Remembering Me: Lesson On Memory

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Remembering Me: Lesson On Memory

  1. 1. Remembering Me: A Lesson of Remembering Demitri Youngblood [email_address] LIS 201: Introduction to Information Literacy 5/2/11
  2. 2. 5/2/11 LIS 201: Introduction to Information Literacy How Does Your Brain Work? Your brain is the hub of your nervous system. It is made up of 100 billion nerve cells - about the same as the number of trees in the Amazon rainforest. Each cell is connected to around 10,000 others. So the total number of connections in your brain is the same as the number of leaves in the rainforest - about 1000 trillion.
  3. 3. LIS 201: Introduction to Information Literacy 5/2/11 LIS 201: Introduction to Information Literacy What Is Memory? <ul><li>a : the power or process of reproducing or recalling what has been learned and retained especially through associative mechanisms
  4. 4. b : the store of things learned and retained from an organism's activity or experience as evidenced by modification of structure or behavior or by recall and recognition </li></ul>
  5. 5. 5/2/11 LIS 201: Introduction to Information Literacy Why Is Memory So Important? <ul><li>Your memory is your brain's filing system. It contains everything you have learned. You can store an amazing amount of information.
  6. 6. – for example, as a child you learned around ten new words a day, and you may eventually know 100,000 or more. </li></ul>
  7. 7. 5/2/11 LIS 201: Introduction to Information Literacy Comparison/Contrast On Memory <ul><li>Male Perspective
  8. 8. CRS Disease
  9. 9. Sticky Notes
  10. 10. Limbic System
  11. 11. Death </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Jonathan Nolan </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Stephen Fuller </li></ul><ul><li>Female Perspective
  12. 12. Mental Illness
  13. 13. Imagination
  14. 14. Megalomania
  15. 15. Phallic Symbol </li></ul>
  16. 16. 5/2/11 LIS 201: Introduction to Information Literacy Earl's Memory <ul><li>Sticky Notes
  17. 17. Therapy
  18. 18. Head Injury </li></ul><ul><li>“ CIGARETTE?
  19. 19. CHECK FOR LIT
  20. 20. ONES FIRST,
  21. 21. STUPID!” </li></ul>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I-lDkWxy8ro
  22. 22. 5/2/11 LIS 201: Introduction to Information Literacy Eudora's Memory <ul><li>Imagination or Reminiscences </li></ul><ul><li>Fantasizes </li></ul><ul><li>Experiences </li></ul>
  23. 23. 5/2/11 LIS 201: Introduction to Information Literacy Writer's View of Memory <ul><li>Fuller used memory as in terms of particular act of creating or recollection of an image or impression from earlier life. </li></ul><ul><li>Nolan view memory as a metaphor because he compares it to death. </li></ul>
  24. 24. 5/2/11 LIS 201: Introduction to Information Literacy Others View of Memory <ul><li>Aid </li></ul><ul><li>Increases Activities </li></ul>
  25. 25. 5/2/11 LIS 201: Introduction to Information Literacy Work Cited <ul><li>Fuller, Stephen M. “Memory’s Narrative Gossamer: Configuration of Desire in Eudora Welty’s ‘A Memory.’” Studies in Short Fiction 35.4 (Fall 1998): 331-37.
  26. 26. Nolan, Jonathan “Memento Mori” Impulse Nine Web. 12 Mar. 2011.
  27. 27. Web Sources: http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/WhoAmI/FindOutMore.aspx </li></ul>
  28. 28. 5/2/11 LIS 201: Introduction to Information Literacy Thanks For Your Attention, Any Questions?

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