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Bridge Knowle Workshop - Interview & Recruitment

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Bridge Knowle - Interview & Recruitment Techniques Workshop …

Bridge Knowle - Interview & Recruitment Techniques Workshop
An Effective Guide & a Practical Approach to the Best Candidate
Kuala Lumpur, February 2012
Workshop Highlights
• Develop Leads on new employees through a Variety of Recruitment Sources
• Conduct own Rating System on Necessity Basis
• Use a Goal-Directed Interview to Discover In-Depth Background information about the Candidate
• Understand & Comply with Legal Rules and Guidelines
• Implement an Interview Preparation Process that is Simple & Effective
• Formulate an Interviewing Strategy, including Opening & Closing of an Interview
• Establish consistent Recruiting, Screening & Hiring Procedures
• Identify the Candidate’s Strengths & Weaknesses
• Acknowledge a selection Standard for Employment

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  • Good morning/afternoon. I’m Katherine Spencer Lee, executive director of Robert Half Technology. [GIVE A BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE COMPANY AND WHAT YOU DO]. As most of you know, hiring mistakes are costly. They can be made in an instant but can require significant money and time to correct. Not to mention, poor employees can harm your group’s reputation and productivity. A new help desk professional who lacks grace under pressure or an ability to explain complex information clearly to end-users, for instance, can quickly generate a host of problems for your team. While not all hiring mistakes can be avoided, many can be prevented with a strategic hiring process. Today, I’m here to share some ideas to help you establish a system that works for you.
  • Each of the 5 Job Families have been independently validated. Norms and interview questions have also been tailored for each of the Job Families Call Center applicants would be scored as “Administrative/Clerical”
  • Each of the 5 Job Families have been independently validated. Norms and interview questions have also been tailored for each of the Job Families Call Center applicants would be scored as “Administrative/Clerical”
  • This survey sends a clear message to any organization – Be attentive to the applicant – it can be the difference between getting the candidate you want and losing a talented person to the competition.
  • Each of the 5 Job Families have been independently validated. Norms and interview questions have also been tailored for each of the Job Families Call Center applicants would be scored as “Administrative/Clerical”
  • Each of the 5 Job Families have been independently validated. Norms and interview questions have also been tailored for each of the Job Families Call Center applicants would be scored as “Administrative/Clerical”
  • The first hiring mistake I’d like to talk about is filling desks, not needs. When you lose someone in your group, it’s tempting to hire someone for the open position without giving the situation much thought. But every time you have a vacancy, it’s an opportunity to analyze what type of skills will most efficiently and effectively satisfy your staffing needs. Your analysis might show, for example, that instead of replacing a Level-2 professional with someone with the same experience and skills, you would benefit more by hiring another person to handle first-tier calls. Alternately, you may distribute someone’s responsibilities among the members of your current team and supplement their efforts with contract IT professionals.
  • Another common mistake is failing to make recruiting an ongoing priority. The best employers identify and track the workers they really want, and their hunts are constant – not just when job openings arise. Vacancies can occur when you least expect them, so it is always smart to have an active base of candidates. Even if you’re not hiring, stay in touch with prospective candidates. These may include people who have contacted your firm about help desk positions and individuals referred to you by employees. [KSL – Do you have an anecdote about a candidate you’ve “tracked” that turned into a great hire?] Invite the professionals you meet to informal company events, such as after-work team outings and barbecues. That way, they’ll get to know your company and you can see how they interact with others on the help desk team. Participate in associations like the Help Desk Institute to meet good candidates. Finally, use your company website to collect resumes. You don’t have to list specific positions – just provide enough information so help desk professionals know how to submit their resumes and note that your company is always seeking top talent. When you receive a good resume, invite the person for an interview and let him or her know that while you’re not hiring now, you may be in the future.
  • [ ASK AUDIENCE: HOW MANY OF YOU HAVE SEEN AN UNREALISTIC JOB DESCRIPTION LIKE THE ONE ABOVE? ] [NOW, HOW MANY OF YOU HAVE POSTED AN AD LIKE THIS BEFORE? WELL, YOU’RE NOT ALONE, IT’S A COMMON MISTAKE.] Descriptions like this often occur when firms are trying to replace one person who performed many roles or combine several jobs into one. They are also seen when employers feel the job market is in their favor and they can raise the bar on the types of candidates they’ll consider. While there is nothing wrong with aiming high, you may not attract very many applicants if you aim too high with your requirements. Candidates who see these requirements are likely to pass your firm by in search of employers with more realistic expectations. And there aren’t too many help desk professionals with the background outlined above who are willing to take a Level-2 help desk position, let alone one requiring night and weekend work. Carefully assess your job requirements before searching for candidates to make sure you are seeking the skills essential to performing the job effectively. You may also want other managers and staff to take a look at the job description to make sure it is realistic.
  • Keep in mind, too, that if your job descriptions are too vague, you may be inundated with resumes from unqualified candidates because they are unclear exactly what you are looking for. The Mystery Job Ad outlined above doesn’t tell applicants exactly what you need: What does a Level-2 help desk professional do at your company? Do you seek someone with basic computer skills or in-depth knowledge of Windows systems? Does a flexible work schedule mean a four-day work week or being available 24 hours a day, seven days a week? The goal is to create a job ad that is eye-catching and shows that you’re a top-notch firm. Your ad doesn’t need to be the largest on the page, but it should make a positive impression with candidates. Remember, people may be scanning through many other similar ads and you want yours to stand out for the right reasons. [KSL -- Let audience know they can pick up a copy of RHT Glossary of Job Descriptions and a Salary Guide after the session.]
  • When you place an ad soliciting resumes, establish a system for managing them before they arrive. An effective system should include: Benchmarks (You want to screen people in, not screen people out. There’s “must haves” and “nice to haves.”) Special requirements Qualifications/attributes critical to strong performance The best way to evaluate resumes is to review them all at once. Do not review them sporadically as they come in. Store them in a folder to look at when you have some quiet time and won’t be interrupted. This will allow you to give everyone equal and fair consideration. Don’t wait too long to review resumes though; strong candidates may be recruited by multiple companies. You can’t afford to procrastinate during this process. ((Can refer to today’s tightening labor market)) Reviewing resumes is a job you should not delegate. Why? Because someone else may not be able to spot “resumes in the rough” – those sent by that ideal employee who, unfortunately, has poor resume-writing skills.
  • Executives surveyed by our company recently cited typos or grammatical errors as the most common resume mistake. [ ASK AUDIENCE: WHAT ARE SOME OF THE OTHER RESUME “RED FLAGS” THAT COME TO MIND?] Make sure you’re paying attention to these issues as you screen resumes. Take note of the wording in each resume. Does the candidate concretely define his or her role? Phrases like “participated in,” “familiar with,” or “in association,” for example, can signal that the candidate lacks expertise in a particular area. Functional resumes – those organized by various categories, such as skills and qualifications – sometimes are used to conceal information, like numerous employment gaps. Watch out for holes in this type of resume. In general, it’s a good idea to start at the bottom of each resume and work your way up, as candidates tend to list their least flattering information last. In addition to wording and organization, consider the overall look of the resume. One with typos or formatting mistakes can signal a candidate lacks attention to detail or isn’t that interested in the job. However, keep in mind that some help desk professionals just aren’t good resume writers. You don’t always need to hire the candidate with the most polished presentation skills. But you do want to rule out someone who is excessively sloppy or unprofessional.
  • [ ASK AUDIENCE: HOW EFFECTIVE DO YOU THINK INTERVIEWS ARE AT ASSESSING CANDIDATES? ] Research from the University of Michigan found that “the typical interview increases the likelihood of choosing the best candidate by a mere two percent.” That’s probably because many managers aren’t very good interviewers. [ ASK AUDIENCE: HAVE YOU RECEIVED ANY FORMAL INTERVIEW TRAINING? IF NOT, HOW DID YOU LEARN? ] One of the biggest problems is that many managers tend to “wing” the interview. But this is one area where you want to plan ahead. Just as with every other step of the hiring process, you need to have a system in place. This will give you an objective standard on which to base your conclusions. Check in with more senior colleagues who may have had more experience interviewing for tips on techniques they felt were particularly insightful. There also are a number of sources online that can provide you with useful information. Job boards and publications such as the Wall St. Journal’s CareerJournal.com, and Workforce Management magazine’s www.workforce.com also offer great advice. In addition, ask your interviewees roughly the same number of questions, and take notes on their responses to ensure you’re evaluating consistently.
  • Timing is important with job interviews. [READ FROM SLIDE.] Why is the morning the best time to interview candidates? In general, it’s when you are likely to be less distracted. You need to schedule interviews for quiet times. If you’re likely to be interrupted in your office, hold the meeting somewhere else, such as a small conference room. In my experience, the first candidate is somewhat less likely to be hired. That’s often because the hiring manager simply can’t remember that person very well. It also could be because the interviewer is worried about hiring the first person without having evaluated other applicants. Either way, it’s a potential bias to be aware of when making your hiring decisions.
