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The Hemingses of Monticello: AnAmerican Family by Annette Gordon-              Reed                         Race, Gender A...
history at Rutgers University. She is the author of Thomas Jefferson andSally Hemings: An American Controversy. She lives ...
slavery. It wouldnt happen in his time, but it would happen. That is not asatisfactory response to many today, but there i...
children by this time, and they all became Jeffersons. As all blacks whopass into the white community must do, in later ye...
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The hemingses of monticello an american family by race, gender and jefferson

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Transcript of "The hemingses of monticello an american family by race, gender and jefferson"

  1. 1. The Hemingses of Monticello: AnAmerican Family by Annette Gordon- Reed Race, Gender And JeffersonBook DescriptionThis epic work tells the story of the Hemingses, whoseclose blood ties to our third president had been systematica lly expungedfrom American history until very recently. Now, historian and legal scholarAnnette Gordon-Reed traces the Hemings family from its origins in Virginiain the 1700s to the familys dispersal after Jeffersons death in 1826. Itbrings to life not only Sally Hemings and Thomas Jefferson but also theirchildren and Hemingss siblings, who shared a father with Jeffersons wife,Martha. The Hemingses of Monticello sets the familys compelling sagaagainst the backdrop of Revolutionary America, Paris on th e eve of its ownrevolution, 1790s Philadelphia, and plantation life at Monticello. Muchanticipated, this book promises to be the most important history of anAmerican slave family ever written. About the Author Annette Gordon-Reed is a professor of law at New York Law School and a professor of
  2. 2. history at Rutgers University. She is the author of Thomas Jefferson andSally Hemings: An American Controversy. She lives in New York City. Questions for Annette Gordon-Reed Amazon.com: One stunning element to this story, for someone who mightonly know its bare outline, is that these families, so intimately relatedacross the lines of race and slavery, were so even before Jeffersons unionwith Sally Hemings: Hemings was not only his slave, but also the half-sister of his late wife, Martha Wayles. (That fact alone could provideenough drama for a hundred novels.) Could you describe the family hemarried into? Gordon-Reed: Well, it has been sort of a mystery. Relatively little isknown about Martha Wayles and her family life before she marriedJefferson, and even after her marriage. A historian, Virginia Scharff, will bewriting on this subject soon. But John Wayles, the father of Sally Hemings,five of Sallys siblings, and Martha has been something of a cipher. I triedfinding out about him when I was working on my first book, ThomasJefferson and Sally Hemings: An American Controversy. I broke off thesearch because his life was not really the focus of the book, but I had tocome back to him for this one. It turns out he was apparently brought toAmerica as a servant, and was given a leg up in life by a prominentVirginian named Philip Ludwell. Martha’s mother, also named Martha (itgets confusing) died not long after she was born. Then she had twostepmothers who died. The first had three daughters with John Wayles.After his third wife died, Wayles had six children with Elizabeth Hemings,the last of whom was Sarah (Sally) Hemings. Jefferson married a womanwho had known a great deal of tragedy in her young life. She had lost hermother, two stepmothers, a husband, and child by the time she was 23,just unfathomable stuff from a modern perspective. Amazon.com: Of course, one other source of drama is that Jefferson, atthe same time that he was one of the greatest advocates for equality andfreedom, also held slaves, including one he was joined so intimately with.How did he reconcile that to himself, if he did? Gordon-Reed: I dont think this was something that Jefferson agonizedabout on a daily basis. This is not to say it wasnt important, but it didn’tconcern him the way it concerns us. I think the Federalists and the threathe believed they posed to the future development of the United Statesconcerned him far more. Jefferson was contradictory, but we are, too. Whodoes not have intellectual beliefs that he or she is not emotionally orconstitutionally capable of living by? I find it more than a little disingenuousto act as if this were something that set Jefferson apart from all mankind.Its always easier to spot others hypocrisies while missing our own. Hedealt with the conflict between recognizing the evils of slavery, to somedegree, by fashioning himself as a benevolent slave holder and takingrefuge in the notion that progress would one day bring about the end of
  3. 3. slavery. It wouldnt happen in his time, but it would happen. That is not asatisfactory response to many today, but there it is. Amazon.com: What was Jeffersons relationship with his children withHemings like? What lives did they find for themselves after his death? Gordon-Reed: That was one of the most interesting things to researchand ponder. There are a series of letters between Jefferson and hisoverseer at Poplar Forest, his retreat in Bedford County, where he spent agood amount of time during his retirement years. In those letters, heannounces his impending arrival. Hell say things like Johnny Hemings andhis two assistants will be coming with me, and depending upon the year,the two assistants were his sons Beverley and Madison Hemings orMadison and Eston Hemings. Poplar Forest is 90 miles away fromMonticello. That was a journey of days together. Then, when they gotthere, John Hemings, Beverley, Madison, and Eston would work on thehouse where Jefferson was staying, where they evidently stayed, too.They were there together, in pretty isolated circumstances, for weeks at atime. Jefferson, who fancied himself a woodworker, too, spent lots of timewith John Hemings and, in the process, spent time with his sons, who wereHemingss apprentices. Madison Hemings remembers Jefferson as beingkind to him and his siblings, as he was to everyone, but said he rarely gavethem the type of playful attention he gave to his grandchildren. The phraseHemings uses is that he was not in the habit of doing that. Yet, all the sonsplayed the violin like Jefferson, and one who became a professionalmusician, Eston, used a favorite Jefferson song as his signature tune. Wehave little sense of his dealings with Harriet, the daughter. He sent heraway from Monticello when she was 21 with the modern equivalent ofabout $900 to join her brother, Beverley, who had left a couple of monthsbefore. I think a very important, and telling, thing is that none of the Hemingschildren had an identity as a servant. The sons were trained to be the kindof artisans Jefferson admired the most, builders--carpenters and joiners--and the daughter spent her time learning to spin and weave. Women of allraces and classes did that, even Jeffersons mothers and sisters. HarrietHemings wasnt turned into a maid for his granddaughters, which wouldhave been a natural thing for her but for her relationship to him. TheHemings children were trained to leave slavery without ever developing thesensibilities of servants. Beverley and Harriet left Monticello as whitepeople, married white people, and pretty much disappeared, although theykept in contact with their nuclear family. When Jefferson died, Madison andEston, who were freed in his will, took their mother and moved intoCharlottesville. They were listed as free white people in the 1830 census,and as free mulatto people in a special census done in 1833 to ask blacksif they wanted to go back to Africa. They all said no. Not long after theirmother died, Madison left Virginia for Ohio and Eston joined him later. Atsome point Eston decided that living as a black person was too onerousand moved to Madison, Wisconsin, under the name E.H. Jefferson. He had
  4. 4. children by this time, and they all became Jeffersons. As all blacks whopass into the white community must do, in later years the family buriedtheir descent from Jefferson. There was no way to claim him as a directancestor without admitting that they were part black, which would have cutoff all the opportunities their children had as whiteFeatures:* ISBN13: 9780393337761* Condition: NEW* Notes: Brand New from Publisher. No Remainder Mark. For More 5 Star Customer Reviews and Lowest Price: The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family by Annette Gordon-Reed 5 Star Customer Reviews and Lowest Price!

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