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APP is one example of my writing abilities within the government sector.
 

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    APP is one example of my writing abilities within the government sector. APP is one example of my writing abilities within the government sector. Document Transcript

    • ACCIDENT PREVENTION PLAN/ SITE SAFETY AND HEALTH PLAN USAMRICD REPLACEMENT FACILITY ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, EDGEWOOD, MD JULY 07, 2009 Prepared for: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Baltimore District Prepared By: Total Engineering, Inc. 9344 Lanham Severn Rd., Suite 200 Lanham, MD 20706 Phone: (301) 459-7484 Fax: (301) 459-7487 Contract Number: W912DR-09-C-0030
    • TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TC-5 LIST OF IMPORTANT TELEPHONE NUMBERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TC-7 1.0 SIGNATURE SHEET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 2.0 BACKGROUND INFORMATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 2.1 Contractor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 2.2 Contract Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 2.3 Project Name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 2.4 Project Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 2.5 Contractor’s Accident Experience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 2.6 Phases of Work Requiring Subcontractor Activity Hazard Analysis . . . . . . . . . . 2-2 3.0 STATEMENT OF SAFETY AND HEALTH POLICY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1 3.1 Total Engineering, Inc. Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1 3.1.1 Required Postings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1 4.0 RESPONSIBILITIES AND LINES OF AUTHORITY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1 4.1 Responsibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1 4.1.1 Contractor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1 4.1.2 Site Safety and Health Supervisor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1 4.1.3 Program Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1 4.1.4 Project Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1 4.1.5 Field Site Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1 4.1.6 Project Safety and Health Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2 4.1.7 Field Team Members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2 4.2 Lines of Authority for Project Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2 5.0 SUBCONTRACTORS AND SUPPLIERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1 5.1 Subcontractors and Suppliers List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1 5.2 Subcontractor Control and Coordination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1 5.3 Subcontractor Safety Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1 6.0 TRAINING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1 6.1 Training Subjects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1 6.1.1 Training of Total Engineering, Inc. Field Personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1 6.1.2 Training of All Site Personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1 6.1.2.1 New Employee Indoctrination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1 6.1.2.2 Weekly Safety Meeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2 6.1.2.3 Mandatory Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 7.0 SAFETY AND HEALTH INSPECTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1 7.1 Inspections and Audits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1 7.2 Inspector Qualifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1 7.3 Imminent Danger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1 8.0 ACCIDENT REPORTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1 8.1 Exposure Data Reporting (Man-Hours Worked) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1 8.2 Accident Investigations, Reports, and Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1 8.3 Notification of Major Accidents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1 9.0 MEDICAL SUPPORT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1 9.1 Address and Directions to Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1 9.2 On-Site Medical Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1 10.0 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-1 10.1 Employee Responsibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-1 10.2 Monitoring and Inspections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-2 11.0 REQUIRED PLANS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-1 11.1 Layout Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-1 11.2 Emergency Response Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-1 11.2.1 Spill Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-1 11.2.2 Hazardous Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-2 11.2.3 Natural Hazards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-3 11.3 Hazard Communication Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-4 11.3.1 General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-4 11.3.2 Container Labeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-4 11.3.3 Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-4 11.3.4 Employee Training On Hazard Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-5 11.3.5 Hazardous Non-Routine Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-5 11.3.6 Informing Contractors of Hazardous Chemicals On-Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-5 11.3.7 List of Hazardous Chemicals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-5 11.4 Respiratory Protection Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-6 11.5 Health Hazard Control Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-6 11.6 Lead Abatement Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-7 11.7 Asbestos Abatement Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-7 11.8 Abrasive Blasting Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-8 11.9 Confined Space Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-8 11.10 Hazardous Energy Control Plan (Lockout/Tagout) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-15 11.11 Critical Lift Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-18 11.12 Contingency Plan for Severe Weather . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-18 11.13 Access and Haul Road Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-19 11.14 Demolition Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-20 11.15 Emergency Rescue - Tunneling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-25 11.16 Underground Construction Fire Prevention and Protection Plan . . . . . . . . . 11-25 TC-2
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 11.17 Compressed Air Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-25 11.18 Formwork and Shoring Erection and Removal Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-25 11.19 Jacking Plan Lift Slab Plans. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-25 11.20 Site Safety and Health Plan for Hazardous, Toxic, or Radioactive Waste . . 11-25 11.21 Blasting Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-25 11.22 Diving Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-25 11.23 Plan for Prevention of Alcohol and Drug Abuse and Site Security . . . . . . . 11-25 11.24 Fall Protection and Prevention Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-27 11.25 Steel Erection Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-28 11.26 Night Operations Lighting Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-28 11.27 Site Sanitation Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-28 11.27.1 Controls and Disposal of Solid Waste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-29 11.28 Fire Prevention Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-30 11.29 Silica Exposure Reduction Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-32 11.30 Heat & Cold Stress Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-32 11.31 Dust Control Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-35 11.32 Excavation and Trenching Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-36 12.0 CONTRACTOR INFORMATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-1 12.1 Equipment Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-1 12.2 Scaffolding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-2 12.3 Medical and First Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-3 12.4 Physical Qualifications of Employees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-3 12.5 Personal Protective Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-3 12.6 Sanitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-3 12.7 Harmful or Poisonous Chemical, Biological, and Physical Agents . . . . . . . . . . 12-3 12.8 Ladders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-4 12.9 Fall Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-7 12.10 Power Operated Hand Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-7 12.11 Protection of the Public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-14 12.12 Fire Prevention/Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-14 12.13 Welding and Burning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-27 12.14 Electrical Wiring and Apparatus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-28 12.15 Motor Vehicles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-29 12.16 Traffic Regulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-29 12.17 Housekeeping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-29 12.18 Unexploded Ordinance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12-29 13.0 SAFETY AND HEALTH EXPECTATIONS AND COMPLIANCE . . . . . . . . . 13-1 13.1 Project Safety Goals and Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-1 13.2 Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-1 13.3 Enforcement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-2 13.4 Violation Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-2 TC-3
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 14.0 APPENDICES APPENDIX A Lines of Authority APPENDIX B Resumes: Kenneth L. Martin, Jorge Colindres, Lee Dial, Neal Stalker, & German Noriega APPENDIX C Layout Plans APPENDIX D Forms 2-24 APPENDIX E Job Specific Traffic Control Plan APPENDIX F Pipe Demolition Checklists APPENDIX G Emergency Action Plan APPENDIX H Total Engineering, Inc. Health & Safety Plan and Procedure Manual APPENDIX I MSDSs APPENDIX J Tabulated Data APPENDIX K Activity Hazard Analysis TC-4
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS ACGIH American Conference of Government Industrial Hygienists AHA Activity Hazard Analysis ANSI American National Standard Institute APP Accident Prevention Plan bgs below ground surface TEI Total Engineering, Inc. Engineering Company, Inc. BTEX Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene, and total Xylenes CFR Code of Federal Regulations CGI Combustible Gas Indicator CIH Certified Industrial Hygienist CPR Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation dB Decibels ͦ C Degrees Centigrade ͦ F Degrees Fahrenheit DOT Department of Transportation EAB Enhanced Anaerobic Bioremediation EM Engineering Manual EMS Emergency Medical Service EZ Exclusion Zones eV Electron Volt FSM Field Site Manager ft Feet HAZWOPER Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response HEPA High Efficiency Particulate Air Hr Hour HSM Health and Safety Manager HTRW Hazardous, Toxic, or Radioactive Waste IDW Investigative Derived Waste IRP Installation Restoration Program LEL Lower Explosive Limit LOTO Lock Out/Tag Out mg/m³ Milligrams per cubic meter of air MSDS Material Safety Data Sheet TC-5
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland NFPA National Fire Prevention Association NIOSH National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health NRR Noise Reduction Rating NWS National Weather Service Accident Prevention Plan O2 Oxygen OSHA Occupational Safety and Health Administration OU Operational Unit QC Quality Control PEL Permissible Exposure Limit PID Photoionization Detector PM Project Manager PPE Personal Protective Equipment ppm Parts per Million PVC Polyvinyl chloride SCBA Self Contained Breathing Apparatus SHM Project Safety and Health Manager SSHP Site Safety & Health Plan SSHS Site Safety and Health Supervisor SVE Soil Vapor Extraction TCE Trichloroethene TLV Threshold Limit Value USACE United States Army Corps of Engineers VC Vinyl Chloride VOCs Volatile Organic Compounds TC-6
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland LIST OF IMPORTANT TELEPHONE NUMBERS EMERGENCY NUMBERS Fire Department: 410-436-4451 Edgewood EMS: 410-436-4451 Edgewood Police: 410-436-2222 Poison Control Center: 800-222-1222 National Response Center: (800) 424-8820 Chemtrac: (800) 424-9300 Government Emergency Response Authority (Edgewood): Government phone dial 911 4- 1095/1096 Cell/non-government phone 410-436-3157/3660 Safety Government (Edgewood): Government phone 5-3157/3660 Cell/non-government phone 410-436-3157/3660 TEI Project Safety and Health Managers: Kenneth Martin (301) 979-1723 Jorge Colindres: (240) 375-8516 TEI Field Site Manager (Lee Dial): 301-640-1955 TEI Project Manger (German Noriega): 240-216-0812 UTILITY CLEARANCE NUMBERS Miss Utility: 1-800-257-7777 OTHER PRIMARY CONTACTS U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Project Manager (Roger A. Moore): 410-436-1900 TC-7
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 1.0 SIGNATURE SHEET Total Engineering, Inc. 9344 Lanham Severn Rd., Suite 200 Lanham, MD 20706 Phone: (301) 459-7484, Ext. 110 Fax: (301) 459-7487 ACCIDENT PREVENTION FOR USAMRICD REPLACEMENT FACILITY ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND EDGEWOOD, MD Contract No. W912DR-09-C-0030 Plan Prepared by: Kenneth L. Martin, Project Safety and Health Manager Phone: 301-459-7484 ________________________________ Plan Approved by: Greg Deweese, Vice President Phone: 301-459-7484 ext. 102 _________________________________ Plan Concurrence by: Neal Stalker, Quality Control Manager Phone 301-459-7484 ___________________________________________ 1-1
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 2.0 BACKGROUND INFORMATION 2.1 CONTRACTOR Total Engineering, Inc. (TEI) has a contract with the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Baltimore District through which the Early Site Package is to prepare the site for construction of the USAMRICD Replacement Facilities at the Aberdeen Proving Ground Edgewood, MD. 2.2 CONTRACT NUMBER W912DR-09-C-0030 2.3 PROJECT NAME USAMRICD Replacement Facility, Early Site Work at Aberdeen Proving Ground in Edgewood, Maryland 2.4 PROJECT DESCRIPTION USAMRICD Replacement Facility, Early Site Work at Aberdeen Proving Ground in Edgewood, MD will consist of, but not limited to, UXO detection, identification, and removal coordination; vegetative clearing installation of sediment erosion controls and storm water management; housing demolition including abatement of hazardous materials; site demolition including utilities and paving; earthwork and grading; installation of underground and above ground steam line; installation of water distribution line; installation of overhead electrical distribution; installation of sewage collection system; and installation of government trailer. 2.5 CONTRACTOR’S ACCIDENT EXPERIENCE The following information is provided to outline the accident and safety experience of the Contractor (Total Engineering, Inc.). YEAR RECORDABLES EMR 2008 2 0.88 2007 2 0.92 2006 4 0.87 2005 0 0.86 2004 3 0.86 2-1
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 2.6 PHASES OF WORK REQUIRING ACTIVITY HAZARD ANALYSES The following work activities have been identified for this project:  UXO Detection, Identification, and Removal Coordination  Vegetative Clearing  Installation of Sediment Erosion Controls and Storm Water Management.  Housing Demolition Including Abatement of Hazardous Materials.  Site Demolition Including Utilities and Paving.  Earthwork and Grading.  Installation of Underground and Aboveground Steam Line.  Installation of Water Distribution Line.  Installation of Overhead Electrical Distribution.  Installation of Sewage Collection System.  Installation of Government Trailer At a minimum, each work activity requires the subcontractor to complete an Activity Hazard Analysis and submit it to the FSM prior to starting the activity (please find AHAs in Appendix K). The submitted AHA will remain accessible on the project site for viewing by all site personnel and will be included as part of training during the phases of work. 2-2
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 3.0 STATEMENT OF SAFETY AND HEALTH POLICY 3.1 TOTAL ENGINEERING, INC. POLICY The safety and health of each and every employee of TEI and associated subcontractors is of primary importance. Therefore, TEI issues the following policy statement: • It is the policy of this company that every employee is entitled to work under the safest possible conditions for the construction industry. To this end, every reasonable effort will be made in the interest of accident prevention, fire protection, and health preservation. • A comprehensive safety and health program shall be maintained with the objective of reducing the number of accidents and injuries to an absolute minimum, zero recordables and zero lost time. To be successful, such a program must embody the proper attitudes towards accident prevention on the part of both the supervisors and employees. It also requires cooperation in all safety and health matters, not only between supervisor and employee, but also between employee and his or her fellow worker. It is only through cooperation that such programs can work effectively. • On each job the site safety and health supervisor (SSHS) will be responsible for implementing the safety program. All employees shall adhere to the rules, regulations, and other provisions of our safety program. 3.1.1 REQUIRED POSTINGS All federally required notices shall be posted upon arrival of subcontractors on site. Required notices include but are not limited to the following: Employee Polygraph Protection Act, Equal Employment Opportunity, Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993, Federal Minimum Wage, and (OSHA – Job Safety and Health). TEI will post a summary of the total number of job-related injuries and illnesses that occurred last year. Employers are only required to post the Summary (OSHA Form 300A)—not the OSHA 300 Log—from February 1 to April 30, 2008. 3-1
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 4.0 RESPONSIBILITIES AND LINES OF AUTHORITY 4.1 RESPONSIBILITY Any person on site may shut down a site work operation that poses imminent danger or is immediately dangerous to life or health. When such precautions must be taken, the SSHS shall be immediately notified and actions to remedy the situation shall be implemented. No work shall be performed unless a designated competent person is present on the jobsite. 4.1.1 CONTRACTOR TEI is the contractor responsible for conducting work, directing subcontractors, and implementing the Site Safety and Health Plan. TEI will conduct safety briefings for all personnel working or entering the site. 4.1.2 SITE SAFETY AND HEALTH SUPERVISOR (SSHS) The SSHS is responsible for implementing and overseeing this plan. The SSHS is responsible for identifying safety and health hazards that may impact site personnel, maintaining proper medical surveillance, providing hazard communication information, training employees in safe operating procedures, emergency response, reviewing accident reports, and reviewing inspection results. The SSHS is also responsible for advising the project safety and health manager (SHM) and project manager on matters concerning the safety and health of employees or the public. The SSHS may be required to perform various types of area or personnel monitoring to verify worker exposure and ensure the proper selection of personal protective equipment (PPE). The SSHS should be consulted before any changes in the recommended procedures or levels of protective clothing are made. 4.1.3 PROGRAM MANAGER The program manager (Neal Stalker, see Appendix B for credentials) has primary responsibility for fulfillment of contract terms and oversight of operations to verify that all legal and safety requirements are met. The program manager has the responsibility to keep the project on schedule and within budget and communicate with the client regarding progress toward specified goals. 4.1.4 PROJECT MANAGER The TEI project manager (PM) (German Noriega, see Appendix B for credentials) will have primary responsibility to satisfy the technical and administrative requirements of the project and will provide direction and oversight to the field site manager (FSM) and the SSHS. The project manager will be responsible for communicating progress and any problems to the program manager, who in turn will report to the USACE project manager. The project manager is responsible for procuring and providing the proper safety equipment at the site. 4.1.5 FIELD SITE MANAGER The FSM (Lee Dial, see Appendix B for credentials) is the on-site operations coordinator of the field activities. The FSM is OSHA 10HR & 30HR trained, Confined Space Supervisor trained, HAZWOPER-trained, and receives the annual HAZWOPER 8-hour 4-1
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland refresher training. The FSM will also be current on respirator fit-testing, and be current on receiving HAZWOPER medical physical. The FSM will maintain site security, control site access for unauthorized personnel, supervise personnel on the site, coordinate the activities of subcontractor personnel and stop site activities based on unsafe conditions or weather extremes. The FSM will enforce the buddy system where required, and verify that all procedures (safety and health, decontamination, protective equipment, etc.) are followed. The FSM will report to the project manager. The FSM will revise the SSHP by written amendment if site conditions change based on consultations with the SHM, the project manager, and the program manager. 4.1.6 PROJECT SAFETY AND HEALTH MANAGER The project SHMs are a Construction Site Safety Master (CSSM), an authorized OSHA Outreach Instructor, and First Aid and CPR instructor who will provide professional support by reviewing all safety and health programs as they apply to this project. The SHM will approve the APP/SSHP and all modifications to the plan as they affect the safety and health of field personnel. The SHM will be consulted on matters relating to emergency response and will provide directions for upgrading and/or downgrading of protection levels as needed. The project SHM is responsible for providing professional safety and health support and oversight management to the SSHS. The SHM will review and provide support in all concerns regarding the safety and health of field personnel assigned to the project. The SHM will be responsible for evaluating air-monitoring data and recommending changes in engineering controls as needed. The SHM will ensure that all TEI project personnel have relevant and current safety and health training, and that training is documented. Periodic field audits of the project work site may be conducted by the SHM to evaluate the adequacy of the program and implement any necessary changes. The SHM will review accident reports and the results of inspections (See Appendix B credentials). In addition to the project or program manager, the following individuals will have the authority and responsibility to change the levels of protection and, if necessary, shut down field operations: • SSHS, Lee Dial • FSM, Lee Dial • SHM, Kenneth Martin and Jorge Colindres 4.1.7 FIELD TEAM MEMBERS The field team members will be responsible for reading and understanding this plan and following the directives of the SSHS, FSM, and the SHM. The field team members will be responsible for performing all work according to the procedures outlined in this plan and to notify the SSHS, FSM, and SHM of any conditions that may pose a threat to the safety and health of the employees and the community. 4.2 LINES OF AUTHORITY FOR PROJECT SAFETY Appendix A provides a graphic presentation of the lines of authority for project safety. 4-2
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 5.0 SUBCONTRACTORS AND SUPPLIERS 5.1 SUBCONTRACTORS AND SUPPLIER LIST Specific subcontractors that have been selected for this project are as follows: • L.J. Brossoit ( Mechanical) • Modular Genius (Government Trailer) • Dvorak, LLC (Electrical) • Tetratech (UXO)  Berg Corporation (Demolition) 5.2 SUBCONTRACTOR CONTROL AND COORDINATION Any person on site may shut down a site work operation that poses imminent danger or is immediately dangerous to life or health. When such precautions must be taken, the SSHS shall be immediately notified and actions to remedy the situation shall be implemented. Each subcontractor shall be issued a copy of this APP/SHSP and be required to comply with the requirements set forth herein. Subcontractors and Suppliers will comply fully with all laws, orders, regulations and statutes with respect to safety, accident prevention, safety equipment and practices. In particular, subcontractors/suppliers agree to comply with the most recent version of USACE Safety and Health Requirements Manual (EM) 385-1-1, Federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Standards for Construction and General Industry (29 CFR 1926 and 29 CFR 1910), NFPA 70E Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace, Total Engineering, Inc. Health & Safety Plan and Procedure Manual, State codes, as well as this APP/SHSP. Subcontractor will conduct inspections to determine that safe working conditions and equipment exist and accepts sole responsibility for providing a safe place to work for its employees and for employees of its subcontractors and suppliers and for the adequacy of and required use of all safety equipment. Subcontractor/ Suppliers will comply with all safety, pollution control, noise control and environmental laws and regulations. Subcontractor/Supplier personnel will attend safety meetings organized on site by Contractor and submit all required safety submittals in a timely manner. The subcontractor is responsible to give names and training qualifications for subcontractor competent/qualified person(s). These information will be submitted to TEI prior to allowing subcontractor to start work. A Competent person is one who can recognize hazards or potential hazards and has the authority to correct or abate the hazard. In addition, qualifications for being a competent person shall include at least the OSHA 10-Hour Construction Safety Course. 5.3 SUBCONTRACTOR SAFETY RESPONSIBILITIES Key Subcontractor responsibilities (not necessarily all) are outlined below. All forms are included as part of Appendix D: 5-1
