the cause of research in the field of renewable energy.<br />A comprehensive list is available on the company website.<br />[edit]Tata acquisitions and targets<br />February 2000 - Tetley Tea Company, $407 million<br />March 2004 - Daewoo Commercial Vehicle Company, $102 million<br />August 2004 - NatSteel's Steel business, $292 million<br />November 2004 - Tyco Global Network, $130 million<br />July 2005 - Teleglobe International Holdings, $239 million<br />October 2005 - Good Earth Corporation<br />December 2005 - Millennium Steel, Thailand, $167 million<br />December 2005 - Brunner Mond Chemicals Limited, $120 million<br />June 2006 - Eight O'Clock Coffee, $220 million<br />November 2006 - Ritz Carlton Boston, $170 million<br />Jan 2007 - Corus Group, $12 billion<br />March 2007 - PT Kaltim Prima Coal (KPC) ( HYPERLINK "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bumi_Resources" o "Bumi Resources" Bumi Resources), $1.1 billion<br />April 2007 - Campton Place Hotel, San Francisco, $60 million<br />February 2008 - General Chemical Industrial Products, $1 billion<br />March 2008 - Jaguar Cars and Land Rover, $2.3 billion<br />March 2008 - Serviplem SA, Spain<br />April 2008 - Comoplesa Lebrero SA, Spain<br />May 2008 -  HYPERLINK "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piaggio_Aero_Industries" o "Piaggio Aero Industries" Piaggio Aero Industries S.p.A., Italy<br />June 2008 - China Enterprise Communications, China<br />June 2008 -  HYPERLINK "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neotel" o "Neotel" Neotel, South Africa.<br />October 2008-  HYPERLINK "http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Miljo_Grenland&action=edit&redlink=1" o "Miljo Grenland (page does not exist)" Miljo Grenland /  HYPERLINK "http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Innovasjon&action=edit&redlink=1" o "Innovasjon (page does not exist)" Innovasjon, Norway<br />Imacid chemical company, Morocco [16]<br />[edit]Targets<br />Close Brothers Group, $2.9 billion<br />Orient-Express Hotels, $2.5 billion<br />January 2008 - T-Systems International (IT division of Deutsche Telekom)<br />[edit]Revenue<br />Tata gets more than 2/3rd of its revenue from outside India.[16]<br />[edit]Controversies and Criticisms<br />[edit]Kalinganagar, Orissa<br />On 2 January 2006, policemen at Kalinganagar, Orissa, opened fire at a crowd of tribal villagers. The villagers were protesting the construction of a compound wall on land historically owned by them, for a Tata steel plant. Some of the corpses were returned to the families in a mutilated condition. When pushed for comment, TATA officials said the incident was unfortunate but that it would continue with its plans to set up the plant.[17]<br />[edit]Dow Chemicals, Bhopal Gas Disaster<br />In November 2006, survivors of the Bhopal gas disaster were outraged by Ratan Tata’s offer to bail out Union Carbide and facilitate investments by Carbide’s new owner Dow Chemical. Tata had proposed leading a charitable effort to clean-up the toxic wastes abandoned by Carbide in Bhopal. At a time when the Government of India has held Dow Chemical liable for the clean-up and requested Rs. 100 crores from the American MNC, survivor’s groups felt that Tata’s offer was aimed at frustrating legal efforts to hold the company liable, and motivated by a desire to facilitate Dow’s investments in India.[18]<br />[edit]Supplies to Burma’s military regime<br />TATA Motors reported deals to supply hardware and automobiles to Burma’s oppressive and anti-democratic military junta has come in for criticism from human rights and democracy activists. In December 2006, Gen. Thura Shwe Mann, Myanmar’s chief of general staff visited the Tata Motors plant in Pune. ["Myanmar Ties." 8 December 2006. The Telegraph, Calcutta, India]. In 2009, TATA Motors announced that it would press ahead with plans to manufacture trucks in Myanmar.[19], HYPERLINK "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tata_Group" l "cite_note-19" [20]<br />[edit]Land acquisition in Singur<br />The Singur controversy HYPERLINK "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tata_Group" l "cite_note-20" [21] in West Bengal led to further questions over TATA’s social record, with protests by locals and political parties over the forced acquisition, eviction and inadequate compensation to those farmers displaced for the TATA Nano plant. As the protests grew, and despite having the support of the Communist Party of India (Marxist) state government, TATA eventually pulled the project out of West Bengal, citing safety concerns. The Singur controversy was one of the few occasions when Ratan Tata was forced to publicly address criticisms and concerns on any environmental or social issue. Ratan Tata subsequently embraced Narendra Modi, the Chief Minister of Gujarat, who quickly made land available for the Nano project.