  • When interviewing, start out with a basic ice-breaker question that will make it clear you’ve done your homework on the candidate. This is the type of question that the person should be expecting, and you may get a well-rehearsed answer. However, you are just trying to get the conversation started. After a few easy questions, you’ll want to move into more challenging territory. Questions such as: [ READ QUESTIONS FROM SLIDE. ] When inquiring about a candidate’s professional achievements, try to determine how he or she defines success. Is it through winning customer service awards? Handling difficult technical questions successfully? Collaborating with others? Is the person’s idea of success in synch with yours and the firm’s? When you ask about working with a difficult end-user or manager, pay attention to how the candidate defines “difficult.” For example, if a previous supervisor is defined as a micromanager, it may suggest the person prefers a hands-off management style. Note how the candidate describes the situation. Is the person diplomatic? By asking the candidate what kind of environment he or she will be least comfortable in, you’re more likely to get a candid answer. If you inquire about his or her preferred work environment, the interviewee will likely describe what is known about your organization.
  • When progressing through the interview, it’s important to remember that if you’re doing most of the talking, you’re making a mistake. Your goal is to get the candidate to talk. I’m not suggesting you keep candidates in the dark, but it’s best to keep your remarks brief. You might be tempted to give a long history of your company during the interview, Savvy help desk professionals will use the information you provide to tell you exactly what you want to hear. Make sure you’re listening attentively during the interview. This can be more challenging than you think. Sometimes managers begin rehearsing in their minds the next question they intend to ask while an applicant is still answering the earlier question. There’s also a tendency during interviews to draw conclusions before the candidate has completed the discussion. While you may be impressed early on to learn an applicant possesses highly sought-after database expertise or find yourself feeling discouraged when you discover the individual never pursued formal education or training beyond high school, avoid jumping to conclusions.
  • It’s not uncommon to focus on technical skills during the interview, as they’re more easily discussed and defined. But a help desk professional’s attitude and values are equally, if not more, important. Most people can learn how to use new technologies, but it’s harder to change attitudes. Make sure you’re giving soft skills enough attention during interviews. You want help desk staff who have the communication and problem-solving skills to deal with unscripted technical problems appropriately. Exceptional customer service skills can make all the difference. [ ASK AUDIENCE: HOW MANY OF YOU USE STAGED PHONE CALLS TO EVALUATE CANDIDATES’ PHONE SKILLS FIRSTHAND? ] If not, you may find it beneficial to include this step in your interview process. Someone may interview well but not necessarily have what it takes to work the phones. Remember, end-users will base their satisfaction with your team mostly on auditory performance. You should be certain you’re hiring a skilled communicator who will make the right impression with end-users. Here are some other signs to look for in help desk professionals during the interview. [REFER TO SLIDE.]
  • Another common hiring mistake in today’s team-oriented workplace is to allow many people to have a say in the final hiring decision. It can be tempting to invite everyone on your help desk team to meet and speak with potential hires so they can weigh in on the selection, particularly if you’re a small group. But be wary of this approach: If you bring too many employees into the process, you may end up selecting the least objectionable candidate rather than the best one. Some participants may insist that applicants meet certain criteria while others may have different motivations, such as choosing someone who is a personality fit. Emotions can come into play, making it difficult for everyone to agree on the right person for the job.
  • Help desk managers, eager to fill critical vacancies in a tight labor market, sometimes make the mistake of rushing the hiring decision. Rather than having applicants go through standard procedures, such as two interviews followed by reference checks, they might extend an offer as early as the initial meeting. While streamlining hiring procedures may be valuable – for instance, having a promising candidate attend a second interview the same morning as the first – skipping stages altogether can be risky. As much as you may need someone on staff right away, you will lose time and money in the long run if that person proves to be a poor match to the job and company. Be sure you know as much as possible about whom you’re hiring before making your final decision.
  • And while you don’t want to make hiring decisions in haste, you also don’t want to drag your feet or you risk alienating or losing quality candidates. So, be careful not to take too long, either, in making your decision. Chief information officers surveyed for our 2 nd -quarter 2006 IT Hiring Index and Skills Report noted that help desk/end-user support is the fastest growing job category within their IT departments. Chances are if you’re looking for more staff, so are your competitors. Try to move things along at a fairly brisk pace and keep help desk candidates informed of where you are in the process. The last thing you want is to lose promising applicants to other offers because they didn’t know they were frontrunners for the position or because you waited a month to extend your offer. [ ASK AUDIENCE: HAS ANYONE LOST OUT ON A CANDIDATE BECAUSE THE HIRING PROCESS TOOK TOO LONG?] [ KSL – Do you have an anecdotal example of this from one of our clients or could you state that we see this in our work with some firms. ]
  • Now that you’ve wrapped up the interview process and feel you’ve found a quality candidate, be careful that you don’t go too far trying to convince him or her to accept an offer if they seem reluctant. It’s tempting to pull out all the stops to lure someone to your team once you’ve decided you’d like to hire him or her, but set some limits. While it’s fine to negotiate salary, vacation days and other considerations, if a candidate shows too much hesitancy when making a decision, it’s probably best to take a pass. Even if you convince that person to accept your offer, he or she may leave as soon as a better position comes along. There’s a particular tendency to go to the extreme in order to secure “superstar” candidates – those who excelled in their former roles. However, a help desk professional who was a superstar at a large corporation with plenty of resources may not be such an asset in your midsize organization. A Harvard research study found that superstars’ past performance depended at least as much on their former employers’ resources and infrastructure as it did on individual talent.
  • Finally, don’t underestimate the importance of conducting effective reference checks. Never skip or gloss over this step, even if you’ve had trouble generating useful references in the past. It is worth talking to at least three references to verify information provided by the candidate and to gain insights into the person as an employee. The best questions are open-ended yet specific enough to yield valuable information. Word your questions carefully when checking references. You’ll receive more thoughtful responses. [KSL – Can you share with audience any reference-check questions you’ve had particular success with?] If you speak with an individual who is reluctant to provide assistance, explain that his or her candid comments can help you make sure the applicant is an ideal fit for the position. Acknowledge that no one wants the candidate to be unsuccessful in a job. In addition to what is being said, pay attention to the tone of the response. Is there hesitation? How much enthusiasm does the reference show? Similar to the interview, you don’t want to dominate the conversation. Your goal is to get the person providing the reference to do most of the talking.
  • Also seek a variety of references – from supervisors, colleagues and others in the organization. We all know people who get along with their bosses but not their colleagues, and vice versa. Finally, do all reference checking yourself: You’ll obtain more accurate and in-depth information speaking to your peers than you would having an HR representative or staff member manage the task. Being closer to the actual position, you should also know what questions to ask.
  • Also seek a variety of references – from supervisors, colleagues and others in the organization. We all know people who get along with their bosses but not their colleagues, and vice versa. Finally, do all reference checking yourself: You’ll obtain more accurate and in-depth information speaking to your peers than you would having an HR representative or staff member manage the task. Being closer to the actual position, you should also know what questions to ask.
  • Also seek a variety of references – from supervisors, colleagues and others in the organization. We all know people who get along with their bosses but not their colleagues, and vice versa. Finally, do all reference checking yourself: You’ll obtain more accurate and in-depth information speaking to your peers than you would having an HR representative or staff member manage the task. Being closer to the actual position, you should also know what questions to ask.
  • Also seek a variety of references – from supervisors, colleagues and others in the organization. We all know people who get along with their bosses but not their colleagues, and vice versa. Finally, do all reference checking yourself: You’ll obtain more accurate and in-depth information speaking to your peers than you would having an HR representative or staff member manage the task. Being closer to the actual position, you should also know what questions to ask.
  • Also seek a variety of references – from supervisors, colleagues and others in the organization. We all know people who get along with their bosses but not their colleagues, and vice versa. Finally, do all reference checking yourself: You’ll obtain more accurate and in-depth information speaking to your peers than you would having an HR representative or staff member manage the task. Being closer to the actual position, you should also know what questions to ask.
  • ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________
  • Example: Define ‘Initiative’ How do rate Initiative on a 10-pt scale?
  • Example: Define ‘Initiative’ How do rate Initiative on a 10-pt scale? Exercise: Determine 1 core Competency/Values you want to evaluate Create a list of 5 ‘observable’ behaviors of that competency
  • Three Steps to Assertive Communication: 1. Describe the situation or idea as clearly and specifically as you can. 2. Express how you feel about the situation. (Note: Use "I" or "My" statements to refer to how you are feeling and what you are thinking.) 3. Specify what you want. Include a specific deadline.
  • This grid and discipline will also help in: managing conflicts on where limited resources should go Solve the problem of ever compounding activities and resources
  • B. Adopting creative approaches and models to attract and identify right talents There are many definitions of Talent. Don’t listen blindly to Consultants nor simply trust books nor MNC practices.
  • Performance The ability of a person to meet current expectations Key Words: Results, Targets, KPIs, Achievement, Expectations, Training, Job Concentrates on the Past i.e. what the person has done Potential The capacity of a person to meet future expectations Key Words: Competencies, Learning, Fit, Adversity, Failure rate, Development, Career Concentrates of the Future
  • Group 1: High Potential, High Performance (Talent) Staff this category will automatically be placed in the company’s Succession Plans. Be the first priority to be considered for any promotions or upgrading exercises. Career Acceleration + Specialist Career Paths. Group 2: Average Potential, High Performance (Leadership Issues) Leadership, motivational and cultural development would be given to these staff while they perform in their current positions. Group 3: High Potential, Average Performance (Potential) Should not be given career advancement unless performance improves. Good targets for transfers or job rotations to departments that require urgent manpower. Group 4: Average Potential, Low Performance (Issues) Staff in this group should be monitored closely by HR. They should be eventually moved out of their current work function, department or even the company entirely.
