Brooklyn Race Track Update 2012

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Brooklyn, Ohio Horse Racing Track Written For Brooklyn Historical Society in 2010.

Brooklyn, Ohio Horse Racing Track Written For Brooklyn Historical Society in 2010.

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  • 1. The Forgotten Horse Race Track: Brooklyn Driving Park By Kenneth J. LavelleThe first Brooklyn Driving Park was established in 1849 to fulfill a need seen by area farmers and wealthy horse owners to display andrace their horses in local competition. Very little historical documentation remains today of its early existence and its location. Onelocal map indicated it was located West of Ridge Road and North of the New York Central Short Line Railroad tracks in Brooklyn Twp.This specific map was a 1927 G.M.Hopkins map seen at the Cleveland Public Library Map Room and at the Brooklyn Historical Society.This writer believed that this Brooklyn Driving Park was privately owned and used by its club members in some sort of early “MinorLeague” harness racing circuit. Not everyone living in the area of the horse track visited there since gambling was frowned upon by mostarea church going members in the 1850s through the several decades it was in operation. It is thought that those who visited this harnessracing track lived outside of rural Brooklyn Township. This was a close knit farming community where some Brooklyn residents weremembers of the Parma Grange whom held their monthly meetings in Parma Heights Village, Ohio.The second Brooklyn Driving Park was established in 1923 as a half-mile long horse harness racing track in rural Brooklyn Township, OhioIt was renamed and indicated on local street atlas maps as the “Brooklyn Race Track”. The Brooklyn Driving Park was located in oldtaxation districts twenty and twenty-one in Brooklyn Township on land parcels there once owned by Anthony James and J. T. James in 1852(later William James in 1856). A review of old tax records indicated the James Family at one time owned land from Ridge Road to what isnow Tiedeman Road in Brooklyn, Ohio. This horse-driving park seems to predate the quarrying of sandstone with clay in land parcel numbertwenty-one by The Cleveland Stone Company in 1858 East, South and North of the Brooklyn Driving Park. The quarrying of the sandstoneseems to be done on limited basis there between the years 1858 and 1929 when that special type of sandstone was needed. Area maps andlists of active quarries seen by this author did not indicate it as a working quarry site after 1870, 1905, 1920, and 1927. The use of the twoland parcels has been changed by the construction of the I-480 highway with its opening in August 1986 with the later development of theRidge Park Square Shopping Center in 1987, along Ridge Rd and Northcliffe Rd. Brooklyn became a city in 1951.Horseracing had started as being a small part of local Agricultural Societies who were formed to display in public areas locally grown farmproduce, promote new farming methods and machinery, and the type of horses needed to plow the soil. The small Village/City of Clevelandhad its local Agricultural Society Fairs in 1819, 1829, and 1849. Also, in 1849 more rural area townships had their own fairs to promoteagriculture. These early agricultural fairs were the beginning of what we now know today in 2009 to be local County Fairs in Ohio. It is avery common event by many persons to attend their local County Fair today. The Cuyahoga County Fair was established at the county fairgrounds in Berea, Ohio since 1891. The local Granges, Four-H clubs and other local farm family related organizations in collaboration withthe Cuyahoga County Farm Bureau has displayed their members farm skills and crafts there to the general public.Horseracing Tracks were very common in Cuyahoga County and in the State of Ohio at that time. Laws were passed and enforced to notallow legalized betting on horses that raced at early tracks. For example, The Village of Cleveland had outlawed the racing of horses on itsstreets in 1820. Thus creating the need to have such horse races on private property with flat racetracks. Gambling, games of chance, cardplaying and betting on horses at racetracks were not legal under the 1803 State of Ohio Constitution. Local papers reported to its readers inthe 1850s that they and many of their readers did not support or want to have gambling and betting on horse racing. Those persons whoattended and did bet on horse races were not representative of most local communities and most voters in the State of Ohio. As the readermight expect, support for such illegal events created a horseracing industry and lobbyists in the state legislature to allow gambling andbetting on horse races. In the 1850s and future years, it is believed that professional gamblers and later organized crime rackets controlledsuch early horse race tracks in Cuyahoga County and elsewhere. This is the reason why racetracks gained such a poor reputation over time.In 1870, wealthy horse owners created a horse racing set of tracks to run their horses on privately owned tracks in Ohio and other nearbystates. The Cleveland Driving Park Company, Inc. was established to run and maintain a house-racing track in Glenville in NewburghTownship, Ohio. The Cleveland Driving Park Company was the first amateur driving club in America. They had built the racetrack coursewith the Northern Ohio Fair Association, who had decided to have a large agricultural fair across the street in Glenville. A bridge was builtover St. Clair Avenue to connect the two events held in 1870. Wealthy citizens had wanted to host the Ohio State Fair in Cleveland in 1870,but the State Board of Agriculture refused to hold it in Cleveland, Ohio. The Agricultural fair promoted agriculture, horticulture and themechanical arts, as well as horse trotting harness racing. Some eighty-seven acres of land was purchased there for the buildings to be erectedthere at East 88th and St. Clair Avenue. This local area annual agricultural fair next to the Glenville racetrack operated until 1881.TheCleveland Driving Park Company was in existence until 1908. In 1872, the Quadrilateral Circuit met at Glenville. and considered it to be the“model” for the “Grand Circuit” of Harness racing which was established in 1873. The “Grand Circuit” was formed to become the “MajorLeague” of harness racing in America. Cleveland was a member of this “Grand Circuit” along with such cities as Buffalo, Utica, andRochester, New York. The Brooklyn Driving Park did not seem to become part of the “Grand Circuit” since it was not mentioned on the list Publication Editor/Writer Ken Lavelle kenlavelle@juno.com (440) 230-2777 Not printed with ink or on paper provided by NOCSIA funds. Page 1 3/1/2012
  • 2. of horse race tracks that he saw while researching this paper. The Brooklyn Race Track was part of the “Ohio Short Ship Circuit” from 1923to 1926. By the 1890s, it was not uncommon for some townships to have at least one local harness horseracing track on private property. Forexample, in Rockport Township in Cuyahoga County Ohio there was the Rockport Hamlet Driving Park. It operated from 1890 to 1903.During the term of Ohio Governor M. Herrick (1904-1906) lobbyists in the Ohio Legislature passed a bill to allow betting at Ohio racetracks.The bill was sent to his desk for his signature to allow betting legal at Ohio racetracks. He vetoed the bill and was not re-elected as Governor.Many if not all, flat harness and thoroughbred horse racing tracks were closed in Ohio soon after Governor’s Herrick’s veto. It is thought thatthis is when The Brooklyn Driving Park was closed. Area thoroughbred horses were trained and stabled there in the mid 1920s.The State ofOhio enforced the law that no betting on horse races were allowed in Ohio. The horse racing and gambling interests were also slowly closeddown when local townships with local flat race tracks were annexed by larger nearby cities. For example, the City of Cleveland annexedGlenville in 1905. The horse-racing track there was closed in 1908 as a result. Horse racing and now more professional gambling interestswere forced to move to Warrensville Twp. in 1909, where they created the Village of North Randall, Ohio. This was where horse racing andbetting on horse races could be legal since it was the major industry in the Village. For gamblers in the Cleveland area, it was possible totravel to several local horse tracks there via local streetcar lines and transfer to a special streetcar line operated by the track interests in theVillage of Colett, Ohio until such service ended in 1925. Then patrons of the track could drive their own private cars to reach the track to beton horse races.In May of 1923, a local race track promoter and owner of the Brooklyn Race Track, a Mr. King, announced his willingness to make the WestCuyahoga County Fairgrounds the location of a track in his circuit and was prepared to invest $60,000.00 in expanding its horse racingfacilities. He also proposed to build a four or five story modern hotel in Berea, Ohio. The concept of a race track and gambling connectedwith it was condemned by the Board of Trustees of Baldwin-Wallace College. It was not in the best interests of the College nor the Village ofBerea. Their objections were supported by the leading citizens. The proposed modern hotel and a horse race track did not become reality.The Brooklyn RaceTrack opened in June 3, 1923 with Mr. John A. King as the General Manager. The Lessees of the Brooklyn Track land wereThomas McGinty and Gerald Haynes. Those who attended the harness races in 1923 listened to live music provided by an orchestra betweenharness horse races held there. Buses and private cars entered through a large wooden arch built in 1924. The Brooklyn RaceTrack reportedits held races in The Cleveland Press newspaper in early September 1924. There were three types of daily races held: Classified Pace – Purse$500.00. Named Pace – Purse $5,000.00. Classified Trot – Purse $500.00. Each type of harness race had three daily heats (races) todetermine the winner of the purse. Some of the daily races had different names associated with them. For example: The Classified Trot was aMile long heat. The 2:15 Trot was also a Mile long heat. The Brooklyn Pacing Derby – Purse of $500.00 consisted of Three-Quarter Mileheats. Enlarged copies of harness race results were made from microfilm of The Cleveland Press for the reader. Both the Brooklyn RaceTrack and the Cranwood Race Track competed for customers during 1924 Labor Day Holiday racing meets. It was thought that both theBrooklyn and Cranwood Rack Tracks had independent owners and operators that did not coordinate races meets. The Brooklyn RaceTrackappeared to have been a harness horse race track operation in from 1923 to1924. It became a thoroughbred horse race track in 1925 to 1928.In 1924, there was a large fire of unknown origin that burned down the large wooden grandstand and several other racing related woodenstructures. The out of control file spread out along a local railroad spur leading to a automotive car manufacturing company burning it to theground. The Marsh Car Company later went out of business and restarted again on the site producing machine parts. So any horse harnesstraining and stabling of horses there at the Brooklyn Driving Park was thought to be no longer in business. However, area maps found in2009 dated from 1924, 1927 (Hopkins map), 1928 wall maps and a 1939 Street Guide indicated its location and specific buildings there inBrooklyn Village, Ohio found at the CPL Map Room in Cleveland, Ohio for the Brooklyn Driving Park. It is possible this harness racetrackwas operating until 1938. Undated later area photos from the 1940s show the Brooklyn Airport, but not a trace of the racetrack and its oval.In the fall of 1924, thoroughbred horse racing began on September 24, 1924 at the Brooklyn Race Track. Harness racing was on the decline.Area farmers now, as in the past, were not breeding the normal supply of trotter and pacer harness racing horses for horsemen to use attracks. It was thought that with the declining number of working farms, farmers in Ohio and elsewhere were not breeding horses for harnessracing. Only a rare farmer in a rural community was raising horses with the advent of the automobile in 1920s becoming widely available.However, there was another reason why the thoroughbred horse racing changed there. It seems illegal gambling was being done there the lessees of the land Thomas McGinty and Gerald Haynes were taken to Garfield Heights Municipal Court to prove their innocence in anillegal betting and gambling operation with local bookmakers and gambling clubs/dens in the area. The City of Cleveland’s Public SafetyDirector, Mr. Barry, was on a crusade to eliminate illegal gambling in the Cleveland area here. The plan was to close the race track since itwas a” nuisance”. The race track was not closed down for cause of being a nuisance in 1924 or 1925.In 1925, there were only thoroughbred horse racing and auto car racing with modified FORD engines racing at the Brooklyn Race Track.An advertisement for Motor Car Races at the Brooklyn Race Track was posted in the Cleveland Plain Dealer August 23, 1925 on page 18.. Publication Editor/Writer Ken Lavelle kenlavelle@juno.com (440) 230-2777 Not printed with ink or on paper provided by NOCSIA funds. Page 2 3/1/2012
  • 3. The number of allowed weeks of horse races was reduced by the track owners by mutual agreement when the racing season ended early.However, Mr. King was still in charge of the Brooklyn Race Track in 1925. The moment to curtail early the 1925 local racing season wasthe result of local race track managers that Cleveland was getting an overdose of racing. For the good of the sport in 1926 it might begood to end the racing season early. Also, the Brooklyn Track faced a added difficulty of attracting a good list of entries, with the MapleHeights Track meet off, because of shipments (of race horses) from distant tracks to compete in local races. This represented a change forlocal horse racing. The local economy was indicating signs of a economic slowdown in employment levels and manufacturing ordersplaced. The general public was not attending horse races as often and in large numbers as in earlier years to support this new local sport.There could have been a change in management and owners of the Brooklyn Race Track or programs in 1925 as the result of these events.In 1926, The State of Ohio had a problem enforcing its ban on betting on thoroughbred and harness horse racing. The State Attorney Generalannounced that it was now up to the Sheriff in each county how many and which specific racetracks could be open to the general public.Betting on horseraces was still illegal in the State of Ohio. The Sheriff in Cuyahoga County allowed the closed Brooklyn Driving Park toopen for an eighteen-day running race called the “Ohio Handicap” starting on August 29, 1926. This thoroughbred horse racing meet was forthree-year old horses and up for a mile and one-sixteenth contest. During the eighteen-day race schedule horse trailers transported some eighthundred (800) horses from the Eastside Cranwood Driving Park to the Westside Brooklyn Driving Park. The Plain Dealer had very goodcoverage of the event and indicated in its promotion that a large wooden arch was the gateway to the Brooklyn Driving Park. The woodenarch was similar in Design to that used at the amusement “Euclid Lake Park” and the wooden arch built on Public Square for 1896Centennial Celebration in Cleveland. Horse racing fans could board public buses at Public Square in Cleveland riding them to and from theBrooklyn Driving Park for those eighteen days. A horse called “Zoya” won the first opener race of two-year old Thoroughbred horses in afive-and-one-half furlong dash infront of a large crowd a newly built grandstand and clubhouse in Brooklyn Township, Ohio. The telephonenumber of the Brooklyn Driving Park was Lincoln 1 – 1681 found in a Criss-Cross Agency Directory of Cleveland, O. Vol. 3, dated 1926,page 477. The race activity was changed to be only fifteen days according to The Cleveland Press newspaper on September 1926.This writer was not really sure why the “Ohio Handicap” meet was held at the Brooklyn Driving Park. There were many questions in hismind. One question was if the meet was held in Brooklyn, what was the reason why it was moved there from Cranwood Race Track?It had become a Village in 1927. The Village of Brooklyn now had an entertainment landmark indicated on local maps producing revenue.This writer thought it was possible the Cranwood race track was having modernization or new construction of buildings