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Introduction to FatWire 6.3
Introduction to FatWire 6.3
Introduction to FatWire 6.3
Introduction to FatWire 6.3
Introduction to FatWire 6.3
Introduction to FatWire 6.3
Introduction to FatWire 6.3
Introduction to FatWire 6.3
Introduction to FatWire 6.3
Introduction to FatWire 6.3
Introduction to FatWire 6.3
Introduction to FatWire 6.3
Introduction to FatWire 6.3
Introduction to FatWire 6.3
Introduction to FatWire 6.3
Introduction to FatWire 6.3
Introduction to FatWire 6.3
Introduction to FatWire 6.3
Introduction to FatWire 6.3
Introduction to FatWire 6.3
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Introduction to FatWire 6.3

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Introduction to FatWire 6.3 for Rush U Web page managers.

Introduction to FatWire 6.3 for Rush U Web page managers.

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Transcript

  • 1. Introduction to FatWire 6.3 Ken Quandt, MSLIS Web Managing Editor Marketing and Communications
  • 2. Your Web Site’s Goals
    • Question: What are your Web site’s goals?
  • 3. Your Web Site’s Goals
    • Question: What are your Web site’s goals?
      • Make the sale.
  • 4. Your Web Site’s Goals
    • Question: What are your Web site’s goals?
      • Make the sale.
      • Deliver the service.
  • 5. Your Web Site’s Goals
    • Question: What are your Web site’s goals?
      • Make the sale.
      • Deliver the service.
      • Build the brand.
  • 6. Your Web Site
    • Your site should be customer-centric.
  • 7. Your Web Site
    • Your site should be customer-centric.
    • Your site must be useful.
  • 8. Your Web Site
    • Your site should be customer-centric.
    • Your site must be useful.
    • Focus on most important audience first.
  • 9. Your Web Site
    • Your site should be customer-centric.
    • Your site must be useful.
    • Focus on most important audience first.
    • Two types of Web sites:
      • Task-dominant site
      • Audience-dominant site
  • 10. Your Web Site
    • Your site should be customer-centric.
    • Your site must be useful.
    • Focus on most important audience first.
    • Two types of Web sites:
      • Task-dominant site
      • Audience-dominant site
    • Your site should either make a task easier or help achieve a goal .
  • 11. Your Web Site
    • Content should support those tasks or it should not go up.
          • Web content guru, Gerry McGovern
            • Chicago, Illinois, 2007
  • 12. Your Web Site
    • What it is NOT:
      • The next great American novel.
      • A dissertation.
      • A research report.
      • A university catalog (that’s already been created by the Registrar’s Office).
      • A place to share photos from the department picnic five years ago.
  • 13. Writing for the Web
    • In 2009:
      • Average visit to Rush U Web site lasted under eight (8) minutes
      • Average number of pages viewed per visit was about four (4)
      • Among Top 20 Platforms:
        • iPhone (#7)
        • Google Android (#13)
        • Blackberry (#17)
        • Windows Mobile (#20)
  • 14. Writing for the Web
    • Competition for Your Web Site Content:
      • Music
      • Text messages
      • Twitter
      • Facebook
      • YouTube
      • Kindle
      • Phone calls
      • Television
  • 15. Writing for the Web
      • Trains
      • Tickets
      • Toilets
  • 16. Writing for the Web
      • Trains
      • Tickets
      • Toilets
        • Be concise . Get to the point .
  • 17. Writing for the Web at Rush
      • Style Guide: The Associated Press Stylebook
      • Rush In-House Style Manual
  • 18. FatWire Basics
    • FatWire 6.3 – www.rushu.rush.edu
      • Login page:
        • edit.rushu.rush.edu
          • Use same username and password as that you use for your Rush PC
      • Accessible off campus with SecurID
        • Metaframe
            • or
        • Remote access to your Rush PC
  • 19. Learning Objectives
    • At the end of this session you should be able to:
      • Log into FatWire.
      • Explain what an “asset” is in FatWire.
      • Locate the “Rush Assets” and “Rush Pages” tabs.
      • Understand the difference between the “Rush Assets” tab and the “Rush Pages” tab.
      • Expand and collapse “nodes” on a “tree.”
      • Distinguish between “Level” pages and content blocks.
      • Edit an existing content block and save changes.
      • Add or remove a content block from a “Level” page.
      • Add or remove a document from a “Level” page.
      • Add or remove a link from a “Level” page.
      • Remember the specifications for images.
      • Understand what a workflow group is and what roles are included in workflow.
      • Locate FatWire resources on the Rush U Web site.
  • 20. Questions?
      • Ken Quandt
      • E-mail: [email_address]
      • Phone: 2-6846

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