  • COMM = Internal Comm (Sales Marketing) + External Comm (PR Marketing)
  • So… the definition for effective COMM for Marketing applies to PR as well! What about CSR? That’s another topic for another time. CNI’s business itself is CSR, in BDP (Entrepreneur Development), Products (Health, Quality, Affordability), and Yayasan (less fortunate) What about Share Price (i.e. Investor Relations)? Secondary. Primary goal of Public Listing was to generate ‘WOM’ excitement for F/L, generate public credibility for Sponsoring.
  • If this is not a achieved, PR/Corp Comm has failed its job. Fair? Not fair? Who cares?
  • Now let’s look at it from a HR perspective...
  • Just a thought… are we in business for loyalty or for consumption? Actually = BOTH are important and must be in balance. But today’s conference is on one side of the Equation and we must be mindful of that. We are still in the topic of Philosophy. So… are we in business for Retention or Performance?
  • Using the concept from Marketing on “Positioning” to explain the concept
  • Can you answer the question? If not, you have no talent management strategy…what you have are a bunch of ideas from books, MNC best practices and Consultant advice and HOPE they will work
  • Refer to Handout: Managing Change – Understanding the Demographics of the Evolving Workforce.pdf Engaging the Four Generations of Workers Exercise: What are the Demographic spreads for your ‘Current’ vs. ‘Ideal’ Brand? What appeals to your ‘Ideal’ segment? What do you need to do to Brand your company?
  • Exercise: What are the Demographic spreads for your ‘Current’ vs. ‘Ideal’ Brand? What appeals to your ‘Ideal’ segment? What do you need to do to Brand your company?
  • Refer Handout: GEN Y ranking of job considerations 10 non-monetary benefits to attract and retain top developers Exercise: Strategies for ‘Women’?
  • Exercise : Plot the graph above using your Targeted Segments (1-10) vs. Current Brand positioning (1-10) Indicate where are the Gaps What can we do about the Gaps?
  • Exercise : Plot the graph above using your Targeted Segments (1-10) vs. Current Brand positioning (1-10) Indicate where are the Gaps What can we do about the Gaps?
  • Exercise : Plot the graph above using your Targeted Segments (1-10) vs. Current Brand positioning (1-10) Indicate where are the Gaps What can we do about the Gaps?
  • Exercise : Plot the graph above using your Targeted Segments (1-10) vs. Current Brand positioning (1-10) Indicate where are the Gaps What can we do about the Gaps?
  • This grid and discipline will also help in: managing conflicts on where limited resources should go Solve the problem of ever compounding activities and resources
  • This grid and discipline will also help in: managing conflicts on where limited resources should go Solve the problem of ever compounding activities and resources
  • Exercise: Plot what tools you want to use for Internal Branding for your Company. Indicate Gaps where you need to improve or add
  • Refer Handout: 1. Job Boards Tap Facebook For Gen Y Workers.pdf Notes: *Rising importance of Top Management Bloggers, Google Alerts, Youtube, and RSS Candidates also listen to Bloggers; all with differing opinions; some cannot be trusted
  • Red Circle: Areas where EXISTING EMPLOYEES has influence over how it will turn out, be perceived, or communicated
  • Group 1: High Potential, High Performance (Talent) Staff this category will automatically be placed in the company’s Succession Plans. Be the first priority to be considered for any promotions or upgrading exercises. Career Acceleration + Specialist Career Paths. Group 2: Average Potential, High Performance (Leadership Issues) Leadership, motivational and cultural development would be given to these staff while they perform in their current positions. Group 3: High Potential, Average Performance (Potential) Should not be given career advancement unless performance improves. Good targets for transfers or job rotations to departments that require urgent manpower. Group 4: Average Potential, Low Performance (Issues) Staff in this group should be monitored closely by HR. They should be eventually moved out of their current work function, department or even the company entirely.
  • Refer to Handout: Managing Change – Understanding the Demographics of the Evolving Workforce.pdf Engaging the Four Generations of Workers Exercise: What are the Demographic spreads for your ‘Current’ vs. ‘Ideal’ Brand? What appeals to your ‘Ideal’ segment? What do you need to do to Brand your company?
  • Exercise: What are the Demographic spreads for your ‘Current’ vs. ‘Ideal’ Brand? What appeals to your ‘Ideal’ segment? What do you need to do to Brand your company?
  • Exercise : Plot the graph above using your Targeted Segments (1-10) vs. Current Brand positioning (1-10) Indicate where are the Gaps What can we do about the Gaps?
  • Exercise : Plot the graph above using your Targeted Segments (1-10) vs. Current Brand positioning (1-10) Indicate where are the Gaps What can we do about the Gaps?
  • Exercise : Plot the graph above using your Targeted Segments (1-10) vs. Current Brand positioning (1-10) Indicate where are the Gaps What can we do about the Gaps?
  • Exercise : Plot the graph above using your Targeted Segments (1-10) vs. Current Brand positioning (1-10) Indicate where are the Gaps What can we do about the Gaps?

Transcript

  • 1. INTERVIEW & RECRUITMENTTECHNIQUESTraining Session and WorkshopKenny Ong http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 2. To p H ir in g M is t a k e s a nd H o w to A v o id Th e m http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/Behavioral Based (Event) Interviewing For By Direct Results Asia Pacific Consultancy Sdn BhdK&N Kenanga Holdings Bhd
  • 3. QUESTION 1 What is the most WIDELY USED Pre-employment test in Malaysia today? ANSWER: THE INTERVIEWhttp://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 4. QUESTION 2 What is the LEAST ACCURATE Pre-employment test in Malaysia today? ANSWER: THE INTERVIEW (TRADITIONAL)http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 5. Realities of Interviewing• 70% of interviewees feel that the interview process is a strong indicator of how the company operates.• 39% say their number one frustration is that interviewers are “not prepared and not focused during the interview.”• 38% frustrated by a “lack of feedback on the status of their candidacy.”• 27% said position descriptions differed from one interviewer to another within the same company. http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 6. POOR ODDS with HIGH STAKESMost Hiring Managers make their selection decision within 3the first ___ minutes of the interview. Source: Harvard Study 75More than ___% of turnover can be tracedback to poor interviewing and hiringpractices. Source: Harvard StudyIf an untrained interviewer uses anunstructured interview format, then theprobability of hiring the best applicant is less 15than ___%. http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 7. IMPROVING OUR ODDS THE BEST PREDICTOR OF FUTURE PAST PERFORMANCE IS _______ PERFORMANCEUsing behavioral-based interview questions in conjunctionwith standard questions can improve the accuracy ofselecting the best candidates over standard interviews by 500as much as ____%.Source: The Advisory Board Company http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 8. M i s t a k e # 1: Filling desks, not needs• Analyze what is really needed• Consider all staffing possibilities for each vacancy http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 9. M i s t a k e #2 : Failing to recruit constantly• The best employers continually search for top talent• Keep in touch with candidates, even when you’re not hiring• Participate in trade associations• Collect resumes online http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 10. M i s t a k e #3 : Creating poor job descriptions• The Fantasy Job Ad Seeking Level-2 help desk professional with 10 years of experience with Cisco, LINUX and Windows systems. Master’s degree and bilingual skills preferred. Must be willing to work nights and weekends. http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 11. M i s t a k e #3 : Creating poor job descriptions• The Mystery Job Ad Growing firm seeks a level-2 help desk professional. Must have good technology skills and be willing to work a flexible schedule. http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 12. M i s t a k e #4 : Having no system for screening resumes• An effective system includes: – Benchmarks – Special requirements – Qualifications/attributes critical to success• Review resumes all at once• Avoid procrastinating• Don’t delegate the task http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 13. M i s t a k e #5 :Ignoring red flags onresumes • Note vague terminology such as: “Participated in,” “familiar with” and “in association” • Be cautious with functional resumes • Read resumes beginning at the bottom • Judge the appearance • Give the benefit of the doubt http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 14. M i s t a k e #6 : Ignoring interviewing techniques• Don’t “wing” the interview• Ask candidates the same number of questions• Take notes http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 15. M i s t a k e #6 : Ignoring interviewing techniques• More than two-thirds of executives surveyed said the most productive time for meeting with candidates is between 9 a.m. and 11 a.m.• The first candidate interviewed for a job is somewhat less likely to be hired than other candidates Source: Robert Half International http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 16. M i s t a k e #6 : Ignoring interviewing techniques• Start the conversation with an easy ice-breaker question that illustrates you’ve done your homework.• Move into challenging questions: – How do you define success? – Tell me about a time you worked with a difficult end-user. How about a difficult manager? – What kind of work environment do you like least? http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 17. M i s t a k e #7 : Doing more talking than listening• Don’t share too much information about your company• Focus on one question at a time• Avoid drawing conclusions until the end of the interview http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 18. M i s t a k e #8 : Focusing too heavily on hard skillsLook for:• Passion - Does the person care about his/her work? Does it come through in most answers?• Optimism - Top performers acknowledge difficulties and how they learned from them.• Work ethic - What has the candidate been doing if unemployed? Top performers use the time wisely.• Expectations - Candidates should be motivated to learn and advance, but not have unrealistic expectations. http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 19. M i s t a k e #9 :Inviting too much input • You may select the least objectionable candidate versus the best one • Participants in the selection process bring different motivations http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 20. M i s t a k e # 10 : Making rushed decisions• Never skip any stages of the hiring process – More likely to make poor matches• Learn as much as possible about top candidates before making a decision http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 21. M i s t a k e # 11: Making slow decisions• Keep the process moving• Avoid losing highly skilled candidates to competitors• Inform candidates of where you are in the hiring process http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 22. M i s t a k e #12 : Persuading reluctant candidates• Be wary of candidates who are hesitant to accept an offer – Even if they decide to join your company, they may not stay long• Don’t rely entirely on past performance when identifying “superstars” http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 23. M is t a k e # 13 : Conducting poor reference checks• Never skip this step• Remind reluctant references of the importance of their feedback• Take note of the tone of the response• Let the reference do the talking http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 24. M is t a k e # 13 : Conducting poor reference checks• Talk to supervisors, colleagues and others in the organization• Manage the process yourself http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 25. M is t a k e # 14 : Superficial Interviewing• Interview questions not prepared• Questions not written• At least two to three interviewers• Magnifying glass missing• Claims and facts not verified• No interview debriefing http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 26. M is t a k e # 15 : Human Nature Traps• I like you• I’d like to be your friend• I can save you• She is just like me!• We went to the same high school, etc. http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 27. M is t a k e # 16 : Hiring out of Desperation• Wait until the last minute• Passive marketing waits for resumes• Hiring quick and can get back to work http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 28. M is t a k e # 17 : Inappropriate Pre Requisites Used Too Early• Over emphasis on – Education – Experience http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 29. DocumentationJOB DESIGN http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 30. District Engineer, TNB Duties and If stated as Accountabilities then the job Responsibilities must produce :Control, operate and Ensure uninterrupted supply tomaintain the District consumers in the district by operatingDistribution System the District Distribution System. Ensure availability of adequate supply forPlan and design the High future needs of industries in the district byvoltage system planning and designing the High voltage SystemManage major supply Ensure satisfaction of the major customersprojects to customers in in the district by managing supply andthe district. Distribution. Ensure high performance and ProductivitySupervise all technical of technical staff by adopting proper humanstaff in the district. resource management methods on selection, training, coaching, counselling and motivation.