while races for theeighteen days were held in Brooklyn Village, Ohio. A Cleveland area map dated 1928 indicated the racetrack at Cranwood, ‘The NewCranwood’. The owner of the land where Brooklyn Driving Park was located did not seem to be indicated on local land record plat bookswhen checked by this writer in 2009. He thought the land was leased from the Belt & Terminal Realty Co. to the Brooklyn Driving Park,which seemed to run by the Brooklyn Driving Park Club based on it phone listing number. How often and what type of persons visited thisracetrack? What, if any involvement in the operation of Brooklyn Driving Club George Smith might have had was not clear. He was the soleowner of the Cranwood Race Track in 1926. There was not much documentation to find and consider in 2009 to answer his questions.It was not an easy task to attempt to identify landowners of Parcels Number 20 and 21 in Brooklyn Township and Village. For example,a routine check for Land Parcel ValuationTax Record Cards at the Cuyahoga County Archives yield no results. It seems all the parcel cardsdating from 1935 to 1964 were missing from the archives when a request was made to view them. The current plat books in the County maproom had no old information to mention for this paper. One old quarry section was listed as Parcel 1 with the Guardian Title Company asowner. However, a check done of the Belt & Terminal Realty Company, the only name on some of the maps seen, reveled it was firstincorporated in October 21, 1905 and cancelled on October 21, 1930. The filing agent was T.J. Hopkins, who had the following associatesJ.G.W. Cowles, M.A. Fanning, W.R. Hopkins & Others. It was established as a corporation for profit. The second filing of the same namewas Incorporated August 24, 1932 with David J. Hopkins as filing agent with the following associates Carl F. Shuler, Elvi Kahkonen, andAnna Kahkonen. The B & T Realty Company appeared to be inactive as of March 12, 1973. W.R. Hopkins was once City Manager in the1920s for theCity of Cleveland. He supported the idea of having the Cleveland Short Line Railroad route South of Cleveland to run throughtrain traffic around Cleveland. The Cleveland Airport was later named for W.R. Hopkins; it had opened in 1925. Voters changed from theCity Manager form of local government in 1929 to the current Mayoral form. This writer thought the land where the Brooklyn Driving Parkwas located may have been leased form the Belt &Terminal Realty Company while it was open there in 1926.At some point in 1926, some of the horse stable buildings were used by local road building improvement crews to store their equipment in,mules, and housed the work crews in the vacant buildings of the former racetrack. Bob Depew’s interview by Lynette Filips mentioned thisin her June/July 2001 series articles. After 1926, the racetrack had limited use as a stabling and training facility of horses for other racetracks.It seems the 1926 races scheduled at Brooklyn Race Track failed to entertain the trotters and pacers according to the Cleveland Plain Dealernewspaper article dated January 12, 1927 in the Cleveland Sports Section on page number 21.In 1927, horse harness racing was not scheduled for the Cranwood and Brooklyn Race Tracks as part of the normal racing season. Why? Publication Editor/Writer Ken Lavelle kenlavelle@juno.com (440) 230-2777 Not printed with ink or on paper provided by NOCSIA funds. Page 3 3/1/2012
  • 4. The stewards of the Ohio Short Ship Circuit who met at the Hollenden Hotel in Cleveland, did not include both the Cranwood andBrooklyn Race Tracks in the 1927 schedule. Cranwood Track was not represented at the meeting. Mr. King, who represented theBrooklyn Race Track, refused the scheduled race meet date offered at the meeting for the start date of August 1, 1927. There had beenmuch discussion at the meeting which race track in the Ohio Short Ship Circuit would be scheduled for the race date of July 4th, 1927. TheFremont, Ohio race track was scheduled for the July 4th, 1927 starting date. The Ohio Short Ship Circuit horse racing meet schedule for1927 listed the folowing Ohio towns: Norwalk; Beulah Park, Columbus; Mansfield; Canton; Fremont; Toledo; and Kalamazoo, Michigan.The Grand Circuit was held at North Randall. It was thought the Ohio Short Ship Circuit no longer existed in 2010. It was not clear tothis writer how the race horses were transported to each track in 1927. Perhaps by interurban train, Railway Express, or by horse trucks.It is thought no horses were transported by rail along the Cleveland Short Line to the Brooklyn RaceTrack via its nearby 1919 industrial spur.In 1928 and 1929 the Brooklyn Race Track was not listed as a scheduled race meet location in the Ohio Short Ship Circuit.. This writer wasnot sure what ever happened to Mr. John A. King and his management staff in the late 1920s.It seemed that the horses that ran in the OhioShort Trip Circuit that won local races might be able to race in the Grand Circuit later in year. During the writing of this paper, the name ofMr. Edward A. Pohlman of Cleveland, Ohio was seen several times related to the Brooklyn Race Track. It seems Mr. Pohlman introduced thesuccessful “Pohlman Plan” of Thoroughbred Horse Racing at Longwood, Florida in 1926. This “Pohlman Plan” was used at the BrooklynRace Track for the thoroughbred horse races in 1928. However, no evidence existed in 2010 when harmess horse races ran at the BrooklynRace Track in 1928 since it was not part of the Ohio Short Ship Circuit. Mr. Pohlman lived in Shaker Heights, Ohio. He was the GeneralManager of the Longwood, Florida race track . He was national and a local horse racing promoter here in Cleveland.With the hard times of the Great Depression in that began in October 1929, all the horse racing tracks were closed in 1930 in CuyahogaCuyahoga County and the State of Ohio. In 1931 and 1932, to the Sheriff in each county could decide how many and which specificracetracks could be open to the general public. The Brooklyn Village Council wanted to re-open the Brooklyn Driving Park in 1931 andpassed a council resolution to allow horse racing again at The Brooklyn Driving Park. The Village Council members openly defied the orderby the Cuyahoga County Sheriff to keep the driving park closed. It is not known if any horse racing occurred that year. However, it is knownthat none was held at the Brooklyn Driving Park in 1932. Why? When betting on horse races in the State of Ohio was legal in June 1933, theCuyahoga County Sheriff announced that any horse tracks closed in 1932 would not be open in 1933. The Sheriff thought three (3) localracetracks were enough for the public to bet at in Cuyahoga County: Cranwood, Thistledown and Berea. The Bainbridge track in GeaguaCounty was also allowed to open in 1933.The Erie Railroad provided train passenger service to and from the Bainbridge track on openscheduled race days for horse race fans. The Brooklyn Driving Park in Brooklyn Village was not among the short list of open horseracetracks in Cuyahoga County in 1933. It is thought that a German Soccer Team used the abandoned race track area for a practice andplaying field in the 1930s on Sundays for a time and then stopped. A soccer ball was dropped from a plane flying above the field areato start each game held.In 1933, Mr. Pohlman, the locally and nationally known race track promoter, planned a schedule rehabilitation of the Brooklyn Race Track.This update of the long vacant race track was done with the knowledge of legalized gambling in Ohio at its race tracks was to become areality. However, Mr. Pohlman died on April 5, 1933. The scheduled rehabilitation of the Brooklyn Race Track did not take place!The Brooklyn Race Track remained vacant, closed, and unused until all the remaining structures there were removed after March 1938.On May 28, 1933 (during the Memorial Day Holiday) there was an automobile car race held at the Brook Park Speedway Race Track whichwas located at Brook Park Road and West 139th Street. This auto race track was a ½ mile long type of track. There seemed to be no autoracing done at the Brooklyn Race Track in Brooklyn, Ohio in 1933. Any events held there in the 1930s were difficult to document.It is thought no more horse racing was done at the Brooklyn Driving Park between the years 1933 and 1938. No mention of horse racingactivity was reported in the Plain Dealer newspaper Sports Pages when reviewed that was on microfilm at the Cleveland Public Library bythis writer in September 2009 for this paper. An account of horse racing activity there in the mid-1930s could not be confirmed from asource at the Brooklyn Historical Society in 2009. He was told as a child to not to cross the nearby railroad tracks and play there since thehorse track was still in operation. However, it must be noted here that this writer was given a copy of an aerial photo taken from an airplane of the Brooklyn Driving Track dated March 31, 1938. The Aerial photo taken seems to indicate a possible operational judging stand andmany abandoned stable buildings just South of a possible still working track. It could have been possible horse races were held and notreported to the Plain Dealer Sports Desk.Another interesting item that supports the case of the Brooklyn Driving Park being open is the fact itwas still indicated on a 1939 Printed Street Guide One question this writer could not answer when comparing the 1926 race photo in theCleveland Plain Dealer newspaper to the March 1938 aerial photo was this one:How and when was the clubhouse and the 2nd large woodengrandstand removed at the Brooklyn Driving Park? Who operated this racetrack? It appeared to this writer that the races were run by aprivate group of individual investors. Specific details were unknown in 2009. What was the normally scheduled racetrack season there?This writer thought the harness racing and/or thoroughbred race season might have been from April to November based on incomplete, Publication Editor/Writer Ken Lavelle kenlavelle@juno.com (440) 230-2777 Not printed with ink or on paper provided by NOCSIA funds. Page 4 3/1/2012
  • 5. vague, and limited 1926 and 1931 season information. Also, he thought the horse races there might have been only held for one or two briefperiods of several weeks during the normal racing season. Then, the racetrack had little or no racing activity scheduled. In 2009, this writerwas shown a small piece of white-pained wood saved from the Brooklyn track in 1932. He was not sure what type of building it was fromthere. It is possible some or many of the stable buildings and other buildings where the horse owners had stayed in temporary for local races,when held, were torn down. Two nails were at each end of this white pained (on all four sides) stick-like piece; perhaps from a chair, ladderor once on wall type divider or stairway rail. Part of the old racetrack was used as a runway take-off and landing runway for airplanes at thenearby Brooklyn Airport between 1940-1963.The City of Cleveland purchased a large undeveloped abandoned land parcel in 1949 at the end of McGowan Avenue intended to be a futurepark playground. A small dirt road went through in this wild, undeveloped future park over the B&O R.R. track leading into Brooklyn, Ohiotowards Tiedeman Road. Property boundary lines were not clear in the early 1960s there since there were no posted signs or fences in thewild open area. This writer visited the area briefly as a young child to play there. He found birds, animals, trees, wild berry bushes, saw anpumping gas well and open pools of water stored there for some reason East of the B&O R.R. tracks. He may have entered a small portion ofThe Roseland golf Course (1932-1985) which seems to have owned land West of Tiedeman Road as indicated on an Official Arrow Map ofCleveland and Vicinity. This dated 1945 map was compiled by The Cleveland Directory Company. Their clubhouse was located East ofTiedeman as indicated on old area maps seen years later on a dated 1933 Hopkins map. The City of Cleveland did not develop this large landparcel into a playground park for kids to play in until 1994.This writer did not visit there often in the 1960s. It was possible that others mayhave explored further into the wild woods of Brooklyn towards the Brooklyn Racetrack area from that point.There was an old unconfirmed story from the 1920s that children playing on the Brooklyn side of the B & O R.R. tracks. North of this futurepark was a small train like depot station where one might purchase train tickets. Outside steps led to a small window that opened to an officetype room. It was still possible in the early1920s to see old railroad tracks on the ground, overgrown with grass and weeds leading off themain track towards this building and leading away into the woods. Where the tracks led remains a mystery to those that saw them in the1920s and told to this writer in 2009. There were oil and gas wells in the area in the 1960s. It is possible train cars were there to carrypumped oil or gas out of the fields. No local railroad maps available in 2009 could verify this story. This writer’s point of mentioning this isthere were wooded areas where children visited where that had a sense of mystery in the Cities of Cleveland and Brooklyn.This paper was written to further explain and update Lynette’s initial Old Brooklyn News newspaper articles of the Brooklyn/South Brooklynareas concerning the racetrack and stone quarries. She had mentioned to me in 2003 as she read the August 1926 Special Edition of TheCleveland News concerning the Parma Centennial celebration that horse racing had began again at the Brooklyn Race Track. I did not knowmuch concerning the race track operations. She was there in Parma Heights to view the newly dedicated Ohio Historical Marker for the FirstRural Brick Road in The United States, along the Wooster Pike from Olde York Rd. to Ablion, Ohio completed in 1896. One of the bricksfrom her garden was amongst those placed in the ground infront at the base of the historical marker. In 2009, this writer decided to do somemore research and write a paper concerning the Brooklyn Driving Park for others to read in the future. In 2009, on the local ballot registeredvoters were given the choice to vote for or against allowing gambling Casinos in Ohio. The point being made here is legalized gambling inthe area was common in the past and after 2009 when legalized gambling Casinos were allowed by the voters in the State of Ohio. There hadbeen Bingo Games allowed that were held at the local Catholic Churches since the 1930s. The Ohio Lottery was created in 1974. The Stateof Ohio allowed Keno games in 2008 and Mega Powerball lottery ticket sales in 2010.The Brooklyn Racetrack and old quarry pits areas were for many years an attractive nuisance type area. Children and adults seemed to liketo visit the area in the woods along the railroad track off Ridge Road in Brooklyn. All sorts of persons seemed to be in the woods there atdifferent times years ago. There were homeless and unemployed men, teenagers who did not attend school that day, hobos, hikers, picnicparties were held there, neighborhood persons walking along railroad tracks who avoided the working train crews, etc. In the process ofwriting this paper, the writer learned some old interesting stories. In the 1930s through the 1950s, hobos left the moving trains in the area andvisited local persons asking for food as they traveled. Some persons lived in small caves inside the old quarry walls for a time. Gypsies wereknown to camp there at times in the 1940s. In the early 1950s, a circus was permitted hold its public performances North of the old BrooklynRacetrack, a resident told me. Mr. Frey told this writer that he once found an old horseshoe at the old racetrack site in the 1950s. As time passed, the oval track circle disappeared as a local landmark with grass and weeds growing where the horses once ran. In time theold race track became a memory, its old quarried sandstone pits located nearby became an area of mystery to visitors and residents alikealong the New York Central Railroad Cleveland Short Line double train tracks in the Cleveland, Ohio area. It is this writer’s hope some ofthe readers’ questions concerning this mysterious area have been answered.Quarry Map Sources:“Cuyahoga County Surveyor’s Record Volume No. 5, 1849-1893” (43). Brooklyn Driving Park not mentioned here. Perhaps not surveyed. Publication Editor/Writer Ken Lavelle kenlavelle@juno.com (440) 230-2777 Not printed with ink or on paper provided by NOCSIA funds. Page 5 3/1/2012
