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Arts organization training

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  • Notes:The CCS are not National Standards – they are common standards that were developed by the Council of Chief State School Officers and the National Governors Association. Work began on the standards in the fall of 2009. The work began with the development of the College and Career Standards so that all future standard development would keep this end goal in mind. It is amazing that the standards were developed so quickly.
  • 45 states and two territories have adopted the CCSS
  • Notes:One of the main focuses of the Obama administration is that students will be college and career ready when they exit high school.This will also likely be one of the main goals of the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) in the coming years.
  • Notes:Reviewers of the CCS have found them to be clearly stated so that all stakeholders can understand them.In the past, there was little basis for collaboration when states each had their own standards. The CCS allows California to work with other states and have a common element for dialogue about best practices, instructional materials, pedagogy and professional development. Potentially, this could create common instructional materials between states, possibly reducing the costs of development of instructional materials.
  • Intent: Transition from Structure and Content of Standards to the shift created by the standards
  • INTENT: Provide visual of 3 categories, or big buckets, of text types. Everything we write is either an opinion/argument, explanation/information, and/or a narrative. Talking Points/Examples:Opinion: used for persuasion can be less formal in tone may only include one viewpiont.Argument: used for persuasion change a reader’s point of view includes opposing point(s) of view bring about some actionInformational/Explanatory: used for clarification to increase the readers knowledge of the subject to enable understanding to enhance comprehensionNarrative: conveys experience, either real or imaginary. History: students write about individuals Science: students write narrative descriptions of scientists, events, etc.
  • Overview of findings about arts references in ELA standards. Examples of a few.
  • ...more findings about arts references...
  • Overview of findings about arts references in ELA standards. Examples of a few.
  • 5 minutes to share with partners – what can you do in your subject with these standards
  • 80% is argument/explanatoryInfusion – analysis of music, opinion on their/others artwork, critiques of performances
  • Transcript

    • 1. The Arts Go HARD CORE Tuesday, March 5, 2013 Presented by Dr. Lisa Gonzales
    • 2. Outcomes• Review the "current state of arts education" in Santa Clara County• Gain an understanding of the new standards for instruction• Learn valuable information on how to interact, access and work with schools and districts with a panel of school leaders Common Core Standards 101 2
    • 3. 3
    • 4. State of the Arts – Feb 2013• Annual survey – 87% response rate• Those that did not respond: Gilroy, Morgan Hill, Mountain View/Los Altos UHSD, San Jose• 96% of district did NOT reduce programs for the 2012/13 school year 4
    • 5. Overall Data• 65% include the arts in their mission, vision, goals• 73% of teachers have access to professional development (PD)• Areas of PD: 68% arts integration, 68% music, 63% visual, 37% theatre, 26% dance, 21% graphic arts 5
    • 6. Staffing • Only 8% of districts (2) have full-time arts coordinators • 15% have a part-time person (5) • The other 77% do not have a staff member assigned to the arts 6
    • 7. Funding• 81% use General Funds (categorical, block grants, Title I federal funds)• 46% have PTA/parent support• 35% use their district/ foundation funds• 23% have a bond/parcel• 19% with private grants• 8% tap into gov’t grants 7
    • 8. Supplements to Programs• 83% with assemblies• 71% offer extra curricular programs• 67% have field trips• 25% have artists in residence• 75% use cultural/ community organizations(write ins – art shows, artdocents, art fairs) 8
    • 9. Additional Training Needs • Digital technology and the arts • Learning objectives in the arts • Arts integration • The arts and Common Core • Arts generalist training (secondary) 9
    • 10. Common Core State Standards What I already What I would like What I learned know about the to learn about the today about the Common Core Common Core Common Core State Standards. State Standards. State Standards.
    • 11. http://youtu.be/5s0rRk9sER0 11
    • 12. The Common Core Standards (CCS orCCSS as we use it in Santa Clara County)were developed by the Council of ChiefState School Officers and the NationalGovernor’s Association Center for BestPractices, and were formally released onJune 2, 2010.
    • 13. States that have adopted theCommon Core State Standards
    • 14. The focus of the CCSS is to ensure students are:• Meeting college & work expectations• Prepared to succeed in a global economy & society• Provided with rigorous content and applications of higher knowledge through higher order thinking skills
    • 15. What are the benefits of the CCSS?• Internationally benchmarked• Student expectations are clear to parents, teachers, and the general public• Allows for collaboration with other states on best practices, instructional materials, and professional development• Reduces costs to the state
    • 16. 16
    • 17. Areas of Emphasis• Provide an integrated model of literacy• Focus on text complexity• Address reading & writing across the curriculum• Emphasize analysis of informational text• Focus on writing arguments and drawing evidence from sources• Emphasize participating in collaborative conversation• Integrate media sources across standards
    • 18. With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about keyK details in a text.1 Ask and answer questions about key details in a text. Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and2 how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.3 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.4 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
    • 19. 5 Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.6 Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.7 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.8 Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
    • 20. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of9- what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the10 text. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of11- what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the12 text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
    • 21. What’s the Shift? Build Focus on Knowledge in Analysis & the Other Evidence Disciplines Increase Text Expand Complexity Vocabulary Balance Literacy & 21st CenturyInformational Skills Text
    • 22. The 3 Big Buckets Narrative Informative/Opinion(K-5) ExplanatoryArgument(6-12)
    • 23. Arts References in Common Core Standards for Reading• If definition of text includes non-print texts (dance, media arts, music, or theatre works)…• …then all reading standards refer to arts- based content or investigation.