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland Activity/Job Hazard Analysis (AHA) (Form 1) Complete the pre-task AHA for each phase of work activity and submit to the FSM prior to starting the work activity. Subcontractor will also send a representative to attend any appropriate pre-planning meetings to discuss and review the AHA with TEI as part of the quality control inspection(s). Please find AHAs in Appendix K. Project Orientation Training (Form 2) Each contractor will submit Form 2 to acknowledge familiarization with site safety and health procedures. Certification of Training (Form 3) Prior to every employee being allowed to start work at the site, complete the record of safety training for each employee and submit to the FSM. Competent Person Designation (Form 4) Identify the Competent/Qualified persons and submit Form 4 to the FSM prior to starting work. Hazardous Material Control Report (Form 5) For every hazardous material brought on site, submit to the FSM the Hazardous Material Control Report (Form 5). This includes listing actual (estimated) quantities of hazardous materials to be stored on site, mapping the location of storage, and providing two copies of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for each material. Access and Haul Roads Plan (Form 6) Required if subcontractor must construct any access or haul roads for the project. Submit plan to TEI for USACE approval prior to construction of roadways. Crane Operations Report (Form 7) Required if any cranes are brought on site. Confined Space Report (Form 8) Form 8 is required prior to entry of any confined spaces. Trench and Excavation Report (Form 9) Required when conducting trenching/excavations on site. Fall Protection Report (Form 10) Subcontractors are required to complete this form and submit it to the TEI FSM. Silica Exposure Reduction Report (Form 11) This report is to be completed by each Subcontractor and will state whether or not they plan to conduct any activities where the release of silica dust may be possible. This includes saw cutting of concrete, demolition of concrete, and blasting, etc. This report is to be submitted to the FSM. If suspect silica-producing activities will be conducted, then a Silica Exposure Reduction Plan must be prepared by the Subcontractor to prevent silica inhalation exposures. Silica exposure may cause silicosis of the lungs. 5-2
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland Weekly Toolbox Safety Training (Form 12) Use Form 12 to document topics and personnel present for weekly safety training. Incident Report (Form 13) Subcontractor will report any accidents, incidents, near misses (near hits) occurring on their work to the site FSM immediately according to the procedures in Section 9.2. Violation Notice (Form 14) This form will be used as a written notification to a subcontractor of a potential safety or health hazard. Work Area Inspection Checklist (Form 15) The SHSS or FSM may use this form to periodically evaluate safety and health conditions on the site. Monthly Exposure Report (Form 16) Use this form to record man-hours worked on the project site. Safety Performance Report (Form 17) Project Safety & Health Assessment (Form 18) This form may be used to record conditions on the site during periodic audits by the SHSS or PM. Weekly Subcontractor Safety Report (Form 19) Subcontractors are required to complete and submit a ―Subcontractor Safety Report‖ (Form 18) to the FSM. AHA Log (Form 20) Contractor may use this log to track the status of AHA submittals. Subcontractor Verification Form (Form 21) All project subcontractors must submit this form to TEI prior to starting work. Pre-Task Analysis (Form 22) This form will be completed by the front line supervisor for each major work task. Amendment Form (Form 23) Use the amendment form to modify or amend this APP. Agreement and Acknowledgement Statement (Form 24) This form will be signed by all personnel working on the site, to acknowledge their having read the APP and that they understand the contents of the document. Welding & Cutting (Form 25) Hot Work Permits shall be obtained from the SSHS prior to the start of work each Monday morning. 5-3
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland First Aid Log (Form 26) This Log is a site-specific document for tracking all first aid injuries occurring on the site. The Log is to be a running total of all first aid injuries. Daily Safety Huddle (Form 27) Onsite daily safety meetings will be held before each workday to reinforce pertinent topics from the site-specific training, coordinate work activities, address task-specific hazards and protection levels, and anticipate problems that may arise during the day. 5-4
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 6.0 TRAINING 6.1 TRAINING SUBJECTS 6.1.1 Training of Total Engineering, Inc. Field Personnel All TEI personnel are required to attend new employee orientation training. This training includes: • Hazard Communication • Emergency Action Procedures • Safety Training Requirements • Ergonomics • Corporate Safety & Health Policy In addition all TEI field personnel are required to successfully complete the OSHA 10- Hour Construction Safety Training. The following topics are included in OSHA 10-hour Construction Safety Course given by the TEI Safety & Health Department to employees: • Introduction to OSHA • Hazard Communication/Lead & Asbestos Awareness • Cranes/Rigging • PPE • Confined Space Entry • Legal Issues • Fall Protection • Electrical Safety • Material Handling • Excavations, Trenching, and Shoring • Ladders/Stairs • Scaffolds • Steel Erection 6.1.2 Training of All Site Personnel Communication is necessary to help prevent accidents and insure a safe working environment. Material Safety Data Sheets will be made readily available for all hazardous substances associated with the project. Training on these substances and their safe usage shall be conducted. 6.1.2.1 New Employee Indoctrination Every job site is unique; therefore all workers (TEI’s employees and subcontractor employees) are required to attend Project Orientation training prior to being allowed access to the site. Orientation classes may be scheduled by contacting the SSHS. Topics to be covered during this training class are listed on Form 2. ―Project Orientation Training‖ shall also include emergency procedures, location of the material safety data 6-1
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland sheet (MSDS), and UXO awareness training. At the conclusion of training, each employee will be asked to sign the form with the understanding they have understood the topics covered and have had an opportunity to ask questions. Each worker may then receive a TEI hard-hat safety sticker to identify them as having received the site- specific training. Exceptions for those not required to attend the orientation include those persons who will be continuously escorted onsite for less than 8 hours, or a onetime visit. Some examples may include persons coming onsite to service the toilets, the hand wash, delivery of drinking water, etc. 6.1.2.2 Weekly Safety Meeting Weekly safety meetings shall be conducted to reiterate safety precautions, accident prevention procedures, and review AHA sheets. This weekly training will be documented on Form 12 or an equivalent form. Daily Safety Huddles Onsite daily safety meetings will be held before each workday to reinforce pertinent topics from the site-specific training, coordinate work activities, address task-specific hazards and protection levels, and anticipate problems that may arise during the day. Topics will include site-specific hazards, accident investigation results, air-monitoring and employee exposure monitoring results, and any specific employee concerns that may arise during the project. The Field Team Leader, FSM/SHSS, or subcontractor’s Field Team Leader will conduct these meetings for their respective crews. These meetings may be combined into a single meeting in order to aid coordination between the contractors. The FSM/SHSS will review and document the items discussed at the daily safety huddle meeting. Attendance and the items discussed at the meeting will be documented (using the appropriate safety form provided in Appendix D, Form 27) as part of the daily documentation for the site. The Field Team Leaders for the various employers will coordinate work activities on a daily basis. 6.1.2.3 Mandatory Training Training requirements will vary for workers, depending on their tasks. Therefore, subcontractors are to provide a ―Certification of Training‖ (Form 3) for every employee working on the project. This form will be submitted to the FSM prior to the employee starting work. Some of the mandatory training (must be current) required on this project includes: • Hazwoper Training (current certificate) • Hazwoper 8-hour Supervisor training for supervisors • First Aid/Adult Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) • Hazard Communication Training • Personal Protective Equipment Training • OSHA 10-Hour Construction Safety (Competent Persons and Safety Officers) • Respirator Fit Test Certification • Asbestos Abatement Training 6-2
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 7.0 SAFETY AND HEALTH INSPECTIONS 7.1 INSPECTIONS AND AUDITS The SSHS, designee, or the Subcontractor will conduct a daily safety and health inspections of the project site. The ―Work Area Inspection Checklist‖ (Form 15) may be used to record the results of the inspection, or the results may be recorded into the field log book. Any noted deficiencies will have corrective action initiated by the FSM. Corrective actions are to be initiated by the FSM or the TEI project manager immediately with a note as to who was contacted to correct the item and what corrective action was taken and when it occurred. Periodically, a quality control (QC) Safety and Health audit may be completed by the project SHM. This audit is included as Form 18 of this plan, Project Safety and Health Assessment. 7.2 INSPECTOR QUALIFICATIONS The SHSS will possess a Hazwoper 8-hour certificate, be current on Hazwoper annual refresher training, and have successfully completed the OSHA 10-hour Construction Safety course. In addition, the SHSS will have at least 1 year of experience working on Hazardous waste sites. Any designee will have similar credentials. The QC Safety and Health audit will normally be conducted by the TEI Safety Director, having at least an Environmental Health & Safety degree and 5 years of experience. In addition, the Safety Director will be current on Hazwoper training and have completed the OSHA 10- hour construction safety course. Records of employee qualifications are kept in the TEI Safety & Health Department. 7.3 IMMINENT DANGER For any dangers that are serious and/or immediately dangerous to life or health, work shall be stopped until corrective actions are taken. 7-1
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 8.0 ACCIDENT REPORTING 8.1 EXPOSURE DATA REPORTING (MAN-HOURS WORKED) The site SSHS, with help from the TEI project manager, will complete each month a ―Monthly Exposure Report‖ (Form 16). 8.2 ACCIDENT INVESTIGATIONS, REPORTS, AND LOGS For all incidences including accidents, work-related illnesses, or near misses (near hits), Subcontractor will notify the SSHS (Lee Dial). Within 24 hours, the subcontractor will provide a written accident report to TEI’s SSHS (Lee Dial), who will complete and send an ―Incident Report‖ (Form 13) to the PM and SHM the and the USACE PM. Accidents must also be reported to the USACE on Form USACE ENG 3394 (copy not included in this plan). In order to eliminate injury and damage, it is important to perform thorough, in-depth root cause analysis and investigations when incidents occur. 1. The FSM/SSHS will ensure completion of investigations of all accidents and near miss incidents. a. The incident Investigation will include, but is not limited to: i. Statements of facts from the person(s) involved in the incident. ii. Statements of facts from the involved persons. iii. Statements of facts from any Employee witnessing the incident. iv. Statements of facts from any witness to the incident not working for TEI or the subcontractors. v. Date and time of Incident. vi. The USACE PM must be notified immediately, but no more than 24 hours. vii. The SHM must be notified within one (1) working day. viii. Within 48 hours develop a Safety Bulletin. ix. Within 24 hours following receipt of the Safety Bulletin field management will conduct a “Safety Stand-Down”. x. Submit the incident report to the USACE PM as soon as possible but no later than (5) five working days following the accident. Safety Bulletin Within 48 hours following completion of the accident investigation and determination of the potential root causes, the SSHs and SHM will develop a Safety Bulletin for immediate distribution to all personal on the jobsite. The Safety Bulletins are to heighten employee awareness regarding specific hazards that may be present in the work place or that may present the risk of personal injury. Safety Bulletins will advise employees of the specific actions, procedures, personal protection equipment, and/or required training that must be to be taken to avoid such hazards and risks. 8-1
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland “Safety Stand-Down” Meeting Within 24 hours following receipt of the Safety Bulletin field management will conduct a “Safety Stand-Down” meeting that must be attended by all employees on the jobsite. During the Safety Stand-Down meeting the FSM/SSHS will review the safety bulletin, discuss the incident and create an awareness of the root causes (i.e., what occurred and why it occurred) and will communicate corrective actions implemented to prevent a reoccurrence. The FSM/SSHS will complete and submit a Safety Stand-Down report to the USACE PM and SHM, documenting key discussion points and the date, time, and names of those in attendance. 8.3 NOTIFICATION OF MAJOR ACCIDENTS In the event of a major accident, work-related illness, or near miss (near hit), the subcontractor will immediately notify the SSHS. This includes lost-work time cases, lost work-day cases. In the event of a fatality, or if three or more are injured from a particular incident, OSHA must be notified within 8-hours. In the event of a fatal injury, a permanent total disability, a permanent partial disability, an incident where three or more people are hospitalized from a single occurrence, or a property damage of $200,000 or more, the SSHS will notify the USACE PM immediately of the event, reporting will follow the procedure described above. 8-2
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 9.0 MEDICAL SUPPORT 9.1 ADDRESS AND DIRECTIONS TO HOSPITAL See Appendix G for the address and detailed directions to the hospital. 9.2 ON-SITE MEDICAL SUPPORT It shall be the policy of TEI to have first aid kits on hand at areas most accessible to employees and in the proximity of those areas where accidents are most likely to occur. Each site or location will be responsible for keeping the first aid kits adequately supplied. First aid kits will be provided at a ratio of one for every 25 employees or less. The SSHS will ensure that first aid kits are available on the worksite and that these locations are known to all employees on the premises. Checks of the first aid equipment will be made as part of the ―Work Areas Inspection Checklist‖ (Form 15). As a measure to provide immediate first aid attention to personnel who suffer minor injuries, at least two selected site personnel are trained in first aid (if the site has more than one person present). The First Aid/CPR trained individuals include the FSM and the Jobsite Foreman. 9-1
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 10.0 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT 10.1 EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITY No single combination of PPE can protect field personnel from all hazards. The use of PPE can create significant worker hazards, such as heat stress, physical and psychological stress, and impaired vision, mobility, and communication. Nonetheless, field personnel must be prepared to upgrade their PPE if an unexpected hazardous situation is encountered. Careful pre-entry planning, anticipation of worst case conditions, and caution during field operations are imperative to an effective PPE program. The employee is responsible for wearing appropriate PPE in operations where there is exposure to hazardous conditions, or where need is indicated to reduce hazards. Head Protection Hard hats in good condition are required to be worn during working hours. (with the bills worn forward) Hard hats that have been altered by drilling or cutting the shell are not permitted to be worn. Metal hard hats are not permitted. Eye Protection Safety glasses with hard side shields are required to be worn during work hours. Goggles are required when handling corrosives, sawing, grinding, and chipping with power tools. Burning goggles are required for all burning and gas welding operations. Lenses shall have a No. 3 density minimum. Shoes Safety toe boots are required for use by all workers. All safety toe boots shall meet nationally recognized standards. Workers are encouraged to keep their boots in good repair. Boots with worn heels or thin and worn soles are encouraged to have them replaced. No sandals or tennis shoes are permitted. Foot protection (guards) will be worn when using tampers, jackhammers and similar equipment. Hearing Protection Hearing protection will be worn in areas that exceed 85 decibels. Respiratory Protection Respiratory protection requirements are described in detail in the Total Engineering, Inc. Respiratory Program as found in the Total Engineering, Inc. Corporate Health & Safety Plan and Procedure Manual, Safety Operating Procedures. Basic rules of respiratory usage are listed below: Facial hair that interferes with a satisfactory fit of the mask-to-face seal is not allowed on personnel required to wear respirators. 10-1
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland The proper type of respirator will be worn when working near hazardous or toxic conditions. Dust masks may be considered in dusty conditions. Respirator cartridges should be replaced after approximately 8-hours of continuous or intermittent usage, unless otherwise noted. Cartridges used for benzene must be replaced at the start of each shift. Cartridges should also be replaced if they become damaged, after the expiration date is exceeded, if vapor smell breakthrough occurs, or if filters become clogged causing resistance to breathing. Contact lenses may be worn when respiratory protection is required, in conjunction with additional eye protection to protect against particles or splashes, provided there is no interference with the respirator seal. Respirators shall be cleaned and disinfected after each day’s use or more often, if necessary. The appropriate organic vapor cartridge will be used for protection against benzene and naphthalene vapors. A 3M-P100 particulate filter will be used to protect against polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (oil-based) particulate contaminants and asbestos fibers. Prior to donning, respirators will be inspected for worn or deteriorated parts. Emergency respirators or self-contained devices will be inspected at least once a month and after each use. After donning, personnel should perform daily positive and negative pressure fit-checks to determine if a good seal has been achieved. The employees will be familiar with all sections of the established Respiratory Program found in the Total Engineering, Inc. Corporate Health & Safety Policy and Procedure Manual. Jorge Colindres will be the Program Administrator (please see credentials in Appendix B). Other Full face shields are required when handling molten materials, i.e. lead, tar, etc. or acids. Gloves should be worn when handling equipment and materials. When handling chemicals, solvents, acids, etc. the proper type of rubber or plastic coated gloves should be used. Full-Body Safety harnesses shall be worn and secured when working on suspended scaffolds, flat roofs without guardrails within six (6) feet of the edge or roof opening, and at elevated work locations where guardrails or other motion stopping systems are not provided. Any employee exposed to vehicular traffic must wear warning vests of high visibility material. 10.2 MONITORING AND INSPECTIONS Photoionization detector (PID), combustible gas indicator (CGI), direct-reading instruments, and detector -tube readings measured in the employee's breathing zone will be used to determine if a change in the level of protection is required. 10-2
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland Upgrading to higher levels of protection will require additional personal sampling using standard methods established by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) or OSHA for the collection and analysis of airborne contaminants. If readings exceed the range for the level of protection indicated, personnel should withdraw and not return until an appropriate level of protection has been achieved. Upgrading protection shall be communicated to the PM, who will convey this information to the project SHM. 10-3
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 11.0 PLANS 11.1 LAYOUT PLANS See Appendix C. 11.2 EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANS Emergency procedures, a map and directions to the hospital, along with emergency phone numbers are included in Appendix G of this APP. Copies of those emergency procedures will be kept in the project trailer, all TEI site vehicles, and provided to personnel in charge at the site. Emergency information will also be included in any site- specific addenda. When the emergency signal, consisting of three repeated long blasts of the job whistle, is sounded, all employees shall immediately cease work, secure all equipment, and proceed directly to the designated assembly points (General Contractor’s trailer or the FSM work truck, please see Appendix G) and remain there until further instructions are assigned by the FSM. The FSM/SSHS (Lee Dial) shall immediately notify the TEI Project Manager and the USACE project manager of any accident/incident. Rescue and medical duty responsibilities are to be determined only by trained and competent personnel. If the extent of injuries can be treated by first aid medical attention, then a first aid certified person would administer medical help. In the event of rescue, immediate notification of the SSHS, FSM, and the Project Manager will be initiated. The competent person will evaluate the circumstances and appropriate rescue action will take place if action can be accomplished without endangering employees. If rescue can be conducted safely by trained competent person or person’s onsite, then such action will take place. If rescue is determined to require additional assistance, then emergency medical service or Fire Department rescue personnel will be notified and dispatched to the jobsite. Employees have been trained to immediately contact or notify their immediate supervisor and/or foremen. Supervisors/foremen have been trained as the ―competent person‖ to react to an emergency situation. The SSHS must be notified of the situation as soon as possible to help lead appropriate immediate action. The FSM/SSHS shall be responsible for conducting at least one test every calendar year of the emergency response procedures under this plan including procedures for spills and fires. 11.2.1 Spill Plan If hazardous or unknown potentially hazardous materials are unexpectedly discovered during project work activities, workers will evacuate and secure the area (to keep out unsuspecting personnel), and call for assistance being careful not to get exposed to the material. The SSHS and, depending on the size of the spill, the Project Manager shall be contacted. For large spills of hazardous materials, a Hazardous Materials Response team may need to be contacted to limit exposures to site personnel and/or the community. The SHM (Jorge Colindres) will report any spills or hazardous substances releases and he will follow up with complete documentation. He will immediately notify the 11-1
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland Contracting Officer and Facility response Personnel in addition to the required reporting channels. Each employee, who may be potentially exposed to hazardous substances or spills during the course of their work, is provided with hazard communication training during the New Employee Indoctrination. The project manager is responsible for ensuring that Total Engineering project employees have been trained. If hazardous or unknown potentially hazardous materials are unexpectedly discovered during construction activities, workers will evacuate and secure the area. We may also need to contact a Hazardous Materials Response team for large spills of hazardous materials. When spill occurs, contain spill by isolating the spill area to prevent, further contamination, removed contaminated soil and dispose of it accordantly in accordance with 40 CFR 68, 40 CFR 302, 40 CFR 355 and EM 385-1-1; these regulations shall be follow at all times. The jobsite shall be equipped with at least two complete sets of spill kits. If a spill cannot be contained, Jorge or Lee will inform the safety department and 911 explaining the details of possible contamination. Fuel tanks will be used and stored on site (need approval from the Corps), and maintenance will be performed on site. Onsite management and storage of fuel, lubricants and oil will be performed in accordance with all Federal, State, Garrison and local laws and regulation. The contaminant prevention plan is closely linked to the spill control plan. Total Engineering will transport its generated hazardous waste off Government property within 60 days in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Transportation laws and regulations. The contaminant prevention plan will be updated as new hazardous materials are brought onsite or removed from the site. Total Engineering will maintain all facilities constructed for pollution control within our scope of work, while onsite, as long as our operations creating the particular pollutant are being carried out or until the material concerned has become stabilized to the extent that pollution is no longer being created. Please refer to the attached Material Safety Data Sheets. 11.2.2 Hazardous Materials Hazardous materials (even as small as one ounce) must not be commercially shipped or transported without being properly packaged, labeled, marked, placarded, and accompanied by appropriate shipping papers. Personnel who engage in packaging, 11-2