  • 6. 1852 “Map of Cuyahoga County, Ohio”. Harris H. Blackmore, Architect and Civil Engineer. Published by Stoddard and Everett.Map courtesy of the Beford Historical Society Museum. Placed on-line in 2009 for website http://ww.railsandtrails.com. J. T. James listed.“Treasurer’s Duplicate of Taxes Assessed in Brooklyn Township No. 6 For Year 1856.” No listing for Brooklyn Driving Park or Quarry.1858 “Map of Cuyahoga County”. G. M. Hopkins Jr. C.E. Published by S.H. Matthews. www.railsandtrails.com. Brooklyn Township.1874 The Atlas of Cuyahoga County. Brooklyn Township. Stone quarry indicated on this map in Parcel number 21 owned by A. James.1897 Township Map: Southern Ohio Insert Map of Cleveland, Ohio in right corner. Number 91, printed in Volume 34, The New Volumesof the Encyclopedia Britannica 1903. This was part of a general Ohio map in two parts: Northern Ohio and Southern Ohio in The CenturyAltas by the Century Company, copyrighted in 1897 and 1902. Good map for reader to learn where local townships once were located here.1903 Brooklyn Township Map. H.B.Stranahan Company, Chicago, Ill.1904 United States Department of The Interior Geological Survey Map. Cleveland, Ohio – Cuyahoga County. Surveyed 1901-1902.1905 U.S. Department of Agriculture. Soil Map Cleveland, Ohio Sheet Number 29. Field Operations of the Bureau of Soils. Base map fromU.S. Geological Survey Sheets. Soils surveyed by J.E. Lapham and Charles M. Mooney. The A. James Quarry was indicated as havingMiami Stoney (MS) Loam. West and North of the A. James Quarry was a soil condition indicated as being Dunkirk (D1) Loam which waspart Loam and Heavy Clay Loam. Loam is defined as being a rich soil composed of clay, sand and some organic matter. Clay is needed tomanufacture bricks.The Cuyahoga Brick and Shale Company along Brookpark Road (1904) (later Cleveland Building Supply Co.) wasnearby. Cleveland Stone Company owned part of the land parcel along with Mr. James indicated on area maps in 1858, 1874, 1903, and1912. The 1905 map was the former property of The Amerada Petroleum Corporation Map No. 29. Purchased by this writer on E-Bay March2004.The quarries in the area may have been for clay and sandstone at various times in time past. This is what this writer thought afterviewing the 1905 soil map. This base sheet map of 1904 also indicates The Valley Driving Park near Clark Avenue in Cleveland, O. Notindicated on all 1910 maps. Driving Parks were popular in Cleveland area. Brooklyn Driving Park not indicated since this was soil map of aquarry pit area.1912 Sanborn Insurance Co. Map. “Cuyahoga County and its Suburbs”. Brooklyn Village.1920 G. M. Hopkins Co. Map. “Plat Book of Cuyahoga County. Volume 3. 1920”. Revised 1924. Philadelphia, Pa.1953 United States Department of The Interior Geological Survey Map. Cleveland South Quadrangle – Ohio – Cuyahoga County.7.5 minutes Series (Topographic) Updated 1963.The remains of an old Cleveland Quarries Company operation on a part of parcel 20/21 South of the CSL railroad tracks along BrookparkRoad was visible in an aerial photo number 14093 taken in March 31, 1962. Photo was part of the “Cleveland Aerial Photographic Index”.Cleveland Aerial Survey Company. Aerial photos in Ohio taken from 1925 to 1970s available for viewing at WRHS Library Archives andGenealogical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. P.G. 75 Container Number 23. Cleveland Quarries Company was the owner of 20 parcel on 1927G.M. Hopkins Company map along Brookpark Road West of Ridge Rd. Bill Hatchel visited this area of the old large quarry North of theR.R. tracks. This writer could only examine the 1938 and 1962 photos to see the ramp-like road leading down into the quarry pit in 2009.David A. Simmons. “True Grit: Ohio’s Industrial Grindstones”. Timeline. Ohio Historical Society. February-March 1991. Volume 8,Number 1. Pages 40-45.Ken Lavelle. “Berea Mahler Museum and History Center Tour”. NOCSIA Newsletter. NOCSIA tour in Berea, Ohio March 23rd, 2002.David A. Simmons presented very good program concerning Ohio sandstone quarries at the NOCSIA Annual meeting December 14, 2002at Cleveland State University in the Rhodes Tower. He distributed handouts for Ohio sandstone quarries dating from the 1870s to 1915 andideas how to investigate a quarry in Ohio.John A. Bownocker. “Building Stones of Ohio”. Columbus: Geological Survey of Ohio, 1915. Fourth Series, Bulletin 18.“Report on the Building Stones of the United States, and statistics of the Quarry Industry for 1880”. Report of the Tenth Census of theUnited States. Washington, D.C.: GPO, 1884. Volume 10.James A. Hieb. “Sandstone Center of the World: Images and Stories of Quarry Life in Amherst, South Amherst and Lorain County, Ohio”.Published by Quarrytown.net Publishing, South Amherst, Ohio 44001. 2007. ISBN 978-0-6151-4653-9.www.quarrytown.nettripp42@aol.com . Chapter 1 – Quarry History. Pages 25, 30, 32-33. On July 26, 1886 The Cleveland Stone Company Publication Editor/Writer Ken Lavelle kenlavelle@juno.com (440) 230-2777 Not printed with ink or on paper provided by NOCSIA funds. Page 6 3/1/2012
  • 7. was incorporated. Many small operating and formerly independent sandstone quarries were included into The Cleveland Stone Company.This writer believed that the A. James Quarries in Brooklyn Township were one of these small independent sandstone quarries now to be partof The Cleveland Stone Company. It was further thought that William James of Brooklyn Twp. had purchased the former stone quarry inLorain County in 1863 once known as the John Elliott Quarry in North Amherst. Mr. James operated that Lorain County quarry for 15 years.The Brooklyn Twp. quarry was thought to be in operation from 1858 to the 1870s and then on a limited basis until 1929.The 1927 Hopkinsmap of Brooklyn Twp. indicated that the Cleveland Stone Company still owned a parcel of land South of the CSL train tracks to BrookparkRoad West of Ridge Road. The WRAH tour group visited the Sandstone Village in Amherst, O. in the Spring of 2009 for a tour of theirmuseum. Many, if not all small quarries eventually became part of the Cleveland Stone Co. The stone quarries along the B&O R.R.Cleveland to Lester, O. Branch seemed to be part of Cleveland Stone Company by 1929 when the Cleveland Quarries Company was formed.The NOCSIA group toured two South Amherst quarries and their cut stone mill operation in Lorain County in June 2002. This writer wasvery surprised to learn the company had a contract to cut sandstone stone grave markers for the three National VA cemeteries in Ohio for theU.S. Veterans graves. Soon after the tour the company moved to Erie County to work a new sandstone quarry area. Planned development ofthe old South Amherst quarries never became reality there. The former abandoned quarry pits became local lakes filled by rainwater andsnow during the cold Ohio winters.“The Sandstone Story”. Brochure distributed during the WRAH tour in 2009 in the 1881 Grange hall meeting room. The Amherst HistoricalSociety. 113 South Lake Street, Amherst, Ohio 44001. 2002 address: 710 Milan Avenue, Amherst, Ohio in May 2002 NOCSIA Newsletter.Email: amhersthistory@centurytel.net. Website: www.amhersthirotricalsociety.org .Plans were being made in 2009 to have the general public in the future be able to view existing incomplete records of the Cleveland QuarriesCompany now in storage at the Sandstone Village in Amherst. Telephone: 1-440-988-7255 Fax: 440-988-2951.2009 “Cuyahoga County Plat Book Number 443”. Page 14. Quarry is Parcel One – Guardian Land Title Company. Parcel ‘A’. .3.474 acres.There was no 1935-1964 Land Tax Parcel Valuation Record Cards available at the Cuyahoga County Archives to view when requested.The old remaining sandstone quarry this writer visited and photographed on 11/23/2009 with Mr. Frey seemed like one that was cut downfrom the top and sides. There were no remains of quarry type buildings nearby or normal stone cutting markers on the walls seen. Smallrock outcroppings were seen in the cliff across from the quarry and photographed. These were thought to be the ‘caves’ persons lived inthat Lynette wrote about in her Old Brooklyn News articles. The old quarry had not been quarried for a very long time – perhaps 100+ years.It was located behind Mr. Frey’s backyard, between the CSX R.R. tracks and I-480 on a small strip of land about 250 feet wide.John, the archivist at the Brooklyn Historical Society showed this writer a photo of the old stone house the James Family once lived in on11/24/2009. The two-story sandstone house was similar in design to that of the Old Stone Tavern along the Wooster Pike in Parma Twp.Racetrack Map Sources:1924 Map. Mount Castle Map Company. “Cleveland and Cuyahoga County”. Large wall map.1927 G. M. Hopkins Map. “Plat Book of Cuyahoga County. Volume 6. 1927”. Partial Revision 1943. Brooklyn Driving Park page 30. Parma Heights Village page .31.1928 Map. Mount Castle Map Company. “Cleveland and Cuyahoga County “. Large wall Map. Date Stamped at CPL with date of 1932.1939 Map. Mount Castle Map Company. “Cleveland and Cuyahoga County Street Guide”. Section Number Page 15.1940(?) Map. “AAA Cleveland and Cuyahoga County” folding street map purchased on e-bay. Two maps: No date on either side! 1920/30s.“Official Arrow Map of Cleveland and Vicinity”. Compiled by The Cleveland Directory Co. 1945. Three East Side racetracks indicated.Racetrack Aerial Photo Sources.Aerial photo number 14093 taken in March 31, 1962. Photo was part of the “Cleveland Aerial Photographic Index”. Cleveland Aerial SurveyCompany. Aerial photos in Ohio taken from 1925 to 1970s available for viewing at WRHS Library Archives and Genealogical Center,Cleveland, Ohio. P.G. 75 Container Number 23. “Brookpark Road Factory Area”. Part of the western oval was still visible from the air inMarch 1962. This is the portion that seemed to have a local creek flowing through it southward at an angle in a 1938 aerial photo.Donated aerial Brooklyn Airport area photo dated March 21, 1938 given to the Brooklyn Historical Society, Cleveland, Ohio.(0-29-779G-112). Copy of photo was given to this author by the Brooklyn Historical Society in October 2009.Newspaper Gambling Article Sources:“Cleveland Newspaper Digest”. Items from the Daily True Democrat – 1850. Numbers 876, 877. Page 112.Annuals of Cleveland Volume 33. 1850. Part One. Ref F449.C6.U6.Topic: Gambling and Lotteries “Cleveland Newspaper Digest”. Items from the Daily True Democrat – 1852. Numbers 790, 791,792, and Publication Editor/Writer Ken Lavelle kenlavelle@juno.com (440) 230-2777 Not printed with ink or on paper provided by NOCSIA funds. Page 7 3/1/2012
  • 8. 873. . Page 130. Annuals of Cleveland Volume 35. 1852. Part One. Ref F449.C6.U6. Brooklyn Driving Park not mentioned in Annuals1849-1852. Also as topic entry, not mentioned in Annuals of Cleveland in 1929, 1930, 1932 to 1938.“STOP ALL BETTING AT AKRON RACES”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. June 16, 1922. Page 21. Betting common in early 1920’s.“Showing Where Gambling Flourishes in County”. The Cleveland Press. December 2, 1925. Page 1 and 2. Brooklyn was one area!“Barry Furious at attack on Police in Gambling trial”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. December 8, 1925. Pages 1 and 5. Illegal Track Wirethought to have existed from the Brooklyn Rack Track to the Clinton Club near West 73th Street in Northern Brooklyn Area. Persons arrestedand brought to trial were Mr. John Sullivan and Mr. John Radke in Judge Corlett’s Courtroom investigation of suburban gambling inCleveland.Decline of Supply of horses for Harness Races“Farmers Stop Raising Racers: Trotters and Pacers Becoming Scarcer”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. January 7, 1923.Note: This writer was told that a Law was passed that limited the number racing meets that could be held at a specific community track. Thus, the racing horses and their owners did a lot of traveling to various racing meets at different tracks in a season.W. F. Hozworth, Men of Grit and Greatness: A Historical Account of Middleburg Township, Berea, Brook Park and Middleburg Heights.1970. Reprinted 1986. Chapter 10: Hotels and Taverns. Page 39. Mr. King was the owner of the Brooklyn Driving Park and local race trackcircuit promoter. He wanted to have another horse racing track at the County Fairgounds and build a nearby hotel for race fans. Not done.Brooklyn Driving Park (1923-1926. Closed 1927-38?)There were no horse races listed in The Cleveland Press for years 1921, 1922 when checked on March 13, 2010. Three heats eachheld in 1924. There were three types of daily races held: Classified Pace – Purse $500.00. Named Pace – Purse $5000.00. Classified Trot –Purse $500.00. The Classified Trot was a Mile long heat. The 2:15 Trot was also a Mile long heat. The Brooklyn Pacing Derby – Purse of$500.00 had Three-Quarter Mile heats. There seemed to a combination of trotting horses and harness horses racing there in 1923 and 1924.The present day location of the Brooklyn Diving Park oval can be found by overlaying the 1937 and 2007-2008 Cleveland Area streetatlases. I-480 went through the center of the oval. Saybrook Drive at the following streets are at the northern point of the oval: BentwoodDrive, Forest Edge Drive, Roadon Road, and Elizabeth Lane. Melody Lane and Idlewood Drive are at the southern portion of the formeroval. I-480 was open in August 1986. The western portion of the oval is visible in a 1962 aerial photo and still existed in early 1980s.Stuart M. Bell. “The New Brooklyn Race Track is the scene of the finest races”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. January 7, 1923.Stuart M. Bell. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. January 10, 1923.“Ohio To Be Scene of Much Racing: Grand Circuit, Ohio Short Ship and Fair Meetings Will Keep Horses Here Most of Summer”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. February 18, 1923. Page 2-D. Sports Section.Stuart M. Bell. “Patrick Todd Trots to Victory in Two Heats in Brooklyn Feature Race”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. 6/6/1923. Page 22.“Sports – Plenty of Them”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. July 1, 1923. Page Two-D. John King was General Manager of Brooklyn Track.“FAST ONES MOVE ON TO BROOKLYN”. July 8, 1923. TheCleveland Plain Dealer. Page 3-D. Music between races at Brooklyn.Stuart M. Bell. “FAVORITES FLASH IN FIRST AT BROOKLYN”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. July 10, 1923. Page 22.Stuart M. Bell, “Miss Myrtle L, New Arrival From East, Cops 2:30 Race at Brooklyn”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer 8/7/1923. Opening Day!There were no races held at the Brooklyn Track on Friday August 10, 1923 out of respect for the memory of President Harding who died.Stuart M. Bell, “Edna Early Forces Kate Hal to New Track Record in Brooklyn Park Feature. The Cleveland Plain Dealer.8/9/1923. Page 20.“3,000 TURN OUT DESPITE RAIN THREAT”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. August 23, 1923. Page 15.“Harness Racing Has Year of Prosperity”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. December 30, 1923. Page 6-D.“HARNESS RACERS HERE THIS WEEK”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. June 1, 1924. Page 3-D. Six Day meet scheduled. Ad on page.“STOKES COPS 2 BROOKLYN WINS”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. June 6, 1924. Page 22.“Doc Vail Nips 3 at Brooklyn”. The Cleveland Press. September 2, 1924. Page 19.“Trotting Stake is Brooklyn Feature”. The Cleveland Press. September 3, 1924. Page 17.“Alisal Wins at Brooklyn Again”. The Cleveland Press. September 4, 1924. Page 21.“Gay Worth, 5 to1, Wins at Brooklyn”. The Cleveland Press. September 5, 1924. Page 21.James J. Doyle. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. 9/25/1924. Brooklyn threw its coming out party as a running track...It is thought by this writer that the 1924 fire that destroyed the Brooklyn Race Track buildings took place in the Fall of 1924 since races wereheld there in September 1924. No specific date was seen when viewing old newspaper articles. A fire was put out at track by visitingfirefighters from Cincinnati, Ohio. Details not in local papers to verify and comment further.“Gamblers have 4 arrested in Return Crusade Their Attorney Charges Barry Has Played Favorites”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. October 10, 1924. Final 7 O’Clock Edition. No. 284. Page 1. Lessees of the Brooklyn Track land were Thomas McGinty and Gerald Haynes.“Brooklyn Track Chart”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. June 19, 1925. Page 2-B. Publication Editor/Writer Ken Lavelle kenlavelle@juno.com (440) 230-2777 Not printed with ink or on paper provided by NOCSIA funds. Page 8 3/1/2012