  • 31. Results Driven Activity vs. Accountabilityhttp://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 32. Exercise: Results DescriptionKey Result Key Activities 1.1. 2. 3. 4. 1.2. 2. 3. 4. 1.3. 2. 3. 4. 1.4. 2. 3. 4. http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 33. General Manager, ManufacturingKey Results Major Supporting Actions Performance Indicators1. Ensure •By monitoring production performance and •Timely productionachievement taking corrective actions targetsof targeted •By analysing production downtime and •Productivity ratiosproduction introducing improvements •Downtimevolume •By thorough preparation for introduction and •Implementation implementation of new models and variants schedule •2. Ensure •By reviewing quality performance results and •Quality indexachievement identifying non conformance and undertaking •Defect occurrenceof product corrective actions •Non-conformance toquality targets •By analysing customer feedback and taking established corrective actions standards •By undertaking on-line and off-line •Demerit points continuous quality improvement programs and activities •By undertaking education and re-education programs
  • 34. General Manager, ManufacturingKey Results Major Supporting Actions Performance Indicators •By incorporating safety and health features •Accident rate3. Ensure safeand healthy into infrastructure design and development •Health standards •By creating awareness of safety and healthoperating •Operation audit among employees through programs andenvironment findings campaigns •By constant monitoring of safety and health standards through working committees •By developing and implementing occupational health programs4. Ensure •By developing and implementing on-the-job •Productivity ratioscompetent, training •Turnover ratemotivated and •By developing and promoting effective •Employee moraleproductive communication with employees and union •Team activitiesmanufacturing •By ensuring continuous development and •Strikes / disciplinaryworkforce upgrading of skills actions •By providing appropriate recognition and rewards for high performance •By promoting teamwork through QCC and 5s activities
  • 35. General Manager, ManufacturingKey Results Major Supporting Actions Performance Indicators •By ensuring effective and efficient •Operating efficiency5. Enhanceoperating maintenance of plant, machinery and standards resources •Cost per unitefficiency and •By reducing wastage and eliminatingproductivity •Wastages and pilferage losses •By reducing and managing indirect overtime •By managing utilisation of consumables and materials6. Timely •By undertaking effective planning and •Timely completionexecution of provision of resources of projects withinprojects •By monitoring implementation and progress cost allocation of projects •By managing project costs •By developing effective project teams
  • 36. Personality and Motive Profiles http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 37. Understanding Personalities Handouts: People Personalit y Types & Getting Tasks DonePeaceful: Phlegmatic Popular: SanguineClosed Open Perfect: Melancholy Task Powerful: Choleric http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 38. The Motive Profile Power (nPow)Affiliative Achievement (nAff) (nAch) http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 39. Motive Profile vs. Job Description Achievement Affiliation Power• Continually improve his/her •Work cooperatively •Depend on others’ work performance •Frequently help others with •Maintain others’ morale• Personally produce work of their problems •Be sensitive to his/her impact excellent quality •Socialize much on an on others• Be creative & innovative informal basis •Tell others what has to be• Accomplish tasks or projects •Empathize with others done & manage them personally, start to finish •Be interested in others •Respond to others’ requests• Set own performance for decisions, & make• Monitor own progress & know decisions that affect others results of work immediately •Make things happen through after work is completed others http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 40. The Motive Profile shown below has been constructedusing a non-conscious response instrument (PictureStory Exercise - McClelland)The typical superior performing manager profile: High Job Med Low Person Ach Aff Pow
  • 41. Profile Mismatches Managerial job Engineer H H M M L L Ach Aff Pow Ach Aff Pow Engineer in Teacher in Managerial job Managerial Job H H M M L L Ach Aff Pow Ach Aff PowMentoring, coaching and counselling helps peopleconsciously develop job related responses.
