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Women & Entrepreneurship in Malaysia - Strategies & Action Plans

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Wawasan Open University (WOU) 4th RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL AND PROJECT WORKSHOP …

Wawasan Open University (WOU) 4th RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL AND PROJECT WORKSHOP
KL, May 2011

• Trends on Women & Entrepreneurship (Global and Malaysia)
• Why Women Rule
• Malaysian Government Support for Women and Entrepreneurship
• Barriers and Challenges to Entrepreneurship
• Understanding Your Business
• Where Do I start?
• Access To Funding and Capital in Malaysia
• Networking, Assistance and Support in Malaysia

Published in: Business, Travel

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  • 1. WOMEN &ENTREPRENEURSHIP INMALAYSIASTRATEGIES AND ACTION PLANSKenny OngCNI Holdings Berhad
  • 2. Intro: CNI1. 22 years old2. Core Business: MLM3. Others: Contract Manufacturing, F&B Retail, Export/Trading, eCommerce, Shared Services4. Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei, Indonesia, India, China, Hong Kong, Philippines, Italy, Taiwan, Oman, United States, Vietnam5. Staff force: ± 500 (Malaysia)6. Distributors: 150,000 (Malaysia)7. Products: Consumer Goods and Services
  • 3. The Business World Today…
  • 4. The World Today… 13th April 2009 •Two Domino’s employees •YouTube •Apology from Domino’s after 48 hours •1 million hits •Twitter: questions on silence •LinkedIn: suggestions by users in forum BusinessWeek, May 4, 2009
  • 5. Guess Who?
  • 6. Intro Trends & Statistics Barriers Government and Intro InitiativesChallenges 10th Malaysia Plan
  • 7. Trends: Women (Global)• One billion people living on less than US$1 a day, an estimated 70 per cent of whom are girls and women.• Globally, the participation rate of women in economic activities is 52.5 per cent,• Income earned by women is less than that of men’s, with the ratio ranging from 0.83:1 in Kenya to as low as 0.19:1 in Oman Source: “Malaysia - Nurturing Women Entrepreneurs”, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Malaysia, May 2008.
  • 8. Trends: Women (Global)Low Literacy: Why women have been prevented fromparticipating fully in the economy Source: “Malaysia - Nurturing Women Entrepreneurs”, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Malaysia, May 2008.
  • 9. Trends: Women (Malaysia)The level of gender inequality in Malaysia declined sharplyover the period 1980-2004 Source: “Malaysia - Nurturing Women Entrepreneurs”, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Malaysia, May 2008.
  • 10. Trends: Women (Malaysia)• Since 1990: rapid increase in the share of female employment in the wholesale and retail trade, hotels, and restaurants sector and the financial services sector• Ratio of estimated female to male earned income is a mere 0.36.• Sizable portion of women to stop working after their first child has been a continuing feature of Malaysia’s labour market.• A big challenge for Malaysia is to increase the proportion of Malaysian women in higher professional positions Source: “Malaysia - Nurturing Women Entrepreneurs”, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Malaysia, May 2008.
  • 11. Trends: Women (Malaysia)Women in Malaysia have high education attainment, howeverlabour force participation is still low
  • 12. Trends: Women (Malaysia)Distribution of Malaysian Women Entrepreneurs by Ethnicity,Stratum, and Age Group Source: Malaysian Labour Force Report (Department of Statistics, 2004)
  • 13. Trends: Women (Conclusion & Summary)1. Women entrepreneurship has been recognised as an important untapped source of economic growth2. Women entrepreneurship is the best and fastest way forward to bridge gap in gender inequality
  • 14. Why Women Rule
  • 15. Men vs. Women: Getting Dressed
  • 16. Decision ChainInfluencer Why Women Rule Buyer User
  • 17. Men vs. Women
  • 18. Government Initiatives• Gender as a development focus was first mentioned in the Third Malaysia Plan (1976– 1980)• 2001: formation of the Ministry of Women, Family and Community Development (MWFCD)• 2004, the Cabinet Committee on Gender Equality• The Ninth Malaysia Plan (2006–2010): gender equality and women’s empowerment, new policies and strategies to deepen the mainstreaming of women in development Source: “Malaysia - Nurturing Women Entrepreneurs”, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Malaysia, May 2008.