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland labeling, marking, placarding, or transporting hazardous materials must be trained and aware of the Department of Transportation (DOT) requirements for hazardous material transportation. Hazardous materials include those materials, substances, and wastes listed in the Code of Federal Regulations Title 49. 11.2.3 NATURAL HAZARDS The following precautions will be observed during severe weather (e.g., tornadoes, high winds, thunderstorms, and hail): Upon notification that an evacuation is in progress, all company personnel and visitors will immediately proceed to their designated assembly location. If lighting is occurring, stop outdoor work and move indoors, or stay inside a moving vehicle (do not continue to linger outdoors). Shut down and move away from heavy equipment. • The SSHS will take a head count. • Any visitors should remain with the group, if feasible. • All personnel will stay assembled until further instructions are received. However, it is important to note that in some emergencies, employees must deviate from these instructions. Use common sense. For example, if smoke is present, employees need to begin evacuating even if the alarm has not been sounded. If smoke is present, stay below smoke while evacuating. Tornadoes • Check the weather forecast before arriving at the site phone number for the National Weather Service (NWS) at Baltimore, Maryland (703) 996-2200, ext. 1, or on the Internet at www.ncdc.noaa.gov. • The daily safety tailgate meeting will include specific directions about procedures to be taken in the event of hazardous weather conditions. • If work is allowed during a tornado watch, the SSHS will periodically check the NWS updated weather forecast and notify site personnel as to any changes in weather conditions. • If a tornado warning is issued by the NWS, or a funnel cloud is seen by site personnel, the SSHS will be notified and all work will be stopped. All personnel will then evacuate the site. • If no warning is received and a funnel cloud is fast approaching, the SSHS will notify all site personnel to seek shelter at the nearest building available. If an adequate shelter is not found, remain away from the windows and possibly under a table until the tornado has passed. If it is not possible to safely find shelter, employees should seek safety under a heavy piece of equipment that offers protection from falling debris. Severe Weather • Check weather forecast before arriving at the site. • Shut-down operations in the event of lightening. • The daily safety tailgate meeting will include specific directions about procedures to be taken in the event of hazardous weather conditions 11-3
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 11.3 HAZARD COMMUNICATION PROGRAM 11.3.1 General Information Hazard Communication Program In compliance with the OSHA Hazard Communication standard, the following written Construction Hazard Communication Program has been established for TEI and this project. Any questions regarding this program, or help needed in implementing this program, should be directed to the TEI SHM. The written program will be available in on-site for review by any interested employee. Where a work site is included in an area known or suspected, to contain hazardous materials, a Hazardous Area Work Permit (HAWP) will be included in the specifications. The contractor shall post a copy of the permit in full view at the work site. The contractor shall be responsible to inform all his personnel and assure they conform to the special requirements directed by the permit. This conformance shall be monitored by the installation DSHE. Non-conformance shall result in a work stoppage until the situation is corrected, at no expense to the Government. Continued instances of non- conformance may result in contract termination. Hazardous materials include, but are not limited to, National Priority List (Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), chemical surety materials, hazardous chemicals, carcinogens, asbestos, explosives, etc. These hazardous materials may be encountered at work sites at Aberdeen Proving Ground. When an HAWP is not included with the specifications, the work site is in an area not known or suspected to contain hazardous materials. However, during operations such as excavation or demolition, materials may be uncovered which could be hazardous (e.g. asbestos). If contractor personnel should encounter materials, either known hazardous materials or unrecognized materials, they should stop work in that area immediately, and notify the Installation Safety Office at 410 436-4839 for work in the Edgewood Area, and the COR. Work may be resumed after identification of the material, and notification of work constraints, if any, caused by the materials. 11.3.2 Container Labeling The TEI SSHS will verify that all containers received for use will: • Be clearly labeled as to the contents, • Have the appropriate hazard warning written on the label, • List the name and address of the manufacturer on the label. 11.3.3 Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) All subcontractors are responsible for notifying the SSHS as to the hazardous chemicals (as defined by OSHA in 1910.1000) they are bringing on-site by using Form 5 ―Hazardous Material Control Report‖. Furthermore, contractors are responsible for providing copies of the MSDS to the SSHS for every chemical brought on site. 11-4
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland The SSHS will be responsible for receiving and maintaining the data sheets applicable to each construction project. Copies of MSDS's for all hazardous chemicals to which employees of this remediation project may be exposed will be kept on-site in the GCs trailer. MSDS’s will be available to all employees for review during each work shift by asking the SSHS. If MSDS’s are not available or new chemicals do not have MSDS’s in the file, immediately contact the SSHS. 11.3.4 Employee Training On Hazard Communication Each employee, who may be potentially exposed to hazardous substances during the course of their work, is provided with hazard communication training by means of a brief overview during the New Employee Indoctrination. A course outline and records of TEI employee training for hazard communication are maintained in the Safety and Health Department. The Project Manager is responsible for ensuring that TEI project employees coming on the site have been trained in hazard communication. The SSHS is responsible for ensuring that subcontractor employees coming on the site have been trained in hazard communication. For further information on training, see Section 6 in this plan titled ―Training‖. 11.3.5 Hazardous Non-Routine Tasks Prior to performing non-routine tasks, such as a confined space entry, the SSHS must be informed of the planned activity and an AHA completed. Upon being informed that a non-routine task will take place, the SSHS will inform the affected employees of hazardous chemicals to which they may be exposed as well as protective measures that may be taken to reduce chance of exposure (i.e. PPE, air testing, ventilation, respirators, etc.). 11.3.6 Informing Contractors Of Hazardous Chemicals On-Site All subcontractors who bring employees and/or contractors on-site are responsible for and required by the work contract to train their employees and subcontract employees in safe chemical handling and to submit copies of the MSDS to the SSHS. It is the responsibility of the SSHS to make the following information available to contractors such as by arranging an on-site training/orientation meeting: Location of MSDS availability for employees’ review, precautions the employees may take to lessen the possibility of exposure by usage of appropriate protective measures, and requirements for container labeling. 11.3.7 List of Hazardous Chemicals The names of chemicals used on this project are located with the MSDS on-site and can be reviewed or copied by obtaining copies of the ―Hazardous Material Control Report‖ (Form 5). 11-5
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 11.4 RESPIRATORY PROTECTION PLAN The Respiratory Protection procedures are discussed under Section 10, Personal Protective Equipment. 11.5 HEALTH HAZARD CONTROL PROGRAM The AHAs (Appendix K) addresses the hazard evaluation for proposed site activities. The AHA is an ongoing process from initiation of the APP to implementation and completion of fieldwork. The SHSS, in consultation with the subcontractors and the USACE Representative, will update the AHA when site conditions or potential hazards change. The updated AHA will be reviewed with all site employees during the daily tailgate safety meeting. Possible health hazards at this work site will be more thoroughly defined through review of completed AHA forms. In general, some primary health and safety concerns during field activities are physical contact with contaminated soil, water, and inhalation of vapors. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) venting from boreholes during drilling and SVE may present an additional concern for explosive atmospheres. Climatic conditions can also present a health hazard to site personnel, especially when wearing PPE. In order to prevent exposure to hazardous conditions, monitoring for the presence of volatile vapors and explosive atmospheres percent lower explosive limit (LEL) will be conducted when knowledge of the site indicates their potential presence. Personnel will also be monitored for heat and cold stress when atmospheric conditions warrant. Employee exposure to the site contaminants may be minimized through engineering and administrative controls, and through the use of PPE. Engineering and administrative controls will be used wherever possible, even if PPE will also be utilized. Exposure control methods will be implemented before any work with contaminated materials is performed onsite, and protective measures will be utilized at all times during soil disturbance or other activities on the work site with the potential to create exposure. These controls include careful materials handling; establishment of work zones; establishment of appropriate housekeeping and decontamination procedures; assignment of the appropriate PPE; and provision of hygiene facilities for personnel hand and face washing. In addition, all personnel must show proof of the appropriate level of training before working on the site. Work zones will be established during all work involving hazardous materials handling, in accordance with the provisions of Section 11.23, see Site Security. Access to the work area will be limited to authorized personnel with the appropriate protective equipment and training. All personnel working in an EZ must perform the required decontamination procedures upon exiting the work zone. Engineering controls for any contaminated materials handling activities shall consist of those methods that produce the least airborne concentrations of hazardous materials, and covering of all potential sources of contaminated vapors. All work activities will be evaluated prior to implementation for their potential to produce airborne hazards, and the appropriate proactive measures will be implemented. Waste will be handled in such a manner to minimize their spread. Contaminated materials will be stored in approved 11-6
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland containers pending disposal. Dermal exposure will be controlled by limiting contact, the use of protective clothing as appropriate, and personal hygiene. Ingestion hazards will be controlled by strict limitation of eating, drinking, and smoking in the EZs, and by rigorous application of decontamination and personal hygiene protocols. Selection and use of hearing protective devices including earplugs and ear muffs will be made based on the measured noise levels in the work zones and will take into account the fit and comfort of the hearing protection devices. Hearing protectors have a Noise Reduction Rating (NRR) as assigned during laboratory testing conditions. The hearing protective devices used on site will have a minimum NRR of 28 or greater (as marked on the hearing protection package). However, this NRR does not take into account the susceptibility of the human ear to hearing loss as reflected by the A-weighted decibel scale, neither does it account for ―real-world‖ conditions that reduce the effectiveness of the devices. The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) 12.6 – 1997 standard describes obtaining this ―real world‖ data on the effectiveness of hearing protectors by using personnel and conditions that simulate field conditions. This data, sometimes called Method B data, is currently available from a limited number of hearing protection suppliers upon contacting the manufacturer. This data will give more information on the actual decibel reduction of the hearing protectors. Therefore, the selection of the hearing protective devices will be made using either field attenuation data (Method B data) for the protectors, such as that supplied by E-A-R Company, or if the field attenuation data is not available, the NRR will be adjusted by a calculation. The calculation involves adjusting the NRR for the A-weighted scale then adjusting with a 50% derating according to the OSHA Technical Manual (http://www.osha.gov). This calculation will be made for the hearing protective devices to determine a more realistic decibel reduction while in use if Method B data is not available. The following formula will be used to adjust the NRR to arrive at a more accurate estimate of decibel reduction: (NRR-7) divided by 2 = actual noise reduction in decibels (dB) Assuming a hearing protective device has an NRR of 28, the above formula would estimate the actual noise reduction of the device to be 10.5 dB. This reduction of 10.5 dB should then be subtracted from the measured noise levels to estimate noise levels impacting the ear. If levels equal or exceed 85 dBA for 30 days or more per year, irrespective of hearing protection, then the employee must be enrolled in the employer’s hearing conservation program. The same applies if a dosimeter equals or exceeds a 50% dose of the American Conference of Government Industrial Hygienists level, equivalent to 82 dBA. 11.6 LEAD ABATEMENT PLAN Please refer to Berg Corporation’s APP. 11.7 ASBESTOS ABATEMENT PLAN Please reference Progress Environmental Site Specific Plan for Asbestos Abatement. Please see Appendix C Figure 3-1 Site Layout for location of Asbestos Containment area. 11-7
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 11.8 ABRASIVE BLASTING PLAN Not applicable. 11.9 CONFINED SPACE PROGRAM POLICY STATEMENT  As part of the installation of underground utilities we will be encountering a confined space area for the work associated with the manhole installation and utilities within. These confined spaces will be managed in compliance with the below detail Confined Space Program.  Every employee shall be properly trained to recognize a confined space hazard. Specific employees who will become the Competent Person shall be properly trained to transform a confined space into a safe work environment. Specific employees who will become the entrant will be properly trained to enter a confined space, once it is made safe. CLASSIFICATION OF EMPLOYEES  Competent Person: One who is capable of identifying existing and predictable hazards in the surroundings or work conditions which are hazardous or dangerous to employees and who is authorized to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate the hazards or remove the employee from the hazardous condition.  Attendant: A specially trained individual stationed outside of a confined space who monitors the authorized entrants inside.  Entrant: An authorized person who enters a confined space.  FSM: A person who is responsible for determining if acceptable conditions are present to enter a confined space.  Stand-by Attendant: When required, a specially trained individual stationed outside of a confined space who will monitor the authorized entrants.  Stand-by Entrant: When required, an authorized person who enters a confined space. POLICY  All employees required to work in a confined space operation must receive specific training and protective equipment prior to entry.  A confined space entry ACTIVITY HAZARD ANALYSIS will be completed, which will communicate and document the specific hazards to all involved employees.  Some examples of confined spaces are: o Tanks and pipelines. o Manholes and trenches. o Building crawl spaces. o Mechanical chases.  The Competent Person will evaluate the space for potential and existing hazards. 11-8
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland  Signs will be posted and the entry barricaded to limit access to the confined space.  When required erect the non-entry rescue system.  The atmosphere in and around the space must be tested for oxygen content, toxic and flammable gases before entry.  Proper personal protective equipment must be identified before entry.  All required tools and equipment to be used in the confined space must be identified and tested before entering a confined space. o Verbal communication will be the primary means of communication for this project unless the competent person deems otherwise. The UXO technician must approve a secondary means of communication (i.e., a range radio). The communication will be inspected before entering into the confined space.  A confined space checklist must be completed before entry.  Unless verified all confined spaces are to be considered as having a toxic atmosphere.  All confined space equipment will be inspected and have current certification before usage. TRAINING (GENERAL)  Training must be completed before any confined space duties are assigned.  When a change in the work presents a new hazard, all employees will require retraining.  Retraining must be provided whenever there are deviations from the confined space entry procedures.  Retraining will be required annually for those employees applicable or if a lack of proficiency is observed or new procedures or equipment are introduced. TRAINING (SPECIFIC)  Competent Person will be specifically trained in the following: o Recognition of hazards. o Hazard elimination. o Implementing an ACTIVITY HAZARD ANALYSIS. o Atmospheric testing. o Erecting signs and barricades. o Ventilation equipment and procedures. o Selection and the use of personal protection equipment. o Employee retraining. o Training Attendants. o Training Entrants. o Training Project General Superintendents. o Site-specific duties and responsibilities.  Attendant will be specifically trained in the following: 11-9
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland o Recognition of hazards. o Constant monitoring of the work area. o Summoning rescue help. o Identifying changing work conditions. o Site specific duties and responsibilities.  Entrants will be specifically trained in the following: o Recognition of hazards. o Site-specific personal protection equipment. o Rescue procedures. o Identifying changing work conditions. o Site specific duties and responsibilities.  Entry FSM will be specifically trained in the following: o Recognition of hazards. o Checking all personal protection equipment, the ACTIVITY HAZARD ANALYSIS and proper personnel. o Coordinating with customer requirements. o Site specific duties and responsibilities. INSPECTION AND STORAGE  The Competent Person must inspect all equipment used for confined space entry.  Equipment that is defective or damaged shall be red tagged (danger do not use) and returned to the Safety Director.  Damaged or defective equipment will be replaced before entry into the confined space.  Confined space entry equipment shall be stored in a manner that will not adversely affect its integrity and in a location that is free of harmful agents. DEFINITIONS  A confined space has the following characteristics: o Its size and shape allow a person to enter it. o It has limited openings for workers to enter and exit. o It is not designed for continuous human occupancy.  A permit required confined space has one or more of the following additional characteristics.  Contains or has the potential to contain a hazardous atmosphere.  Contains a material that has the potential for engulfing or entrapping an entrant.  Has an internal configuration such that an entrant could be trapped or asphyxiated by inwardly converging walls or by a floor that slopes downward and tapers to smaller cross-section.  Contains any other recognized serious safety or health hazard. Permit Required Confined Space Entry Procedures  The PM is responsible for coordinating and regulating the work assignments in a manner that will reduce hazards to personnel entering confined spaces. 11-10
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland  Entry FSM must properly complete a Confined Space Entry Permit.  When there is doubt as to whether or not a particular location requires a permit the SSHS must be consulted.  No deviations from the TEI confined space entry requirements specified in these instructions will be permitted.  For Permit required spaces:  Complete the confined space entry permit.  Assign an entry attendant.  Verify that the means of summoning emergency personal and equipment is available for the entry attendant.  Verify that all requirements of the confined space entry permit are met.  Close-out the permit at the completion of the task assignment.  If a Flammable atmosphere is present and lighting and power requirements cannot be met by the use of battery lights and pneumatic equipment, reduced voltage lighting equipment with a maximum of 12 volts must be used. When lighting is required hardhat lights will be utilized and inspected before entry into confined space.  Unless verified all confined space is to be considered having a toxic atmosphere. General Procedures o The executed Confined Space Entry Permit is valid only for one shift, and for the specified work, location and time period indicated on the permit. o The Confined Space Entry Permit must be posted near the entry point of the confined space. o A secondary method of exit should be considered during the planning stage in order to execute a quick and safe exit should an emergency situation arise during the occupancy of the confined space. o If the confined space is equipped with a grounding cable, a firm mechanical joint should be verified. o All electrical power must have G.F.C.I. protection located outside the confined space. o If plant air is used for pneumatic equipment, it must be verified that inert gases, such as nitrogen, cannot enter the plant air system. o All persons entering the confined space, stand-by attendants and back-up personnel must be instructed in the hazards involved, the precautions to take, the use of protective and emergency equipment and the use of rescue equipment. o At least one Entry Attendant must be at each point being used to enter the confined space. 11-11
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland o The Entry Attendant must have some reliable method of communication for summoning additional assistance. Verbal communication will be the primary means of communication for this project unless the competent person deems otherwise. The UXO technician must approve a secondary means of communication (i.e., a range radio). The communication will be inspected before entering into the confined space. o The Entry Attendants primary responsibility is to be attentive to the personnel inside the confined space. No other duties should be assigned. Isolation Requirements  All energy sources such as pipelines, electrical services, agitators and any other services leading to the confined space must be isolated or made safe prior to personnel entering. Do this by means of the following:  Physically disconnected  Blanked off  Valved off  Locked and tagged Confined Space Atmospheric Requirements  Review of the confined space and its previous contents must be made by the FSM responsible for the work to ascertain that the necessary ventilation, protective clothing, respiratory equipment, emergency stand-by equipment and fire prevention precautions have been specified and provided.  If the confined space has previously been in use and is contaminated, cleaning and decontamination must be performed prior to personnel entering.  Appropriate tests of the atmosphere must be made before entering the confined space. In all cases an oxygen and flammability test will be performed. The test results will be recorded on the Confined Space Entry Permit by the person performing the test, who will initial the permit. The atmosphere inside the confined space must meet the following conditions: o Oxygen (O2): Atmospheric oxygen content must be between 19.5% and 23.5%. o Flammables: Flammable gases and vapors must be less than 10% lower explosion limit (LEL) by volume. o Toxic contaminants: Must be verified and below the permissible exposure level.  If work being performed inside the confined space could generate any toxic or flammable o vapors or produce any oxygen deficient or enriched atmosphere, testing must be done continuously while work is being performed.  Atmosphere testing can only be conducted by an employee who has successfully completed gas detector training for the monitor being used. 11-12