  • 42. Competencies and ‘Ideal’ Profiles http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 43. Position: Secretary Responsibilities + Personal Competencies Differentiating Tasks + Activities Competencies•Typing •Pleasant •Proactive•Manages •Accurate •Initiativecommunications •Is able to take notes •Independent•Keeps short-hand on shorthand and •Integrity (trust)notes typing memo effectively •Creative•Makes •Presentable •Resourcefulness •Appearance •Always excelappointments •Behaviours •Unwavering•Uses the computer •Good manners dedication and•Filing •Courteous commitment•Takes minutes •Diligent •Ability to make simple•Follow-up decisions•Makes coffee •Sensitive to people•Keeps secrets •Positive attitude•Drafts letter•Screens calls The Job Person Characteristics The Superior Performer
  • 44. Understanding People:Iceberghttp://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 45. The appointment of a Senior Manager - an illustrationSelection criteria of the Present Selection Selection Criteria for thepast Criteria FutureMBA Knowledge MBA MBA10 yrs work experience Skills 10 yrs work experience Less than10 yrs work experience I am able to help others I can get others to agree I am an expert Self Concept in doing things right on what is right I have to gain I enjoy contributing as a I enjoy having to get Social Role team player to what is respect of others others to determine right what is right Aggressive or Positive and Positive, enthusiastic submissive Traits proactive and proactive •Achievement & Resourceful power• Personal social power (persuasion,Aggrandizement Motive •Use of technical influencing,• Excessive use of knowledge & reasoning, concernposition power power of for personal(status & authority) persuasion impact) This model provides clarity on job related competencies. http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 46. Job vs Person Match: District Engineer Mr. A Ms. B M.Eng.10 years as M.Eng.10 years as an an engineer in engineer in Tech.jobs Skills & Tech.Jobs. KnowledgeI like to help my I’ll help if I amteam achieve. Social Role askedI like to learn new I am an Self Concept expertthings Proactive Traits Aggressive I told them what isI want to do better right Motive http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 47. Job vs Person Match: Room Sales person Ms. A Ms. B Diploma in Social Diploma in Social Sc. Sc. 5 years as an 5 years as as Skills & Admin.clerk waitress in a hotel KnowledgeI like to meet I don’t likenew people Social Role injusticeI like to learn new I am always Self Conceptthings unluckyAssertive Traits AggressiveI want to do better I told them Motive what is - right http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 48. Competency Target Setting1. Initiative2. Teamwork3. Problem Solving4. Leadership5. Integrity What’s the problem here? http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 49. Competency Target SettingInitiative2. Minimize problems quickly without needing to be asked3. Seeks personal growth and professional self- development4. Doing more than is required/expected in a job5. Seeks new and improved solutions and approaches to completing assignments6. Looks for opportunities to help others and team http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 50. • Exercise: Competency Dictionary http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 51. Competency Standards3 Meets behavioral standards consistently. Is a good role model for others.2 Meets behavioral standards some of the time. Needs improvement.1 Does not meet behavioral standards. Require counseling or disciplinary actions. http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 52. THE INTERVIEW PROCESS http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 53. Behaviourial Event Interview http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 54. • Lychee Tree http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 55. What’s wrong with Typical Interviews?1.2.3.4.5.6.7.8. http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 56. "He has 20 years experience: 1 year of bad experience repeated 20 times" http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 57. What is BEI?• Structured Probe• Investigative• What the interviewee did, not what he or she might have done• Descriptions of actual behaviour - both actions and thoughts• Behaviourally specific performance data http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 58. BEI Outline1. Introduction• Introductions• Small talk• Purpose of interview• Interview format and time frame• Clarifying roles of additional persons present http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 59. BEI Outline2. Candidate background on education and activities• Candidates University or other Educational institution and Programme• Key academic courses or activities in past year• Extra-curricular activities• Work experiences in past two years• Other activities and interests pursued in last two years http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 60. BEI Outline3. First event : "A time when you did something difficult or challenging on your own"4. Second event : "A time when you tried to influence or persuade someone to do something" http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 61. BEI Outline1. Optional third event : "A time when you were pleased with something you accomplished"(to be used if one of the first two events yielded little information or if 45 minutes or more are available for the interview) http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 62. BEI Outline6. Closing• Optional follow-up probing to obtain additional target data on a time the candidate demonstrated one of the mentioned characteristics• Thank candidate• Next steps in the selection process• Questions from the candidate http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 63. BE Interview problems and how to deal with them• Interviewee begins to describe educational experience in great detail• Interviewee begins to talk at length about what he /s he did in a job• Interviewer asks questions that are too complicated, or has trouble thinking of appropriate questions• Interviewer probes for detail too soon, or cannot seem to find a thread for a critical incident http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 64. BE Interview problems and how to deal with them• The key part of the incident is not clear• Interviewee is giving too much information, too fast, or the information is scattered• Interviewee says he or she cant remember the actual words in a conversation• Interviewee cannot remember a specific incident• Interviewee seems uncomfortable http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 65. BE Interview problems and how to deal with them• Vagueness : Interviewee talks of the philosophy of doing the job and remains abstract or discusses hypothetical situations• Reticence : the interviewee is evasive or refuses to answer questions because he or she is concerned about revealing confidential material about himself, herself, or others• Interviewee rambles, digresses to topics unrelated to critical incident http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 66. Trigger Questions• how the incident started / how candidate first became involved• the broad stages of development• the outcome http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 67. Initial Probes• "How did you become involved … tell me how it started … etc"• Immediate follow-ups then are :-• "What went through your mind at that point …?"• "What was the first thing you did …. ?" http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 68. Data To Look For…• Dialogue• Specific and attributable action• Thoughts operating at the time of the event http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 69. Coding: Rules of evidence• Attributable to the • Retrospective individual• Specific • Relevant• Detailed • No leading questions http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 70. Wrong Target Data – Why?• Discussions of the candidates current opinions and attitudes• Current thoughts about technical ideas• Statements describing what the candidate usually does• The candidates views on what he / she hopes to do in the future• Descriptions of what other people were doing in past situations• "we" data in which it is impossible to determine what the candidate was doing or saying• current reflections and feelings about what he candidate did in a past situation http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 71. Interview ProcessCOMMUNICATION ANDNEGOTIATION SKILLS http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 72. Communications & RelationshipsBasics of Relationships• Why?• Good performance & skill wont get you very far. You need others to succeed• You cannot get people to listen to you if they dont like you.• And if they don’t listen to you, you won’t accomplish anything!• Relationships = Expectations. http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 73. People Skills1. People are interested in themselves, not in you2. What is the most interesting subject in the world to them? THEMSELVES http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 74. People Skills1. Take four words out of your vocabulary: “I, me, my, mine” and substitute for the most powerful word: “YOU”2. Remember that the more important you make people feel, the more they will respond to you.3. Avoid arguing. http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 75. Communication Styles  Passive   Assertive Comm Aggressive  Passive- Refer to Handout for Aggressive detailed explanation http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 76. How to be Assertive 3. Specify 2. Express1. Describe http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 77. Three Steps to Assertive Communication:• Describe the situation or idea as clearly and specifically as you can.• Express how you feel about the situation. (Note: Use "I" or "My" statements to refer to how you are feeling and what you are thinking.)• Specify what you want. Include a specific deadline. Refer to Exercise: Practicing Assertive Behavior http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 78. Active Listening1. Attending 1. Asking2. Paraphrasing 2. Encouraging3. Speaking 3. Reflecting4. Clarifying 4. Summarizing Personal Tip: ‘Picking’ Refer to Exercise: Practicing Active Listening http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 79. Communication SF LINAListen with interest and praisemake the person feel Importantuse their NameAsk questionshttp://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 80. Influence SF PASSEPraise and encourageAsk questionsallow the person to Save Faceuse SMART goalsEncourage small improvementshttp://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 81. Asking Questions?1. Ask to clarify viewpoints, values or beliefs 1. What further info do you need? 2. Is it the <problem>, or is there something else? 3. What exactly do you mean? 4. Would you like a drink? 5. What do you think are the pros and cons? http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 82. Asking Questions?1. What’s most important to you in… http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 83. Asking Questions?1. Convert instructions into Questions http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 84. Personality SF S + FH + C Smile Firm Handshake Complimenthttp://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 85. ICE-BREAK SF F.O.R.M.FamilyOccupationRecreationMoney http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 86. Paired Exercise:• Find out as much information as possible about your partner• Note down everything you remember http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 87. Pacing1. Mirroring their body language, voice, vocabulary and mood2. Mutual feeling of harmony, well being and security3. Tendency to like people who are similar to ourselves http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 88. Pacing1. Body language – Sitting position, movement, and position of the legs, arm movements, overall posture, angle of the head, walk, dress, facial expression, breathing, touch.2. Speech – Pitch, speed, tone, volume, choice of words, jargon, foreign words, slang, professional terms.3. Feelings / Moods – Attitude, conviction, belief, enthusiasm, tolerance, involvement, respect for the other person’s skill, qualities and experience. http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 89. PacingExamples:2. Enthusiastic colleague with great idea3. Angry customer in a hurry4. Friend who is sad and confused http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 90. Negotiations Extra Communication Skills http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 91. Do you agree with these?“Good Negotiators are born.”