  • 19. Government Initiatives [10th Malaysia Plan]12 National Key Economic Areas - Oil and gas - Palm oil and related-products - Financial services - Wholesale and retail - Tourism - Information and communications Opportunities fortechnology Entrepreneurship - Education - Electrical and electronic - Business services - Private healthcare - Agriculture - Greater Kuala Lumpur Source: “TENTH MALAYSIA PLAN 2011-2015”, THE ECONOMIC PLANNING UNIT PRIME MINISTER’S DEPARTMENT PUTRAJAYA 2010
  • 20. KNOWING YOUR BUSINESS
  • 21. Barriers and Challenges Understanding Business BarriersNetworking Access to& Support Capital
  • 22. End“Having money but no solidbusiness idea is like havingmotivation with no direction”
  • 23. Business ModelWhy it’s the most important thing you have to know
  • 24. The McPlaybook* Make it easy to eat Make it easy to prepare • 50% drive-thru • High Turnover • Meals held in one hand • Tasks simple to learn & repeat Make it quick Make what customers want • “Fast Food” • Prowls market for new • Tests new products products for Cooking Times • Monitored field tests*Adapted from: Businessweek , Februrary 5th 2007
  • 25. What is the Business Model?•Google•Tata Nano USP Market Profit Model Discipline
  • 26. What is the Business Model? USP MarketProfit Model Discipline
  • 27. What is the Business Model? USP MarketProfit Model Discipline
  • 28. Business Model: Profit Model RevenueAssets Cost Cash Margin Flow
  • 29. Market Discipline Product "They are the most innovative" •LV Leadership "Constantly renewing and creative" "Always on the leading edge" Customer•Air Asia Operational •Ramly Intimacy Excellence "Exactly what I need""A great deal!" Customized products Excellent/attractive price Personalized communications Minimal acquisition cost and "Theyre very responsive" hassle Preferential service and Lowest overall cost of flexibility ownership Recommends what I need"A no-hassles firm" "Im very loyal to them" Convenience and speed Helps us to be a success Reliable product and service
  • 30. Market Disciplines Product Leadership (best product)Operational Excellence Customer Intimacy (low cost producer) (best total solution)
  • 31. Market Disciplines Product Leadership (best product) Operational Excellence Customer Intimacy (low cost producer) (best total solution)Ref: The Discipline of Market Leaders, Michael Treacy & Fred Wiersema; 1995
  • 32. Market Disciplines Product Leadership (best product) Operational Excellence Customer Intimacy (low cost producer) (best total solution)Ref: The Discipline of Market Leaders, Michael Treacy & Fred Wiersema; 1995
  • 33. Market Discipline: Disciplines, Priorities, and KPIsOperational Product Leadership Customer Intimacy Excellence • New, state of the art • Management by• Competitive price products or services Fact• Error free, reliable • Risk takers • Easy to do business with• Fast (on demand) • Meet volatile customer needs • Have it your way• Simple (customization) • Fast concept-to-• Responsive counter • Market segments• Consistent of one • Never satisfied - information for all obsolete own and • Proactive, flexible• Transactional competitors products • Relationship and• Once and Done • Learning organization consultative selling • Cross selling
  • 34. Alignment & Consistency Product Leadership (best product) Operational Excellence Customer Intimacy (low cost producer) (best total solution)Ref: The Discipline of Market Leaders, Michael Treacy & Fred Wiersema; 1995
  • 35. Alignment & Consistency Apple powerful Product Leadership products, premium (best product) pricing, limited range Still Doing well in HP well-balanced Acer super lean 2009-2011 portfolio, mass cost structure, aggressive pricing customization Operational Excellence Customer Intimacy (low cost producer) (best total solution)Ref: The Discipline of Market Leaders, Michael Treacy & Fred Wiersema; 1995
  • 36. The Business Model USP MarketProfit Model Discipline
  • 37. ConclusionWHERE DO I GO FROM HERE?
  • 38. “Hope is not a strategy.” John Maxwell