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland  If the atmosphere within the confined space cannot be maintained within the allowable ranges for oxygen content, toxicity levels and flammable limits (as defined above), employees must not enter. Burning and Welding  Burning and welding in confined space entails unusual hazards and a detailed analysis, using the ACTIVITY HAZARD ANALYSIS, must be made of each specific case to insure safe performance of the work.  When burning, welding or heating operations are required in a confined space, either a mechanical method of ventilation (such as a blower) or local exhaust ventilation method (such as an exhaust hood) must be provided to ensure adequate ventilation. When sufficient ventilation cannot be obtained without blocking the means of access to the confined space, employees in the confined space must be protected by air supplied respiratory equipment.  When burning or welding is required in any confined space, the gas cylinders and welding machines must be located outside the confined space.  Hose connections shall be checked for leakage prior to entry into confined spaces.  Hoses shall be removed from the confined space at the end of work, during lunch periods, breaks or whenever all personnel leave the confined space.  Vessels and/or tanks of laminated shell construction should be given special consideration for the possibility of trapped residuals from the previous contents. Emergency Alarms  The Confined Space Entry Permit will be automatically canceled in the event that a major alarm, gas/vapor release, area fire alarm, or plant emergency is sounded, with the exception of a test alarm. When the all clear signal is sounded, the Confined Space Entry Permit can be reinstated or reissued after atmospheric tests are retaken and noted on the permit.  If the alarm is sounded, personnel inside the confined space must exit and follow the site-specific emergency evacuation procedures. Atmosphere Testing  Calibrate air-testing equipment according to manufacturers’ specifications.  Perform a function test of the equipment. Function tests do not replace calibration. o Blow into oxygen sensors to test for oxygen deficiency o Use a known gas concentration to check the combustible gas sensor. o Prior to allowing employee to enter the space, test the air in the space to determine if it is safe to enter by measuring the oxygen level, flammability, and toxicity. 11-13
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland  Air that contains too little oxygen is known as oxygen-deficient. Breathing such air can cause loss of coordination, fatigue, vomiting, unconsciousness and death.  Air that has too much oxygen is known as oxygen-enriched. This is a serious fire hazard.  The atmosphere can contain a high concentration of flammable materials, which can cause the air to burst into flame or explode.  The air can contain toxic materials, which can affect your heart, brain or central nervous system at varying rates. o Conduct pre-entry testing from outside the space, taking samples through a pick hole, or through a slightly opened cover on the downwind side of the space. o If ventilation is being used, turn the system off for your first tests. Then turn it back on and retest the air. o Test all vertical levels of the space – top, middle, and bottom. o Test as much of the space’s horizontal area as you can reach. o If any test shows the air to be unsafe, the hazard must be controlled before anyone enters the space. o Continually monitor Confined Space to make sure the air is safe. o If the task in the confined space involves scraping, scaling, using solvents, or hot-work. The entrant may also use a second monitor. Such monitoring must be done within the workers breathing zones. Ventilation  Ventilate a confined space whenever its atmosphere is hazardous in any of these ways: o The air contains too little oxygen o It contains too much oxygen o The atmosphere is flammable o The atmosphere is toxic  Begin ventilating far enough in advance so that the air will be safe before anyone enters the space. Conduct testing to determine the success of the ventilation effort.  Continue ventilating as long as a worker is in the space.  Keep the exhaust intake close to the work area.  Use local exhaust ventilation to control flammable and toxic materials produced at a single point.  Use general ventilation; also know as dilution ventilation, when contaminants are widely dispersed. This type of ventilation flushes the atmosphere by supplying and exhausting a large volume of air.  Use exhaust ventilation when the atmosphere could be flammable or toxic. 11-14
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland Confined Space Rescue  The Competent Person must develop a site specific confined space rescue plan. Such a plan must be explained to all confined space entry participants. The plan must address the requirements in this section.  The rescue team must be established prior to the entry and the FSM must verify that rescue services are available and that the means for summoning them are operable.  If an onsite Rescue Team is used, the FSM must assure that each member of the Rescue Team is provided with and trained to use the personal protective equipment and rescue equipment necessary for making rescues from permit spaces.  Members of the Rescue Team must also be trained in first-aid and CPR and will assist if any medical emergencies occur during confined space entries.  To facilitate non-entry rescue, retrieval systems or methods must be used whenever an authorized entrant enters a permit space, unless the retrieval equipment would increase the overall risk of entry or would not contribute to the rescue of the entrant. Retrieval systems shall meet the following requirements: o Each authorized entrant will use a chest or full body harness, with a retrieval line attached at the center of the entrant’s back near shoulder level, or above the entrant’s head. Wristlets may be used in lieu of the chest or full body harness if the FSM can demonstrate that the use of a chest or full body harness is unfeasible or creates a greater hazard and that the use of wristlets is the safest and most effective alternative. o The other end of the retrieval line will be attached to a mechanical retrieval device or fixed point outside the permit space in such a manner that rescue can begin as soon as the rescuer becomes aware that rescue is necessary. A mechanical retrieval device will be available to retrieve personnel from vertical type permit spaces more than 5 feet deep. o Whenever conditions exist within a confined space that exposes an entrant to environmental conditions that are Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health (IDLH) or have a possibility of becoming IDLH, a 30- minute Self Contained Breathing Apparatus or a combination airline respirator with a 5-minute escape pack must be immediately available for rescue. 11.10 HAZARDOUS ENERGY CONTROL PLAN (LOCKOUT/TAGOUT) Policy Statement All Employees who may be exposed to energized or potentially energized equipment either on purpose or accidentally, must be properly protected from the energized circuit, equipment and parts or unexpected start-up of that equipment. Energy sources include electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, and other power sources. TEI has a ZERO TOLERANCE for the violation of this lockout tagout procedure. 11-15
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland Classification of Employee Affected Employee: An employee whose job requires him/her to operate or use equipment under lockout/tag out, or whose job requires him/her to work in an area where lockout/tag out is being performed Authorized Employee: An employee who has received proper and documented training in this lockout tagout procedure on the affected equipment. Other Employee: Employee whose work is or may be in an area where lockout/tag out is being implemented. Policy 1. No work shall be performed on or near energized circuits, or where workers can come in contact either deliberately or accidentally with an energized source. If the energized circuit, equipment or part cannot be properly de-energized and locked out and tagged and meet the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.333, then the work must be performed in full compliance with the NFPA 70E Standard. 2. Applying tape, tags without lockout devices and locks or simply tagging the switch, valve, etc. is prohibited. 3. All employees will at all times have a voltage tester to detect voltage and will use it to verify no electrical current is present before beginning any work. Work on energized circuits, equipment or parts is strictly prohibited unless in full accordance with the NFPA 70E Standard. 4. No employee is permitted to remove another employee’s lockout. 5. It is the responsibility of the FSM to ensure that no work is performed on electrical related systems beyond the protection of the installed lockout device, lock and tag. 6. Multi-lock devices must be used if other employees or crafts are involved in the lockout. 7. Every person working on an electrical circuit, equipment or part that has been de- energized, locked and tagged shall have a lock and tag in place on the lockout device. 8. Proper lockout devices, locks and tags will be available when needed or required. 9. In every case the controlling switch, breaker or disconnect means shall be rendered inoperable, locked, properly tagged and tested with an operable voltage tester to verify no electrical current is present before beginning any work. 10. If the lockout of a system must be in place for a long period of time, inspections must be performed after each break, lunch or start of the shift to ensure lockout devices and tags are still in place. 11. Failure to fully comply with this Lockout / Tagout policy will result in immediate dismissal. 11-16
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland Control of Electrical Rooms 1. All electrical rooms will be locked with only qualified individuals having access, marked with ―Danger Electrical Voltage‖ signage or equivalent, which will not be removed until the room’s final inspection and the following conditions are met. a. All electrical work is completed in the room. b. All electrical work is complete which originates or is controlled in the room. 2. The signage will include a list of all employees authorized to work in the electrical rooms along with the names and cell phone numbers of the following employees. If another trade or an unauthorized employee has to access the electrical room they will be escorted at all times by an authorized electrician. Training 1. All employees onsite must receive training on the lockout/tag out procedure at least annually, before implementing the procedures on the project and in the event this policy is revised or when a change in machinery, equipment or process presents new hazards. 2. Every employee will receive initial LOTO training during the New Employee Orientation process. 3. FSMs shall receive training to assist in the identification of potential hazards, training of employees to perform proper lockout/tag out, supervise the locking out of equipment and the process to re-energize any electrical circuit, equipment or part. 4. All authorized employees shall have the authority to halt work in the event of an unsafe situation that may expose our employees or other affected workers to potential hazards or risks. 5. Lockout/tag out training will be conducted on each project with every employee prior to energizing the permanent power or prior to beginning tasks in existing electrical gear requiring the implementation of the lockout/tag out processes. Any employee arriving on site after this training has been conducted shall be trained by the FSM before being allowed to work on site. Energy Isolating Devices (Tags) 1. Tags used in the lockout / tag out process must be standardized in such a way to serve as a prominent warning, i.e., DANGER - DO NOT OPERATE. 2. The tag must have informational spaces available for: a. Authorized employee name b. Division name c. Date / Time d. Contact number e. Each person shall have their own lock and tag applied to the lockout device. 3. The tag shall be applied to the lock either by a tie-wrap or by running the lock shaft through the grommet hole on the tag. 11-17
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 4. Tags may be re-used, only if all information is clearly removed from prior use. 5. Alterations of tags or use of the tags for other than this procedure is prohibited. Energy Isolating Devices (Lockout Devices) 1. Multi-lock hasp devices shall be used when 2 or more persons need to lockout an electrical circuit. 2. Breaker lockout device, lock and tag shall be used on all breakers, rendering them inoperable that have been opened for the purpose of performing work under the requirements of the lockout /tagout procedure 3. Toggle switch lockout device, lock and tag shall be used on all toggle switches including light switches and motor switches, rendering them inoperable that have been placed in the ―off‖ position under the requirements of the lockout / tagout procedure. 4. Cord lockout devices, locks and tags shall be used on all cord caps that in the event a cord plug has been disconnected as a requirement of the lockout / tagout procedure. Lockout / Tagout Procedure The following steps should be taken to implement the lockout / tagout procedure: 1. Notify the Owner / General Contractor, other trades and all employees on the project that may be affected. 2. Identify and verify all energy sources applicable. 3. Turn ―off‖ the equipment (remove and/or disconnect the energy source). 4. Test the ―on‖ switch/control, on the equipment, to confirm the energy source has been removed. Turn the switch back to ―off‖. 5. Lockout/block-out the energy sources; using lockout devices, locks and appropriately completed tags. 6. Test lockout devices to be sure re-energization is not possible. 7. Using a volt meter test all circuits, equipment connections and parts where work has to be performed to verify the electrical energy has been shut off. (The volt meter should be tested on a know energized circuit to verify it is working properly) 8. Begin and complete work. 9. 11.11 CRITICAL LIFT PLAN The ―Crane Operations Report‖ (Form 7) must be completed prior to bring any crane on the site. 11.12 CONTINGENCY PLAN FOR SEVERE WEATHER In the event of severe weather procedures in the SHSP will be followed. In the event that severe weather approaches, all personnel shall shut down field 11-18
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland operations and take shelter. All facility personnel must understand the Emergency Response and General Evacuation Procedures for their location. This information will be provided during the New Employee Indoctrination. Employees must also know the correct exits to use for all areas they enter and the assembly point locations. Note that not all emergencies are the same. In some cases, employees will have to follow a procedure that is different from the facility evacuation plan. Be certain to train and drill employees in this need to exercise common sense above all in emergency situations. 11.13 ACCESS AND HAUL ROAD PLAN Prior to the construction of any access or haul roads, the subcontractor must complete the ―Access and Haul Road Plan‖ (Form 6) A Site Specific Traffic Control Plan has been developed for the project (please see Appendix E). This has been submitted to USACE for approval prior to roadway construction. All traffic control devices shall conform to the latest edition of MUTCD and Maryland’s Supplements. Road shall be standard width of 12’. The speed limit is 25 MPH unless otherwise posted. Lower limits are posted in certain locations. The speed limit when approaching or passing troop formations is 10 MPH. Passing troop formations in your lane of traffic is prohibited. Radar and other enforcement devises are frequently used Use of non-hands free cell phones while operating a moving vehicle is prohibited. The following guidance applies when operating motor vehicles or equipment: • The driver is responsible for the safety of passengers and cargo stability. • Seat belts will be worn at all times. • Obey all speed limit and other traffic signs. • Motor must be shut off during refueling. • Personnel must be properly seated in vehicles before moving. • A flagman should direct the backing of a vehicle in congested areas. • Only licensed drivers will be allowed to operate company vehicles. • All machinery and equipment shall be operated by qualified personnel and authorized personnel. • Inspections shall be conducted regularly and certified to be in safe operating condition. Trenches will be backfilled, plated, or fenced off during non-working hours. When applicable, pedestrian controls should be addressed. Access to driveways will be maintained at all times unless other arrangements are made. 11-19
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland TEI will replace all striping removed or damaged. All flaggers must if required be ASST Certified and adhere to all of Maryland’s Standards for flagging. TEI will maintain all traffic control devices 24 hours per day and 7 days per week prior to start of work. Permanent paving to be completed upon completion of the project, the extent of paving shall be as defined in the pavement repair details for the project. TEI will designate and submit the name of the onsite Traffic Manager to USAMRICD Project Manager 5 business days prior to start of work. Off-Site Disposal All removed, dismantled or demolished material and/or equipment including rubble, scrap and debris not specified or indicated to be Government salvaged, reinstalled under this contract or otherwise retained for disposal on Government land will become the property of the Contractor and shall be promptly removed from the site and disposed of by the Contractor at his own expense and responsibility. Off-site disposal shall be coordinated and approved by the DSHE-EMD (Directorate of Safety, Health and Environment-Environmental Management Division) through the Contracting Officer. No burning of debris and rubbish on Government property will be permitted at any time. Disposal of Spoil (Fill Material) The Contractor shall dispose of all uncontaminated earth material on post. The material shall be segregated into two types, topsoil and clean non-organic soil. Topsoil must be free of all root material. Topsoil shall be hauled by the Contractor to stockpile areas designated by the Directorate of Installation Operations (DIO); clean non-organic soil shall be hauled by the Contractor to areas designated by the DIO. Soil found to be contaminated shall be disposed of by the Government. Arrangements for all disposal shall be made through the Contracting Officer. Designated disposal areas for non- hazardous fill will be within 5 miles of the Project site. 11.14 DEMOLITION PLAN PURPOSE AND SCOPE Purpose This procedure provides the minimum requirements for creating and maintaining safe operations on this site for underground pipe demolition. Demolition of the Cheveron houses will be performed by The Berg Corporation, please refer to the Project Demolition Plan for further demolition activities that will occur during the Early Site Work. Scope 11-20
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland This procedure applies to all TEI personnel and subcontractors working on projects where pipe demo and line breaking safety requirements are applicable. REFERENCES Title 29, Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 1910 and 1926, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), U.S. Department of Labor. APPENDIX Appendix F Line Breaking Permit & Pipe Demo Checklist GENERAL Definitions  Blank / Blind Flange - the solid plate or ―cap‖ which completely covers the bore of a pipe, line, etc. The blank / blind must absolutely close the line, pipe, etc., must be capable of withstanding the maximum upstream pressure and be fabricated from compatible materials.  Double Block and Bleed - two locked and tagged closed valves with a locked and tagged open drain or vent between them.  Energy Isolating Device - a mechanical device that physically prevents the transmission or release of energy including, but not limited to, the following: A manually operated electrical circuit breaker, a disconnect switch; a manually operated switch by which the conductors or a circuit can be disconnected from all ungrounded supply conductors and, in addition, no pole can be operated independently; a slide gate; a slip blind; a line valve; a block; and any similar device used to block or isolate energy. The term does not include a push button, selector switch or other control circuit type devices.  Equipment Isolation Log - the form used to identify the equipment, work to be done, energy sources, locks and tags applied and those giving the authorization. It may serve as the individual, job specific Lockout / Tagout Procedure.  Equipment Owner - the Department in whose area the work is being performed. Note: This is usually the department responsible for operation or use of the equipment.  Hot Work - any work such as welding, burning, cutting, grinding or other activity that could act as a source of ignition.  Normal Production Operations - the utilization of a machine or equipment to perform its intended production function. 11-21
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland  Slip Blind - a metal disc with a short handle which is used to block the flow of material in a pipe. It is to be slipped between two flanges and bolted in place. RESPONSIBILITIES  FSM is responsible for implementing and enforcing this procedure.  The FSM is responsible for monitoring compliance with this procedure.  The FSM, who initiates/directs work, is responsible for ensuring the following:  All workers have been educated in the hazards associated with the specific demo or line breaking operation.  All workers have been trained in the proper use of all personal protective equipment being used or required.  Reviewing the isolation and line entry plan or SOP’s developed by the Project Manager or Equipment Owner, then visually inspecting the work site ensuring all isolation valves are closed, confirming locks and tags are applied to all isolation and drain valves in accordance with Lockout / Tagout procedure and ensuring drain and vent valves are secured in the open position.  Determining the location of the nearest safety shower and eye wash station and checking its operation.  Reviewing the entry permit with the Project Manager or Equipment Owner. If any concerns arise they must be resolved prior to signing the permit.  Obtaining the personal protective equipment specified on the Line Entry Permit.  Assuring the workers have the current training for the specific equipment to be used.  Assuring workers are physically capable of using the equipment.  Signing the permit and returning it to the Project Manager or Equipment Owner for posting at the work site.  Upon completion of the work, verifying that the work area has been left in a safe, clean condition and that craftspersons have signed off the permit.  The Employees/Craftspersons performing the work are responsible for:  Reviewing and signing the Line Entry Permit and Equipment Isolation Log prior to beginning work. If there is any question concerning the safety of the plan, the issue(s) must be resolved prior to starting work. 11-22
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland  Placing their personal locks and tags on all required locations.  Inspecting and testing all Personal Protective Equipment. Ensuring defective personal protective equipment is not used and reporting any discrepancies to the supervisor.  Determining the location of the nearest safety shower and eye wash station and checking its operation.  Treating any line or piece of equipment as full, under pressure or containing product. Requiring that the following actions be taken for any breaking activity:  Assuring there is a free and clear escape route from the work location.  Performing a review of the system to be isolated. The review should include a field and document review to determine the following: a. Line content b. Direction of flow c. Isolation points near to the work site d. Pressure release points e. Low point drains & high point vents f. Determine any lock out requirement that may apply g. Fill out and sign any permits required h. Plan for any spillage that may occur i. Determine any barricading or area protection required j. Determine the required personal protective equipment for performing the line entry k. Developing a formal Equipment Isolation Log based on the system information. l. Directing area personnel to close all isolation valves and open all vents and drain valves, prepare the equipment in accordance with the plan and apply ―DO NOT OPERATE‖ Tags and any required locks in accordance with the TEI Lockout / Tagout Procedure m. Performing an inspection of the system to be opened or entered and completing the Equipment Isolation Log and Line Entry Permit with special emphasis given to ―Methods of Isolation‖ and ―Personal Protective Equipment.‖ n. Discussing the potential hazards with each supervisor of personnel who will be performing the entry into the system. o. Signing and issuing the permit to the supervisor of personnel performing the work. 1. PROCEDURE  Identify and mark the lines or process equipment to be opened, the work to be done and any hazardous materials that may be involved. An MSDS must be available and kept at the jobsite when working with known hazardous chemicals. 11-23
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland  Shut down and depressure the equipment according to Standard Operating Procedures (SOP’s).  Drain, vent and / or purge and prepare the equipment as per the equipment specific SOP’s.  Assuring any spill recovery and safety equipment required by the plan is available for use.  Providing containment for liquids and solids that may still be in the system.  Determine how the equipment can be isolated, locked and tagged. Isolations of the line or process equipment should be done as close to the work area as possible.  Complete the job specific Equipment Isolation Log, noting how the equipment has been isolated, locked and tagged.  Implement the lockout / tagout procedure.  Verify equipment isolation and lockout / tagout. Rod out any drains or bleed valves to assure they are not blocked or plugged.  Select and inspect the PPE. Take defective PPE out of service.  Inspect the area above, below and adjacent to the work area (at least 35 feet in all directions) for any potential hazards, people, equipment or operations that could adversely affect the work to be performed or could be adversely affected by the work. Take the appropriate precautions (i.e., barricade the area, cover equipment and cable trays, stop all hot work, etc.)  Locate and verify accessibility and operation of all area safety equipment (i.e., safety showers, potable water, SCBAs, fire detection and suppression equipment, etc.)  Complete the Line Entry Permit review it with craftspersons that will perform the work and post the permit at the work site but only after it has been signed by all appropriate personnel.  Loosen only one bolt at a time starting with the bolt down and away from the workers. Be prepared for a sudden release of the piping content and be prepared to re-tighten the flange if necessary.  Do not remove the required PPE until it is certain the line is completely drained and vented. Lines will sometimes ―burp‖ several minutes after the line is opened. 11-24
