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English 3395 slideshow
 

English 3395 slideshow

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  • According to the definition in the book Lexicons are a languages inventory of words either native or borrowed. This passage from GeofferyChaucers “ The Canterberys” tales contains an abundance of French vocabulary. The assimilation of French forms into English is shown by the English derivational and inflectional affixes which are attached to the borrowings such as prik-eth, special-ly, engender-ed, courage-s, pilgriimage-s. Despite all the French every function word in this passage remains English, with the exception of the Old Norse pronoun they borrowed in the late Old English Period.
  • According to the text book Phonetics are f
  • According to the book synax is the loss and leveling of inflections in Middle English accompanied two important changes in grammer: the increased use of peripharasis and the development of more fixed word order. Chaucer makes this difficult sometimes with longen after the subject of folk you have to read the full sentence before you can understand it but he does so to keep his rhyming couplets in tack.
  • OU -> OWY-> I

English 3395 slideshow English 3395 slideshow Presentation Transcript

  • Presented By: Keisha Murphy THE CANTERBURY TALES: THE GENERAL PROLOGUE
  • Whan that Aprill with his shoures soote The droughte of march hath perced to the roote, And bathed every veyne in swich licour Of which vertu engendered is the flour; Whan zephirus eek with his sweete breeth Inspired hath in every holt and heeth Tendre croppes, and the younge sonne Hath in the ram his halve cours yronne, And smale foweles maken melodye, That slepen al the nyght with open ye (so priketh hem nature in hir courages); THE CANTERBURY TALES: THE GENERAL PROLOGUE ORIGINAL Thanne longen folk to goon on pilgrimages, And palmeres for to seken straunge strondes, To ferne halwes, kowthe in sondry londes; And specially from every shires ende Of engelond to canterbury they wende, The hooly blisful marttir for to seke, That hem hath holpen whan that they were seeke
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v= QE0MtENfOMU YOUTUBE VIDEO
  • When that April with his shower sweet The Drought of March has Pierced to the root And Bathed every vein in such liquid Of which power created the flower; When zephyr (the west wind)also With his sweet breath Inspired has In every forest And feild Tender crops, and the young son Has In the Ram his half course run And small fowls make melody That sleep all the night with open eye So ? Them nature in her heart Then long folk to go on pilgrimages And pilgrims to seeking foreign shores To distant shrines, known In various lands And specially from every shire’s end Of England to Canterbury they travel The holy blessed martyr for to seek That them has hope for when they were sick THE CANTERBURY TALES: THE GENERAL PROLOGUE TRANSLATION
  • THE CANTERBURY TALES: THE GENERAL PROLOGUE PARAPHRASED
  • The rhyme scheme in this poem consists of herioc couplets* definition : AA BB CC DD Alliteration Imagery Metaphors POETIC FEATURES
  • Some French words throughout the Canterbury Tales are : Perced Veyne Licour Vertu Engendered Flour Inspired Tendre Cours Melodye Priketh Nature Corages Pilgrimages Palmeres Straunge Ferne Specially LEXICONS
  • Spelling and pronunciation has changed from Middle English to Modern Day English. SIGNIFICANT POETIC FEATURES
  • SYNTAX ME :Thanne longen folk to goon on pilgrimage PDE: The people longed to go on trips ME: The holy blissful matter for to seek PDE: The holy bilissful matter for to see
  • FIGURATE LANGUAGE
  • SYMANTIC CHANGE
  • ME: Shoures ME: Droughte ME: Veyne ME: Nyght ME: Sonne ME:Kowthe MdE: Showers MdE: Drought MdE: Vein MdE: Night MdE: Son MdE: Known THE GREAT VOWEL SHIFT