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An Introduction to Poetry for Fifth Graders
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An Introduction to Poetry for Fifth Graders

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This is an interactive PowerPoint that covers the basic terms of poetry. It is appropriate for the fifth grade classroom.

This is an interactive PowerPoint that covers the basic terms of poetry. It is appropriate for the fifth grade classroom.

Published in: Education, Technology

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  • Thank you for this. It will really help my middle schooler
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  • REFERENCING TO GROUP : '36 POETRY IN THE WORLD'

    Congratulations and thank you for sharing ... We invite you to join us !. You are welcome!

    http://www.slideshare.net/group/36-poetry-in-the-world

    PS: I thank you in advance for your participation
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  • 1. An Introduction to Poetry for Fifth Graders Nicole Kerber ED 205 Sec 01
  • 2. Parts of a Poem Alliteration Onomatopoeia Repetition Rhyme Allegory Metaphor Rhythm Hyperbole Simile Paradox Oxymoron Allusion Resources About the Author CHECK FOR UNDERSTAND Fun Video for Some Review Quit
  • 3. Alliteration The beginning letters of a set of words are the same Example: “Loosen the light Let it dance across the sky” -4th grader Quit
  • 4. Rhyme When two words have similar sounds in their last syllables Example: “Faster than fairies, faster than witches, Bridges and houses, hedges and ditches.” -R.L. Stevenson QuitQuit
  • 5. v Rhythm The “beat” or alteration of stressed and unstressed syllables Example: “I see my boat Is still afloat” Quit
  • 6. Paradox A statement which apparently contradicts itself Example: “Thence Shall life succeed in that it seems to fail” -Robert Browning Quit
  • 7. Onomatopoeia The sound of the word is like the sound of the thing it is describing Example: “Pop, pop, pop! Says the popcorn in the pan” -Louise Abney Quit
  • 8. Allegory Story where persons and events are meant to represent something other than themselves alone Example: TIME “Who’s creeping around the clock so rapidly? Where are you going? Who are you? Round and round again. Every move you make screaming and scolding, ‘Rush! Rush! Hurry!’ STOP!” -Jennifer, age 13 Quit
  • 9. Hyperbole An exaggeration Example: “Suddenly night leaves And light takes its place Shining like a ball of fire Like a parade Cymbals! Horns! Drums! You know the morning has arrived.” -Kim, age 11 Quit
  • 10. Oxymoron Two apparently opposite ideas are put together (a squashed paradox) Example: “Freezing fire, burning ice” -John Milton Quit
  • 11. Repetition Repeating words or whole groups of words Example: “Loosen the knot of birds. Don’t ruffle the leaves. Don’t rattle the trees. Don’t blow over the bike. Fold the rainbow neatly.” -Billy, age 9 Quit
  • 12. Metaphor Direct comparison without using the words “like” or “as” Example: “Broken glass in the alley, Broken glass in the street. I am the city wind. I whip through slums On a rainy day.” -Tim, age 10 Quit
  • 13. Simile Comparison using the words “like” or “as” Example: “Brave man On a high wire Above the spellbound crowd. Like a spider on its silk web, He glides.” -Joseph, age 13 Quit
  • 14. Allusion Reference to commonly known stories or characters Example: “He was a very Hercules, and I a famous coward” Quit
  • 15. Check for Understanding Question One: Which term does this poem represent? Wonder what happened To Flash Gordon and Tarzan- And sunny Sundays. A. Rhyme or B. Allusion Quit
  • 16. Sorry! Try Again! Quit
  • 17. Good Job! Question Two: Which term does this poem represent? Spring is here And summer is near. Winter is far, And we’ll sing about a star. A. Rhyme or B. Metaphor Quit
  • 18. Sorry! Try Again! Quit
  • 19. Good Job! Question Three: Which term does this poem represent? My ears will be ringing ‘till I’m half deaf A. Hyperbole or B. Onomatapoeia Quit
  • 20. Sorry! Try Again! Quit
  • 21. Good Job! Question Four: Which term does this poem represent? My apartment bulges out Like a huge balloon. A. Simile or B. Metaphor Quit
  • 22. Sorry! Try Again! Quit
  • 23. Good Job! Question Five: Which term does this poem represent? Crash violently Cars burn. Rubber! Smash! BAM Car explodes violently-AHH! But wait… -Bert, age 11 A. Allegory or B. Onomatopoeia Quit
  • 24. Sorry! Try Again! Quit
  • 25. CONGRATULATIONS! Quit
  • 26. Resources A Celebration of Bees: Helping Children Write Poetry by Barbara Juster Esbensen Poems Please! Sharing Poetry with Children by David Booth and Bill Moore http://www.cccoe.net/social/images/g0501342.GIF Quit
  • 27. About the Author Nicole Kerber is currently a sophomore at Grand Valley State University. She is studying English and Elementary Education. She is from Hopkins, Michigan. Her hobbies and interests include reading, movies, culture, travel, and spending time with loved ones. I would love to hear from you! Send me an email! Quit