“Good Negotiators take risks”“Good Negotiators rely on intuition” http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 92. Do you agree with these?“Good Negotiators No, effective negotiation, like other skillsare born.” requires practice and study No,“Good Negotiatorstake risks” 1. They know how to evaluate a decision situation 2. They make a best choice based on information available to them.“Good Negotiators No, the most important work of negotiationrely on intuition.” takes place before the negotiator is seated at the table. It is preparation. http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 93. The Number 1 Objective ofNegotiation:To create a win-win solution http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 94. The Number 1 Objective of Negotiation:The other person must walk away feeling that they they have wonFact of life: You will be negotiating with the sameperson in the future, orYour reputation will be told to other people http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 95. Fact:The other person isaiming for the same thing as you are! http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 96. Always remember this…Negotiation is a Game http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 97. BATNA: Best Alternative to Negotiated Agreement"The reason you negotiate is to produce something better than the results you can obtain without negotiating” http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 98. BATNA: Best Alternative toNegotiated Agreement…if the proposed agreement is better than your BATNA, then you should accept it.…If the agreement is not better thanyour BATNA, then you should reopen negotiations or walk away. http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 99. Strategy 1 Ask for more than you expect to get http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 100. Strategy 1: Ask for more than you expect to get WHY?1. It gives you more room to negotiate2. You might get it!3. Increases the value of what you are offering4. Prevents negotiation from deadlock 1. It’s the only way you can create a climate where the other person feels that he or she has won http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 101. Starting Strategy 1: Ask for more than you expect to getMPP – Maximum Possible Position This is the most you can ask for and still have the other side see some flexibility in your position http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 102. Starting Strategy 1: Ask for more than you expect to get Bracketing X XRM 11,000 RM 13,000 RM 15,000 Your StartingOpening Your Offer Offer Target (MPP) http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 103. Positive Bargaining Zone Sellers Bargaining Range Positive Bargaining Zone Buyers Bargaining Range $220k $225k $230k $235k $240k Sellers Target Sellers OfferBuyers Offer Buyers Target http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/ -104-
  • 104. Strategy 2: Never say Yes to the first offer WHY? I couldSomething have donemust be betterwrong http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 105. Strategy 2: Never say Yesto the first offer I could have done better “…the next time I deal with this person I’ll be a tougher negotiator” http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 106. Strategy 2: Never say Yes to the first offer Something must be wrongHumans are basically KIASU and don’t trust people easilyPsychology: “Cheap things not good. Goodthings not cheap.” http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 107. Strategy 3Act Surprised at Proposals http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 108. Strategy 3: Act Surprised at Proposals WHY?When people make a proposal to you… …they are watching your reaction! http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 109. Strategy 3: Act Surprised at Proposals Your Reaction 70% of humans believe more of what they SEE, not what they hear The easier you are, the tougher they will negotiate!!This can also work in Telephone negotiations http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 110. Strategy 4 Never Argue http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 111. Strategy 5The Reluctant Seller andthe Reluctant Buyer http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 112. Strategy 5: The Reluctant Seller and the Reluctant Buyer Reluctant SellerKeep Cool (Bertenang) “I don’t want to sell, but take a look…”Mention all the good points “Just to be fair to you…”“…what’s the best price?” http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 113. Strategy 5: The Reluctant Seller and the Reluctant Buyer Reluctant BuyerLet the Seller present to you “I appreciate all the time you’ve taken…”“It’s not really what we want…” Pause and Wait until the right moment“Just to be fair to you…” “…what’s the lowest price?” http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 114. Strategy 5: The Reluctant Seller and the Reluctant Buyer Get the other side to commit firstHow toCounter Higher Authority Good Guy/Bad Guy http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 115. Strategy 6 “You’ll have to do better than that” http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 116. Strategy 6: “You’ll have to do better than that”1 “You’ll have to do better than that”2 SHUT UP!! This also called “The Silent Close” http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 117. Strategy 6: “You’ll have to do better than that” Why? An inexperiencednegotiator will give away their negotiating range http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 118. Strategy 6: “You’ll have to do better than that” “Exactly howHow to much better do ICounter have to do?” http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 119. Strategy 7: Higher Authority Why? He knows that he mustcompletely win you to his side so that you will want topersuade your higher authority to agree with his proposal http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 120. Strategy 7: Higher Authority How? Don’t let the other side know you have the authorityYour higher authority should be an unclear group, not an individual Leave your ego at home http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 121. Strategy 8: The Declining Value of Services FACT!!The value of service always appears to decline quickly after you have performed the service http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 122. Strategy 8: The Declining Value of Services How? When you make a compromise,get back a compromise right away DON’T WAIT!! http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 123. TALENT WARS IN THE NEWECONOMY http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 124. The New World… 13th April 2009 •Two Domino’s employees •YouTube •Apology from Domino’s after 48 hours •1 million hits •Twitter: questions on silence •LinkedIn: suggestions by users in forum BusinessWeek, May 4, 2009http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 125. Global-Local TrendsBack-sourcing Power re-balancingBottom-up Innovation/ Mergers, AcquisitionsDisruptions & DivestmentMobile Devices Lower Middle Class ruleNationalism and Extreme EmergingProtectionism CountriesCurrency Wars BRIC and PIIGS http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 126. Post Recession Trends and ImplicationsNo trust in Big Malaysia no bigCompanies effectNo trust in Experts Decrease in OffshoringNo trust in BestPractices Seniors working longer, re-entryCash Flow issues Part-timers andM&A&D increase Freelancers http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 127. Post Recession Trends and ImplicationsIndustry Convergence/ExtinctionSocial Networking Auditors,Increased Regulations Lawyers, Civil Servants,Green & CSR Consultants, DocumentorsNon-Profit/NGOincrease http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 128. • Exercise: What recent trends (global, local, industry etc.) that have impacted your company’s talent plans? How do they impact? http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 129. Talent Wars: Pre- and Post- RecessionLast Time Today• Beg • Beg <harder>• Buy • Buy <@ higher• Borrow price>• Steal • Borrow <from diff. people> • Steal <more often> http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 130. The New World…with New Problems 13th April 2009 •Two Domino’s employees •YouTube •Apology from Domino’s after 48 hours •1 million hits •Twitter: questions on silence •LinkedIn: suggestions by users in forum BusinessWeek, May 4, 2009 http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 131. Budgeting vs. PrioritiesExample: Business Situation vs. R&D Priorities Upturn Flat DownturnFight Complacency Innovation SalesSharpen Edge Acquire Cash FlowKeep Momentum ProfitsConquer Build momentumNPD Cycle Time Focused on Improve Top 15% ‘Breakthrough’Improve Edge revenue-generating JV, In-source, Out- productsExtensions sourceCounter Competitor ↓ R&D, ↑Sales Eliminate bottom 20% http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 132. Business Situations vs. HRM Upturn Flat DownturnFight Complacency Innovation SalesSharpen Edge Acquire Cash FlowKeep Momentum ProfitsConquer Build momentum‘Change’ mgmt Talent Mgmt Top Talent focusReduce Fat Innovation/R&D Sales, Sales, SalesContinuity Early wins Increase attritionEveryone Happy Slow Down HR Costs Motivation http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 133. Business Situations vs. HRM Upturn •Projects Flat Downturn •Job Ads Fight Complacency •Communication Innovation Sales Sharpen Edge Acquire Cash Flow •F/L Manager Com. Keep Momentum •Middle Management Profits •Involvement (survey, momentum Conquer Build suggestions)‘Change’ mgmt Talent Mgmt Top Talent focus •Realistic GoalsReduce Fat Stack R&D Stack Sales •Controllable KPIs (customerContinuity Early wins Increase attrition satisfaction, production)Everyone Happy Slow Down HR Costs Motivation http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 134. Activity Grid to determine budget prioritiesIncrease (↑) Create (+)What are features/ What are features/ activities/services to activities/services to increase? introduce?Reduce (↓ ) Eliminate (-)What are features/ What are features/ activities/services to activities/services to reduce? eliminate?1. Manage conflicts where limited resources should go2. Solve problem of compounding activities & resources http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 135. • What is your company’s situation now?• How would you prioritize your Activity Grid? http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 136. THE BATTLE FOR TALENT http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 137. Intro:“Cow don’t drink water cannot push cow head down” http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 138. Question: TalentManagement for Who? Excellent Very Good Average Not Good Commit Suicide http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 139. Before we start…1. Who designs your Talent Management programs?2. Are you in the Talent Pool?3. Do you qualify?4. “It takes a crook to catch a crook” http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 140. Talent Segmentation• Who are your Talents? : A Talent for others does not mean a Talent for you http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 141. Talent Segment Targeting• Unwanted by big MNCs• Small companies• Boring Environment• No Growth/Learning• No MBA• Passion, Values, IQ (streetsmart)• Appreciate Chaos• Multitask• Passion to Learn http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 142. Talent Segmentation• Identify POTENTIAL 2 3 4 5PERFORMANCE Group I 5 (Talent Pool) 4 3 2 http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 143. Talent Segmentation• Identify POTENTIAL 2 3 4 5PERFORMANCE Group II Group I 5 ( Potential) (Talent Pool) 4 Group IV Group III 3 (Counseling) ( Performance) 2 http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 144. Talent Scarcity and Brain- Drain Problem1. Change your Business2. Change your Business Model3. Re-locate4. In-Source5. JV or Partnership or Swap6. Create micro Business Units7. Over Promote8. Over Pay9. Contractual tie-up10.Hire Low, Train High http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 145. Employer BrandingATTRACTING ANDPOSITIONING http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 146. The real goal of Marketing and Branding Understanding our role in the whole scheme of things http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 147. • Exercise: Why do we need ‘Branding’? http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 148. What is the purpose of Marketing & Branding?Ultimate Objective of Marketing:“Get more people, to buy morethings, more frequently, at higherprices.”“Retention and Loyalty are useless ifNo Conversion is happening.” Sergio Zyman http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 149. What is the purpose of Marketing & Branding?“Retention and Loyalty are useless ifNo Conversion is happening.”