Myths, Realities, Potential and Future of Urban Schools
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Myths, Realities, Potential and Future of Urban Schools

on

  • 2,657 views

Urban myths will be debunked; realities, challenges and joys of serving in the urban environment will be presented; successes and the potential of urban students will be shared; and a dialogue on ...

Urban myths will be debunked; realities, challenges and joys of serving in the urban environment will be presented; successes and the potential of urban students will be shared; and a dialogue on these topics will occur leading to questions about the future of urban schools. The conversation is designed to be stimulating and provocative while raising questions about issues of urban education to which a lack of solutions may portend grave implications for our nation and its’ preeminence

Statistics

Views

Total Views
2,657
Views on SlideShare
2,655
Embed Views
2

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
12
Comments
0

2 Embeds 2

http://www.slideshare.net 1
https://ecampusprod.tamu.edu 1

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Myths, Realities, Potential and Future of Urban Schools Myths, Realities, Potential and Future of Urban Schools Presentation Transcript

  • EDUCATIONAL STUDIES COLLOQUIUM The 2006-2007 Brown Bag Series Winter Semester Presents Dr. Kenneth Stephen Burnley Senior Resident Fellow Myths, Realities, Potential and Future of Urban Schools Urban myths will be debunked; realities, challenges and joys of serving in the urban environment will be presented; successes and the potential of urban students will be shared; and a dialogue on these topics will occur leading to questions about the future of urban schools. The conversation is designed to be stimulating and provocative while raising questions about issues of urban education to which a lack of solutions may portend grave implications for our nation and its’ preeminence Brownlee Room Thursday, April 19, 2007 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.
  • Kenneth Stephen Burnley Background & Experience
    • Education
    • Work Experience
    • Career Decisions
    • Colloquium on Urban Education in General
    • Detroit Public Schools In Particular
  • What is the Graduation Rate Around the Nation?
    • 2002 national rate of 72% (Jay Greene and Marcus Winters, Manhattan Institute)
    • “ Students from historically disadvantaged minority groups (American Indian, Hispanic, Black) have little more than a fifty/fifty chance of finishing school.” (Christopher Swanson, The Urban Institute, February 2004)
    • “ In the class of 2002, about 78% of white students graduated….compared to 56% for African American students and 52% of Hispanic students.” (The Gates Foundation, 2005)
  • Graduation Rates Around the Nation
    • Chicago
    • 1995: 61.2% 2004: 70.7%
    • Detroit
    • 2005: 68%
    • Philadelphia
    • 2005: 41-46%
    • Boston
    • 2004: 53%
  • Graduation Rates Around the Nation (continued)
    • 2001 Four Year Graduation Rates ( Dropouts in America , Christopher B. Swanson)
    • Nation: 68%
    • South: 62%
    • West: 68%
    • Northwest: 71%
    • Midwest: 75%
  • What’s My Point?
    • Myth: DPS graduation rates are the lowest in the nation
    • Truth: Contrary to popular opinion, the DPS graduation rates are NOT the worst in the nation. In fact, they are better than those for minorities nationally (Gates 50/50) are similar to or better than the rates in other urban districts, and are about 10% away from the national rate for whites (Gates)
    • DPS graduation rates are not acceptable and must improve
  • Truth: Until Recently, State Calculations Varied Widely
    • Wild Fluctuations
    • 1998: 68% (last year of DPS calculation)
    • 1999: 46% (beginning of state calculation)
    • 2000: 58%
    • 2001: 54%
    • 2002: 67%
    • 2003: 44%
    • 2004: 61% (State begins to search state-wide for students)
    • 2005: 68%
    • Beginning in 2004, the state looked for DPS leavers in the state-wide data base. These DPS leavers were enrolled in other districts but DPS was not informed. Thus, previously, they count as dropouts for DPS.
  • What’s Going On?
    • The old formula did not look at individual students. It calculated a rate based on the number of entering Grade 9 students and the number of graduates 4 years later.
    • Formula favors stable districts and growing districts
    • Penalizes districts with declining enrollment
    • Forces a district to count a student as a dropout if their new enrollment is unknown (students illegally enrolled in other districts, students enrolled in districts that don’t request records from DPS, etc.)
  • MI Projected Fiscal Year 2007 Per Pupil Funding 12,340.00 120.00 12,220.00 Bloomfield Hills 12,262.00 122.00 12,140.00 Birmingham 11,344.00 157.00 11,187.00 Southfield 10,452.00 191.00 10,261.00 Farmington 10,178.00 198.00 10,080.00 Grosse Pointe 9,271.00 259.00 9,012.00 West Bloomfield 8,979.00 280.00 8,698.00 Dearborn City 8,490.00 317.00 8,173.00 Livonia 7,469.00 0.00 7,469.00 Detroit 7,269.00 0.00 7,269.00 Pontiac Total Hold Harmless Per Pupil Funding School Districts
  • Myth: DPS wastes money Truth: inequitable funding places DPS in a position to be short of resources $309,225,000 A More Equitable State School Finance Act could yield more Financial Support to DPS Federal Funding is Limited to Use Category 105,000 # Detroit Students 2,945 Difference in Metro Average vs. Detroit $10,414 Top 8 Metro Average
  • Myth: Detroit teacher salaries are too high Truth: Detroit teacher salaries are not in the top 47 highest paying districts in the Tri-County area Salary Ranked Bachelors Max 70,026.00 Farmington/Oakland 70,854.00 West Bloomfield/Oakland 70,975.00 Walled Lake/Oakland 72,093.00 Dearborn/Wayne 72,560.00 Bloomfield Hills/Oakland Salary Ranked District/County