  • 9. “Racing Season May End With Randall Finale”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. August 22, 1925. Page 1. Track owners met and all agreed toend season early. Too much horse racing held. Brooklyn track faced added difficulty of attracting a good list of entries.“Showing Where Gambling Flourishes in County”. The Cleveland Press. December 2, 1925. Pages 1 & 2. Brooklyn was one area! “Good Riders to Perform at Brooklyn”. The Cleveland News. Volume 85. No. 239. August 27, 1926. Page 18. “The Riding Colony” here.“Bets Likely At Brooklyn Oval”. Parma Heights Section of the Cleveland News. The Cleveland News. Sunday, August 29, 1926. Page 7.James E. Doyle. “Eighteen-Day Running Race Meet Opens at Brooklyn Oval Tomorrow: West Side Replaces East Side as Scene ofThoroughbred Racing”. Star Jockeys and Mounts Move Over From Cranwood for West Side Affair. The Plain Dealer. Sunday, August 29,1926. Page Two – B.“Brooklyn Race Track Opens Turf Followers See Little Chance of Halting Bets Despite Opposition by Crabbe”. The Cleveland News.August 30, 1926. Page 18. A.G. Crabbe began an anti-gambling effort. Closed Thistledown. Brooklyn open. Sheriff went on vacation.“Big Crowd Sees Zoya Win Brooklyn’s Opener”. The Plain Dealer. August 31, 1926. Microfilm Box 434 CCPL Fairview Library.Zoya won by two lengths! Affectionate Mary, Second. Glenmary, Third. Golden Dust, Fourth.“Attack Crabbe Crusade: Thistledown Attorneys File Surprise Move To Strike Out Petition”. The Cleveland News. 9/1/1926. Page 2.“Veterans of Turf Perform In Good Style”. The Cleveland News. 9/1/1926. Page 19. The News was a good local Sports source here.George Lewis. “Eames Supreme in Meet at Brooklyn”. The Cleveland Press. 9/2/1926. Page 24. Associate Track Manager H .J. Kline.“MUDDERS Go At Brooklyn”. The Cleveland Press. 9/2/1926. Page 24.George Lewis. “Ex-Jockey is Now Racing Official”. The Cleveland Press. 9/3/1926. Page 26. Brooklyn meet to close September 15th.“Clevelanders Stage Battle at Brooklyn”. The Cleveland News. 9/3/1926. Page 24. Brooklyn Race Track called ‘The Local Colony”.“Town Marshals Will Organize To Enforce (Anti-Gambling) Law”. The Cleveland Press. 9/5/1926. Page 7. Enforcement lax and limited.“Brooklyn Chart”. The Cleveland News. 9/6/1926. Page 15. List races scheduled to be held and race results later were printed.George Lewis. “Consisent Joe Clashes With Silent Lil Monday”. The Cleveland Press. 9/6/1926. Page 12. Trackman’s Selection Chart.George Lewis. “Local Dopesters Draw Horse Laugh”. The Cleveland Press. 9/7/1926. Page 21. Brooklyn was a 15-day meet in 1926.George Lewis. “Another Chesnut In Brooklyn Light”. The Cleveland Press. 9/8/1926. Page 24. Ad on Page, Admission only $1.00.George Lewis. “Old Plater Still Fast”. The Cleveland Press. 9/10.1926. Page 30.George Lewis. “Joe Campbell Starts After Ninth Victory”. The Cleveland Press.9/13/1926. Page 26“Seven Go In Race Feature”. The Cleveland Press. 9/14/1926. Page 25.“Cranwood Set For Return of The Bangtails: 15-day Meet Planned at George Smith’s Park. The Cleveland News. 9/16/1926. Page 23.“No Half-Mile Harness Meet in Cleveland: Cranwood and Brooklyn Out; Short Ship in Meeting”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. January 12,1927. Page 21. Mr. John King was still the Track Manager in 1927.Cleveland Plain Dealer Index 1931. Page 183. Topic: Horses – Cuyahoga County. Ref F449.C6.C535X .The Newspaper Index Project . District 4. Work Projects Administration in Ohio, 1941.“Sulmann O.K.’s Race Betting: Contribution System Wins His Approval”. The Cleveland News. 3/7/1931 Page A1. 100% is his demand.“Racing In County O.K. With Sheriff”. Cleveland Plain Dealer. March 8, 1931. Page four-A.“Only 3 Tracks To Run, Sheriff Says: Thistle Down, North Randall, and Cranwood are Favored Ones”. Cleveland Plain Dealer.March 9, 1931. Page 5 Column 1. The Sheriff thought three racetracks in area were enough for the Cleveland area.“Sheriff John’s Dilemma”. Editorial Page. Cleveland Plain Dealer. March 10, 1931. Page 1 Column 2.Local communities urged to regulate race track meets and new State Legislation regulation permitting home-rule control urged.“Brooklyn Council approves race meet in Defiance of Sheriff’s Order”. The Plain Dealer. March 24, 1931. Page 1 Column 4.“Racing Here On April 25”. The Cleveland News. March 24, 1931. Chart of scheduled 1931 Race Season April 25 to November 28, 1931.Brooklyn Racetrack on list, 18-day races planned. April 25 to May 16, 1931 for this racing district. Contributions. Page 22.“Brooklyn Village Awaits Word to Open Track”. The Brooklyn News-Times. April 3, 1931. Idea was to employ unemployed workers. P. 1.“Calls Meeting of Track Representatives to Arrange Meets”. Cleveland Plain Dealer. April 16, 1931. Page 2 Column 7.There was no racing held at Brooklyn Track. No mention in The Cleveland News for April 25 and April 26, 1931 when checked at CPL.George Lewis. “ Habletonian Stars Clash in Matron Stake at Randall: Governor White to See Legal Betting Inaugurated Here”Cleveland Plain Dealer. July 1, 1933. Page 19. Legalized Betting PhotosLynn Heinerling, “6,000 At Randall For Legal Bets: Gov. White, Mayor Miller, and Sulzmann at Grand Opening”. Cleveland Plain Dealer.July 2, 1933. Pages A1 and 6 column 7.Mary B. Stavish. CWRU. “Horse Racing” for “The Encyclopedia of Cleveland History”. 1996. Pages 539-540. Yearbooks – WRHS. • Cleveland Bicentennial Commission (Cleveland, Ohio), David Van Tassel (Editor), and John Grabowski (Editor) ISBN 0-253-33056-4.Brooklyn News on microfilm General Reference Microfilm Center. May 1981 to December 2005. Call Number XX 5571122.1).Lynette Filips. “Ridge and Brookpark: An important community crossroads”. The Old Brooklyn News. March 2000. Pages 6 and 7.Lynette Filips. “Returning to the History of The Mather Airport”. The Old Brooklyn News. June 2001. Pages 6.Lynette Filips. “Hobos, Hooch, and Brick Making”. The Old Brooklyn News. July 2001. Page 8. Microfilm copying completed July 2009.Old Brookyn News newspapers sent to Cleveland Public Library for processing 2005. Completed when this writer asked to view them in Publication Editor/Writer Ken Lavelle kenlavelle@juno.com (440) 230-2777 Not printed with ink or on paper provided by NOCSIA funds. Page 9 3/1/2012
  • 10. 2009. Old Brooklyn News newspapers from 2005 to 2009 were planned to be sent to CPL for microfilm processing in 2010.Mr. Edward A. Pohlman (1870-1933).“Ohio Tracks in New Race Loop”. Cleveland Plain Dealer. March 1, 1925. Page 1-B. Elected President of U.S. Circuit of ThoroughbredRacing.“Mansfield Opens Harness Session”. Cleveland Plain Dealer. June 18, 1925. Page 18.Cleveland Plain Dealer. March 1, 1926. Page 1-B.Cleveland Plain Dealer. March 27, 1926. Page ?. Director of U.S. Circuit of Thoroughbred Racing.“Sees World’s Record With Star Pacer”. Cleveland Plain Dealer. November 28, 1926. Page 3-B. Managing Director – Seminola Park, Fla.James E. Doyle. “Hoss Talk Rules Short Ship Meets”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. February 8, 1928. Page 23 Annual meeting toschedule 1928 racing meets. Motion pictures of Grand Circuit training scenes were shown by Edward A. Pohlman.Cleveland Plain Dealer. June 3, 1928. Page ?.Cleveland Plain Dealer. June 18, 1928. Page 18. “Pohlman Plan” of racing at Brooklyn Race Track.Cleveland Plain Dealer. July 19, 1928. Page 8.“Mansfield Set to Stage Ohio Short Trip Event”. Cleveland Plain Dealer. July 22, 1928. Page 8-C .Cleveland Plain Dealer. June 15, 1930. Page ?. Address on Fontenay Road, Shaker Heights, Ohio.Cleveland Plain Dealer. April 6, 1933. Page 17. Death Notice that he died on April 5th at his home.Cleveland Plain Dealer. April 7, 1933. Page 17. Death Notice that he died on April 5th at his home.Cleveland Plain Dealer. April 8, 1933. Page 20. Mention of Mr. Pohlman’s rehab plan for the vacant Brooklyn Race Track, now in doubt.Cleveland Plain Dealer. April 8, 1933. Page 20. Death Notice that he died on April 5th at his home. Services planned for April 10th.Cleveland Plain Dealer. April 10, 1933. Sports Section Column. Nationally-known promoter of horse races...died at age 63.Brooklyn Race Track Related Ohio Short Ship Circuit References“Ohio to Be Scene of Much Racing”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. February 18, 1923. Page 2-D.“Fast Ones Move On To Brooklyn”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. July 8, 1923. Page 3-D.The Cleveland Plain Dealer. December 16, 1923. Page 3-D.George Lewis. “Joe Campbell Struts in Cranwood Feature”. The Cleveland Press. 9/16/1926. Page 22.“No Half-Mile Harness Meet in Cleveland: Cranwood and Brooklyn Out; Short Ship in Meeting”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. January 12,1927. Page 21. Mr. John King was still the Track Manager in 1927. No races for Brooklyn Race Track in 1927. No later mention seen foryears from 1927 to 1939.Cranwood Track (1923-1956?) Cranwood Driving Park had an office at 417 Schofield Bldg, in Cleveland. Listed in the1922ClevelandBusiness Directory on page 2793 under Amusement – Places of.The Cranwood Track in its later years had small sized auto races held there. Closing date 1955 mentioned by Mr. TomBusinger to author after NORM 2010 Annual Meeting May 8, 2010 in Seville, Ohio. Walt Stoner mentioned a companycalled Gem built several buildings on the property.Stuart M. Bell. “COLUMBUS TRAINER HAS GOOD STABLE” . The Cleveland Plain Dealer.June 16, 1923. Page 19.“Sports – Plenty of Them”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. July 1, 1923. Page Two-D.Ad for Brooklyn Track. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. July 8, 1923. Page 2-D. Sports Section.“New Cranwood Puts In Novel Scoreboard”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. August 23, 1923. Page 15. George E. Smith, Owner.“RAIN MAKES ‘EM SAD AT CRANWOOD”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. August 29, 1923. Page 17. Frank Woodland, Manager.“CRANWOOD WILL SHOW 20 EVENTS”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. June 1, 1924. Page 3-D. New half-mile track in 1923.Both Cranwood and North Randall Open. The Cleveland Press. 8/17/1926. Page 13.“Here Are Scratches For New Cranwood”. The Cleveland Press. 8/17/1926. Page 20.“Long Prices Go Over at Cranwood”. The Cleveland Press. 9/2/1924. Page 19.“Cranwood To Have 15 Days”. The Cleveland Press. 9/11/1926. Page 12.“Sensational Charlie Healy to Ride at New Cranwood Meeing”. The Cleveland Press. 9/14/1926. Page 24.George Lewis. “Joe Campbell Out Of Money For First Time”. The Cleveland Press. 9/14/1926. Page 25.George Lewis. “Joe Campbell Struts in Cranwood Feature”. The Cleveland Press. 9/16/1926. Page 22. “No Half-Mile Harness Meet in Cleveland: Cranwood and Brooklyn Out; Short Ship in Meeting”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. January 12,1927. Page 21.James E. Doyle.“Healey Captures Daily Double in Triple Victory at Cranwood Park”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. September 13, 1956.Cranwood Track was still in operation! Publication Editor/Writer Ken Lavelle kenlavelle@juno.com (440) 230-2777 Not printed with ink or on paper provided by NOCSIA funds. Page 10 3/1/2012
  • 11. Hillside Driving Park (1905-1912)Independence Historical Society. “The Story of Independence”. Kings Court Communications, Inc., Brunswick, Ohio: 1979. Page 96.J.Merkles ½ mile race track held races every Wednesday and Saturday afternoon. Sulky races held there about 1905 to unknown date.Thought not to be related to or with plans of the L.E.T. R.R. Interurban train from Cleveland to Akron, Ohio which was never built. Mr.Merkle closed his saloon on Brecksville Road and opened a bar under the grandstand when horse racing was held. Layout of driving parkindicated on 1914 map of Independence Twp., Ohio. Mrs. Merkle provided sandwiches and lemonade for about one hundred persons daily.Kenneth Lavelle and Kenneth Pacanovsky. “The Forgotten L.E.T. Steam Railroad Route in Parma, Seven Hills, and Independence, Ohio1906-1922”.First written 1977. Copyrighted 1985. Updated 1991 and 2011. L.E.T. R.R. Right-of -way route indicated on 1914 Twp. map asdividing the ½ mile course in half. Not listed in area city directories seen as an operating racing track after 1912.Hillside Driving Park Article. Sports Page. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. June 25, 1910.Hillside Driving Park Article. Sports Page. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. May 23, 1912.Maple Heights Track (1921-1924)The Maple Heights Track was ¾ mile long and triangular in shape located at Rockside and Broadway near the railroad tracks.A local horse called ‘Black Gold’ from Maple Heights was a Ohio Derby winner who raced there. Track later became a baseball park.Ad for Maple Heights Track. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. July 8, 1923. Page 4-D. Sports Section.“Maple Heights To Open Meet May 17”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. December 28, 1923. Page 7.Earle Ferris. “Stuart Polk Stable to Race Here”. The Cleveland Press. 9/5/1924. Page 28. A law limited number of races held at tracks.Ad. “Running Races Today”. The Cleveland Press. 9/11/1924. Page 23. Ohio Derby held here in 1924. Moved to Thistledown 1925.Earle Ferris. “Runaway Comes Back to Beat Favorite”. The Cleveland Press. 9/18/1924. Track closed 1925?.George Lewis. “Old Plater Still Fast”. The Cleveland Press. 9/10/1926. Page 30.Gamblers in Maple Hts. Thomas Club – Cleveland Press.John Camanelli, “Black Gold cocktail adds some luster to Ohio Derby”. The Plain Dealer. July 26, 2010. Page D1.John Camanelli, “The story behind the equine namesake”. Story of ‘Black Gold’ the race horse. The Plain Dealer. July 26, 2010. Page D1.North Randall Track (1909-1975)Ad. “Cleveland Grand Circuit Races: North Randall Track”. The Cleveland Press. July 2, 1921. Page 27.Earle Ferris. “Five Races Today at North Randall”. The Cleveland Press. July 1, 1924. Sports Page and Photo.George Lewis. “Rumor 12 Ovals to be in 1927 Grand Circuit”. The Cleveland Press. 8/27/1926. Page 28.Letters To Writer: (Information concerning first Brooklyn Driving Park)Reply for information concerning Brooklyn Driving Park and Brooklyn racetrack from the Ohio Secretary of State’s Officedated August 27, 2009. The Brooklyn Diving Park had an incorporation date of September 7, 1849. No date given when it ceasedoperations. Charter Number 61493.The Cleveland Plain Dealer. Article. August 25, 1880. Mention seen of horse harness racing done at the Brooklyn Driving Park.Reply for information concerning The Belt & Terminal Realty Company and Brooklyn Racing Club from the Ohio Secretary of State’sOffice dated September 30, 2009 The Belt & Terminal Realty Company was incorporated twice: in 1905 and in 1932. Not active in 1973.The Brooklyn Racing Club was not filed as an incorporated entity according to a letter dated October 1, 2009. Any early records and thoseIn later years seemed not to be available to access for this paper. Perhaps the early records were destroyed in the 1924 fire at the racetrack.Local Sources:Mr. Frank Frigy, 10507 Leawood Oval, Stongsville, Ohio. Telephone: 1-440-238-5653. Horse stable/exercise boy at Brooklyn 1924-1927.The Ohio Secretary of State’s Office and its office staff, 180 East Broad Street, 16th Floor, Columbus, Ohio 43215.The Staff of the Western Reserve Historical Society and its Historical Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio.Mr. Edwards and The Staff of the Cleveland Public Library Map Room – Main Branch. Cleveland, Ohio.The Staff of the Cleveland Public Library History Department Room – Main Branch Sixth Floor. Cleveland, OhioThe Staff of the Cuyahoga County Archives, Cleveland, Ohio.The Brooklyn Historical Society who provided copies of old area photos. March 21, 1938 dated Aerial photo of race track and quarry area.The Maple Heights Historical Society. Telephone conversation April 17, 2010.Bill Hachtel of The Brick Collectors Association. 9801 Smith Road, Waite Hill, Ohio 44094.The Old Brooklyn News and their readers to provided information to Lynette Filips for her many articles.Brooklyn Councilman Mr. Greg Frey, City of Brooklyn, Ohio. Mr. Frey showed this writer the quarry area on November 23, 2009. Publication Editor/Writer Ken Lavelle kenlavelle@juno.com (440) 230-2777 Not printed with ink or on paper provided by NOCSIA funds. Page 11 3/1/2012