“Communication is useless if NoConversion is happening.” http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 150. What is the Objective?• Comm = Relationship (something like Dating)• Comm ≠ Media glitz• Comm ≠ ATL/BTL/BwTL/ArTL/FTL• Comm ≠ CSR• Comm = Get more people, to buy more, more frequently, at higher prices http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 151. Intro“Retention and Loyalty are useless ifNo Conversion is happening.”“Retention and Loyalty are useless ifNo Performance is happening.” http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 152. IntroLoyalty is misleading…• Heavy Consumption ≠ Loyalty• Loyalty ≠ Heavy Consumption• Good Performance ≠ Retention• Retention ≠ Good Performance http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 153. So… are we in business for Retention or Performance? http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 154. Corporate & EmployerBrandCorporate Brand Right Type of People Employer Brand http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 155. Why Employer Branding? 1.AttractEmployer 2.Retain Branding 3.Motivate 4.Focus http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 156. Components of Branding Positioning, Execution, and Communicationhttp://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 157. Components of Branding Positioning Execution Communication http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 158. Brand PositioningSegmentation, Targeting, Basics, Differentiatorshttp://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 159. Positioning“Hope is not a strategy” John Maxwell http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 160. Positioning• For who? – Segmentation, Targeting• Your Offer?• Key Differentiator? http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 161. Two Types of Segmentation for HRM1. Demographic segmentation2. Talent segmentation http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 162. Recruitments of Gen X and Gen YUNDERSTANDINGDEMOGRAPHICS http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 163. Demographic Segmentation - GeneralRefer: Managing Change – Veterans (Pre-Boomers) Understanding the Demographics of 1934-1945 the Evolving Workforce Gen Y Boomers (Millennials, Netster) 1945-1960 1980+ Gen X (Cusper, Buster) 1960 - 1980 http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 164. Generational Differences In The Workplace• Now 4 Generations in the workplace• Events and conditions each of us experience during our formative years help define who we are and how we view the world.• Each Generation has different value systems – Values drive behavior.• We need to understand each other so we can value what each generation brings to the team.• In 10 years, 40% of current workforce will retire. http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 165. Generational Thoughts• X&Y act first, evaluate later – they know more than older generations knew at their age. Thrive in speed and chaos. May think about having multiple careers. – May not Actively Listen to Builders & Boomers, missing valuable info.• Builders & Boomers – paid their dues, have vast experience & knowledge. – May question how much X&Y know, undervalue their quick decision-making, don’t think of them as colleagues and collaborators because assume they’re inexperienced. – May think X&Y are too impatient –quick to throw out tried & true strategies .• Loyalty to Co. – Builders & Boomers may value; X&Y may not• Challenge Authority – Builders & Boomers may not, X&Y may.• Work Life Balance: Builders & Boomers may do without, X&Y may not do without. http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 166. Generational Thoughts• Builders may see Boomers as self absorbed & prone to sharing too much info.• Boomers may see Builders as dictatorial and rigid.• Y may view X as too cynical and negative.• X may view Y as too spoiled and self- absorbed.• X may view Boomers as being too Politic – say right thing to right person. http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 167. What Bonds GenerationsAll Generations want:Work-Life Balance – flexible hours, fewer hours• Younger Generations – may be less ambitious in traditional terms, less willing to make tradeoffs - family focus.• Boomers – want time for hobbies or fitness, care for aging parents, family, start own business.Timely, Constructive FeedbackSense of Community with OthersEffective Projects and MeetingsUse their TalentsEnhance their Skills http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 168. Things Research Says Gens Want to be Valued for• Builders: “Your experience is respected – It’s valuable to hear what’s worked in the past.”• Boomers: “You are valuable & worthy. Your contribution is unique and important to our success.”• Xers: “Let’s explore some options outside the box – your technical expertise and is a big asset.”• Y’s: “You will be collaborating with other bright, creative people – you have really rescued this situation with your commitment.” http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 169. What All Generations Need to DoSeek balance between• building on traditional procedures and• supporting flexibility and creativity to effectively blend the generations work ethics.• Allow choices• Openly explore ideas• Value different points of view• Encourage active listening• Share expertise• Share recognition and appreciation• Value hard work• Build in humor and fun into learning.• Accommodate the needs and values of all generations. http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 170. What Generation’s Next?The Millenniums – They are in secondary school right now…coming out soon…in about 10 years or so 171 http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 171. Demographic Segmentation - others1. Women, Working Mothers2. Youtube generation3. Working retired4. Social Activists5. Work/Life balancers6. Industry (ICT, Advertising, Engineer, Accounting, Lawyer, etc.) http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 172. Exercise: Who is your target?Company Segmentation Employer Segmentation http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 173. Exercise: Employer Segmentation What do you know aboutWho are your Targets? them? http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 174. Employer BrandingWHAT NEEDS WORK? http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 175. Basics & Differentiators DifferenSegments tiators Targets Targets Basics http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 176. Demographic Segment: Example Exercise1. Gen Y Refer: • GEN Y ranking of2. ICT job considerations • 10 non-monetary3. Women benefits to attract and retain top developers http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 177. What needs work? High Fun place to work Training For people like me OpportunitiesTarget Segment Importance to Attractive Location Familiarity with Tasks Innovative company Career Opportunities Expected success of application High Salary Low Weak Strong Current Brand http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 178. What needs work? High Fun place to work Training For people like me OpportunitiesTarget Segment Importance to Attractive Location Familiarity with Tasks Innovative company Career Opportunities Expected success of application High Salary Low Weak Strong Current Brand http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 179. For Starting Up… HighImportance to Segment Target Low http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 180. For Starting Up… Weak Strong Current Brand http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 181. Activity Grid to determine HRM prioritiesIncrease (↑) Create (+)What are features/ What are features/ activities/services to activities/services to increase? introduce?Reduce (↓ ) Eliminate (-)What are features/ What are features/ activities/services to activities/services to reduce? eliminate? http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 182. Exercise: Activity GridIncrease (↑) Create (+)Reduce (↓ ) Eliminate (-) http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 183. Employer BrandingBRAND AND RECRUITMENTCOMMUNICATION http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 184. Summary of Branding Branding in its simplest form (and it saves cost too…)http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 185. Focus
  • 186. Communicate
  • 187. Check
  • 188. Brand CommunicationImage, Touch Points, Repetition, and Emphasis http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 189. Attract“You don’t attract who you want. You attract who you are” John Maxwell http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 190. Attract: HR and Marketing1. Who designs your Job Ads? – It better be Marketing• Understand the psychology of a Talent Job Seeker when reading Job Ads• Not sure? Consult experts• Use Marketing weapons for Job Ads: brand logos, slogans, newspaper clips, awards, customer profile, video clips, web, banners etc. http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 191. KEY MESSAGESWho am I?What do I offer? In other words: “Why should ISupport? join you?”End benefit(s)Tagline: http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 192. Power WordsAdvantage Exciting Improved ProudSave Deserve Discovery EasyBenefit Fun Investment ProvenSecurity Guarantee Happy HealthComfort Free Joy ProfitTrust Love Money NewResults Right Safety TruthValue Powerful Vital You http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 193. • Exercise: Use two or more Power Words to describe: 1. Your company to prospective candidates 2. Your company’s employer brand http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 194. The Right Tools for the Job Personal Internships, (exp) joint projects withQuality/Intensity of University Communication Events, Personal workshops, (info) campaign visits, seated dinners Impersonal (info) Individual Mass Reach of Communication http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 195. The Right Tools for the Job Personal Mentorship (exp) programsQuality/Intensity of Communication Personal Campus presentations, career fairs (info) Impersonal Online games, sponsorship of awards (info) Individual Mass Reach of Communication http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 196. The Right Tools for the Job Personal (exp)Quality/Intensity of Communication Personal Direct Marketing (info) (eg. mailing) Direct-response marketing Impersonal (info) Print media, radio Individual Mass Reach of Communication http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 197. Exercise: Right Tools1. Plotting your Communication strategy: – Determine the level of Quality/Intensity of Communication – Determine the level of “reach” of communication• What tools do you want to consider? Why? http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 198. Brand Touch Points Employee Newsletter Customer Bloggers Gov./ s Public Politics Events AnalystsAnnua Mgmt Candidates/ Action Relatives l EmployeesReport s Pasar Media Malam Internet* Economic s Ads AGM Ex- employees Employees Friends http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 199. Brand Touch Points Employee Newsletter Customer Bloggers Gov./ s Public Politics AnalystsEventsAnnual Mgmt Candidates/ Action RelativesReport Employees s Pasar Media Malam Internet Economic s Ads AGM Ex- employees Employees Friends http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 200. Exercise: touch points• List down all direct and in-direct touch points that affect your employer brand• Which ones you do want to take action on? http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 201. Attract1. What’s your main Differentiator? – Money? Opportunity? Big Projects? Big Clients? Career Growth? Environment? Love and Fresh Air?• Fish where the Fish are…• Hire Strict. Refuse if possible.• Who you retire determines who you attract http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 202. Putting It All TogetherTHE RECRUITMENT PROCESS http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 203. 9 Rules for Dating(and Recruiting) http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 204. Dating rule #1 First impressions are critical.• Recruiting application: Differentiate yourself. Resist the “I have a great position for you” especially if you have never spoken to them. http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 205. Dating rule #2 Don’t believe everything you see.• We have all heard stories from people that signed up for an online dating service and were shocked when their date was two feet shorter and 10 years older than the profile.• Recruiting application: Candidates exaggerate their strengths and skills and down play their weaknesses. Do not assume anything. Prescreen, interview, administer assessments, and call the references before you present the candidate to your hiring manager. http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 206. Dating rule #3 Play hard to get.