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland  Install any required blinds or blank flanges. Blinds must be of the correct materials of construction and pressure rating. Pressure ratings for blanks and blinds must be equal to or grater than the pipe / equipment pressure rating. Nuts and bolts must also be of the correct materials of construction, temperature rating and tensile strength. Gaskets required for the job must be of the correct size and materials of construction.  When installing blanks or blinds, install all the required bolts / studs and nuts and torque them according to the job specific SOP.  Upon completion of the job, clean up the work area, notify the maintenance supervisor, sign off and return the permit, remove personal locks and tags and sign off the Equipment Isolation Log. 11.15 EMERGENCY RESCUE – TUNNELING Not applicable. 11.16 UNDERGROUND CONSTRUCTION FIRE PREVENTION AND PROTECTION PLAN Not applicable. 11.17 COMPRESSED AIR PLAN Not applicable. 11.18 FORMWORK AND SHORING ERECTION AND REMOVAL PLANS Not applicable. 11.19 JACKING PLAN LIFT SLAB PLANS Not applicable. 11.20 SITE SAFETY AND HEALTH PLAN FOR HAZARDOUS, TOXIC, OR RADIOACTIVE WASTE Not applicable. 11.21 BLASTING PLAN Not applicable. 11.22 DIVING PLAN Not applicable. 11.23 PLAN FOR PREVENTION OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE AND SITE SECURITY TEI prohibits the use, possession or distribution on the project site of any of the following by TEI employees and by subcontractor employees: alcoholic beverages, intoxicants, narcotics, illegal or unauthorized drugs (including marijuana), simulated drugs and related drug paraphernalia. 11-25
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland Employees must not report for duty under the influence of any drug/alcohol that may in any way adversely affect their working ability, alertness, coordination, response or adversely affect the safety of others on the job. For purposes of this program, influence shall be presumed for any individual whose drug or alcohol level exceeds applicable testing levels. All employees who work on the project will provide evidence of a negative drug/alcohol screen no later than the time of safety orientation prior to commencing work and will be required to submit to a post injury drug test. Such test will be administrated at the time of when the injured worker receives medical treatment. TEI will not perform random drug testing however, lower-tier subcontractors to TEI may utilize a random testing program. TEI and its subcontractors shall not allow employees who are found to be using alcohol or drugs illegally to remain on the project. TEI and its subcontractors will determine when the employee in violation can return to the project or be permanently removed. Subcontractors must submit their drug and alcohol programs to TEI for evaluation or they will be required to adopt the drug and alcohol program of TEI. If a subcontractor chooses to adopt the TEI program, a notice must be made in writing to TEI. TEI will periodically check with subcontractors to evaluate the compliance of the submitted drug and alcohol program. Legally prescribed drugs may be permitted on premises or work locations, provided the drugs are contained in the original prescription container and are prescribed by an authorized medical practitioner for the current use of the person in possession. Legally prescribed drugs must not affect working ability, alertness, coordination or response of the person taking the medication. Site Security This section presents work zone designations and site security procedures. The site is located within the boundaries of the Aberdeen Proving Ground Edgewood Base, and all applicable security provisions will be followed by workers. Additional restrictions within the overall site will consist of establishment of exclusion zones (EZ) at each area where contaminated materials are handled, Decontamination Zones for equipment and personnel cleanup, and Support Zones. Exclusion Zones The active work areas around the area where contaminated materials are encountered or may be exposed will be considered EZs. The EZs will be established to accommodate all equipment, personnel, and vehicular movement where the potential for exposure to hazardous materials exists, such as exposed UXO, support truck operations, waste handling, etc. The EZs will be modified, as necessary, as the work progresses at a specific location. The EZ will be demarcated by barricades, warning tape, temporary construction fence, or other appropriate measures, as well as signs posted in English/Spanish and, if appropriate, in any other language necessary for all workers and visitors to clearly understand. Access to these areas will be limited to authorized 11-26
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland personnel with the appropriate protective equipment, who have met the training and medical requirements, as specified in the appropriate sections of this APP, appropriate for their work effort. Personnel working in these areas will check in and out of the area, and utilize the buddy system. Site activities in the EZ will stop if unauthorized personnel enter the area and work will not resume until those individuals have exited the area. Eating, drinking and smoking will be prohibited in these zones in order to prevent inadvertent ingestion of contaminated materials. Decontamination Zones Decontamination zones will be located immediately adjacent to each EZ. All site personnel working in the EZ must pass through the Decontamination Zone before proceeding to the Support Zone. PPE cleaning and storage areas will be included in the Decontamination Zone. Equipment and vehicle decontamination areas will be located immediately adjacent to the work area, in a manner that prevents tracking of contamination from the source location to other areas. A temporary equipment decontamination wash pad will be constructed as necessary; all wash water will be collected for disposal. Support Zone Support Zones will be established outside the Decontamination Zone. Eyewash, first aid kits, fire extinguishers, potable water, emergency communications and sanitary facilities will be maintained in the support zone. The Buddy System The two-person or buddy system must be used at all times for entry into the exclusion zone. The buddy system requires workers to assess and monitor their buddy’s mental and physical well being during the course of the workday. A buddy must be able to:  Provide assistance  Verify the integrity of PPE (when required)  Observe partner for signs and symptoms of heat stress, cold stress, or contaminant exposure  Notify other personnel in the work area if emergency assistance is needed.  Workers must be able to see or hear and effectively communicate with their buddy at all times when in the exclusion zone. 11.24 FALL PROTECTION AND PREVENTION PLAN All subcontractors are required to complete and submit to the TEI FSM the ―Fall Protection Report‖ (Form 10). This form will identify all subcontractors who may be expected to work at heights above 6 feet that are unprotected from falls (including tree work) and will therefore need to implement a Fall Protection Plan (Please see Appendix H, Total Engineering, Inc. Health & Safety Plan and Procedure Manual) that must be submitted to the SSHS prior to working at heights. Furthermore, the AHA shall state if 11-27
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland fall hazards are expected and the method of fall protection to be used. The Fall Protection Plan will be prepared by a qualified subcontractor employee and may be unique for each subcontractor due to the tasks and situations they may be performing. The plan shall include fall protection and prevention systems, equipment and methods employed, responsibilities, rescue and escape equipment and operations, training requirements, and monitoring methods. The plan may need to be revised depending on site conditions and the length of the project. Please find Modular Genius AHA and Fall Protection Plan in Appendix K. Provide standard guardrails and toeboards at all work platforms above six (6) feet from lower levels or ground level. 11.25 STEEL ERECTION PLAN Not applicable. 11.26 NIGHT OPERATIONS LIGHTING PLAN Not applicable. 11.27 SITE SANITATION PLAN Clean drinking water, a sanitary container for the paper cups and waste receptacle for the used cups shall be provided. If workers choose, they may bring their own personal water jugs/thermos. A portable hand wash facility or other suitable hand washing facilities will be made available to workers on site, as necessary. Sanitation Facilities Adequate sanitary facilities will be provided on construction sites for employee use. Sanitary facilities will not be located in the public right-of-way or closer than five feet from a side or rear property line. Sanitary facilities will be screened and/or located in a location that is the least visible to adjacent properties. Non-sewered portable toilets will be available to workers during the ―active construction process‖. If there are inactive construction periods of one month or more when no workers are on sites served by the unit, toilets will not be provided during such times. Portable toilets will be placed at least one hundred (100) feet from any body of water and installed in such a way as to insure that there is no possibility of a spill or run-off into any body of water. Portable toilets will be screened and/or located in a location that is the least visible to adjacent properties. Property containing portable toilets will be maintained in a sanitary and odor-free condition at all times. Toilets at construction jobsites. Toilets shall be provided for employees according to the following table: Table D-1 11-28
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland Number of employees Minimum number of facilities 20 or less . . . . 1 20 or more . . . . 1 toilet seat and 1 urinal per 40 workers. 200 or more . . . . 1 toilet seat and 1 urinal per 50 workers. 11.27.1 CONTROLS AND DISPOSAL OF SOLID WASTE Solid waste will be picked up and placed in containers as generated. All waste containers shall be emptied by the contractor on a regular basis, as to prevent over- flowing conditions. All handling and disposal will be conducted in such a fashion as to minimize secondary contamination by overflow or spillage during waste transfer. HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT Disposal of investigation-derived waste (IDW) shall occur according to the site work plan and in accordance with Federal, State, and Local regulations. HAZARDOUS WASTE MANIFESTS Hazardous waste manifests will be generated for the drummed waste if required by regulation. SEWAGE All sewage will be disposed of through connections to established sanitary systems. Where such systems are not available, chemical toilets or comparable effective units will be used with collected wastes periodically emptied by means of a sanitary pumping service. No conditions shall be allowed to exist where noticeable odors are present. CHEMICALS AND CHEMICAL WASTE Chemicals are not anticipated as a part of this project or its supporting activities. However, in the event that a chemical is put into use in some form (after submittals and approvals from project manager are obtained), the following procedures shall be followed: • All chemicals shall be dispensed ensuring no spillage to the ground or water. Periodic inspections of dispensing areas to identify leakage and initiate corrective action. • All activities and inspection shall be documented. • Chemical waste shall be collected in corrosive resistant containers. • All chemical containers shall be investigated to assure chemical compatibility with the medium to be collected. • Collection drums shall be monitored and removed to a storage or staging area 11-29
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland when contents are within 6-inches of the top. • Wastes shall be classified, managed, stored and disposed of in accordance with Federal, State, and local laws and regulations. • TEI and its subcontractors shall refuel vehicles or equipment in designated areas only. Any fuels brought on-site by the contractor shall be in approved, self- closing, leak-proof, steel containers. These containers (if any) shall not be stored on-site overnight and shall be removed at the end of each workday. During the workday, any fuel containers brought on-site shall be restricted to the Contractor’s storage container located in the designated staging area (if applicable). • No lubricant exchange or transfer operations shall be conducted on-site by TEI personnel or its subcontractors. WASTEWATER DISPOSAL • Wastewater generated during the course of field activities, such as development and purging water, and decontamination water shall not be allowed to enter any waterways or to enter any storm drain system. Any generated wastewater shall be treated to remove any contaminants prior to discharge, or shall be captured, stored and removed from the facility as potentially contaminated wastewater. • No wastewater shall be disposed of without compliance with all Federal, State, or local laws and regulations. GARBAGE DISPOSAL • The contractor will place all generated garbage in an appropriate container and arrange for disposal by means of contracted vendor or, the garbage will be disposed of by TEI field personnel at a designated trash receptacle. Garbage is considered solid investigative derived waste and will include gloves, paper towels, and plastics. Soil and groundwater is not to be included under this category. 11.28 FIRE PREVENTION PLAN TEI and all subcontractors shall comply with all fire prevention measures prescribed in the installation fire regulations, a copy of which is on file in the office of the COR. A written fire permit shall be obtained by the contractor for use of open flame devices, such as blow torches, portable furnaces, tar kettles, or gas and electric welding and cutting equipment from the Fire and Emergency Services Division (F&ESD), of the Directorate of Safety, Health, and Environment (DSHE). The contractor shall be liable for any fire damage to Government property attributable to negligence on the part of the contractor, including failure to comply with fire prevention measures prescribed by terms of this contract. Contractors may call the F&ESD at (410) 436-0572/0573 for on-site inspection, or report to Building 2200, Aberdeen Boulevard, to receive specific fire 11-30
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland instructions if in the Aberdeen Area. Edgewood Area contractors should call (410)436- 4451 or 436-4452, or visit Building E-5180. Permits will be valid for a period of one month and are renewable. The Procedures will be followed to prevent unplanned burning of dry grass, residual vegetation, and structures at the Replacement Facilities Site and the C-Field site. Vehicles driving over dry, tall grass/weeds will be limited. Smoking will only be allowed in designated smoking areas. Perform a pre-work survey to determine potential fire hazards, sources of ignition, hot spots, and location of exits. Coordinate this with the number of workers to be in the area, the square footage, and the types and amount of combustible/flammable materials that will remain on-site. Some protective clothing will burn and melt quickly. It can shrink, adhere to skin and drip as it burns. Heavy black smoke is a combustion by-product. Polyethylene (which is combustible) will start to burn slowly and pick up speed as more heat is generated. It gives off heavy black smoke as the fire progresses. Flame spread is slow and steady. Sheeting should be kept away from heat sources as transformers. (Polyethylene should not be allowed to contact surfaces of about 1,500 Fahrenheit.) To avoid fire problems while working at the Replacement Facilities Site and the C-Field site, the following should be enforced (if applicable): • Ensure that all sources of ignition are removed. Be sure that gas and other fuel sources are cut off and pilot lights in boilers, heaters, hot water tanks, compressors, etc. are extinguished. • Strictly enforce no smoking, eating or drinking, inside the work area. • When using an oxygen/acetylene torch to cut pipe, etc., post a fire watch with an appropriate fire extinguisher, such as pressurized water. Do not use CO2, extinguishers in confined or enclosed spaces. Dry chemical extinguishers are effective, but the powder is a respiratory irritant. • When using a cutting torch, know what is on the other side of the wall and below the floor. Use sheet metal or a treated tarp to catch sparks. • Reduce to a minimum the amount of flammable/combustible materials inside a space prior to hanging plastic. This includes removal of any chemicals, flammable liquids, heat-sensitive materials, etc. • Mark exits from work area and post directional arrows when exits are not visible from remote work areas. This can easily be done using duct tape on the polyethylene walls and barriers. • Keep trash and debris to a minimum (i.e., tape, poly bags, lumber, etc.). • A daily inspection should be conducted, to insure secondary exits are not blocked. • Lighting of exits and exit routes should be provided. • In case of fire, the fire hazard becomes more immediate than the environmental 11-31
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland hazards and workers may need to violate the routine protective barriers. This should be covered with workers in the emergency action plan for the job site. • Be alert for flammable vapors in industrial areas (solvents such as naphtha, toluene, xylem, etc.). • A telephone should be available at all times for notification of authorities in an emergency. • Post local fire department and rescue squad phone numbers. Advise them of operations in progress. • Ensure that you have a monitor outside at all times trained in emergency procedures. Someone should be trained in first aid, and in the treatment of heat stress. • Fire extinguishers shall provided on all construction equipment, or within 75’ of equipment location. • Storage of small quantities (5 gals). 11.29 SILICA EXPOSURE REDUCTION PLAN All subcontractors are required to complete and submit to the site FSM Form 11, ―Silica Exposure Reduction Report‖. This report will identify possible operations in which subcontractors may encounter silica. If such potential exposure situations are identified on the form, then the subcontractor must detail the methods and procedures they will use to prevent silica overexposures. Crystalline (free) silica may cause silicosis and lung fibrosis. The primary route of exposure to silica is by breathing airborne dusts. The Threshold Limit Value (TLV) for silica is 0.05 milligrams per cubic meter of air (mg/M3). This limit is based on an 8- hour, time-weighted average exposure. Subcontractor must take measures to ensure that they produce no silica dusts that approach the TLV, unless the work area is isolated and all exposed personnel are wearing personal protective equipment, including appropriate respiratory protection. Personnel working around silica dusts should have periodic medical examinations, including a chest x-ray and be medically cleared to wear a respirator. If respirators are used, subcontractor must submit a respiratory protection plan. Saw-cutting of concrete requires wet methods or some type of dust collection system with an in-line HEPA (High Efficiency Particulate Air) filter to collect the dusts. Breaking of concrete must be controlled to prevent dusts. Visible dusts from a concrete cutting/breaking activity are not acceptable and must be stopped immediately until dust control measures can be implemented. Sandblasting or other activities should not use crystalline silica sand. 11.30 HEAT AND COLD STRESS Training The SHSS will have received training developed by the American Red Cross in first aid 11-32
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), including training in heat-related illnesses. Workers should be capable of recognizing and treating the signs and symptoms of heat stress conditions. During potential heat stress conditions, ice should be readily available to rapidly cool victims. Body Fluid Replacement Water will be made available at the Site for employee fluid replacement. When heat stress is determined to be a problem by the SHSS, employees will be provided with balanced, electrolyte solutions to replace fluid and electrolyte loss. Employees will be provided with replacement fluids at a minimum rate of 8 ounces each half hour per person. Environmental Monitoring Heat Stress and heat strain are conditions resulting from environmental factors including temperature, relative humidity, radiant heat transfer, and air movement, as they are affected by clothing. The primary objective of the heat stress management program is to prevent heat stroke which is life threatening and the most serious of the heat-induced disabilities. Rest Breaks When heat stress conditions are applicable, all rest breaks should be taken out of the zone of exclusion into a cooler, shaded, rest area. If these conditions are not available, more frequent rest breaks will be taken. Medical Monitoring Always monitor sign and symptoms of heat-stressed workers. When water vapor impermeable clothing is worn, exposure to environmentally induced or activity induced heat stress will be discontinued for a person when: • Sustained heart rate is greater than 160 beats per minute for those under 35 years of age; and 140 for 35 years or older. • Deep body temperature is greater than 38 degrees centigrade (°C) or 100 degrees Fahrenheit (°F), or • There are complaints of sudden and severe fatigue, nausea, dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting, or • There are periods of inexplicable irritability, malaise, or flu-like symptoms, or sweating stops and the skin becomes hot and dry. Procedure The employee's pulse rate will be used to monitor their individual response to environmental and internal heat load. To measure the heart rate (pulse), have the individual employee monitor their radial pulse by counting the number of pulse beats in a 10-second time span, multiplying the number of pulse beats counted by six to calculate the pulse rate in beats per minute, and comparing the results with the chart 11-33
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland below. This monitoring program will become effective when the ambient work area temperature exceeds 77°F. The pulse rate will be monitored at the beginning and end of each shift and during each rest break. Pulse Rates between 60 to 90 beats per minute are considered normal and regularly scheduled work hours are recommended. For unacclimatized workers, the lower pulse rate from each range should be used for the first 2 weeks. COLD STRESS MONITORING This procedure applies to all employees who perform fieldwork in cold environments at risk of cold stress injury. Environmental Monitoring Frostbite and hypothermia are two types of cold injury that personnel must be protected against during the performance of field duties. Two factors influence the development of a cold injury: • Ambient temperature • Wind velocity The SHSS will monitor environmental conditions by recording ambient temperature and Heart Rate 90-100 100-110 110-120 120-130 130-140 140-150 Above 150-180 Work Time >8 hr 8 hr 2 hr 1 hr 30 min 15 min 4-6 min (continuum) estimated wind-speed. Information contained in Tables 8-1 and 8-2 will be used to evaluate the possibility of hypothermia among workers on-Site. Protective Clothing and Rest Breaks Using appropriate cold weather protective clothing when temperatures are at or below 40°F exposed skin surfaces must be protected. These protective items can include facemask, hand wear, and foot wear. Workers handling evaporative solvents during cold stress conditions will take special precautions to avoid soaking gloves and clothing because of the added danger of prolonged skin contact and evaporative cooling. Personnel will wear protective clothing appropriate for the level of cold and planned physical activity. The objective is to protect all parts of the body, with emphasis on the hands and feet. Eye protection against a glare and ultraviolet light will be worn in snowy and icy conditions. The work rate should not be so great as to cause heavy sweating that could result in wet clothing. If heavy work must be done, opportunities for rest breaks will be provided where workers have the opportunity to change into dry clothing. Conversely, plan work activities to minimize time spent sitting or standing still. Rest breaks should be taken in a warm, dry area. Windbreaks can shield the work area from the cooling effects of wind. Identification and Treatment of Cold Stress 11-34