[22]<br />[edit]Dhamra Port<br />On the environmental front, the Dhamra port controversy has received significant coverage, both within India and in Tata’s emerging global markets. (‘India – Tata in troubled waters’, Ethical Corporation, November 2007, London, UK)[23]<br />The Dhamra port, a venture between TATA Steel and Larsen & Toubro, has come in for criticism for its proximity to the Gahirmatha Sanctuary and Bitharkanika National Park, from Indian and international organizations, including Greenpeace.  HYPERLINK "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gahirmatha_Beach" o "Gahirmatha Beach" Gahirmatha Beach is one of the world’s largest mass nesting sites for the Olive Ridley Turtle andBhitarkanika is a designated Ramsar site and India’s second largest mangrove forest. TATA officials have denied that the port poses an ecological threat, and stated that mitigation measures are being employed with the advice of the IUCN.[24] On the other hand, conservation organizations, including Greenpeace, have pointed out that no proper Environment Impact Analysis has been done for the project, which has undergone changes in size and specifications since it was first proposed and that the port could interfere with mass nesting at the Gahirmtha beaches and the ecology of the Bitharkanika mangrove forest.[25], HYPERLINK "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tata_Group" l "cite_note-25" [26]<br />Protests by Greenpeace to Dhamra Port construction is also alleged to be less on factual data and more on hype and DPCL's (Dhamra Port Company Limited) response to Greenpeace questions harbours on these facts,[27][28].<br />[edit]Soda extraction plant in Tanzania<br />Tata, along with a Tanzanian company, joined forces to build a soda ash extraction plant in Tanzania.[29] The Tanzanian government is all for the project.[29] On the other hand, environmental activists are opposing the plant because it would be near Lake Natron, and it could possibly affect the lake's ecosystem and its neighboring dwellers.[30]Tata was planning to change the site of the plant so it would be built 32 km from the lake, but the opposition still thinks it would negatively disturb the environment.[30] It could also jeopardize the Lesser Flamingo birds there, which are already endangered. Lake Natron is where two thirds of Lesser Flamingos reproduce.[31] Producing soda ash involves drawing out salt water from the lake, and then disposing the water back to the lake. This process could interrupt the chemical make up of the lake.[29] Twenty-two African nations are against the creation of the project and have signed a petition to stop its construction.[29]<br />[edit]See also<br />Jamsetji Tata<br />Dorabji Tata<br />J.R.D.Tata<br />Ratan Tata<br />Pallonji Mistry<br />Corus Group<br />[edit]References<br />^ "GEO and GCC". Tata Group. Retrieved 2009-06-21.<br />^ "Leadership with trust". Tata Group. Retrieved 2009-06-21.<br />^ "Tata Companies". Tata Group. Retrieved 2009-06-21.<br />^ "A tradition of trust". Community Initiatives. Tata.com. Archived from the original on 2006-05-23. Retrieved 2006-10-30.<br />^ Sirkin, Harold L; James W. Hemerling, and Arindam K. Bhattacharya (11-06-2008). GLOBALITY: Competing with Everyone from Everywhere for Everything. New York: Business Plus, 304. ISBN 0-446-17829-2.<br />^ "Tata Family Tree" (PDF). tatacentralarchives.com. Archived from the original on 2007-03-25. Retrieved 2007-06-02.<br />^ Kneale, Klaus (6 May 2009). "World's Most Reputable Companies: The Rankings". Forbes. Retrieved 2009-06-21.<br />^ "Our Heritage". Tata Group. Retrieved 2009-06-21.<br />^ Huggler, Justin (1 February 2007). "From Parsee priests to profits: say hello to Tata". The Independent. Retrieved 21 June 2009.<br />^ Hazarika, Sanjoy (28 March 1991). "BUSINESS PEOPLE; Nephew to Take Over Tata Company in India". The New York Times. Retrieved 21 June 2009.<br />^ "India's Tatta Group to supply parts for Boeing Dreamliner".  HYPERLINK "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agence_France-Presse" o "Agence France-Presse" Agence France-Presse. Google News. 6 February 2008. Retrieved 21 June 2009.<br />^ "The rainbow effect". 4 May 2008.<br />^ "India's Tata Group: Empowering marginalized communities". 4 May 2008.<br />^ "U.S. and Indian philanthropists recognized for conviction, courage and sustained efforts". 4 May 2008.<br />^ "Ratan Tata gifts $50m to Cornell varsity". The Economic Times. 21 October 2008. Retrieved 21 June 2009.<br />^ a b Timmons, Heather (4 January 2008). "Tata Pul<br />

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