• Desperation is the world’s worst perfume.• Recruiting application: If you make a huge fuss over the candidate and beg them to interview, you will diminish your negotiating power. http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 207. Dating rule #4 Be selective. You can not change people.• Recruiting application: Look for the red flags; don’t avoid them. It is better for you to uncover any candidate weaknesses or issues than your hiring manager discovering them. Your name and reputation is all you have in this business. http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 208. Dating rule #5 Prepare for the date.• Recruiting application: If your candidate has spent 20 minutes on the phone with you and takes time off work to come to interview, and then you ask them “so, tell me what you want to do?” — you are wasting the candidate’s time. You should have notes on the candidate’s resume that you want to clarify, and if appropriate, the company profiles that best match what your candidate’s needs. http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 209. Dating rule #6 Don’t talk too much.• People who express the “enough about me, what do you think about me?” attitude sit home alone, a lot.• Recruiting application: The candidate should be doing most of the talking. Assess what the candidate has to offer, what they need, and then set expectations of how you will work together. Let the candidate talk about the interview before you disclose the hiring manager’s view. If you blurt out “they love you, you are the best candidate they have ever met!” — what do you think happens to the candidate’s salary requirements? http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 210. Dating rule #7 Follow up with your date.• Recruiting application: As an industry, one of the biggest complaints we get from candidates and hiring managers is the lack of communication. No news is still considered news to the candidate; make sure you keep your candidate in the loop. http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 211. Dating rule #8 Don’t be afraid to end the date early.• Recruiting application: Prescreen carefully, ask the hard questions, and always tell the candidate the truth. If they are not going to fit into your recruiting focus (skills, salary expectations, location, etc.), coach or make suggestions regarding who may be able to help them in the market. http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 212. Dating rule #9 Improve your odds by hanging out where (like) people hang out.• Recruiting application: If you are recruiting technology talent, sign up and participate in technology activities in your market. Volunteer at association meetings to check members in: you will meet every attending member, every meeting.• Explain to people you meet that there are two types of people you would like to be introduced to: those who are leaders in their field and are looking for an opportunity and those who are leaders in their field and are not looking for an opportunity right now. You are an expert in your market, so people who are not looking now would still benefit from knowing you and the people in your network. http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 213. Sample Recruitment Life Cycle -Simple http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 214. Sample Recruitment Life Cycle - FULLhttp://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 215. Traditional vs. Data-Driven Recruitment Processhttp://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 216. Sample Assessment Tools http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 217. OPTIMIZING COMPENSATION& BENEFITS http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 218. Background: The Four Desperates1. Desperate 2. DesperateCompetition Consumer3. Desperate 4. Desperate Achievers Changes Refer: Analysis of Retention – Example and Exercise http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 219. • Exercise: Define your Talent issues, limited to the most critical 4 aspects. http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 220. What drives our Reward?Strategy Values Compensation & Benefits http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 221. Before we proceed…Reality #1 Cash is King http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 222. Before we proceed…Reality #2 Tangible C&B Attraction http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 223. Before we proceed…Reality #3 In-Tangible C&B Retention http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 224. Before we proceed…Reality #4 In-Tangible C&B Tipping Point for Attraction/Retention http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 225. The 51.28% Theory• Resign = Push + Pull > 51.28%• If staff is Happy: => 0 + Pull > 51.28% http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 226. Values Driven C&B1. Performance2. Differentiation3. Teamwork4. Caring http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 227. • Exercise: What “Values” drive your Talent Management strategies?• How will these Values impact your HR and C&B policies? http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 228. Branding and Positioning:“You don’t attract who you want. You attract who you are” John Maxwell http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 229. ‘Basic Values’ Driven C&B• Performance• Differentiation• Caring• Non-tangibles & Segmentation http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 230. What to Pay?• Pay for Service• Pay for Job• Pay for Competency• Pay for Performance http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 231. Pay for Job• Competency • Problem solving - Knowledge - Complex - Skills - Type of problems - Experience - Special Problems • Responsibility - Authority - Success/Failure - Freedom to act http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 232. Performance and Incentives1. Internal Equity – Internal Job Rates – Performance differentials3. External Competitiveness – External Job Rates - Benchmarking – Demand & Supply http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 233. What’s the Difference?• Increment• Bonus• Promotion Exercise: How does your company define the difference? http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 234. What to Pay?• Pay for Service• Pay for Job• Pay for Competency• Pay for Performance Exercise: Which ones does your company use for Pay? http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 235. Compa Ratio TableUse this if your company:• Pays for Performance, and• Pays for Job ratesDef:Mid-Point = Mid Point of Pay GradeGrade E2 Min MID Max RM2,000 RM2,500 RM3,000 http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 236. Compa Ratio Table < 0.7 ≥0.7 - >0.9 - ≥1.1 - > 1.3 ≤0.9 <1.1 ≤1.354321 http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 237. Compa Ratio Table < 0.7 ≥0.7 - >0.9 - ≥1.1 - > 1.3 ≤0.9 <1.1 ≤1.3543 5%21 http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 238. Compa Ratio Table < 0.7 ≥0.7 - >0.9 - ≥1.1 - > 1.3 ≤0.9 <1.1 ≤1.35 94 73 9 7 5% 4 32 21 0 http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 239. Compa Ratio Table < 0.7 ≥0.7 - >0.9 - ≥1.1 - > 1.3 ≤0.9 <1.1 ≤1.35 15 12 9 8 74 12 9 7 5 33 9 7 5% 4 32 6 4 2 1 01 4 2 0 0 0 http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 240. • Exercise:• Determine your pay grades and salary points (internal or external benchmark?)• Draw your Compa Ratio Table http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 241. Employee Differentiation through Relative Performance and Talent Management http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 242. Values Driven C&B• Performance• Differentiation• Caring• Non-tangibles & Segmentation http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 243. Employee Distinction? < 0.7 ≥0.7 - >0.9 - ≥1.1 - > 1.3 ≤0.9 <1.1 ≤1.35 9 8 7 6 54 8 7 6 5 43 7 6 5% 4 32 6 5 4 3 21 5 4 3 2 1 http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 244. Employee Distinction? < 0.7 ≥0.7 - >0.9 - ≥1.1 - > 1.3 ≤0.9 <1.1 ≤1.35 20 15 12 8 54 18 12 9 5 33 9 7 5% 4 32 1 1 1 0 01 0 0 0 0 0 http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 245. Employee Distinction Average Rating Multiply Example Example Rating Factor Rating Increme nt > 4.1 5 2 4.2 8.4%> 3.3 – 4.1 4 1.2 3.5 4.2%> 2.3 – 3.3 3 0.75 2.8 2.1%> 1.3 – 2.3 2 0.5 1.8 0.9% ≤ 1.3 1 0 1.0 0% http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 246. Employee Distinction• Identify POTENTIAL 2 3 4 5PERFORMANCE Group II Group I 5 ( Potential) (Talent Pool) 4 Group IV Group III 3 (Counseling) ( Performance) 2 http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 247. Talent Strategy: C&B1. Eliminate Staff Awards 1. Additional Profit Sharing2. Eliminate Staff Trips points for TP3. Eliminate HOD trips 2. ↑ Pay for Performers,4. Remove Salary structure ↓ pay for Non- limitations for TP Performers5. Premium Group Pay 3. Additional % during annual increments6. Year-round 4. Special Allowances promotions/increment 5. SCL Allowances7. Spot Bonus Pool 6. Flexitime http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 248. Curse of the Bell Curve ‘A’ ‘B’ ‘C’ ‘D’ ‘E’Staff Staff Staff Staff Staff http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 249. Values Driven C&B1. Performance2. Differentiation3. Caring http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 250. Values Driven C&B• Performance• Differentiation• Caring• Non-tangibles & Segmentation http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 251. Caring (1/2) Staff Loans/ Discounts Uniform Subsidies Lactation Allowance/ Room COLAExtensive Caring Subsidized Training Lunch Free Flexitime Carpark Work/Life SRC Balance http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 252. Caring (2/2) Add. Internal Transfer/ Maternity Selection Secondment Leave Free IT Paternity Classes LeaveDiscount Caring Van PnB Transport & OOP (KTM) Emergency Sub. Yoga/ Loan Study & Line Dance Library & Exam Magazines Leave http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 253. • Exercise: What ‘Caring’ C&B policies do you have to attract and retain talent? http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 254. Values Driven C&B• Performance• Differentiation• Caring• Non-tangibles & Segmentation http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 255. Demographic Segmentation - General Veterans (Pre-Boomers) 1934-1945 Gen Y Boomers(Millennials, Netster) 1945-1960 1980+ Gen X (Cusper, Buster) 1960 - 1980 http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 256. Demographic Segmentation - others1. Women, Working Mothers2. Youtube generation3. Working retired4. Social Activists5. Work/Life balancers6. Industry (ICT, Advertising, Engineer, Accounting, Lawyer, etc.) http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 257. SCL: Specialist CareerLadder Principal Consultant (1) Consultant (4) Specialist (4) Associate Specialist (2) http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 258. SCL: Specialist Career Ladder •Telco,Principal Consultant (1) •Outsourcing, •Aerospace, Consultant (4) •Biotech, Specialist (4) •Digital media, •Animation, •M&AAssociate Specialist (2) •Financial forensics http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 259. What needs work? High Fun place to work Training For people like me OpportunitiesTarget Segment Importance to Attractive Location Familiarity with Tasks Innovative company Career Opportunities Overseas Opportunities High Salary Low Weak Strong Current Attractions http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 260. What needs work? High Fun place to work Training For people like me OpportunitiesTarget Segment Importance to Attractive Location Familiarity with Tasks Innovative company Career Opportunities Overseas Opportunities High Salary Low Weak Strong Current Attractions http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 261. For Starting Up… HighImportance to Segment Target Low http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 262. For Starting Up… Weak Strong Current Brand http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 263. Dangers of Direct Incentives1. lessen internal motivation,2. switch to mercenary mode,3. do something and do not do something else,4. bribe and fraud culture,5. easier for competitors to recruit,6. lessen teamwork & helpful culture,7. less and less impact for same value,8. mockery of base salary and employment contract,9. rebellion from non-incentivised staff,10. end up incentivising everyone for everything?, http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable.blogspot.com/
  • 264. Thank You. soft copy of slides:http://totallyunrelatedrandomanddebatable. blogspot.com/