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland When frostbite, hypothermia, or other cold stress symptoms are suspected, treat the patient to relieve symptoms or transport them to the medical facility. Training TEI workers have been trained in cold stress as part of their First Aid & CPR training. Site workers will receive refresher training by the SHSS in cold stress safety and health procedures. The training program will include, as a minimum, instruction in the following areas: • Proper first aid treatment • Proper clothing practices • Proper eating and drinking habits • Recognition of impending frostbite • Recognition of the signs and symptoms of impending hypothermia or excessive cooling of the body when shivering does not occur. 11.31 DUST CONTROL TEI shall assure that positive dust control is exercised during this project. Dust generation shall be minimized by use of a constant water stream wetting the concrete during any saw-cutting activities. All efforts to minimize dust generation with water spray shall be expended. The use of heavy equipment during the excavation activities and the stockpiling of soils from the Replacement Facilities Site to C-Field may create dust emissions. TEI personnel will implement the following dust abatement measures to preclude the spread of dust during site activities:  Dust producing operations, such as excavation, transportation of fine materials, and demolition will be curtailed when wind speeds exceed 15 mph.  A street sweeper and/or water-based dust suppressant will be sprayed during dust producing operations to minimize the creation and dispersion of dust.  Trucks carrying rubble and contaminated debris off-site will be covered and sealed to control dust release and have a double positive-locking mechanism on the tailgates.  Construction entrances will have a pad of aggregate underlain with filter cloth.  Speeds on haul roads will be at a set rate to minimize the generation of dust; if significant levels of dust are generated on haul roads then the roads will be sprayed with water or a water-based dust suppressant mist. The effectiveness of the dust control will be evaluated and monitored visually. The SSHO will be responsible for ensuring that dust control practices are being utilized effectively and will regularly monitor the air for particulates at the site boundary. During work activities, dust control will be a top priority to protect personnel and members of the public from contaminant exposure. 11-35
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland The main dust generating activities are: excavation, soil processing, demolition, stockpiling of the treated material, and hauling. Soil Excavation Phase Dust abatement measures (i.e., water spraying) will be implemented to preclude the spread of dust whenever necessary. Soil will be kept damp, but not wet. There will be one water truck on-site for the purpose of dust suppression. To avoid the generation of clouds of dust, the maximum drop height between the excavator bucket and truck beds will be kept to a minimum (approximately one foot). The effectiveness of the dust control activities will be evaluated and monitored visually. If soil has to me stock piled it will be covered to prevent the infiltration of precipitation and windblown releases of soil and dust. 11.32 EXCAVATION AND TRENCHING PLAN Policy Statement All employees engaged in site operations or activities requiring entry into, or work around excavations on site will be properly instructed on and protected from the hazards associated with excavation work. Classification of Employee 1. Competent Person: One who is capable of identifying existing and predictable hazards in the surroundings or work conditions which are hazardous or dangerous to employees and who are authorized to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate the hazards or remove the employee from the hazardous condition. a. Lee Dial will be the competent person onsite (See Appendix B) b. TetraTech will be the competent person onsite for UXO clearance. c. CTI has determined the type soil. For the purposes of this USAMRICD project all soil will be classified as Class ―C‖. 2. Safety trained: An employee trained by a competent person to recognize the hazards associated with trenching and excavation operations. Policy 1. No employee is allowed to enter an excavation deeper than four (4) feet unless an adequate protective system is in place. 2. The maximum depth an excavation can be is 20’-0‖ without a Registered Engineer’s design and approval. 11-36
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 3. Shoring must be provided in all excavations over 4’-0‖ in depth (and up to 20’-0‖ without a Registered Engineer’s design and approval), where benching or sloping is not used. 4. Benching or sloping (depending on soil type) must be used for all excavations over 4’-0‖ in depth (and up to 20’-0‖ without a Registered Engineer’s design and approval), where shoring is not used. 5. It will be necessary to call-in to the FSM/SSHP when working in: 6. A shored excavation deeper than 4’-0‖ in depth. 7. An excavation over 6’-0‖ and is benched or sloped. 8. Utility companies or owners must be contacted to establish the location of the underground utility installations. Be sure you receive a confirmation number. 9. Employees are prohibited from entering an excavation until the Competent Person has completed an inspection and completes a Daily Excavation Checklist along with a Soil Typing Checklist. Such an inspection must take place before the start of work each day and as necessary throughout the shift. 10. While the excavation is open, existing underground utility installations shall be protected, supported or removed to protect all employees from the possible structural failure of the unearthed existing utility. 11. TEI competent person must obtain the certification of UXO clearance before excavation commences. TEI will have Tetratech as the "competent person" on site during all excavations. This is to include inspections, removing and/or handling of MEC/UXO. If at any time during excavations the competent person suspects the presence MEC/UXO all operations will stop and TEI will evacuate the area until the competent person has cleared the area to resume excavation operations. 12. All surface objects that may present a hazard to Employees by rolling or falling into an excavation shall be removed or secured. Excavated or other material and equipment shall be kept at least three (3) feet from the edge of excavations or behind retaining devices sufficient to prevent material or equipment from falling or rolling into the excavation. 13. Adequate barricades providing physical protection shall be provided at all excavations. All wells, pits, shafts, etc. must be barricaded or covered. 14. Where oxygen deficiency (less than 19.5%) or a hazardous atmosphere exists or could exist, the atmosphere in the excavation shall be tested before Employees enter excavations. 15. Employees shall not work in excavations in which there is accumulated water, or which water is continually accumulating unless the proper precautions have been taken. 16. Except in stable rock, excavation below the level or base of footing of any foundation or retaining wall shall not be permitted unless the wall is underpinned 11-37
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland and all other precautions taken to ensure the stability of the adjacent walls and the safety of Employees involved in the work. Underpinning Slab on grade and footing 17. For excavations greater than twenty (20) feet deep, the SHM must be notified and a Registered Professional Engineer must design and approve any support/shield systems to be used. 18. If protective shoring equipment is going to be utilized the FSM/SSHS must be notified. 19. A stairway, ladder, ramp or other safe means of access and egress shall be located in excavations that are three (3) feet or more in depth, so as to require no more than twenty-five (25) feet of linear travel for employees. a. Ladders must extend 36 inches above the point of support at the top of the excavation. b. The Competent Person shall design structural ramps used solely by Employees. c. Step ladders will not be used as a safe means of access or egress. Trench Length of 50 feet Maximum. Egress Ladder positioned at Midpoint. Trench Depth of 11-38 3 feet Minimum
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 20. All soil classifications will be Type ―B‖ or Type ―C‖. Although the testing of the soil could result in giving the soil a Type ―A‖ soil classification, TEI will not recognize the soil as Type ―A‖. Soil tested and found to have the properties of Type ―A‖ will need to be reclassified as Type ―B‖ or lower. Subcontractors 1. It is the responsibility of TEI to implement safe work practices on all of our projects to ensure the safety of all Employees (TEI and other Contractor’s Employees). This safety procedure should be part of our sub-subcontract agreement to sub-subcontractors and they will be required to follow our safety procedures or (when approved by the SHM) their safety procedures for excavation. Training 1. The Competent Person must be properly trained in the following: a. Identify soil classifications. b. Identify existing and potential hazards. c. Develop a safe work plan using Job Hazard Analysis. d. Design a safe means of access and egress. e. Design barricades. f. Insure benching, sloping or shoring is adequate. g. Test atmosphere 2. The Employee must demonstrate an understanding of excavation training prior to being allowed to work in an excavation. 3. Training must be documented. The Employee’s name, date of training, and person conducting the training must be submitted to the SHM. 4. Retraining is required if a lack of proficiency is observed, new equipment is introduced, or jobsite conditions change. Inspection 1. The Competent Person shall make inspections of excavations, the adjacent areas, and protective systems: a. Before any Employees or equipment are allowed to enter an excavation. b. Before the start of work each day. c. Following a rainstorm or other weather related event. d. Changing work conditions throughout the shift. 2. The Daily Excavation Checklist is to be used to record inspection activity. 3. The Competent Person must also determine whether the excavation is also a confined space, and what additional requirements shall apply. 4. Where there is any evidence that indicates a possible cave-in, failure of the protective system, or other hazardous condition, employees shall be removed 11-39
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland until the Competent Person can inspect the situation, and proper precautions have been taken. Excavation Procedures 1. All Employees will be protected with personal protective equipment for the protection of head, eyes, respiratory organs, hands, feet, and other parts of the body as required. 2. Requests for utility outages must be in writing (E-mail is preferred) and received by the Directorate of Installation Operations (DIO) at least 21 days in advance. Give location, type of utility, date, time and duration of requested outage (See layout plan in Appendix C). Request will identify the individual who will be responsible for the outage. Requests without an identified responsible party will not be processed. Requests must be forwarded to the DIO through the Contracting Officer. 3. Within 48 hours prior to opening an excavation, contact the local Underground Utility Locating services, receive the confirmation number and wait until all underground is located and marked. And obtain the appropriate digging permit. Call Local Utility Underground Locating Service 3. While the excavation is open, existing underground utility installations shall be protected, supported or removed to safeguard Employees. 4. Excavated or other material and equipment shall be kept at least three (3) feet from the edge of excavations or behind retaining devices sufficient to prevent material or equipment from falling or rolling into the excavation. 3 5. In many instances excavations are considered confined spaces. If this is the case, all parts of both the excavation and the confined space entry procedures must be followed (See Confined Space Entry 12.10 of this plan). 11-40
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 6. Where oxygen deficiency (less than 19.5%) or a hazardous atmosphere exists or could exist, the atmosphere in the excavation shall be tested before Employees enter excavations. 7. Adequate precautions shall be taken to prevent Employee exposure to oxygen deficiency or hazardous atmospheres. These precautions may include providing proper respiratory protection or ventilation. 8. Periodic testing shall be conducted to ensure all potentially hazardous atmospheres remain safe. 9. Emergency rescue equipment such as breathing apparatus and safety harness and lifeline shall be readily available where hazardous atmospheres exist or may be expected to develop. An Attendant shall attend this equipment (See Confined Space Entry Procedure 12.10). 10. Employees entering bell-bottom pier holes or other similar deep and confined footing excavations shall wear a harness with a lifeline securely attached. The lifeline shall be individually attended at all times. 11. Employees shall not work in excavations in which there is accumulated water, or which water is continually accumulating unless the proper precautions have been taken. a. Precautions include support or shield systems, water removal to control the level, and use of a safety harness and lifeline. b. When used, a Competent Person must monitor water removal equipment. 12. Except in stable rock, excavation below the level or base of footing of any foundation or retaining wall shall not be permitted unless the wall is underpinned and all other precautions taken to ensure the stability of the adjacent walls and the safety of Employees involved in the work. Underpinning Slab on grade and footing 13. Physical barricades must be placed around all excavations. 11-41
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 14. If the Operator of mobile equipment adjacent to or near the edge of an excavation does not have a clear view of the edge of the excavation, a warning system such as barricades, stop logs, or hand signals shall be used. If possible, the grade should be slopped away from the excavation. 15. Employees outside of excavations and exposed to vehicular traffic shall be provided with and wear reflectorized or highly visible warning vests. It will be mandatory for every employee to wear a warning vest when working within 10’-0‖ of a roadway, whether the roadway is active or not. 16. No person shall be permitted under loads handled by lifting or digging equipment. 17. All excavating work, regardless of the depth, must have the prior approval of the project FSM/SSHP. 18. The possibility of flammable or toxic gases settling in low places of excavations must be assessed before entering excavations or doing hot work such as welding or cutting. 19. Where Employees or equipment are required or permitted to cross over excavations, walkways or bridges with standard guardrails shall be provided. 20. Adequate barricades providing physical protection shall be provided at all excavations. All wells, pits, shafts, etc. shall be barricaded or covered. The covers must be able to withstand the weight of any person and or vehicle that may walk or drive over the cover. 21. Upon completion of operations, temporary wells, pits, shafts, etc. will be promptly and adequately back filled. 22. Each soil and rock deposit on this project shall be classified by the Competent Person as Type ―C‖ in accordance with the definitions set forth in this safety manual and documented on Daily Excavation Checklist and Soil Typing Checklist. 23. Soil classification by a Competent Person must be based on at least one visual and at least one manual analysis. Such analysis shall be conducted by using tests described in the soil analysis section, which was summarized from the Code of Federal Regulations (29 CFR 1926.652). 24. A stairway, ladder, ramp or other safe means of access and egress shall be located in excavations; 11-42
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland a. Which are three (3) feet or more in depth. b. No more than 25 feet of linear travel for employees. c. Step ladders will not be used as a means of access or egress. d. Ladders must extend 36 inches above the point of support at the top of the excavation. 25. If structural ramps are required, the FSM/SSHS will approve all ramps designed by a Competent Person. 26. When excavating marked existing utilities probing and hand digging will be required within three (3) feet of the marked utility. Hand dig to uncover the entire existing utility. 3’-0‖ 3’-0‖ 3’-0‖ Hand dig and probe zone Underground Utility Locating Procedure No utility services shall be interrupted by the Contractor to make connections, to relocate, or for any purpose without approval of the Contracting Officer. Request for permission to shut down utility services shall be submitted in writing (E-mail preferred)to the Directorate of Installation Operations (DIO) through the Contracting Officer not less than 21 days prior to proposed date of interruption. The request shall give the following information: a. Nature of Utility (Gas, L.P. or H.P., Water, Sewer, Etc.) b. Size of line and location of shutoff. c. Buildings and services affected. d. Hours and date of shutoff. 11-43
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland e. Estimated length of time service will be interrupted. f. Services will not be shut off until receipt of approval of the proposed hours and date from DIO through the Contracting Officer. g. Make utility cutovers and interruptions after normal working hours or on Saturdays, Sundays, Government holidays, and other non-working days of the Using Agency. h. Ensure that new utility lines are complete, except for the connection, before interrupting existing service. i. Interruption to water, sanitary sewer, storm sewer, telephone service, electric service, air conditioning, heating, fire alarm, compressed air, and shall be considered utility cutovers pursuant to Section 01 11 00 SUMMARY OF WORK, paragraph "Work Outside Regular Hours." Coordinate such interruptions with the Contracting Officer. j. Operation of Station Utilities: Operation of control devices for Station Utilities will be by Government personnel. The Contractor shall not operate nor disturb the setting of control devices in the station utilities system, including water, sewer, electrical, and steam services. k. Where shutoff of water lines interrupts service to fire hydrants or fire sprinkler systems, the Contractor shall arrange his operations and have sufficient material and personnel available to complete the work without undue delay or to restore service without delay in event of emergency. l. Flow in gas mains which have been shut off shall not be restored until the Government inspector has determined that all items serviced by the gas line have been shut off. (CENAB) Alterations to Utilities Where changes and relocations of utility lines are noted to be performed by others, the Contractor shall give the Contracting Officer in writing advance notice at least thirty days of the time that the change or relocation is required. In the event that, after the expiration of thirty days after the receipt of such notice by the Contracting Officer, such utility lines have not been changed or relocated and delay is occasioned to the completion of the work under this contract, the Contractor will be entitled to a time extension equal to the period of time lost by the Contractor after the expiration of said thirty day period. Any modification to existing or relocated lines required as a result of the Contractor's method of operation shall be made wholly at the Contractor's expense and no additional time will be allowed for delays incurred by such modifications. (CENAB) Utility Location and Markings The Contractor shall contact the installation/DPW and the One-Call Service, a minimum of 14 days and 48 hours, respectively, prior to any excavation requesting utility location markings. The Contractor shall not proceed with any excavation until all utilities, including abandoned utilities, have been marked to the satisfaction of the Contracting Officer. Prior to requesting the marking of utilities, the Contractor shall stake out proposed excavations and limits of work with white lines ("White Lining"). It is the Contractor's 11-44
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland responsibility to ensure that all permits (excavation or otherwise, including DPW permits) are current and up-to-date without expiration. In addition to the above requirements the Contractor shall: a. Visually survey and verify that all utility markings are consistent with existing appurtenances such as manholes, valve boxes, poles, pedestals, pad-mounted devices, gas meters, etc. prior to any excavation. b. Hand dig test holes to verify the depth and location of all utilities prior to any mechanical excavation within the limits of work. Other non-damaging methods for utility verification may be considered subject to approval by the Contracting Officer. Also, verify that any abandoned utilities are not active. c. Preserve all utility markings for the duration of the project to the furthest extent possible. d. When excavation is performed within 2 feet of any utility line, a non-damaging method of excavation shall be used. The non-damaging method shall be hand digging. If construction is parallel to an existing utility, the utility shall be exposed by hand digging every 100 feet if parallel within 5 feet of the excavation. Other non-damaging methods, such as, soft digging, vacuum excavation, pneumatic hand tools, may be considered subject to approval by the Contracting Officer. Obtain excavation permits prior to start of any excavation work from the Excavation Clearance Office at the Directorate of Installation Operations Building minimum 10 calendar days in advance in accordance with Section 01 01 10 GENERAL CONDITIONS. Prior to start of any excavation Work, the Contractor shall have certified Explosive Ordnance Disposal personnel, Tetra Tech NUS, Inc., review the Final Report - USAMRICD Campus UXO Clearance Project, dated December 28, 2007, and inspect and sweep any areas not covered. Refer to Section 02 31 49 UNEXPLODED ORDNANCE (UXO) DETECTION, PRELIMINARY IDENTIFICATION AND REMOVAL COORDINATION. Regardless of the type of excavation, the Contractor shall notify the Contracting Officer a minimum 48 hours prior to any excavation activity. Failure to notify the Contracting Officer can result in the issuance of a "Stop Work" order, which shall not be justification for contract delay or time extension. The Government reserves the right to have personnel present on site during any type of excavation. e. The Contractor's Quality Control System Manager shall ensure that all excavation requirements herein are met at the time of the preparatory phase of quality control, and that the excavation procedures are reviewed during the preparatory phase meeting. This preparatory phase of control shall also establish and document contingency plans and actions to be followed in the event that existing utilities are damaged or interrupted. Locations of shut off or isolation devices along with other safety features shall be established and their operation reviewed. f. Any work other than excavation in the vicinity of a utility, that could damage or interrupt a utility, such as, exterior or interior work near transformers, power lines, poles, above ground gas lines, gas meters, etc., shall be done with extreme care. The Contractor shall specifically note during the preparatory phase of quality control, the construction techniques to be used to preclude damaging or interrupting any utility. This preparatory phase of control shall also establish and document contingency plans and actions to be followed in the event that existing utilities are damaged or interrupted. 11-45
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland Locations of shut off or isolation devices along with other safety features shall be established and their operation reviewed. g. The Contractor shall complete a risk assessment, using the attached checklist, at least one week prior to the start of any excavation or other work in the vicinity of a utility. The risk assessment shall be submitted for government approval prior to any excavation or other work in the vicinity of a utility. A risk assessment shall be completed for each definable feature of work encountering utilities and shall include all utilities anticipated to be encountered. Color Code for Marking Underground Utility Lines Electrical Power Red Gas/Oil Product Lines Yellow Water Systems/Slurry Pipelines Blue Communication Cable Television Dark Orange Sanitary Sewer Systems Green Temporary Survey Markers Pink Reclaimed Water Purple Proposed Excavation White 11-46
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland Soil Classification Definitions 1. Cemented soil: A soil in which the particles are held together by a chemical agent, such as calcium carbonate, such that a hand-size sample cannot be crushed into powder or individual soil particles by finger pressure. 2. Cohesive: To stick together to from a mass. 3. Cohesive soil: Clay (fine grained soil) or soil with high clay content, which has cohesive strength. Cohesive soil does not crumble, can be excavated with vertical side slopes, and is plastic when moist. Cohesive soil is hard to break up when dry, and exhibits significant cohesion when submerged. Cohesive soils include clayey silt, sandy clay, silty clay, clay and organic clay. 4. Dry soil: Soil that does not exhibit visible signs of moisture content. 5. Fissured: A soil material that has a tendency to break along definite planes of fracture with little resistance, or a material that exhibits open cracks, such as tension cracks, in an exposed surface. 6. Granular soil: Gravel, sand or silt (course grained soil) with little or no clay content. Granular soil has no cohesive strength. Some moist granular soils exhibit apparent cohesion. Granular soil cannot be molded when moist and crumbles easily when dry. 7. Layered system: Two or more distinctly different soil or rock types arranged in loose powdery layers or weak planes in rock or shale are considered layered. 8. Moist soil: A condition in which a soil looks or feels damp. Moist cohesive soil can easily be shaped into a ball and rolled into small diameter threads before crumbling. Most granular soil that contains some cohesive material will exhibit signs of cohesion between particles. 9. Plastic: a property of a soil, which allows the soil to be deformed or molded without cracking, or appreciable volume change. 10. Saturated soil: A soil in which the voids are filled with water. Saturation does not require low. Saturation or near saturation, is necessary for the proper use of instruments such as a pocket penetrometer of shear vane. 11. Soil Classification System: A method of categorizing soil and rock deposits in an order of stability Type ―A‖, Type ―B‖, Type ―C‖, in a decreasing order of stability. Base on an analysis of the properties and performance characteristics of the deposits and the environmental conditions of exposure. 12. Stable rock: A natural solid mineral matter that can be excavated with vertical sides and remain intact while exposed. 11-47