  • 12. Judi Sheridan, Trustee of the Western Reserve Architectural Historians and Secretary of the Northern Ohio Council of Historical Museums.Tom Hites and John G. members of the Brooklyn Historical Society. John did not find any mention of racetrack in 1932 Brooklyn papers.The Early Settlers Association of the Western Reserve. Website: http://earlysettlers.org 3615 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, O. 44115Telephone: 440-235-4441.Walt Stoner. President of NORM in Medina County.Tom Businger. 6158 Stratford Drive, Parma Heights, Ohio 44130.Worked at a local track before retirement.Joe Estep. 19860 Meadowbrook Drive, Parma Heights, Ohio 44130. joestep@32@yahoo.com . He had four (4) old 1920s postcardsdepicting auto racing at Brook Park Race Track. Found on Brooklyn tree lawn. Copies made and given to Ken in July 2010. Telephone:216-281-2962. Auto race indicated in four photos dated May 28, 1933. Brook Park Race Track thought to be Brooklyn Race Track.Why? An object in the distance is tall structure with a truck infront of in one photo. Thought to be 1924 entrance arch for Brooklyn RaceTrack. Later discovered the tall building was part of the American Agricultural Fertizer Plant facility along the CCC&St. Louis R.R.Auto races were held at Brook Park Speedway, Brookpark Road and West 139th Street. West of the closed Brooklyn Race Track.Ohio Short Ship Circuit Reference Sources“Ohio To Be Scene of Much Racing: Grand Circuit, Ohio Short Ship and Fair Meetings Will Keep Horses Here Most of Summer”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. February 18, 1923. Page 2-D. Sports Section.“Fast Ones Move On To Brooklyn”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. July 8, 1923. Page 3-D.Xen Scott. “Joke” Sweepstake Becomes A Fixture”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. December 16, 1923. Page 3-D. Annual meeting to schedule1924 racing schedule to be held 1/4/ 1924.“Harness Racing Has Year of Prosperity”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. December 30, 1923. Page 6-B.Cleveland: Cranwood and Brooklyn Out; Short Ship in Meeting”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. January 12, 1927. Page 21.“Short Ship Race Body Reorganized: Scheduled for 1928 Season”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. January 19, 1928.Page 24.James E. Doyle. “Hoss Talk Rules Short Ship Meets”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. February 8, 1928. Page 23 Annual meeting toschedule 1928 racing meets.“Mansfield Set To Stage Ohio Short Trip Event”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. July 22, 1928. Page 8-C.“Harness Moguls in Confab Here: Ohio Short Ship Stewards Arrange Short Sked this Season”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. February 6,1929. Page 22. Short Season of only four weeks scheduled from May 23 to June 10th, 1929.The Cleveland Plain Dealer. April 21, 1929. Track location for storage and training of horses to be raced at other tracks.Book Reference and Article Sources for Governor Herrick: (January 11, 1904 to January 8, 1906)The Cleveland Plain Dealer. February 2, 1905.The Cleveland Plain Dealer. May 29, 1905.“Sale of St. Clair Terrance Property”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. June 25, 1905.Page 8.“Governor Lays Cornerstone”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. June 26, 1905. Page 5.“Herrick is now a Mason”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. June 27, 1905. Page 7.W.S. Couch. “The Paradise of Gamblers”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. August 13 1905. Pages 1 and 2.W. S. Couch.The Cleveland Plain Dealer. August 14, 1905.W.S. Couch.“Police Move as The Boss (Cox) Bids”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. August 15, 1905.Page 1 and2.The Cleveland Plain Dealer. September 5, 1905.The Cleveland Plain Dealer. September 24, 1905.“No One Wants The Governor”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. October 11, 1905. Page 1.“Herrick Calls Cox Stranger”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. October 19, 1905. Page 2.“Herrick Rebukes Voters of Ohio”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. November 10, 1905. Page 1and 2. He lost Nov. 8 election.James K. Mercer. “Representative Men of Ohio, 1904-1908 Administration of Myron T. Herrick:. F. J. Heer Press: 1908. WRHS Library.Call Number F34H M554 1908. LCCN: 080033426. Governor of Ohio 1904-1905. Chisholm Racing Pool House Bill No. 222 vetoed inearly 1905. Pages 40-41 and 48. General discussion of his administration. Pages 1-48. Copy of book also available at CPL as reference.James K. Mercer. “Ohio Legislative History”. 1909. Columbus, O.: F.J. Heer Co. CPL Call Number 328.771M53 and in storage.Elroy McKendree Avery, “A History of and Cleveland and Its Environs: The Heart of New Connecticut”. The Lewis Publishing Company:Chicago and New York: 1918. M.T. Herrick, Volume III Pages 560-563. Publication Editor/Writer Ken Lavelle kenlavelle@juno.com (440) 230-2777 Not printed with ink or on paper provided by NOCSIA funds. Page 12 3/1/2012
  • 13. W. R. Coats. “Cuyahoga County and The City of Cleveland”. 1924. Mr. Herrick, Page 143.Richard F. Hamilton. ‘Good old days’ weren’t so great for teachers in 19th century”. Forum Page. The Plain Dealer. Sunday, August 30, 2009.Page G3.Story of Mr. Herrick as a teacher and later Governor of Ohio 1904-1905.The Biographical Annuals of Ohio 1906-1908. Volume 3. Table List of Ohio Governors 1787-1906 p.548. Governor Harris pages 542-545.“The Governors of Ohio”. Published by the Ohio Historical Society. Columbus, Ohio: 1954. M.T. Herrick, pages 140-143.Henry Stoddard Sherman. “Myron T. Herrick 1854-1929”. 1949. Cleveland Public Library. Main Branch History Dept. E 748.H45 S48.Biographic of Ohio Governors. 1990 Book. (In Portage and Summit County Book.) F 497. P8 P8 1898A located at CPL.This writer was told during his visit 10/17/2009 that Governor Herrick’s papers are on file available for viewing at WRHS Library Archivesand Genealogical Center, Cleveland, Ohio.Evelyn Theiss. “The goodwill ambassador: In era of city’s influence, Myron Herrick earned power and the love of the French”. ThePlainDealer. October 18, 2009. Pages E1 and E9.Book Reference Area Racetrack Sources:Dwight Akers. “Drivers Up: The Story of American Harness Racing”. CPL 1938. WRHS 1947. G.P Putnam & Sons: 1947.Call Number SF339 A315 1947. LCCN AGR 47000373. OCLC Number OCM026-43932Philip D. Jordan. “Ohio Comes of Age: 1873-1900”. A History of the State of Ohio. Volume V. The Ohio Historical Society: 1943.p. 89-91.In 1880, only six percent of horses raised in Ohio were raised to be thoroughbred racetrack horses.“South Brooklyn: a brief history of that part of the City of Cleveland which lies South of Big Creek and West of the Cuyahoga River”. 1946.James Ford Rhodes High School Class of 1946. CPL Downtown Main Branch Library. F449.C66J35X. It had no mention of the BrooklynDriving Park or the A. James Sandstone Quarry in it! Local telephone exchanges mentioned on page 88. South Exchange created 1889.Lincoln Exchange added at South Exchange for points South to include Brooklyn. The South Exchange was located at 3026 Scranton Rd.This facility was called by several names: South, Harvard, Lincoln, and Atlantic. In 1926, the Shadyside exchange was created and waslocated at 3414 West 35th Street (State Rd). Shadyside had originally used manually operated equipment until 1940. Then modern cross-bardial equipment was installed. The office was divided into three specific units: Shadyside, Florida, and Ontario.William Ganson Rose. “Cleveland: The Making of A City”. The World Publishing Company. Cleveland and New York: 1950.Northern Ohio Agricultural Fair 1870-1881 page 370. The Cleveland Driving Park Company pages 371-173. “The Encyclopedia of Cleveland History”. 1987 and 1996. Randall Race Track and “Grand Circuit” pages 723-724.North Randall Track p.819-820. Gentleman’s Driving Club of Cleveland (1895) and League of American Driving Clubs (1901) p. 342. Glenville Race Track p.453-454 and Harry K. Devereux. p. 918.“Thistledown, Randall, Cranwood”. Pictorial Magazine. 1966. CPL Main Branch Library. Reference F324.35.03 T54 1966X.George E. Condon. “Cleveland: The Best Kept Secret”. 1967. Early Race Track on Woodland Avenue between Brownell (East 4th) andPerry Street (East 22nd) in 1846. Pages 144-146.Richard Wager. “Golden Wheels: The Story of the Automobiles. Made in Cleveland and Northeastern Ohio 1892-1932. Published by TheWestern Reserve Historical Society and the Cleveland Automobile Club. 1975. Fire from the Brooklyn Driving Park moved East anddestroyed the Marsh auto manufacturing facility (1920-1923) located along Ridge Road in 1924. Pages 194-197.Peter C. Welsh. “Track and Road: The American Trotting Horse”. Smithsonian Institution Press:City of Washington, D.C. 1967. Reprinted1969. Page 47. Footnotes in Chapter The Trotting Turf: 6. American Agriculturist, Vol. 16 (November 1857: New Series), p. 247. 7. FrankForester, Volume 2, page 230. Mention of early Agricultural Societies and the conflict with horse racing interests at early local fairs.Philip A. Pines. “The Complete Book of Harness Racing”. Groset and Dunalp:New York. 1970. Pages 176-177, 191-193.“Cleveland, Ohio, listed a half mile track in the 1850’s, races continuing for more than a score of years”. This writer believed he wasreferring to the Brooklyn Driving Park in Brooklyn Township, Ohio. Before 1865, prior to the formation of the “Grand Circuit”, local tracks Publication Editor/Writer Ken Lavelle kenlavelle@juno.com (440) 230-2777 Not printed with ink or on paper provided by NOCSIA funds. Page 13 3/1/2012
  • 14. made their own individual race meet schedules with other tracks.George Ennor and Bill Mooney. “The World Encyclopedia of Horse Racing: An Illustrated Guide To Flat Racing and Steeplechasing”.Carlton Brooks Limited: 2001. Printed in Dubai. Early U.S. History and Today pages 14, 15 and 32-33. Gambling in the U.S. pages 198-199.Pari-mutuel gambling was allowed in Ohio in 1937. On-site slot machine revenue at small racetracks has helped them survive today.CPL Item Number 0009162171939. SF 321.5.E56 2001.Miscellaneous Sources:Walter T. Chester. “Chester’s Complete Trotting and Pacing Record”. Compiled by Author. 1884. Containing summaries of all races trottedor paced in the United States and Canada from the earliest date’s (1830s) to 1883. The Western Reserve Historical Society, Cleveland, Ohio.Names of various horses who won races and lost them are listed. Specific racetracks not mentioned for each horse where the rack was held.All included in the one volume. The following are three examples. “Richard III. A.F., Cleveland, Ohio. (time: 2:44). 11/30/1859. $50.00.”Page 596. “Reindeer. E. Russell. Cleveland, Ohio. 6/18/1860. $400.00”. Page 503. “Sally. Cleveland, Ohio. 1871.” Page 616.Criss-Cross Agency Directory of Cleveland, O. Volume 3, dated 1926 on page 477. Brooklyn Driving Club telephone number LI 1-1681.Kenneth J. Lavelle. “The History of Corlett Village, Ohio”. November 29, 2008.Kenneth J. Lavelle. NOCSIA Newsletter. 2002 Visit to South Amherst, Ohio to tour the Cleveland Stone Company operations and quarry.Local sandstone quarries listed for members prior to visit in South Amherst. Incomplete Cleveland Stone Co. records for quarries available.Mapquest – Map –Street – City Road Maps. Ariel view of old racetrack area 2009. I-480 was built though the area of the old racetrack andquarries, completed in 1986. Ridge Park Shopping Center was built in the area in 1987. Remains of one quarry visited by writer in 2009.Enacted Laws of Ohio Concerning Horse RacingEnacted laws for early communities were made by local elected officers in the form of local ordinances in a Township, Village or Countywhich made the County Sheriff the person to enforce them. The Sheriff had to decide who, when and where horse races would be heldannually. Gambling on horses races were not really allowed when races were held. It did happen and it was an illegal activity under OhioState Law. It was illegal under the State of Ohio Constitution to allow gambling. In the 1890s–1920s time period, horse tracks were common.Local communities were urged to regulate race track meets. New State Legislation regulation permitting home-rule control urged in 1930s.It is thought under the Powers of Municipal Corporations O.G..C. § 3939, in 1931 the Village of Brooklyn, Ohio had the authority to levy aticket admissions tax for tickets sold for horse racing at the Brooklyn Race Track. The Village Council and Mayor had agreed to chose Mr.Pohlman operate the Brooklyn Race Track, if the Sheriff allowed it to be opened. The old & new Ohio Code Sections below were in effect.114 Laws of Ohio 1931§ 3939 (1), p. 125-126. Note: the Ohio General Code was revised in 1953. Powers of Municipalities: what included.3 Ohio Jur.3d, Amusements and Exhibitions, § 17 599 n.2 (2008). Also see 115 Laws of Ohio 1933, § 5544-2, p. 657. State Admission Tax.Id. § 20 601. Any municipal corporation may charge fees as reasonable (e.g. Horse Racing).Id. § 21 602.“Brooklyn Council approves race meet in Defiance of Sheriff’s Order”. The Plain Dealer. March 24, 1931. Page 1 Column 4.“Racing Here On April 25”. The Cleveland News. March 24, 1931. Chart of scheduled 1931 Race Season April 25 to November 28, 1931.Brooklyn Racetrack on list, 18-day races planned. April 25 to May 16, 1931 for this racing district. Contributions. Page 22.“Brooklyn Village Awaits Word to Open Track”. The Brooklyn News-Times. April 3, 1931. Idea was to employ unemployed workers. P. 1.“Calls Meeting of Track Representatives to Arrange Meets”. Cleveland Plain Dealer. April 16, 1931. Page 2 Column 7.There was no racing held at Brooklyn Track. No mention in The Cleveland News for April 25 and April 26, 1931 when checked at CPL.Note: Brooklyn Village Mayor Harry B.Suroski and other Village officials planned to collect a fifteen cent tax on each race track admissionticket sold if the Brooklyn Race Track had been allowed to reopen and operate again in 1931. It was not clear to this author when this tickettax was enacted and repealed in Cuyahoga County. With no racing allowed at the Brooklyn Race Track, this revenue plan was never reality.THE STATEOF OHIO LEGISLATIVE ACTS PASSED (EXCEPTING APPROPRIATION ACTS) AND JOINT RESOLUTIONSADOPTED BY THE NINETIETH GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF OHIO At Its Regular Session BEGUN AND HELD IN THE CITY OFCOLUMBUS, OHIO. JANUARY 2, 1933 to July 10, 1933. Volume CXV. Columbus, Ohio: THE F. J. HEER PRINTING CO. 1933. Boundat State Bindery. Index Page, The HORSE RACING ACT, pages 735-736. Amended Substitute Senate Bill No. 103. Section 1079-1 to1079-14. File No. 58. Pages 171-178. Passed March 28, 1933. Approved by George White, Governor April 6, 1933.Filed in the office of the Secretary of State at Columbus, Ohio on the 10th day of April, A. D. 1933. File No. 59.Amended Substitute Senate Bill No. 372. Section 1079-1 to Section 1079-16 including Repeal of Amended Substitute Senate Bill No. 103.Pages 367- 375. Passed June 22, 1933. Approved by George White, Governor June 28, 1933. Filed in the office of the Secretary of State atColumbus, Ohio on the 29th day of June, A. D. 1933. File No. 132. See Section 1079-7 for Permit Restrictions when and when to race horsesin Ohio.Note: Ohio Revised Code - Horse Racing Law in 2011 can now be found in Chapter 3769.01 through 3769.28. Race tracks may have beenindexed in older Ohio case law books under the category ‘Theater and Shows’ due to its nature of outdoor public amusements. According to Publication Editor/Writer Ken Lavelle kenlavelle@juno.com (440) 230-2777 Not printed with ink or on paper provided by NOCSIA funds. Page 14 3/1/2012