  • 39. How Do I Start?1. Determine your objectives and reasons ‘why?’2. What sort of business is suitable for me?3. Where can I get financing?4. Join business networking groups5. Ask for advice from successful entrepreneurs that you know
  • 40. Why Entrepreneurship?• Second income (side income)• Dual income family• Become rich• Take care of parents/children/spouse• Freedom from job/boss (current job)• Savings for Retirement• Unemployment Self Employed ≠ Business
  • 41. Sources of Extra or More Income• Lottery• Investment (Passive)• Change Job/Career• Part Time Job• Stock Market/Trading• Insurance/Unit Trust• Self Employed• Business
  • 42. Employment vs. EntrepreneurshipEmployment Entrepreneurship• Stable income • Unstable income• Low Risk • High risk• Fixed/Limited income • Unlimited income• Fixed hours • Flexible hours• No control • Full control
  • 43. Popular Business Opportunities for WomenBusiness Types RemarksHome-based Business Microenterprises Direct Selling CraftsFinancial Insurance Unit Trust Real EstateFranchise F&B Education/Child careServices F&B Education BeautyTrading Clothes Beauty Other Products
  • 44. Post Recession Trends and ImplicationsIndustry Convergence/ExtinctionSocial Networking What do theseIncreased Regulations mean to us?Green & CSRNon-Profit/NGOincrease
  • 45. Global TrendsBack-sourcing Power re-balancingBottom-up Mergers, Acquisitions &Innovation/Disruptions DivestmentMobile Devices Lower Middle Class ruleNationalism and Extreme EmergingProtectionism CountriesCurrency Wars BRIC and PIIGS
  • 46. Retail Trends?Cutting back In-store AdsLet consumers help RFID technologythemselvesSmaller stores Niche private labelsReady-made products Eco-friendly storesEthnic stores In-store restaurants
  • 47. Where do Malaysians get money for Business?• Savings• Sell stuff (e.g. Lelong.com)• FAMA• Relatives• Joint Venture• Direct Selling• Government• Banks• Tai Yee Loong (not recommended)
  • 48. Networking & AssistanceSpecial Assistance Schemes for Women EntrepreneursExecuted by SMIDEC (August 1999–August 2007)
  • 49. Micro Finance and SME FinancingDefinition of SMEs• Micro business - sales <250K,less < 5• Small enterprise - sales <10m, less < 50• Medium enterprise - sales <25m, less < 150Micro Finance = Loans of up to RM50, 000 ; No Collateral
  • 50. Networking & AssistanceMicrocredit Schemes in Malaysia
  • 51. Networking & Assistance Profile of Microcredit Institutions in Malaysia
  • 52. Networking & AssistanceMicrofinance Graduation Programme – Mechanism for Adequateand Relevant Access to Financing in Malaysia
  • 53. Support & Networking• National Association of Women Entrepreneurs of Malaysia (NAWEM)• Federation of Women Entrepreneur Associations Malaysia• PUMM - Malaysia Entrepreneurs Development Association (Persatuan Usahawan Maju Malaysia)
  • 54. Support• Malaysia Business Startup Community http://malaysia-bsc.ning.com
  • 55. Government Support• MITI• MIDA – Malaysia Industrial Development Authority• MATRADE - Malaysia External Trade Development Corporation – Matching grant for market development• MPC - Malaysia Productivity Corporation• SME Corporation (formerly SMIDEC) – Advisory, financial, infrastructure, support & services – Central point of reference for info and advisory services• MIDF – Malaysia Industrial Development Bhd• SME Bank
  • 56. Competencies required: Women Entrepreneurship Technical Soft Skills Market• finance • Motivation • Market research• planning • Negotiation • Funding &• marketing • Selling financing options• distribution • Grooming • Business• branding • People skills networks• packaging and • Time labeling Management• Contract & legal • Life balance
  • 57. Encouragement for Entrepreneurs "The digital watch didnt come from established watch companies, the calculator didnt come from slide rule or addingmachine companies, video games didnt comefrom board-game manufacturers Parker Brosor Mattel, the ballpoint pen didnt come from fountain pen manufacturers, and Google didnt come from the Yellow Pages" Bob Seidensticker, Futurehype
  • 58. End “Do something you love so muchthat you are willing to do it for free. Then, do it so well that others are willing to pay you for it.” Unknown
  • 59. Thank You. soft copy of slides:http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blog spot.com/