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 13. Submerged soil: Soil, which is underwater or is free seeping. 14. Unconfined compressive strength: The load per unit area at which a soil will fail in compression. It can be determined by laboratory testing, or estimated in the field using a pocket penetrometer, by thumb penetration tests. 15. Wet soil: Soil that contains significantly more moisture than moist soil, and cohesive material will slump or begin to flow when vibrated. 16. Solid Rock: Rock void of any fissures, cracks and fractures and with no intermingling layers of soil. Classified as Type ―B‖ Also. TEI only recognizes type ―B‖ soil or lower. 17. Type A soil: Cohesive soil with unconfined, compressive strength of 1.5 ton per square foot or greater. Cohesive soils are clay, silty clay, sandy clay, and clay loam. Cemented soils like caliche and hardpan are considered Type ―A‖ soils. NOTE: No soil is Type “A” if: a. The soil is fissured. b. The soil is subject to vibration from heavy traffic, pile driving or similar effects. c. The soil has been previously disturbed. d. Material that is part of a sloped, layered system where the layers dip into the excavation on a slope that is four horizontal or greater to one vertical. 1 4 or More e. The material is subject to other forces that require it to be classified as a less stable material. NOTE: TEI does not recognize Type ―A‖ soil classification. All soil tested and classified as Type ―A‖ will be reclassified as Type ―B‖ or lower. 18. Type B soil: Cohesive soil with an unconfined compression strength greater than 0.5 ton per square foot but less than 1.5 ton per square foot. Granular 11-48
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland cohesion less soils include angular gravel (crushed rock) silt, silt loam, sandy loam. a. Previously disturbed soil except those classified as type C. b. Soil that meets Type ―A‖ compression strength but is fissured. c. Rock that is not stable. d. The soil is part of a sloped, layered system where the layers dip into the excavation on a slope less than four horizontal to one vertical. 1 Less than 4 19. Type C soil: Cohesive soil with an unconfined compressive strength of 0.5 tons per square foot of less. Granular soils including gravel, sand, and loamy sand. a. Submerged soil or soil that water is freely seeping. b. Submerged rock that is not stable. c. Material in a sloped, layered system where the layers dip into the excavation on a slope of four d. horizontal to one vertical or greater. More than 1 4 Reclassification After classifying a deposit, the properties, factors, or conditions affecting its classification change in any way the changes shall be evaluated by a Competent Person. The material shall be reclassified to reflect the changes. Visual analysis Visual analysis is conducted to determine qualitative information regarding the excavation site in general, the soil adjacent to the excavation, the soil forming the sides of the open excavation, and the soil taken as samples from excavated material. 1. Observe samples of soil that are excavated and soil in the sides of the excavation. 11-49
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 2. Estimate the size, range of the particle and the relative amount of the particle sizes. a. Soil that is primarily composed of fine-grained material is cohesive material. b. Soil composed primarily of coarse-grained sand or gravel is granular material. If soil is clumped together, it could be cohesive - further tests will have to be done to determine that. 3. Observe soil as it is excavated. a. Soil that remains in clumps when excavated is cohesive. b. Soil that breaks up easily and does not stay in clumps is granular. 4. Observe the side of the opened excavation and the surface area adjacent to the excavation. a. Crack-like openings such as tension cracks could indicate fissured material. b. If chunks of soil break off a vertical side, the soil could be fissured. c. Small breaks are evidence of moving ground and a potentially hazardous condition. 5. Observe the area adjacent to the excavation and the excavation itself for evidence of existing utility and other underground structures, and to identify previously disturbed soil. 6. Observe the opened side of the excavation to identify layered systems. Examine layered systems to identify if the layers slope toward the excavation and estimate the degree of slope. 7. Observe the area adjacent to the excavation and the sides of the opened excavation for evidence of surface water, water seepage, or the location of the level of the water table. 8. Observe the area adjacent to the excavation and the area within the excavation for sources of vibration that may affect the stability of the excavation face. 11-50
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland Manual analysis Manual tests of the soil samples are conducted to determine properties of the soil in order to classify the soil properly. 1. Plasticity: Mold a moist or wet sample of the soil into a ball and attempt to roll it into threads as thin as 1/8-inch in diameter. Cohesive material can be successfully rolled into threads without crumbling. For example, if at least a two-inch length of 1/8-inch thread can be held on one end without tearing, the soil is cohesive. 2. Dry strength: If the soil is dry and crumbles on its own or with moderate pressure into individual grains of fine powder, it is granular, (any combination of gravel, sand or silt). If the soil is dry and falls into clumps, which break up into smaller clumps, but the clumps can only be broken up with difficulty, (clay in any combination with gravel, sand or silt). If there is no visual indication the soil is fissured, the soil may be considered un-fissured. 3. Thumb penetration: The thumb penetration test can be used to estimate the unconfined compressive strength of cohesive soils. Type “A” soils can be indented by the thumb, and it can be penetrated by the thumb only with great effort. Type “C” soils can be easily penetrated several inches by the thumb. This test should be conducted on an undisturbed soil sample as soon as practicable to keep the drying effects to a minimum. 4. Other strength test can be obtained by the use of a pocket penetrometer or a hand operated shear vane. Drying test The purpose of the dry test is to differentiate between cohesive material with fissures, un-fissured cohesive material and granular material. The procedure for the drying test involves drying a sample of soil one inch thick and six inches in diameter. 1. If the sample develops cracks as it dries, significant fissures are indicated. 11-51
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 2. Samples that dry without cracking are to be broken by hand. If considerable force is necessary to break a sample, the soil has significant cohesive material content. The soil can be classified as an un-fissured cohesive material and the unconfined compressive strength should be determined. 3. If a sample breaks easily by hand, it is either fissured cohesive material or a granular material. To distinguish between the two, pulverize the dried clumps, if the clumps do not pulverize easily, the material is cohesive with fissures. If they pulverize easily into small fragments, the material is granular. Sloping and Benching The following are examples of how to slope and/or bench different types of excavations starting with one type of soil and then showing layered excavation and how to handle multiple soil types in one excavation. 11-52
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland NOTE: TEI does not recognize Type ―A‖ soil classification. All soil tested and classified as Type ―A‖ will be reclassified as Type ―B‖ or lower. 11-53
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 1. Sloping Excavations in type C soil will be shored, shielded or sloped to form a maximum allowable slope of 1-½ to 1. (for every (4) four feet in depth you must excavate an additional (6) six feet in width). NOTE: Type “C” soil cannot be benched and must be sloped 14’ 2’ 4’ 1-1/2’ 6’ 1’ 2. Benching Excavations in any other type soil will be sloped or benched to form a maximum allowable slope of 1 to 1. (for every (4) four feet in depth you must excavate an additional (4) feet in width). 10’ 2’ 8’ 1’ 4’ 1’ 4’ 11-54
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland Protective Shielding Equipment 1. Shielding or a trench box designed or approved by a registered professional engineer may be used as long as the protection it provides is equal to or greater than the protection provided by the appropriate shoring system. 2. Shielding or a trench box must fit tightly in the trench to guard against shifting to one side in the event of an excavation collapse to prevent injury by pinching employees between the inner wall of the trench box and the installed work. Protective Shoring Equipment 1. Materials and equipment used for protective systems shall be free from damage or defects that might impair their proper function. Manufactured materials and equipment shall be used in a manner that is consistent with the recommendations from the manufacturer. Damaged material or equipment shall be removed from use. 2. Members of support systems shall be securely connected together to prevent sliding, falling, kick outs or other failure. 3. Support systems shall be installed and removed in a manner that protects employees from cave-ins, collapses, or being struck by support members. Removal shall begin at and progress from the bottom of the excavation. Members shall be released slowly so as to note any changes in the stability of the structure or excavation. 4. Components of pre-fabricated systems must be supplied with the manufacturer seal or identification markings, these markings must remain legible. 5. Excavations of material no greater than two (2) feet below the bottom of the support or shield systems are permitted if the system is designed to resist the forces of the full depth. 11-55
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 6. Employees shall not be allowed in excavations when shields are being installed, removed, or moved. 7. All surface objects that may present a hazard to Employees by rolling or falling into an excavation shall be removed or all excavations three (3) feet or more in depth. 8. All excavations three (3) feet or more in depth require a safe means of access and egress. 9. Shoring, bracing, or underpinning shall be inspected daily, or more often as conditions warrant by a Competent Person and the protection effectively maintained. 10. Shields and/or timber shoring may be provided as a means of protection from cave-ins in excavations that do not exceed twenty (20) feet. 11. A Registered Professional Engineer must design shields and/or timber shoring for excavations greater than four (4) feet deep. 11-56
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland Trench and Excavation Emergency Protective systems designed for trenching and excavation work are only as good as the people who built them and use them. Unfortunately trenches collapse when safe work practices are ignored. Trenching and excavation injuries occur when: 1. Shoring is not installed. 2. Shoring is not installed properly. 3. Utilities are not properly marked. 4. Underground services are so old they do not show up on today’s maps. 5. The ground shifts. 6. The ground is vibrated. 11-57
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 7. There is a surprise thunderstorm. Never enter a trench that does not have a protective system in place and following proper trenching and excavation practices will reduce your chance of injury. Trench Collapse If a trench collapses you are in extreme danger. When dirt piles up during a cave-in, it can weigh as much as 3,000 pounds per cubic yard. That means that a worker buried up to the knees may be trapped. Trenches that collapse are unstable and subject to further cave-in and/or flooding. Therefore, if a trench collapses and someone is trapped: 1. Stay calm and use your head. 2. Get out of the trench. 3. Call for emergency assistance. 4. Notify the Competent Person. 5. Note the exact time of the incident. 6. Note the location of the trapped worker(s). 7. Leave any hand tools in place. 8. Shut down all heavy equipment. 9. Stop any nearby traffic. 10. Leave everyone at least fifty (50) feet away from the edge of the trench. 11. Be available to meet the rescue team. 12. The Supervisor or Competent Person must inform the rescue team of: a. The depth of the excavation b. The soil classification c. Approximately how much soil has collapsed? d. The number of workers trapped e. How long the workers have been trapped f. The types of utilities around the trench g. Any additional hazards created by the collapse Cave-in response 1. Do not stay in the trench. You could easily become another victim. The best thing to do is go and report the incident. 2. Do not attempt a rescue. By further disturbing the soil you could trigger another cave-in, trapping yourself and adding additional soil to the other victim. 3. Do not try and dig a cave-in victim out with heavy equipment or hand tools. You can severely injure a trapped person by using a shovel to dig them out. The weight of the soil can throw the victim into a distorted position. If you find 11-58
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland yourself in a collapsed trench with a shovel, plant the shovel vertically near the victim and get out. The rescue team may be able to use the location of the tool to locate a worker covered with dirt. Daily Excavation Checklist and Soil Typing Checklist Worksheets (See Appendices Form 9) The worksheets consist of two operations, first the “Daily Excavation checklist” and then the “Soil Typing Checklist”. 1. Daily Excavation Checklist: This is a worksheet used daily as a checklist to assist in reviewing the conditions in and around an excavation. Provide the information requested on the worksheet and survey each inspection requirement. Enter your initials in the appropriate box… ―Yes‖, ―No‖ or ―N/A‖. 2. Soil Typing Checklist: This is a worksheet used to determine the type soil encountered in the excavation area. Provide the information requested. Both the Visual test and the Manual test are to be used to classify the soil type. After the visual and manual tests are completed, classify the soil as Type ―B‖ or Type ―C‖. Remember, if the analysis merits the soil being classified as Type ―A‖, TEI does not recognize the Type ―A‖ classification and the soil will have to be classified as Type ―B‖ or lower. List the type of protective support system to be used for the excavation. Note: The worksheets are only a guide to analyzing an excavation and not all excavation hazards can be pre-determined and listed. It is the responsibility of the Competent Person and the FSM/SSHP to analyze the upcoming excavation and develop a safe work plan to protect all Employees and the Employees of other trades from cave-ins, falls, crushings and suffocation. 11-59
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 12.0 CONTRACTOR INFORMATION 12.1 EQUIPMENT SAFETY Policy Statement Employees will be trained properly to operate, use and work in and around equipment that has the potential to do physical harm if not handled or operated correctly. Classification of Employees 1. Authorized: An employee trained and assigned to perform a specific type of duty or duties. 2. Competent Person: One who is capable of identifying existing and predictable hazards in the surroundings or work conditions which are hazardous or dangerous to employees and who is authorized to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate the hazards or remove the employee from the hazardous condition. 3. Safety trained: An employee trained by a competent person to recognize the hazards associated with construction equipment. Policy 1. Know how to operate the equipment you are using as per the manufacturers guidelines. 2. Seatbelts will be worn at all times when operating equipment. 3. All equipment must be equipped with an audible backup warning device. 4. Do not use heavy machinery when you are drowsy, intoxicated, or taking prescription medication that may affect your performance. 5. Use only equipment that is appropriate for the work to be done. 6. Inspect your equipment to ensure that it is in good working condition before beginning a job. In addition, ensure that regular inspections and maintenance are conducted as appropriate. 7. Do not stress or overload your equipment. 8. Ensure the following before leaving equipment unattended: a. All buckets, blades, forks etc. are on the ground. b. Transmission is in neutral (if the transmission is an automatic, place in park). c. Engine is off. d. Equipment is secure against movement. 9. Never get on or off moving equipment. 10. Wear hearing protection when operating equipment without a cab. 11. Do not attempt to lubricate or adjust a running engine. 12. Turn the engine off before refueling. 12-1
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 13. Keep all shields and safety guards in place. 14. Avoid underground utilities and overhead power lines. 15. Forklift general operations will comply with: a. Only authorized Employees may operate equipment. b. Do not allow yourself to be distracted while raising or lowering a load. c. If you must stop during an operation, check the exact position of the mast in relation to other material before resumption of activity. d. Do not allow riders. e. Do not raise people on a forklift. f. Do not speed. g. Drive up and back down ramps. h. Do not walk, stand, or work under the elevated portion of a forklift (even if it is not loaded). i. Ensure that the forklift has an overhead barrier to protect the operator from falling objects. j. Always set the emergency brake when leaving the equipment unattended. 16. Backhoe and front-end loaders general operations will comply with: a. Only authorized Employees may operate backhoes and front-end loaders. b. Always operate at a safe speed. c. Travel with the bucket low to the ground. d. Always lower the bucket before servicing the equipment or leaving the loader unattended. e. Use a rigid-type coupler when towing loads. f. Always check with the utility division before digging. g. Be extremely careful when operating near banks and slopes. h. When cutting a bank, be careful not to cause a cave-in. i. Do not drive on an overhang. j. Always set the emergency brake when leaving the equipment unattended. Training TEI, prior to task assignment, must ensure all operators are properly trained in heavy equipment operation. Retraining is required if a lack of proficiency is observed or preceding any incident. Inspection 1. The operator prior to each use must inspect all heavy equipment. a. All inspections will be preformed per the equipment manufactures guidelines. b. Any defective equipment will be repaired or replaced before continued use. 12.2 SCAFFOLDING Scaffolding is not expected on this project. Scaffolds must be erected under the direction of a competent scaffold person. All scaffolding may be required to be tagged by the subcontractor’s designated competent person for scaffolds indicating its suitability 12-2
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland for use. Total Engineering, Inc. shall be notified each time a scaffold is tagged prior to employee use. Tags shall be affixed to the scaffold so they are easily noticeable at each access point. The color coding is as follows: Scaffold Color Project Definition: • Red Unsafe - Do Not Use • Yellow Warning Hazard Exists • Green Ready to Use The scaffold erector’s competent person(s) shall make daily inspections of the scaffolding prior to its use. All findings shall be documented by the subcontractor. Only the erector of the scaffold shall make modifications to the structure. Access ladders are required. Climbing up the side of scaffolding is not permitted unless the scaffold is designed for such use. Subcontractors are responsible for obtaining all permits, licenses and having a registered engineer approve the scaffold when applicable. 12.3 MEDICAL AND FIRST-AID At least two persons on the site will be trained in first aid and adult CPR. Major subcontractors are required to provide first-aid and CPR trained personnel according to their crew size. Emergency phone numbers shall be posted near all job-site phones, and the location of nearest treatment facility shall be discussed at safety meetings regularly. First-aid kits shall be provided and replenished on a regular basis by the company or job-site safety officer. 12.4 PHYSICAL QUALIFICATIONS OF EMPLOYEES All employees are to be in good physical condition when reporting to the job-site. Physical examinations may be required for operators of heavy equipment and cranes. 12.5 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT PPE training is described in Section 10. 12.6 SANITATION The site sanitation plan is described in Section 11.27. 12.7 HARMFUL OR POISONOUS CHEMICAL, BIOLOGICAL, AND PHYSICAL AGENTS Handling of poisons or harmful substances shall be conducted or supervised by qualified personnel. Highly toxic substances shall be used in well-ventilated areas only. MSDS shall be kept on file on the job-site for all hazardous material. Training regarding use of these substances shall be conducted prior to any operations requiring contact with such substances. Suspicion of contaminated or hazardous products encountered on the job-site shall be reported to the foreman or safety officer as soon as possible, who will in turn notify the proper contract authorities. 12-3
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 12.8 LADDERS Policy Statement It is the policy of TEI to insure the safety of all employees who use any type of ladder to perform their work. Classification of Employees 1. Safety Trained: An employee trained to recognize the hazards associated with the use of all types of ladders. Policy 1. Use only approved construction grade ladders. 2. Employees will be trained in ladder safety on an on-going basis. 3. Before using, inspect each ladder for defects such as cracked side rails or rungs, broken rungs, etc. 4. Metal ladders are prohibited. 5. When defective ladders are found, attach a red (danger do not use) tag, remove defective ladders from the work area immediately, return to Construction Support as soon as possible. 6. All Ladders shall be used per manufacturers’ recommendations. 7. Metal ladders are prohibited. 8. When defective ladders are found, attach a red (danger do not use) tag, remove defective ladders from the work area immediately, return to Construction Support as soon as possible. 9. All Ladders shall be used per manufacturers’ recommendations. Training The FSM must ensure that each new employee required to use a ladder in the workplace, can demonstrate knowledge of at least the following: 1. How to select the right ladder for the job intended. 2. How to prevent accidents through usage of engineering controls (guardrails, hole covers, door blocking) work practices, and use of personal protective equipment. 3. Methods and observation techniques used to determine the proper placement of ladders for its intended use. 4. Ladder inspection. 5. Ladder set-up. 6. Nature of fall hazards in the work area. 12-4
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 7. Retraining shall be preformed when a lack of proficiency is observed, when new equipment is introduced, or when changes in the policy and program have been changed. Inspection 1. The FSM must require and enforce that each employee ladders inspect their ladder each day before each use looking for signs of wear, misuse, abuse, deterioration, etc. The inspection should include rungs, cleats, rails, hooks, hinges, and tie-off ropes. 2. All employees are responsible to insure that all ladders remain free of defects. 3. The use of ladders with broken or missing rungs, broken or split side rails, or other faulty or defective construction is prohibited. Ladders with such defects will be tagged with a ―Danger Do Not Use‖ tag and removed it from service . 4. immediately. The ladder must be removed from the jobsite or destroyed. No one is allowed to take a damaged ladder that has been removed form the jobsite home. The damaged ladder must be cut up and destroyed. Compliance Requirements 1. Normally step ladders will be used to provide an elevated work platform and straight ladders to provide access to another work level. 2. Portable ladders must be placed on a substantial level base, and the area around the top and bottom of the ladder shall be kept clear of debris and material. 3. Ladder is to be free of oil, grease, and other slip hazards. 4. Never use ladders exposed to fire or corrosive materials. 5. Never overload a ladder. 6. Always use three points of contact while ascending or descending a ladder 7. Select the correct length ladder for the task. 8. Ladders must not be placed in a horizontal position and used as a runway or scaffold. Only one employee may work from a ladder at one time. If work requires two employees, a second ladder must be used. 9. Never lean a ladder against unsafe backing such as loose boxes or barrels. 10. Employees must face ladder when ascending or descending, and use both hands as part of the three point contact rule. If material must be handled, use a rope to hoist tools or material. 11. Ladders must not be painted. They can be treated only with a transparent non- conductive material and be kept free from dirt or materials that could conceal defects. 12. If a ladder is to be placed where the opening of the door may displace it, the door must be locked or otherwise guarded. 13. Be sure that shoes are not greasy, muddy, or slippery before climbing. 12-5