  • 15. Pages Ohio Revised Code Annotated 2010 General Index, page 355 indicates seperate code section details concering horse racing in Ohio.Pages Ohio Revised Ohio Annotated 2006 Title 37 Volume Two, Chapters 3734 to End, starting on page 499 list thse separate code sectionsin some deatail for the reader. Moreover, Wests Ohio Digest 1803 to Date, Words and Phases L-Z indicate the topic of “Theater and Showsnow has a new abbreviation - “Theater” as Digest Topic No. 376. Pages Ohio Revised Code Annotated 2010 General Index, also list“Theaters” on page 741.The Ohio State Constitution was amended to allow gambling casinos in 2009. Four casinos were approved by the voters of Ohio to bebuilt.Owners of racetracks and others were involved in running these four casinos. What role rack tracks will play in casino development isnot clear in 2011to record here. The four casinos planned in Ohio were not to open unit late Summer of 1913.Other known horse racing Driving Parks in Cleveland Area:Valley Driving Park near Clark Avenue Bridge in Cleveland in Valley area near Jennings Road on 1904 U.S.G.S. Topographical MapSheet (surveyed 1901-1902) used for the 1905 Cleveland, Ohio Soil Survey and Rand McNally1910 maps. No remains of it in 2010.Cleveland Driving Park, St. Clair Street Glenville.Newburg Driving Park Harvard Avenue, Corner of Marceline Avenue. Cleveland City Directories 1902-1904 Page 1486.Also 1911.Valley Driving Park, Foot of Castle Avenue. Cleveland City Directories 1902-1904 Page 1486.The three above Driving Parks were listed in the 1912 Cleveland Business Directory on page 1486 under “Amusement – Places of”.Ralph A Pfingsten. “From Rockport to West Park”. 2004. Rockport Hamlet Driving Park. Pages 121-122, 183, 273, and 277.Rockport Hamlet Driving Park on Lorain Road and Rocky River Drive. (1890-1924). Page 121.“Cleveland’s Oldest Race Track is Sold”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. August 23, 1923. Page 15. Harvey Ernest selling track land.Water Street Driving Park. 1827. Cleveland Village. Page 121.Willoughby Driving Park. Date unknown. Jim Vernon, Computer Programmer Analyst at The Blonder Company mentioned the Lake Co.oval.“The Cleveland Pocket, Business and Street Guide”. 1920. Printed by The Cleveland Directory Company. ‘Outdoor Amusements’.“The Cleveland Pocket, Business and Street Guide”. 1926. Printed by The Cleveland Directory Company. ‘Outdoor Amusements’.Brooklyn Racetrack or Brooklyn Driving Park not listed in 1920 or 1926. Cranwood, Randall, and Thistledown listed as open in 1926.Known Ohio Legal Cases Related to Shipment of Racehorses and Injuries to Horses:B.& O. Ry. Co. v. Hubbard, 72, Ohio St. 302-309 (1905). Cuyahoga County Case Number 8093, decided April 11, 1905. Racehorse shippedby rail in a box car from Warren, Ohio to Lodi, Ohio. Horse was injured in train car wreckage on sliding in yard when two trains hit eachother. Horse was removed by owner and horse later died. An example of shipping racehorses for area races in the short-ship racing circuit.Brooklyn and Mather Airport Sources:William F. Reep. “Brooklyn City Scene”. December 11, 1960. He mentions the early racetrack and the history of the two airports.“Cleveland Aerial Photographic Index”. Cleveland Aerial Survey Company. Aerial photos in Ohio taken from 1925 to 1970s available forviewing at WRHS Library Archives and Genealogical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. P.G. 75 Container 23.Number 14092. Taken March 1962.Lynette Filips, “More about the Ridge and Brookpark Area”. The Old Brooklyn News. May 2000.Lynette Filips, More “Shunpike” memories. The Old Brooklyn News. June 2000. Pages 7 and 10.Lynette Filips. “Brooklyn Airport an important part of neighborhood history”. The Old Brooklyn News. July 2000. Pages 8 and 9.Lynette Filips. “Pilots have fond memories of Brooklyn Airport”. The Old Brooklyn News. August 2000. Pages 6, 7 and 8.Wilbur Wihelm. “Learning to fly at Brooklyn Airport”. The Old Brooklyn News. September 2000. Page 7.Lynette Filips. “More Brooklyn Airport memories”. The Old Brooklyn News. September 2000. Pages 8 and 9.Lynette Filips. “More people and their memories of Brooklyn Airport”. The Old Brooklyn News. October 2000. Pages 8 and 9.Lynette Filips, “Brooklyn Airport - as remembered by Jane Walzak Gurdy, daughter of founder”. The Old Brooklyn News. November 2000.Lynette Filips, “Brooklyn Airport - A crash is remembered”. The Old Brooklyn News. January 2001 Page 6 and 13.Lynette Filips, “ Brooklyn and Mather Airports”. The Old Brooklyn News. Feburary 2001. Pages 6 and 7. Land for the Mather Airport was leased from Mr. Hopkins. This is why the writer thought the land for the racetrack was leased too. However, what land the Cleveland Stone Company had quarries on, it is thought from viewing land records, they owned those parcels.Lynette Filips, “Arlo Mather – From funeral director to airport owner”. The Old Brooklyn News. March 2001. Page 8 and 9.Lynette Filips, “Returning to the History of Mather Airport”. The Old Brooklyn News. June 2001. Page 6.Interesting and Recommended Cleveland Area Airplane Historical Books and Airport Books For The Reader to ConsiderThomas G. Matowitz Jr. “Cleveland’s National Air Races”. Images of America. Published by Arcadia Publishing. 2005.Thomas G. Matowitz Jr. “Cleveland’s Legacy OF Flight”. Images of America. Published by Arcadia Publishing. 2008. Portion of 1949Cleveland Air Race Map indicates landing and takes off zones for Brooklyn and Parma Airports on page 119. Arlo Mather photo on p. 114.Brooklyn Airport Assn. V. Brooklyn , 72 Ohio St.3rd 1442, 648 N.E.2d 514 (Discretionary Appeals Not Allowed. Cuyahoga County No. Publication Editor/Writer Ken Lavelle kenlavelle@juno.com (440) 230-2777 Not printed with ink or on paper provided by NOCSIA funds. Page 15 3/1/2012
  • 16. 66590 F.E. Sweeney., J. Dissents) (1995). This was located in CCC-Westerns College Paralegal Library in Shepards Ohio (Legal)Ciciations (Case (Law) Name Edition, 2006 Volume 10, A-M Ohio Case Name Tables.Parma AirportMartin J. Stricker. Obituary. The Plain Dealer. August 21, 2006. Parma Airport was located at 5640 Stumpf Road near Snow Road in Parma,Ohio. Mr. Stricker and Nick Parish were one of several owners of the Parma Airport (1946-1951). Parma Airport existed in reality on an oldfarm with a 900-foot long runway, but not on area street maps! Arlo Mather was also one of the last owners and operators of the ParmaAirport in 1951. Parma Airport was also known as “Port Parma Airport”. The dream of Parma Airport was to become an “Air Park” whereowners and pilots could live in houses near the airfield and park their planes in their garages! This idea began at the Brooklyn Airport andwas attempted to be reality in nearby Parma. However, the City of Parma developed plans after WWII for the General Motors CorporationChevrolet Auto Parts Plants near Brookpark Rd. The concept of an industrial park there was never really reality with a hotel and airport asplanned after WWII by Mr. Stricker and Mr. Mather. Local Residents and The City of Parma did not approve of the rezoning request for theformer farmland for the airpark and airport. While the Cleveland Air Races were in operation until 1949 the Brooklyn, Mather, and ParmaAirports had many planes landing and taking off there. The Port Parma Airport was one of the many early forgotten area landmarks in Parmaby 2009. The Parma Airport had a connection to the Mather Airport. Mr. Stricker had taught Mr. Mather how to fly a plane!The 2009 location for the former Parma Airport is the ABF Truck Freight Terminal at 5630 Chevrolet Blvd/ City of Parma Service Garage.Parma Airport Sources“1946 White Pages Telephone Directory for Cleveland, O.”. Port Parma Airport listing on page 11. Brooklyn Airport Ad on bottom of page.Parma Airport Advertisement. The Parma Post. December 4, 1947. Page 4.”Can You Drive? Then You Can Learn To Fly!”. Call SH. 3970.“Plan First U.S. Residential Air Park in Parma”. The Parma Post. January 8, 1948. Pages 1 and 4.“Airpark Site Report Report Given City Council”. The Parma Post. February 5, 1948. Page 5.“Parma Airpark Plan Gets Airing Before Huge Crowd at Hearing”. The Parma Post. No. 17. March 25, 1948. Pages 1, 6 and 7.“MATHER AIRPARK REPORTS: Fact vs. Rumor”. “What Does This Project Offer Parma?”. The Parma Post. April 1, 1948. AD. Page 7.“No Decision On Airpark By Council”. The Parma Post. No. 19. April 8, 1948. Page 1.“Planning Issue Heats Up City Council Table”. The Parma Post. August 19, 1948. Page 1 and 4“Parma Council Votes to Sue To Enjoin Mather Airpark”. The Parma Post. No. 41. September 10, 1948. Page 1.“Master Plan for Parma is Approved”. December 9, 1948. The Parma Post. No. 2.. P.1. Parma had no prior master city development plan.“Plan Huge Apartment Project”. The Parma Post. November 11, 1948. Page 1.“Plan Many Homes in G-M Site Area”. The Parma Post. March 2, 1950. Explanation of the failure of Mather Airpark, Inc. Page 1.“Huge Chevrolet Plant of G-M to Open Late This Fall: Will Employ 4,000”. The Parma Post. No. 23. May 6, 1948. Page 1.“1951 White Pages Telephone Directory for Cleveland, Ohio”. Parma Airport listed on page 702. Last known listing for Parma Airport.“1951 Cleveland Yellow Pages Telephone Directory for Cleveland, O.”. Parma Airport listed on page 35. Instruction by Arlo Mather.“1967 Cleveland West Suburban Directory”. The Cleveland Directory Co. Transamerican Freight Lines 5630 Stumpf Rd. page 407. (ABF).Walker AirportThis small airport seemed to be part of the former Parma Air Park plan near Queens Highway, Brainard and Hauserman Roads in Parma, O.Very little documentation seems to exist for it. St. Bridgets Catholic Church and parking lot was built on the site in 1952-1953 time period inParma. Robert Runyan photographed it from the air on September 3, 1951 and this writer purchased a copy of photo at a local train show in1990s from Bruce Young. Photo listed as W511 and 1791 in his numbering system on label on back of photo.Cuyahoga County Farm Bureau“4-H members win 1st place in 7 championship titles”. The Royalton Recorder. October 8, 2009. Page 3. 4-H Market Auction, Berea, Ohio.Miscellaneous Comments and FootnotesDuring the writing of this paper this writer had noticed that the number of Cuyahoga County employees was declining as the CountyGovernment Officials struggled with their financial budgets in uncertain economic times. He rode buses and trains of the Greater ClevelandRegional Transit Authority to seek and discover information for this paper. Many RTA buses had fewer riders than in the past that he hadseen. Many local historical books viewed by this writer did not mention the Brooklyn Driving Park or Racetrack. Hopefully, this paper willprovide some insight into a forgotten segment of our local history. The knowledge the older workers gained over many years working withthe older records were not passed along to younger replacements. This writer was very fortunate to have met many experienced countyworkers and was then able to pass along some of their knowledge and experiences to their younger replacements, who did help others.Laura Johnston. “Number of county employees nearing lowest level in decades”. The Plain Dealer. October 11, 2009. Pages B1 and B5.“Fewer taking the bus”. The Plain Dealer. October 11, 2009. Page B1. RTA ridership was much higher in the 1990s when this writer hadvolunteered his time to help run RTA’s Adopt-A-Shelter program. Many older bus-waiting shelters were replaced with modern shelters by Publication Editor/Writer Ken Lavelle kenlavelle@juno.com (440) 230-2777 Not printed with ink or on paper provided by NOCSIA funds. Page 16 3/1/2012
  • 17. businesses and individuals who volunteered to watch and to take care of them for the general good of their communities. Many RTA busroutes were eliminated on April 4, 2010 due to the poor economic state area was in and a declining County Sales Tax income to RTA.Following photos are part of the “Cleveland Aerial Photographic Index”. Cleveland Aerial Survey Company. Aerial photos in Ohio takenfrom 1925 to 1970s available for viewing at WRHS Library Archives and Genealogical Center, Cleveland, Ohio. P.G. 75.Collection is not complete. Some photos were damaged and not included in photo collection after review of materials at WRHS.Container Number 23. “Brookpark Road Factory Area”. “GM Plant”, “B&O R.R. – Parma Tower and CL&W Parma Depot” 1949 Photos Numbers 16204-16208, 14092-14097. “Temporary housing for former military and their families: 14097, 9270.Container Number 11. “GM Plant”, “B&O R.R.” (trackage and related buildings in area in 1949). Numbers 8345, 9270, 9368-9370. “Pearl Road / Brookpark Road, CBS Brick Plant/ Ridge Road”. 1962 Photos Numbers 9700, 9711, 9692-9696.This writer believed that the aerial photographs he saw at WRHS in October 2009 were photographs taken by Robert Runyan for the AerialSurvey Company in 1948, 1949 and 1962. These were the same type of photos sold to the general public in the 1980s through the early2000s at local train Shows by Bruce Young. Mr. Young later donated his negatives and printed photos to the Special Library Archives atCleveland State University in his will before he died in 2005.This writer dropped off a copy of this report at the Brooklyn Historical Society before going to work at The Blonder Company on10/20/2009. He met Barbara Stepic, the group President, who was talking with Frank Mestnik, Editor of The Liberty News and Views whowas visiting the museum to get material for a future news article concerning Brooklyn, Ohio. The paper was established in 1984 and wasnow distributing its paper in the Brooklyn, Ohio zip code area of 44144. He gave a copy of this report to Mr. Mestnik. Then Ken began toexplain what information and new maps he had found concerning the old racetrack area. Tom, the archivist there at the museum was onvacation at the time of this visit. Ken will visit Tom in November 2009. Tom found some information concerning the early racetrack after hisSeptember 2009 visit. Also, Ken learned the Clague Family on Tiedeman Road had horse stables for many years. Not sure of any connectionof its horses using the Brooklyn Racetrack for training purposes or using the horse riding trails in Big Creek Section in 1926 when that parkarea was created in Village of Parma Heights, Ohio.It was not known if there were any type of bicycle, motorcycle, or motor car races ever held at the Brooklyn Driving Park or Racetrack.It is possible such races could have been held there for limited scheduled events. However, no documentation was seen in 2009.It was the consensus of opinion in 2009 the racetrack was not operational when neither the Brooklyn nor Mather Airports were open. Theaerial photo in 1938 was taken for consideration of new development at the site in 1938. The fact remains that the track appeared to befunctional from the air for possible horse racing in 1938 and the track was indicated on a 1939 street atlas. This writer believed the racetrackclosed when the lease for the land was not renewed. Also, this writer was surprised to learn when checking the Annuals of Cleveland for thePlain Dealer newspaper articles that some references could not be verified. It appears another edition was microfilmed for a specific day. Theedition read by a WPA worker and the one mentioned in the topic index summary did not appear on some specific pages. Also The ClevelandNews Special Parma Heights Section was not microfilmed for August 30, 1926 along with the regular edition. The lack of documentationavailable for the racetrack existing seemed to indicate it operated “under the radar” of the local community here. Normally in 2009 areabusinesses were documented as existing for state and local taxing purposes as well as for the general public to be aware of.A review of the 1938 aerial photo taken does not reveal the existence of the large wooden arch along the road at the entrance to the BrooklynDriving Park. Hence, it was thought the lack of the arch signaled the racetrack might have been closed. Also, perhaps it was removed forsafety reasons when the nearby Mather Airport opened in 1936-1937 for airplane take-offs and landings. Land thought to be leased there.It is possible the photo was taken in 1938 for area to be redeveloped and use it planning purposes there. The many stable buildings in the rearSouth and West area of the track may have been removed in 1932. The long buildings East of the track may have been where the horseowners/jockeys had temporary housing for upcoming races in 1926. It was not clear when the clubhouse was torn down near grandstand.It is possible the removal of the various racing related buildings in 1932 was a sign that the Brooklyn Race Track was closed and not open.Also, the possible area for private cars and city buses to park at was not certain for races held there. Maybe North of the track on grassy area.Since this writer was not able to see all the sandstone quarries that once existed in parcel number 21, the form of quarries there were believedto be a combination of surface stones available, a shallow open pit reaching down several beds of stone, and at least one large stone quarrydefined by an unknown depth indicated on the 1903 H.B. Stranahan Map of Cuyahoga County. Land records indicate ownership of the landNorth of the CSL tracks there from 1896 to 1907 by the Cleveland Stone Company. Quarry processes, Secondary processes within or nearany of the various quarries and ancillary buildings could not be determined in 2009 since the area was developed into a shopping centercomplex in 1986-1987. It was thought these early quarries were not accessed by any type of rail spur from the nearby NYC R.R. ClevelandShort Line tracks laid down in 1911. Hence, the mode of transport of the stone out the various quarries over time was thought be by horse Publication Editor/Writer Ken Lavelle kenlavelle@juno.com (440) 230-2777 Not printed with ink or on paper provided by NOCSIA funds. Page 17 3/1/2012