    • 24. Reading a work of drama: • RL.5.3: Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings or events in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., how characters interact.)Using songs in instruction: • RL.2.4: Describe how words and phrases (e.g., regular beats, alliteration, rhymes, repeated lines) supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song.Comparing the same work in different media: • RL.6.7: Compare and contrast the experience of reading a story, drama, or poem to listening to or viewing an audio, video, or live version of the text, including contrasting what they “see” and “hear” when reading the text to what they perceive when they listen or watch.Analyzing and interpreting images: • RI.K.7: With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the text in which they appear.Multimedia references: • RI.7.7: Compare and contrast a text to an audio, video, or multimedia version of the text, analyzing each medium’s portrayal of the subject.
    • 25. Arts References in Common Core Standards for Writing• Eight arts links in 100 standards• Visual art/drawing links found in the standards for the lower grades • W.K.2: Use a combination of drawing, writing, and dictating to compose informative/explanatory texts in which they name what they are writing about and supply some information about the topic.• Media Arts/multimedia links: • W.8.2.a: Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories; include formatting, graphics (e.g., charts, tables) and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
    • 26. Arts References in Common Core Standards for Speaking and Listening• 16 arts links in 60 standards• Most references are related to standard #5: Make strategic use of digital media and visual displays of data to express information and enhance understanding of presentations
    • 27. Standard 5: Make strategic use of digital media and digital displays ofdata to express information and enhance understanding ofpresentations• SL.K.5: Add drawings or other visual displays to descriptions as desired to provide additional detail.• SL.2.5: Create audio recordings of stories or poems; add drawings or other visual displays to stories or recounts of experiences when appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings• SL.5.5: Include multimedia components (e.g., graphics, sound) and visual displays in presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes.• SL.8.5: Integrate multimedia and visual displays into presentations to clarify information, strengthen claims and evidence, and add interest.• SL.11-12.5: Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.
    • 28. Arts References in Common Core Standards for Language• The language standards contain one direct arts reference in standard L.5.3: Compare and contrast the varieties of English (e.g., dialects, registers) used in stories, dramas, or poems
    • 29. CCSS Implications for VAPA?• Follow rules for collegial discussions (1.a)• Pose and respond to specific questions with elaboration and detail (1.b)• Review key ideas expressed (1.c)• Interpret information presented in diverse media & formats and explain how it contributes to a topic, text or issue under study (2)
    • 30. CCSS Implications for VAPA?• 6th-12th grade writing has three main focus areas – argument, explanatory, narrative• Infuse the arts with discussion – standards in each grade level (come to discussions prepared)• Have students elaborate on the remarks of others (listening/speaking)• Use of domain-specific words and phrases
    • 31. IDENTITY LIST DEFINE LABEL MEMORIZE CALCULATE ILLUSTRATE WHO, WHAT, WHEN, WHERE, WHY ARRANGE STATE MEASURE TABULATE NAME REPEAT TELL REPORT RECALL RECOGNIZE USE INFER DESIGN QUOTE RECITE CATEGORIZE MATCH CONNECT COLLECT AND DISPLAY LEVEL ONE IDENTIFY PATTERNS (Recall) SYNTHESIZE GRAPH ORGANIZE LEVEL LEVEL CLASSIFY CONSTUCT How the Arts Have APPLY CONCEPTS FOUR DESCRIBE EXPLAIN TWO SEPARATE MODIFY (Extended (Skill/Meaning in Common Thinking) INTERPRET Concept) CAUSE/EFFECT PREDICT CRITIQUE Core ESTIMATE COMPARE INTERPRET DISTINGUISH ANALYZE LEVEL THREE RELATE Strategic Thinking USE CONTEXT CUES CREATE MAKE OBSERVATIONS REVISE ASSESS DEVELOP A LOGICAL ARGUMENT SUMMARIZE PROVE APPRISE CONSTRUCT SHOW USE CONCEPTS TO SOLVE NON-ROUTINE PROBLEMS CRITIQUE COMPARE EXPLAIN PHENOMENA IN TERMS OF CONCEPTS FORMULATE INVESTIGATE DRAW CONCLUSIONS HYPOTHESIZE DIFFERENTIATE CITE EVIDENCE
    • 32.