    • Myth: DPS is not closing the “student achievement gap” between it’s students and the rest of the State
    • Truth: Detroit is closing the achievement gap in spite of the resource gap in the two areas on which it has focused: reading and mathematics
  • Truth
    • In 2005 and 2006, Grades 3-8 were tested in reading and mathematics.
    • For reading, the gap decreased in 4 of 6 grades tested, remained the same in 1 grade, and increased in 1 grade.
    • For mathematics, the gap decreased in 3 of 6 grades, remained the same in 2 grades, and increased in 1 grade.
  • What’s Going On?
    • Students have made progress in subjects that have been emphasized and supported with massive professional development, new programs and texts, etc.
    • The highly mobile student population in DPS progresses when programs are systemic across the district.
    • Reading and mathematics have received massive support and are systemic .
  • Grade 4 Reading
  • Grade 7 Reading
  • Grade 4 Mathematics
  • Grade 8 Mathematics
  • Myth: Charter schools out perform public schools Truth: In the aggregate public schools out perform charter schools
    • It is difficult to assess as many charter schools have fewer than 30 students at a grade so the scores are not presented
    • A study using 2005 MEAP scores showed that DPS outperformed charter schools at the elementary level but not at the middle school level.
  • Myth: Nothing “Extra” For Kids Truth: DPS Offers a Multitude of After School Academics, Sports and Activities
    • Number of DPS schools offering before/after school Academic Programs
    • 2002-03: 205
    • 2003-04: 208
    • 2004-05: 224
    • Total number of offerings in various categories: Approximately 1,600 by 04-05
    • *DPS Students win science, robotics, debate, state, regional and national competitions, etc .
    • Myth: DPS does not partner with outside organizations
    • Truth: In 2004-05, there were 1,307 partnerships operating in Detroit schools
  • Myth: People flee mixed-race neighborhoods due to perception of bad schools Truth: Some do, but more flee for economic reasons
    • Percent saying it is very or somewhat likely that fear of lower quality schools would keep them from moving into a mixed-race neighborhood
    • Black: 20% White: 32%
  • Truth (con’t)
    • Percent saying it is very likely that fear of lower property values would keep them from moving into a mixed-race neighborhood
    • Black: 40% White: 46%
    • Source: Mitchell Research and Communications, Inc. survey of 650 metro Detroiters, Aug. 13-17, 2001 (+ or – 4.4%)
  • Accomplishments
    • July 1, 2000
    • Initial Assessment
    • June 30, 2005
    • Final Assessment
    See handout accompanying this presentation for details
  • Systemic Improvement In Student Achievement
    • How to do it, and how it was done in DPS
    • Literacy
    • Mathematics
    • *See handout accompanying this presentation for details
  • Challenges
    • Declining enrollment
    • State midyear reductions in the business plan caused student/teacher disruptions
    • Finance inequity
    • Racism/bigotry
    • Bright flight
  • Challenges
    • Disproportionate numbers of lower socio economic homes
    • NCLB collision course with school finance
    • Media representation without regard to human natures need for imbalance in positive to negative stories
  • Challenges: Declining Population
    • Estimated Population of
    • Detroit July 1, 2005: 892,034
    • Change from 2000 to 2005 -59,236
    • Source: SEMCOG Population and Households in Southeast Michigan, 2000-2005
  • Challenges: Segregation
    • 2002: Metro Detroit is “nations most segregated metropolis.” Detroit News, February 19, 2002
    • 1989: “Detroit [metro area] is second in housing segregation among 10 metro areas.” Hyper-segregation in U.S. Metropolitan Areas: Blacks and Hispanic Segregation Along Five Dimensions,” Douglas Massey, University of Chicago Population Research Center as reported in Free Press, 8-4-1989
  •  
  • Segregation
    • “Metro Detroit has the highest level of neighborhood segregation between blacks and whites in the nation.”
    • Separate analyses of 2000 census data by The Detroit News, the Brookings Institution, and the State University of New York at Albany.
  • The Cost of Segregation
  • Segregation
    • “Black suburbanization is a trend we’re seeing across the country.” Jacob Vigdor, Duke University for the Brookings Institution report on segregation data
    • Of the 185 cities and townships in the six-county Detroit region, 115 are more than 95 percent white. (From the 2000 census)
  • Joys
    • Systemically improving student achievement and performance
    • Stewardship over Detroit’s resources
    • Leading a challenge most cower from
    • Serving
    • Solving complex human challenges
    • Grace and humor under fire
  • Joys (Continued)
    • Building a team
    • Building relationships
    • Creating a vision, mission, goals with annual objectives where the whole Organization makes it happen one team on one page
    • Succeeding where others said we couldn’t
    • Theodore Roosevelt
  • In Spite of the Accomplishments The Challenges Seem To Be Winning The Day and Suggest a Continued Spiral Downward for Urban School Districts
    • Worst Fears
    • Spiral Down Continues
    • Workforce Suffers
    • Productive Citizens Declines
    • US Loses Preeminence
    • Inequitable Funding continues
    • Racism is our Achilles Heel
    • Best Hopes
    • NCLB Finally Inspires the Nation
    • Schools Not Seen as the Problem
    • The Village Really Operates
    • Medical Home Conditional Cash Transfers
    • Regentrification
  • What Do You Think Can Be Done?
    • What are your worst fears?
    • What are your best hopes?
    • What would you do?