  • 18. and wagon or truck. This writer never saw the 1870s stone house in the area built of sandstone from one of these quarries. The function of thequarries was thought to be used for building stones, roadstone or aggregates (broken or crushed stone) and rubble stone (walling) into a flatground or plateau accessed by a ramp and/or crane on the sites. In the 1950s, there was a gravel pit operation along Brookpark Road inpresent day Parma at Commerce Pkwy West near Hauserman Rd. The gravel pit operation ceased after a few years, the site was redeveloped.Future research note. This writer learned at CPL Main Branch on 10/27/2009 there was a plan to purchase a new software search packageusing the Plain Dealer Newspaper database from 1929 to present day using key words in 2010 or 2011. It was thought some items, if listed inthe Plain Dealer database, might pop up for the Brooklyn Driving Park or Brooklyn Racetrack when it was operational. Also, plans were touse this new key word search capacity from the 1870s to 1929 Plain Dealer Newspaper database at a future time by CPL library users.This became available in March 2010. The Brooklyn Historical Society did not have a complete set of Brooklyn Newspapers in storage fromthe 1930s to 1940. There was a gap of time between 1933 and 1940. Thus, historical research was difficult to do and confirm for this paperconcerning the racetrack and quarries. The racetrack seemed to not advertise any races, if held in 1931 and 1932 according to John, thearchivist at the Brooklyn H.S. in 2009. This writer made a color copy of the 1905 Cuyahoga Soil map and gave it to John who wanted it inNovember 2009. He was big help to make this paper a reality. Some issues of local newspapers were not copied to microfilm or were nevermicrofilmed at all in our area. In 2012, The Cuyahoga County Public Library (CCPL) provided its patrons a better query search engine thatprovided page numbers with headlines of past Plain Dealer articles searched for. This was a positive and helpful tool for local historians.The Brooklyn Driving Park was called ‘The Riding Colony’ and ‘The Local Colony’ by the Cleveland news reporters in 1926.The Brooklyn Driving Park seemed to be a training/racing facility for racehorses after the 1924 fire took place. It was not clear who wasrunning it after 1924. Records were not available when checked in 2009. However, the name Mr. Edward W. Pohlman was mentioned as aveteran trufman who wanted to purchase Cranwood from Mr. George Smith. He did not purchase Cranwood in 1926. Mr. Pohlman wasselected to run the horse races at the Brooklyn racetrack for the 1931 season by the Brooklyn Village Council. No specific information wasavailable when he died in The Plain Dealer newspaper Obituary database in 2009 to know more about him to record in this paper.There was some drama at the Brooklyn racetrack during the Ohio Handicap in 1926. One owner who had a horse running in a race andlater won did not see his horse win since the owner was in the local hospital. There was the Cleveland Jockey Club there who helped to raisemoney in 1926 to bury a fellow jockey in La. He was exercising a horse in Brooklyn in 1926 and he suddenly died. It was thought thejockeys lived in their own tents or rented rooms in area homes when working at the Brooklyn Racetrack. The owners of the BrooklynRacetrack lived at the track during the racing season. When Mr. Frank Frigy worked at the Brooklyn racetrack as a horse stable/exercise boybetween 1924 to 1927 he was paid $.10 an hour to care for twelve horses. During the winter months, he helped to bed the horses down atnight in the stable. Gambling and drinking of alcohol was common place. The track had an social atmosphere of “anything goes” at that time.Each city that operated horse racetracks had its own district during the racing scheduled season from April to November. In the Clevelanddistrict, the track in 1926 was the Brooklyn Racetrack and those winners then traveled to another city district to compete. In 1931, theBrooklyn racetrack was placed on the racing schedule to hold races for 19 days beginning from April 25, 1931. The Mayor of BrooklynVillage discussed the plan to re-open the Brooklyn Racetrack with the Cuyahoga County Sheriff. The Sheriff decided not to allow theBrooklyn Racetrack to re-open in 1931. The Sheriff had limited manpower to patrol many of the local racetracks.The County had cut hisannual operation budget. The piece of white painted wood from the Brooklyn track was found by a Brooklyn resident in 1932 and laterdonated to the Brooklyn Historical Society on 08/15/1995. The piece of white painted wood was found on the ground there withmany other pieces when a building was torn down. Perhaps the clubhouse? The grandstand and judging stand was still standing in 1938photo. It is possible the truck seen behind the grandstand building in 1938 photo was delivering or taking something away when it was taken.While this writer was visiting the Brooklyn Historical Society on 11/24/ 2009 he met Mr. Bob Gardin, President of The Friends of Big CreekWatershed. Mr. Gardin was there to distribute the newly printed copies of the Big Creek Watershed brochure with a map and description ofarea historical sites within it. They had asked for historical information from this writer in 2008 concerning the B&O R.R. in the Brooklynarea. Some of his ideas for sites were indicated on the watershed map: The Parma Reservoir, the Ohio Historical Marker for the First RuralBrick Road, Pearl Road historical items over the years. Ken was very happy to see these items indicated on the Big Creek Watershed Map!Mr. Gardin asked this writer to suggest more local historical sites in Parma Heights for consideration of the next reprinting of the map in theflyer concerning Big Creek. This writer suggested indicating on the map of the Big Creek Watershed the following historical sites on futuremaps:The Ohio Historical Marker for Crile General Hospital at 7300 York Road, Parma Heights. The Asa Emerson house at 6103 Pearl Road,Parma Heights. It was built in 1826 and it still used as private home in 2010. The Tollgate House replica in the Greenbriar Commons, ParmaHeights. It is the home of the Parma Heights Historical Society and was built in 1980. The Parma Heights Library in the GreenbriarCommons. It was built in 1963.The Parma Heights Cemetery along Pearl Road near the Parma Reservoir and Reservoir Creek. It wasestablished in 1823. Every Memorial Day since 1868 the Parma and Parma Heights community has honored its military dead buried there Publication Editor/Writer Ken Lavelle kenlavelle@juno.com (440) 230-2777 Not printed with ink or on paper provided by NOCSIA funds. Page 18 3/1/2012
  • 19. with a parade and a ceremony at the Parma Heights Cemetery. Prior to 1911, the cemetery was called the ‘Parma Cemetery’.The Ohio Historical Marker for the German Central Farm 7863 York Road, infront of its dancehall building off York Road in Parma. TheHenninger stone house along Broadview Road North of Snow Road in Parma. The Ohio Historical Marker for the first high school in Parmaalong 6726 Ridge Road. The Parma high school was opened in 1922.This Ohio Historical Marker is to be erected and dedicated in 2010.This writer did mention to Mr.Gardin where the Rockport Hamlet Driving Park Oval was located. It was indicated in the 2005 book, “FromRockport to WestPark’ on page 121. An updated copy of this paper was sent to Mr. Gardin with a copy of the 1939 Street Map indicatingwhere the Brooklyn Race Track was indicated on it. It was not known if he might place the Brooklyn Racetrack oval on the Big CreekWatershed map in a future reprinting. The 1938 aerial taken of the Brooklyn Racetrack does indicate a small creek stream flowing throughthe western end of the racetrack oval. That being the case, it is mentioned in this paper concerning the Brooklyn Racetrack.This writer plans to one day check the Brooklyn Village records given to the Western Reserve Historical Society in 1950 for any referenceto the Brooklyn Racetrack or Brooklyn Driving Park. Township and Village Records 1855-1923 in a box there labeled MSS 3130. There areledger books, etc. that were donated by Mayor Coyne in the 1950-1952 time period. This is a future lead to follow in the search for moreinformation concerning the Brooklyn Racetrack to add to this account.This writer listened closely to a story told by the Vice-President of the newly re-established Parma Heights Historical Society in 2009. Thestory concerned a small horse racing track in Parma Heights Village off Pearl Road, near the old wooden tourist cabins. An area seemed to bea place where local horses were trained and raced at one time. This area was seen in 1954 before modern housing development took place.This writer could not confirm this story with talking with older residents he knew who where still living in 2009. Not indicated on earlymaps. It is possible an early horse-riding academy may have existed there and used the nearby 1926 metropark horse trails across Pearl Road.Several members of the Parma Heights Society (1972-2003) did ride horses in that area in the 1920s and 1930s this writer was told once.Casinos in Ohio Results of November 3, 2009 Election.Reginald Fields. “Issue 3 foes bring in ex-officer to dispute Gilbert arrest story “. The Plain Dealer. October 31, 2009. Page B1 and B5.Cuyahoga County Election Results. The Plain Dealer. November 6, 2009. State Issues. Page A13. Issue for Casinos in Ohio passedCleveland to get a Casino! Casino Gambling: Yes 1,663,149 No 1,476,592 . Casinos were planned for Cleveland, Toledo, Cincinnati andColumbus.Jim Nichols. “Gilbert on Cleveland casino: ‘We have to get it right’”. The Plain Dealer. November 6, 2009. Page A1 and A14.Reginald Fields. “Despite promises, poker ace get a cut of casino action”. The Plain Dealer. November 6, 2009. Page A1 and A14.Aaron Marshall. “State’s casino control panel to oversee books, investigate”. The Plain Dealer. November 8, 2009. Pages B1 and B2.The Plain Dealer. Metro page. January 31, 2010. Pages B1 and B5.Reginald Fields. “Casino issue final blitz: $1 Million per day”. The Plain Dealer. December 21, 2009. Metro Page B5.Rick Armon. “Akron stores test converted slots”. The Plain Dealer. Metro Page. January 31, 2010. Slot machines entering small businesses.Bob Sandrick. “City mulls law on gaming devices”. The Sun Post. June 17, 2010. Pages A1 & A7. Games and internet cafes in Parma area.Joan Mazzolini. “Higbee Building could be site for phase one casino”. The Plain Dealer. May 14, 2010. Pages A1 and A8.Tom Feran. “Internet sweepstakes cafes popping up in Northeast Ohio”. The Plain Dealer. July 6, 2010. Pages A1 and A6.Reginald Fields. “Harrah’s is Gilbert’s choice to run his two casinos”. The Plain Dealer. August 13, 2010. p. A1, A6. Follow the storyof casino gambling in Ohio at www.Cleveland.com/casino. www.Cleveland.com/horseracing.Reginald Fields. “Cleveland Casino: 16 acres for gaming facility; Higbee Bldg rental for startup”. The Plain Dealer. 8/20/ 2010. P. A1, A8.“The Insider: This Week August 9-15”. Crain’s Cleveland Business. August 16-22, 2010. Page 19. The big Story: Rock Gambling LLC.“The slots to arrive at Horseshoe in a few days. State agents will watch to avoid tampering”. The Plain Dealer. 2/22/2012. Pages A1, A5.Area Horse Racing TracksD’Arcy Egan. “Ohio Hall to honor racing stars”. Horse Racing Insider. The Plain Dealer. Sports Section. January 15, 2010. Page D7.D’Arcy Egan. “Entire industry under dark cloud”. Horse Racing Insider. The Plain Dealer. Sports Section. January 21, 2010. Page D5.D’Arcy Egan. “Horseman, 75, still going strong”. Horse Racing Insider. The Plain Dealer. Sports Section. .January 29, 2010. Page D2D’Arcy Egan. “Thistledown auction is scheduled Tuesday”. Horse Racing Insider. The Plain Dealer. Sports Section. May 21, 2010. Page D3.D’Arcy Egan. “Harrahs buys Thistledown at auction”. Horse Racing Insider. The Plain Dealer. Sports Section. May 26, 2010. Page D7.Albert A. Gabel. “Ohio’s horse-racing tracks need gambling alternatives to survive”. The Plain Dealer. Forum. June 20, 2010. Page G3.Reginald Fields. “Gilbert could buy stake in Thistledown, with eye on slots”. The Plain Dealer. June 25, 2010. Page A1 & A6.Reginald Fields. “Group drops challenge to slot machines at race tracks”. The Plain Dealer. June 29, 2010. Page A1 & A6.D’Arcy Egan. “Race to honor famed handicapper Lewis”. Horse Racing Insider. The Plain Dealer. Sports Section. July 8, 2010. Page D2.Mark Naymik. “Stickland revives plan to put slots at Race Tracks: Lottery to Introduce New Rules”. The Plain Dealer. July 15, 2010. p. A1.Reginald Fields. “Anti-slots group ignores campaign filing deadline”. The Plain Dealer. August 4, 2010. p. A1, A4. Refuses funding source. Publication Editor/Writer Ken Lavelle kenlavelle@juno.com (440) 230-2777 Not printed with ink or on paper provided by NOCSIA funds. Page 19 3/1/2012
  • 20. Reginald Fields. “Harrah’s is Gilbert’s choice to run his two Casinos”. The Plain Dealer. August 13, 2010. p. A1and A6.D’Arcy Egan. “Northfield’s race-day schedule approved”. Horse Racing Insider. The Plain Dealer. Sports Section. September 24, 2010 P.D6.Follow the latest news from Northfield Park, Thistledown and tracks around the country: www.Cleveland.com/horseracing.Reform of Cuyahoga County Government as Result of November 3, 2009 ElectionJim Nichols. “Pittsburgh Pa.’s tips for our new county government”. The Plain Dealer. November 16, 2009. Pages A1 and A12. VotersDecided to replace the current three County Commissioners with one County Executive position and also streamline county government.It was thought to be an improvement here in Cuyahoga County and might take many years to improve government efficiency and lowerthe increasing cost of local government. More important was the possibility that the separate 58 local governments and the City of Clevelandmight merge into one regional County governmental structure in the future. This writer worked a County Poll Worker in this election inBroadview Heights, Ohio Precinct 2C. He had thought such a change was possible with the creation of the Greater Cleveland RegionalTransit Authority in 1975 when he voted in his first election.Mr. Bob Gardinc/o The Friends of Big Creek3315 Library AvenueCleveland, Ohio 44109November 26, 2009Dear Mr. Gardin,I enjoyed meeting with you and discussing the topic of the Brooklyn Racetrack at the Brooklyn Historical Society on 11/24/2009.I thought the Big Creek brochure was good one with a map and description of historical sites indicated with photos. I noticed thatsome of the information I had given The Friends of Big Creek had been used. That made me very happy. Historical Information waspassed along to others to enjoy in the future.You asked me for more suggestions of local historical sites for consideration to be indicated on the map when it is updated in the future.Below is a list: The Ohio Historical Marker for Crile General Hospital at 7300York Road, Parma Heights. The Asa Emerson house at 6103 Pearl Road,Parma Heights. It was built in 1826 and it still used as private home in 2009. The Tollgate House replica in the Greenbriar Commons, ParmaHeights. It is the home of the Parma Heights Historical Society and was built in 1980. The Parma Heights Library in the GreenbriarCommons. It was built in 1963.The Parma Heights Cemetery along Pearl Road near the Parma Reservoir and Reservoir Creek. It wasestablished in 1823. Every Memorial Day since 1868 the Parma and Parma Heights community has honored its military dead buried therewith a parade and a ceremony at the Parma Heights Cemetery. Prior to 1911, the cemetery was called the ‘Parma Cemetery’.The Ohio Historical Marker for the German Central Farm 7863 York Road, infront of its dancehall building off York Road in Parma. TheHenninger stone house along Broadview Road North of Snow Road in Parma. The Ohio Historical Marker for the first high school in Parmaalong 6726 Ridge Road. The Parma high school was opened in 1922.This Ohio Historical Marker is to be erected and dedicated in 2010.This writer did mention to Mr.Gardin where the Rockport Hamlet Driving Park Oval was located. It was indicated in the 2005 book, “FromRockport to WestPark’ on page 121. An updated copy of this paper was sent to Mr. Gardin with a copy of the 1939 Street Map indicatingwhere the Brooklyn Race Track was indicated on it. It was not known if he might place the Brooklyn Racetrack oval on the Big CreekWatershed map in a future reprinting. The 1938 aerial taken of the Brooklyn Racetrack does indicate a small creek stream flowing throughthe western end of the racetrack oval.In May of 2008, I presented a program for NMRA members at the Independence Holiday Inn concerning the Port of Cleveland andarea train station depots. You might want to indicate the location of the first Parma CL&W train station along the B&O tracks Northof Brookpark Road in Rockport Twp. It is indicated on a 1897 map. Also, you may want to consider indicating the location of the secondB&O train station depot that was located along Brookpark Road (1910-1926) that appeared on a 1927 map of Rockport Twp. I was given.All of these ideas are just suggestions and I look forward to viewing the updated Big Creek Watershed map in the furture.You mentioned to me that you could not attend the WRAH tour of the Baldwin water Reservoir in Cleveland held November 21st, 2009.Those of us who did attend were given advance notice of the water tours for 2010. Enclosed with this letter is that information. Hopeyou and the members of The Big Creek Watershed can attend of one or both of the tours in May 2010. Tours are held, but gettingadvance information is not always possible. Some times only 100 persons attend a tour at a local reservoir, I have noticed when I goneon one in the past. Publication Editor/Writer Ken Lavelle kenlavelle@juno.com (440) 230-2777 Not printed with ink or on paper provided by NOCSIA funds. Page 20 3/1/2012
  • 21. Will let you know when I will be giving my talk concerning how to do historical research here in the Cleveland area with the idea ofthe Parma Heights area as the focus in 2010. The date is scheduled for February 20, 2010. The location is not clear yet at this time.Enclosed is a copy of my basic outline for the presentation in 2010 with the Parma Heights Historical Society and some basic maps I usewhen I speak to area groups.Ken Lavelle9660 Cove Drive 23FNorth Royalton, Ohio 44133Mr. John Mruh Mrs. Joan F. ForesterP.O. Box 484 1882 Fernridge DriveDillionvale, Ohio 43917 San Dimas, Califrornia 91773 November 27, 2009Can you tell me anything you may recall concerning the old Brooklyn Racetrack and sandstone quarries in Brooklyn Village, Ohio?I am a local historian who is helping the Brooklyn Historical Society document the Brooklyn Racetrack and the sandstone quarries.Enclosed is my rough draft of my paper so far. You may enjoy reading it. Enclosed is a stamp to use to reply to this brief letter. Your nameand address was given to me by the Brooklyn Historical Society who asked me to contact you. Thought you’d like to know that. I was toldyou lived in Brooklyn, Ohio years ago.There was no reply sent back to this writer after this above question was mailed to Mr. Mruh and Mrs. Forester in 2009.That being the case, a copy of this draft was sent to D’Arcy Egan, a Plain Dealer Reporter, who covered horse racing events for the paper.This writer asked Mr. Egan if he knew any specific details of the Brooklyn Driving Park or Brooklyn Race Track. Also, if he knew anythingconcerning Mr. Pohlman and his relationship with Mr. George Smith. No reply in early February 2010.In 2010, this author thought that is was possible the Good Templars had decided to establish a chapter in Parma, Ohio due in part to itscloseness to the Brooklyn Driving Park in 1892 and the many taverns that served liquor along the Wooster Pike wooden toll road. So hisbrief paper concerning the Good Templars Chapter (1892 to 1915) is included in this binder for reference.This writer did not get the chance to ask Mr. Wengatz what he knew of the Brooklyn Racetrack. He died 1/27/2010. He had asked thisauthor to write the history of the Parma Grange in 1998.This author was volunteering at the Stearns Farm helping to sell old books on July 10, 2010. He met Joe Step again. He had met Joe last year at the Stearns Farm. Ken took Joe along later on a NOCSIA tour scheduled for downtown Cleveland in July 2009. Joe mentionedto Ken that he had four old postcards indicating auto racing at the Brooklyn Race Track. These old postcards were amongst other itemssitting on a tree lawn in Brooklyn, Ohio. Ken asked Joe to make copies of the postcards and mail them to him. Ken gave Joe a $.44 stampto use. Ken was not aware that any type of postcards existed of any activity at the Brooklyn Race Track! After viewing postcards, Kenthought they were really photographs taken during an auto race held Memorial Day Weekend on May 28, 1933 at Brooklyn Race Track. However, further research revealed that these auto races were held at Brook Park Speedway, Brookpark Road and West 139th Street. West ofthe closed Brooklyn Race Track. This is a example of the type of leads this author tried to follow up and document the last years of theBrooklyn Race Track. It was not uncommon for early area auto race tracks to use a ½ mile race course track for their auto races here.Early Auto Race Tracks “Auto Racers Go at Brookpark Today”. Sports Section. The Cleveland Plain Dealer May 28, 1933. Page 2-B. West 139th and Brookpark.“Clevelander Wins Brook Park Race”. Sports Section. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. May 29, 1933. Page 13.Cyril Posthumus. “The Roaring Twenties: An Album of Early Motor Racing”. Blandford Press LTD: Poole, Dorset (England) 1980. Page 16.Bob Sandrick. “Cloverleaf Speedway Reunion Set July 16th”. The Parma Sun Post. July 1, 2010. Pages A1, A4. In operation in ValleyView, Ohio from 1960 to 1990. Stock Car Racing done there. Short track racing.Elton Alexander, “Short spurts of racing provide bursts of fun”. Sports Section. The Plain Dealer. September 24, 2010. Page D3.Gambling Devices/Locations in Parma, Parma Heights“City mulls law on gaming devices. The Sun Post. June 17, 2010 . Page A1 and A7.Bob Sandrick. “Gambling machine definition elusive”. The Sun Post. August 19, 2010. Page A1, A3 and A11.Postcard left at Mom’s House August 20, 2010 indicated the Grand Opening of an Internet Café at 6444 Pearl Road, Parma Hts. called“The Pink Flamingo Internet Café”. Open hours: Daily 10 a.m. to 2:30 a.m. Offered faxing, copies, e-mail, internet access, ATM machine.It offered weekly giveaways/ raffles: TV, stereo, cruises, etc. Gambling was now in Parma Heights!There seemed to another establishment in the Yorktown Shopping center next to Savealot and the bread store in Greenbrier Center too. Publication Editor/Writer Ken Lavelle kenlavelle@juno.com (440) 230-2777 Not printed with ink or on paper provided by NOCSIA funds. Page 21 3/1/2012
  • 22. Every small shopping center in Parma Heights had a small store front casino operating in it in 2010/2011 along Pearl and W. 130th street.Bob Sandrick, “City backs off action on games”. The Sun Post. September 23, 2010. Page A1 and A6. No current plans for legislation.Bob Sandrick, “Residents Invited to voice opinions on gaming devices”. The Sun Post. October 7, 2010. Page A1, A8.Bob Sandrick, “Moratium on new Parma Internet cafes”. The Sun Post. October 21, 2010. Page A1, A9. Moratorium set for 6 months.Michael Sangiacomo, “Gambling devices seized at two bars in Parma Hts. The Plain Dealer. January 27, 2012. Page B2. Served liquor.Mark Holan, “Bank Accounts frozen, Internet Machines confiscated, cafes remain open”. February 2, 2012. Pages A1 & A8.Did You Know??? Brooklyn had two airports? The Brooklyn Airport was located on the site of the former TopsSupermarket at Ridge Park Square and Mather Airport occupied the grounds where Brookridge School is located.Did You Know??? Ridge Road was called “Shunpike” around the turn of the century. Pearl Road was a toll road and toavoid paying the fee, travelers used Memphis Avenue to reach Ridge Road, which was a wooden plank road without atoll. They were shunning the pike, thus the name “Shunpike”Did You Know??? When the original “Brooklyn Township” was founded in 1818, it’s boundaries were Lake Erie to the north, BrookparkRoad to the south, Cuyahoga River (crooked river) to the east and West 117th to the west. Much of the area was annexed by the City ofCleveland and our little 4 1/2 square miles is what is left. It became Brooklyn Village in 1927 and the City of Brooklyn in 1950.Source: Brooklyn Historical Society Did You Know... City of Brooklyn , Ohio E-Newsletter February 2011 Volume 1 Issue 2.The Cleveland Plain Dealer, Amusement and Feature Section. Sunday June 10, 1923. Page 4.Brooklyn Race Track Opened June 4, 1923. Publication Editor/Writer Ken Lavelle kenlavelle@juno.com (440) 230-2777 Not printed with ink or on paper provided by NOCSIA funds. Page 22 3/1/2012
  • 23. CLEVELAND PLAIN DEALER; Date: 08-23-1925; Page: 18 (originally 2-B in Sunday Sports Section). Publication Editor/Writer Ken Lavelle kenlavelle@juno.com (440) 230-2777 Not printed with ink or on paper provided by NOCSIA funds. Page 23 3/1/2012
  • 24. 1936 Advertisement – Brooklyn Race Track“Gamblers have 4 arrested in Return Crusade Their Attorney Charges Barry Has Played Favorites”. The Cleveland Plain Dealer. October 10, 1924. Final 7 O’Clock Edition. No. 284. Page 1. Lessees of the Brooklyn Track land were Thomas McGinty and Gerald Haynes.Ad for Nelson Company with reference to Brooklyn Race Track CLEVELAND PLAIN DEALER; Date: 08-07-1936; Page: 19 Publication Editor/Writer Ken Lavelle kenlavelle@juno.com (440) 230-2777 Not printed with ink or on paper provided by NOCSIA funds. Page 24 3/1/2012
  • 25. CLEVELAND PLAIN DEALER; Date: 08-16-1925; Page: 8Publication Editor/Writer Ken Lavelle kenlavelle@juno.com (440) 230-2777Not printed with ink or on paper provided by NOCSIA funds. Page 25 3/1/2012
  • 26. CLEVELAND PLAIN DEALER; Issue 233. Date: 08-21-1925; Pages: 1 and 5.. Publication Editor/Writer Ken Lavelle kenlavelle@juno.com (440) 230-2777 Not printed with ink or on paper provided by NOCSIA funds. Page 26 3/1/2012
  • 27. LexisNexis® HeadnotesHide Real Property Law > Torts > Nuisance > General Overview Real Property Law > Torts > Nuisance > Types > Private Nuisance HN1"Nuisance" is a term used to designate the wrongful invasion of a legal right or interest. A "private nuisance" is a nontrespassory invasion of anothers interest in the private use and enjoyment of land. In order for a private nuisance to be actionable, the invasion must be either (a) intentional and unreasonable or (b) unintentional but caused by negligent, reckless, or abnormally dangerous conduct. More Like This Headnote | Shepardize: Restrict By Headnote Real Property Law > Torts > Nuisance > Remedies > Injunctions > General Overview Real Property Law > Torts > Nuisance > Types > General Overview Real Property Law > Torts > Nuisance > Types > Nuisance Per Se HN2An absolute nuisance, or nuisance per se, is that for which strict liability will attach. Absolute nuisance, for which strict liability or liability without fault is imposed by law, may be defined as a distinct civil wrong arising or resulting from the invasion of a legally protected interest, and consisting of an unreasonable interference with the use and enjoyment of the property of another. A qualified nuisance, or nuisance dependent on negligence, consists of an act lawfully but so negligently or carelessly done as to create a potential and unreasonable risk of harm, which in due course results in injury to another. Regardless of the label placed on a nuisance, a trial court retains broad discretion in fashioning the terms of an injunction. More Like This Headnote Evidence > Procedural Considerations > Burdens of Proof > Clear & Convincing Proof Real Property Law > Torts > Nuisance > Remedies > Injunctions > General Overview Real Property Law > Torts > Nuisance > Types > General Overview Real Property Law > Torts > Nuisance > Types > Private Nuisance HN3A court can abate a private nuisance that is already established. Or, a court can enjoin an anticipatory nuisance. A court may enjoin a nuisance that is either threatened or anticipated where it clearly appears that a nuisance will necessarily result from a contemplated act. But the court must see plainly that the acts will constitute a nuisance before it will issue an injunction. The degree of proof required before a court will enjoin an anticipated nuisance must be convincing, and if the act or thing sought to be enjoined may or may not become a nuisance, depending on the use or manner of its operation, or other circumstances, equity will not interfere. The degree of proof required before a court will enjoin an anticipated or threatened nuisance must be clear and convincing. More Like This Headnote Civil Procedure > Remedies > Injunctions > General Overview HN4Civ. R. 65(D) provides that every order granting an injunction shall set forth the reasons for its issuance; shall be specific in terms; shall describe in reasonable detail, and not by reference to the complaint or other document, the act or acts sought to be restrained. The Ohio Supreme Court has held that in order to comply with Civ. R. 65(D)s requirements, an injunction must be sufficiently specific that an ordinary person reading the courts order should be able to ascertain from the document itself exactly what conduct is proscribed. More Like This Headnote Civil Procedure > Appeals > Standards of Review > Abuse of Discretion Real Property Law > Torts > Nuisance > Remedies > Injunctions > General Overview HN5A trial court has the discretion to issue injunctive relief when faced with a nuisance. More than mere error of judgment, an abuse of discretion requires that the courts decision was unreasonable, arbitrary, or unconscionable. When applying the abuse of discretion standard, a reviewing court is not free to merely substitute its judgment for that of the trial court. More Like This Headnote Brackett v. Moler Raceway Park, LLC, 2011 Ohio 4469 (Ohio Ct. App., Brown County Sept. 6, 2011) Brackett v. Moler Raceway Park, LLC, CASE NO. CA2010-07-014, COURT OF APPEALS OF OHIO, TWELFTH APPELLATE DISTRICT, BROWN COUNTY, 2011 Ohio 4469; 2011 Ohio App. LEXIS 3716, September 6, 2011, Decided OVERVIEW: Although a trial court had the discretion to impose an injunction under Civ. R. 65(D) in a nuisance case, it erred by imposing restrictions upon a racetrack because it issued the restrictions without first establishing a clear determination of the nuisance allegedly in existence and the reasons for finding that various restrictions were necessary.Publication Editor/Writer Ken Lavelle kenlavelle@juno.com (440) 230-2777Not printed with ink or on paper provided by NOCSIA funds. Page 27 3/1/2012
  • 28. CORE TERMS: nuisance, racetrack, injunction, anticipated, written opinion, enjoin, private nuisance, invasion, issuing, track ... ... landowners, plaintiffs brought suit claiming that the racetrack constituted a nuisance. They complained that the traffic is increased on race days ... ... and restrictions. Plaintiffs assert that the racetrack is a private nuisance. "Nuisance" is a term used to designate "the wrongful invasion of ... ... Barnett v. Carr ex rel. Estate of Carr (Sept. 17, 2001), Butler App. No. CA2000-11-219, 23, 2001 Ohio App. LEXIS 4142. A "private nuisance" is a nontrespassory invasion of anothers interest in the private ... ... of land. Id. at ¶19. In order for a private nuisance to be actionable, the invasion must be either (a) intentional ... ... by negligent, reckless, or abnormally dangerous conduct. Id. An absolute nuisance, or nuisance per se, is that for which strict liability will attach. "Absolute nuisance, for which strict liability or liability without fault is imposed ... ... Taylor v. City of Cincinnati (1944), 143 Ohio St. 426, 55 N.E.2d 724, paragraph two of the syllabus. "A qualified nuisance, or nuisance dependent on negligence, consists of an act lawfully but so ... ... of the syllabus. Regardless of the label placed on a nuisance, a trial court retains broad discretion in fashioning the terms ... ... Adkins v. Boetcher, Ross App. No. 08CA3060, 2010 Ohio 554, ¶8. A court can abate a private nuisance that is already established. Haas v. Sunset Ramblers Motorcycle Club, Inc. (1999), 132 Ohio App.3d 875, 1999 Ohio 764, 726 N.E.2d 612. Or, a court can enjoin an anticipatory nuisance. "A court may enjoin a nuisance that is either threatened or anticipated where it clearly appears that a nuisance will necessarily result from a contemplated act." State ex rel. R.T.G., Inc. v. Ohio Department of Natural Resources (Mar. 31, 1997), Franklin App. No. 96APE05-662, 1997 Ohio App. LEXIS 1239, 1997 WL 142363, *6 ... ... court must see plainly that the acts will constitute a nuisance before it will issue an injunction. The degree of proof required before a court will enjoin an anticipated nuisance must be convincing, and if the act or thing sought to be enjoined may or may not become a nuisance, depending on the use or manner of its operation, or ... ... required before a court will enjoin an anticipated or threatened nuisance must be clear and convincing." Gustafson v. Cotco Enterprises, Inc. (1974), 42 Ohio App.2d 45, 47-48, 328 N.E.2d 409 Copy reference as hyperlinkPublication Editor/Writer Ken Lavelle kenlavelle@juno.com (440) 230-2777Not printed with ink or on paper provided by NOCSIA funds. Page 28 3/1/2012