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 14. Never slide down a ladder. 15. Never use a defective ladder. Attach a red (danger do not use) tag or mark it defective, remove from service immediately and returned to Construction Support. 16. Do not leave placed ladders unattended unless properly secured. 17. Metal ladders or ladders with metal side rails shall not be used. Aluminum will conduct electricity. 18. Employees must use fall protection if they are working on ladders within ten (10) feet of a guardrail. 19. If the work is near a guardrail or fall hazard, it is recommended to set the ladder up with the rungs facing (parallel to) the guardrail. a. If you do experience a fall toward the guardrail and the fall hazard, the ladder will prevent you from falling in the direction of the hazard. b. If the ladder is tipped to one side and you experience a fall, you will fall parallel to the guardrail. 20. Employees must not anchor (tie-off) personal fall protection to portable ladders. Structural components of fixed ladders may be utilized for personal fall protection only when determined by the Competent Person to meet the anchorage requirements (5000 lbs.) of fall protection. 21. Keep your body centered on the ladder do not reach further than arms length from ladder. Keep your belt buckle between the legs of the ladder. Move the ladder as work progresses. 22. Do not extend, move, shift or adjust ladders while in use. 23. Care should be taken while handling large ladders to prevent injuries and building damage. If the ladder is longer than 12 ft have a second person assist.. 24. Employees must face the ladder at all times, with both feet inside the ladder rails. 25. Never use a portable stepladder as a straight ladder by closing it and leaning it against a structure. Straight Ladders 1. Employees cannot work higher than the third (3) rung from top on straight or extension ladders. 2. Straight and extension ladders require non-skid feet. 3. Straight ladders cannot be used unless equipped with non-slip base. 4. Ladders must be placed so the distance from the foot of the ladder to the base of the wall or other support is one-fourth the working length of the ladder 4/1 rule. 5. Portable ladders must be tied at the top and if necessary, anchored at the bottom to prevent displacement. 12-6
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 6. Ladders must be extended at least 36 inches (four rungs) above the landing when used for access to elevated positions. Step Ladders 1. Employees cannot use the top two steps of a stepladder. 2. Step ladders cannot be used as straight ladders. 3. Step ladders must be fully open and spreader bars locked open when the ladder is in use. If possible consider using platform ladders instead of step ladders. Job Made Ladders 1. Single cleat ladders must not exceed 30 feet. 2. Double cleat ladders must not exceed 24 feet. 3. The width of single cleat ladders must be at least 15 inches, but not more than 20 inches, between rails at the top. 4. Side rails must be parallel or flared top to bottom by not more than one-quarter of an inch for each two feet of length. 5. Cleats must be uniformly spaced, 12 inches top to bottom. 6. Filler blocks must be used on the rails between the cleats. 7. The cleats must be secured to each rail with three 10d common wire nails or other fasteners of equivalent strength. 12.9 FALL PROTECTION Fall Protection is described in Section 11.24. 12.10 POWER OPERATED HAND TOOLS Policy Statement Employees will receive proper on the job training in the use of hand, electrical, powder actuated, fuel-powered, pneumatic, and lifting tools and equipment. Employee Classification 1. Qualified person: A person by possession of a recognized degree, certificate or professional standing, or who by extensive knowledge, training and experience has successfully demonstrated their ability to solve or resolve problems relating to the subject matter. 2. Safety trained: An Employee trained by a Competent Person to recognize the hazards associated with the use of hand, electrical, powder actuated, fuel- powered, pneumatic, and lifting tools. 3. Competent Person: One who is capable of identifying existing and predictable hazards in the surroundings or work conditions which are hazardous or 12-7
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland dangerous to employees and who is authorized to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate the hazard or remove the employee from the hazard. Policy 1. Inspect tools and equipment for defects and cleanliness prior to each use. Defective tools and equipment must be red (danger do not use) tagged and immediately removed from the work area. 2. Comply with all PPE requirements specified by the manufacturer. If a face shield is required, basic eye protection must also be used. PPE requirements applicable to the operator apply equally to non-operators assisting with the task. 3. Do not use tools that are stressed, worn or in need of repair. 4. Shut off or disconnect tools from power source before making any adjustments. In certain cases, this may involve implementing lockout procedures. 5. Do not leave hand tools on top of ladders. Most ladders today are equipped with tool holder locations on the top of the ladder. Even though the tools have a holder, when moving the ladder, it will be necessary to remove the tools. 6. Wear tool pouches on the side. Do not carry tools in pants pockets. OSHA regulations recognize carrying tools in pockets is dangerous, especially if tools are sharp or pointed and a citation can be issued for this. 7. Tools should neither be dropped nor thrown from place to place; nor from person to person. 8. Do not use excessive pressure or force on any hand tool. 9. Make sure all portable electrically powered tools are grounded or double insulated to prevent electrical shock. The universal symbol for double insulated is a square within a square and is usually found on the handle of the tool. 10. Use GFCI’s with all portable power generators. 11. Do not use electric cords for hoisting tools. 12. Make sure all air hoses exceeding 2 inch diameter have a Flow Control Valve installed at the source of supply. 13. Pneumatic power tools used for cleaning must not exceed 30 PSI. 14. Do not use air tools to clean clothing or blow dust or dirt out of your hair. 15. Make sure pneumatic power tools are secured to the hose or whip by a positive means to prevent accidental disconnection. 16. Keep hands dry and warm during operation of tools and equipment. Cold reduces circulation in the fingertips. 17. Lightly grasp tools that vibrate excessively. 18. Use the right tool for the right job. 12-8
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 19. Stationary tools designed to be fastened, must be securely mounted to prevent movement or injury. 20. When power tools are designed to accommodate guards, they must be equipped with the guards. Make sure all guards furnished by the manufacturer are in place at all times during use. Training All Employees using tools will be properly supervised in the safe and proper operation of such equipment, by a Competent Person. Retraining is required if a lack of proficiency is observed, or when new equipment is introduced, unless another frequency is dictated by specific Division policies. Inspection and Storage 1. All tools must be kept clean and pass inspection by the user prior to each use. a. Red (danger do not use) tagged. b. Removed from the work area. c. Repaired or replacement as recommended by the manufacturer. 2. Tools must always be returned to their proper storage place after each use. Improperly stored tools can become damaged and create a hazard. 3. Examine extension cords and ground wires for worn insulation, exposed strands of wire and/or missing ground plugs before using. If any of these conditions exist, have the cord repaired properly or replaced immediately. 4. Grinding wheels must be stored in a dry place with constant temperature above freezing and protected from physical damage that could cause cracking. A damaged grinding wheel can come apart in use and send small projectiles into the area around it. The projectiles can be moving at high speeds and may injure a person. 5. Tools must never be left unattended in a place where it would be available to unauthorized persons. Powder Actuated Tools Hilti and Ramset are just two names of powder activated tools. They should all be used with the same respect as a firearm. Remember the following general safety procedures. 1. Only properly trained operators may use powder actuated tools. When properly trained, each Employee will receive training and a card from a Qualified Person, to carry in their wallet as proof of training. 2. Use only approved tools with all built-in safety features including shields or guards that cannot be removed without making the tool inoperative. 3. Tools must be tested to ensure the safety devices are working properly. Defective tools must be red (danger do not use) tagged and removed from service immediately. 12-9
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 4. As a minimum, goggles and hearing protection are required when using any powder activated tool. 5. Rules for Safe Operation: a. Hold tools firmly against and perpendicular (at a 90 degree angle) to the surface of the material. b. Wear hearing protection and goggles when using the tool. This applies equally to those assisting with the task. c. Do not store or use tools and cartridges in explosive or flammable atmospheres. d. Take precautions for the safety of persons in the immediate vicinity. Do not fire the tool until you are sure there is no one behind the surface you are working on in case of accidental penetration. e. Never point a loaded or unloaded tool at another person, and always keep hands clear of the open end of the barrel. f. Always leave tool unloaded until it is being prepared for immediate use. Keep cartridges in the carrying case provided with the tool, and do not allow them to be carried loose in the operator’s pockets. g. Use only the cartridge and load strength recommended by the manufacturer to control penetration. h. Post warning signs in areas where the tool is to be used. The sign shall read: POWDER ACTUATED TOOL IN USE IN THIS AREA i. Use caution when driving fasteners or pins into soft material. j. Drive fasteners a safe distance from the edge of material and in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. Electrical Tools 1. Do not use ungrounded electrical tools, unless specifically approved/marked as double insulating, and not requiring a ground wire. The universal symbol for double insulated is a square within a square and is usually found on the handle of the tool. 2. Do not use electrical power tools with frayed cords. Electrical tape on a frayed cord does not constitute a repair of the cord. 3. Do not operate a machine you are not familiar with. 4. Do not drag cords over sharp edges or run them across aisles where they can be damaged or cause someone to trip. 5. Do not hang extension cords across sharp objects. 6. Do not roll up extension cords while they are energized. 7. Extension cords should be elevated 7’ above ground to avoid tripping hazards and damage to the cord. Use non-conductive material to secure cords. Never use nails or tie wire. 12-10
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 8. Lock out and tag the power supply to machines while repairing or adjusting them. Electrical repairs can only be made by an authorized electrician. 9. Keep machine guards in position at all times. 10. Do not wear loose or torn clothing, gloves, neckties, wristwatches, etc., when working with electrical equipment. Any electrician caught wearing a necktie will be severely punished by being given a raise and promoted to management. 11. Ensure that electrical cords are clear of any moving parts that could snag the cord and entangle it, resulting in damage to the cord and/or equipment. 12. Unplug hand tools before changing parts or attempting adjustments. 13. Do not hoist or lower electrical tools by the cord. 14. Anytime portable electric tools and/or temporary electrical lines (extension cords) are used outdoors/indoors on a construction site, a ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI’s) must be used to protect Employees from electrical shock hazards. PEDESTAL, BENCH, AND PORTABLE GRINDERS 1. WARNING: Remove or secure any loss fitting clothing before using grinders. 2. Wheel rating must exceed the maximum potential RPM of the grinder on which it is mounted. 3. Only manufacturer approved compatible attachments are permitted. 4. Not more than one wheel be mounted between a single set of flanges. 5. All abrasive wheels shall be mounted between flanges which are at least 1/3 the diameter of the wheel. 6. On all portable tools, the control switch shall be instant-pressure controlled without a locking pin. 7. Guards must be installed and maintained. 8. If dust hazards exist, the proper respiratory protection shall be used. 9. Face shield and goggles shall be used. 10. Guards, work rests, eye shields, and other permanent protection devices must not be removed from any grinding or buffing wheels of Pedestal and Bench Grinders. 11. The user is responsible for installing all wheels and determining that they are designed for the speed of the grinder. 12. Dress the wheel, if it is out of true. 13. Grinding must not be forced. 14. If you are using the wire brush wheel, the work piece should be held at horizontal center of the brush. 12-11
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 15. The wire tips should do the work. Forcing work into the brush results in a. No increase in cutting action. b. An increase in wire breakage. c. A tendency for work to become snagged. 16. Small pieces being brushed should be held in a simple jig, pliers or fixture that will prevent the operator’s hand from contacting the surface of the brush. 17. There will a maximum of 1/8‖ space between the grinding wheel and work rest. 18. Do not grind non-ferrous metals. Pneumatic tools 1. When the air source is furnished by gas or diesel compressors keep them outside or vent them to the outside to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning. 2. If you are using a permanent source of air, make sure it is not oxygen. Oxygen mixed with the oil in your air hose and tool will cause an instant explosion and fire. Oxygen mixed with petroleum and 1 foot/pound pressure will result in an explosion. 3. Air hose and hose connections used with pneumatic tools must be designed for the pressure and service to which they are subjected. 4. Air hoses and connections must be checked daily for defects. 5. Air hoses must be protected from vehicle traffic, pedestrians, and sharp objects. Do not place hoses where they will become tripping hazards. 6. All connections must be pinned or chained to prevent whipping should disconnection occur. 7. Disconnect source and ―bleed‖ hose before breaking connection on any air tool. Never crimp hoses to stop air. 8. Pneumatic hand tools must be disconnected from the source, and pressure in hose lines released, before any adjustments or repairs are made. 9. A tool retainer must be installed on each piece of equipment that, without such a retainer, may eject the tool (IE, chisel, drill bit, etc.). 10. Never point a pneumatic hammer at anyone. There is always the chance the retainer might fail. The bit must be in contact with the work surface before pulling the trigger. 11. Always wear goggles and hearing protection when using air tools for chipping or using air to clean off equipment. 12. Air used for cleaning-off equipment must be regulated to 30 PSI or less. 13. Never use air tools to blow against clothing, any part of the body or use to clean/dust-off personnel. 12-12
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 14. Metatarsal and shin guards must be worn for complete foot protection when using ground tampers that leave the ground such as ―pogo sticks‖, pavement breakers or jackhammers. 15. Keep tools clean and stored properly where they belong. 16. The use of hoses for hoisting or lowering tools is not permitted. 17. or branch line to reduce the pressure in case of hose failure. Lifting tools 1. Chain falls and come-a-longs are designed to be operated by one person only. If it takes two to raise or move a load, chances are the load is greater than the capacity of the lifting device or the device is malfunctioned. 2. Never wrap the chain of a chain hoist around the load. 3. Know the weight of the load and capacity of the lifting device. 4. Before making a lift with the chain fall, be sure the load is rigged properly and the lift area is barricaded and free of personnel. 5. Make all lifts true vertically to prevent a shifting and swaying of loads and excessive wear on the hoist. 6. Do not use cable-type lever hoists if the cable is frayed or damaged. Hoist is to be red (danger do not use) tagged and removed from service immediately. 7. Never use a cheater bar on the handle of the come-a-long. Hand Tools 1. Use the right size and type screwdriver for the job. 2. Do not hold screwdriver work in palm of hand. The screwdriver may slip causing injury. 3. Screwdrivers should be filed properly to prevent slipping. 4. Hammers must have a clear path for back-swing, and the target area must be free from obstructions. 5. Hammers with ―mushroomed‖ heads should never be used as they might glance off the target, or the damaged head may splinter and send metal fragments flying. 6. Never hold with your hand any object to be struck with a hammer by another worker. Hold the object with pliers or another tong-type device. 7. Wooden handles shall be kept free of splinters or cracks and shall be kept tight in the tool. 8. Do not use a file for a pry or hammer as it is brittle and breaks easily. 9. Files shall be fitted with handles to protect workers from the pointed file end. 12-13
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 10. Adjustable (crescent) and combination wrenches should be snug on bolts and/or nuts to avoid slipping. 11. Never use a wrench as a hammer or a hammer on a wrench that is not designed for such use. 12. Never use a cheater bar on a wrench or ―double wrench‖ a nut. Use a hammer wrench or impact instead. 13. Wrenches shall not be used when jaws are sprung to the point that slippage could occurs. 14. Do not use drill as a reamer (get a larger bit). 15. Do not change bits without unplugging the cord. 16. Do not use chisels with defects: a. Mushroomed heads. b. Chipped points. c. Over-tempered surfaces. d. Do not use as a pry bar. e. Do not use one too short for hand safety. f. Do not chip toward yourself or others. g. Do not use without safety glasses, face shield and leather work gloves. 17. Do not use tools with unsafe defects: a. Worn or battered heads. b. Over-tempered. c. Dull cutting edges. d. Rough, loose, cracked, or split handles. e. Nicked edges. 12.11 PROTECTION OF THE PUBLIC Barricades, fencing, warning lights and/or signs shall be used to protect the public from hazards, which may occur during demolition/construction activities. Protection shall be required whenever public safety may be in question, and ranging in type according to severity of danger. All visitors shall be required to wear a hard hat and safety glasses with hard side shields or goggles worn over regular glasses whenever entering the job site. A limited amount of hard hats shall be available in the job office to accommodate visitors. 12.12 FIRE PREVENTION/PROTECTION Contractor’s Fire Prevention procedures will be covered in weekly safety meetings at the job-site on a regular basis covering material pertinent to operations being conducted. 1. All workers are expected to take those actions necessary to prevent fires within the work areas. Each work area will be arranged and equipped as to prevent or at least control fire hazards, first to Workers, then property. 12-14
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 2. All work areas, where there is a potential for fires to occur, must have available and maintain proper fire extinguishers so as to quickly extinguish any small and incipient stage fires before a greater risk to Workers safety and property can occur. 3. All workers shall have the proper training before trying to fight a fire. Sound judgment must be used for small extinguishable fires. If a small inconsequential fire, that could easily be extinguished, is left unattended, it could grow and cause severe damage to the workplace. On the other hand, if a fire grows too quickly into a blaze, do not try to extinguish it, back away and call the fire department. 4. All TEI and all subcontractors employees will never risk the safety of other workers by requiring them to fight fires to save property let the fire department handle the fire and be ready to assist if requested in a non-hazardous capacity. 5. Keep storage and working areas free of trash. 6. Place oily rags in an OSHA compliant covered container. 7. Do not refuel gasoline-powered equipment in a confined space, especially in the presence of an open flame such as a furnace or water heater or a spark producing source. 8. Do not refuel gasoline-powered equipment while it is hot. 9. Keep flammable liquids stored in tightly closed, self-closing, spill-proof containers. Pour from storage drums only what you’ll need. 10. Store flammable liquids away from spark-producing sources. 11. Use flammable liquids only in well-ventilated areas. 12. Look for old wiring, worn insulation and broken electrical fittings. Report any hazardous condition to your supervisor. 13. Prevent motors from overheating by keeping them in good working order. A spark from rough-running motor can ignite the oil and dust in it. 14. Utility lights should always have some type of wire guard over them. Heat from an uncovered light bulb can easily ignite ordinary combustibles. 15. Do not misuse fuses. Never install a fuse rated higher than specified for the circuit. 16. Investigate any appliance or electrical equipment that smells strange. Unusual odors can be the first sign of fire. 17. Do not overload wall outlets. Load them for their intended use and ratings. Overloading them can cause overheating of the wiring system and could lead to a fire. Training 1. All Workers will be instructed in the proper use of fire extinguishers and fire prevention methods. 12-15
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 2. Fire drills will be held as needed to familiarize Workers with the emergency/fire response procedures for the work site as well as the location and operation of fire extinguishing equipment. 3. Fire safety is to be covered in the site safety meetings and specifically covered in the site safety meetings when the condition of the project offers a potential for fires. Inspection and Storage 1. The Competent Person (Lee Dial) or his/her designee must routinely inspect all fire extinguishers at least monthly. 2. In addition to the monthly inspection, an in-depth/thorough inspection shall be completed at regular intervals, not more than one year apart or when specifically indicated by a routine inspection. Extinguishers shall be thoroughly examined and/or recharged or repaired to ensure operability and safety and replaced as needed. 3. Extinguishers removed from their locations to be inspected, repaired or recharged shall be replaced by spare extinguishers of the same type during the period they are gone. 4. Each extinguisher shall have a durable tag securely attached to show the date of the last thorough inspection, maintenance or recharge date and the initial or signature of the person who performs this service. 5. A Competent Person will perform inspection and maintenance of all firefighting equipment. The following general guidelines will be observed: a. Portable fire extinguishers shall be inspected at regular intervals, not more than one year apart, extinguishers shall be thoroughly examined and/or recharged or repaired to ensure operability and safety or replaced as needed. Each extinguisher shall have a durable tag securely attached to show the maintenance or recharge date and the initial or signature of the person performing the service. b. Fire extinguisher hose nozzles should be kept free of obstruction at all times. c. In areas where insects tend to nest in protected small areas, the nozzle should be covered with small cloth or plastic bag to keep it free of obstructions, but not to impede the operation of the extinguisher. d. A fire extinguisher that is empty, defective, or has been discharged should be removed from service; a red (out of service) tag attached, and should be replaced by a Competent Person or recharged by a qualified service Division. 6. All flammable liquids/solvents should be kept in approved, properly labeled containers. 7. Small quantities of flammable liquids such as gasoline and solvents should be handled, transported, dispensed and stored in approved, marked safety cans. Safety cans have self-closing caps, flame arrestors, and pressure relief vents. The contents must be properly labeled. 12-16
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 8. Although it is not an OSHA requirement, it is recommended by the NFPA to follow a color code for fuel cans. The color coding is: a. Gasoline cans are red b. Diesel fuel cans are Yellow c. Kerosene cans are blue Safety Cans 9. Cans of oil, kerosene, oily rags, waste, etc., must not be allowed near sources of ignition, such as fires, flames and/or sparks. 10. Gasoline, kerosene, or other flammable liquids must not be stored in glass containers. 11. Do not store flammable liquids in open containers. 12. Flammable and combustible materials such as oil or gasoline soaked rags/clothing; oily waste and shavings must not be left lying around or piled on the ground. Spontaneous combustion is likely to result and cause a fire. These materials must be stored in approved and covered metal containers. These containers should have lids, and should be emptied daily to maintain the premises in a safe and sanitary condition. 13. Because of their convenient size, aerosol cans are often stored or set down in unsafe places. Keep in mind that all aerosol cans are pressurized and that this 12-17
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland pressure increases when exposed to heat. If the can is overheated, it can violently explode sending projectiles and flames into the surrounding atmosphere. Aerosol spray cans containing various commodities are typically labeled as flammable. If the product isn’t flammable, the propellant usually is. Do not store pressurized aerosol flammable cans in non-approved storage containers. Do not store aerosol cans in areas where the manufacturer’s recommended storage temperature is exceeded. 14. Storage cabinets, rooms or particular areas should be designated and approved to store flammable liquids. The SSHS is to determine the approved method to store flammables. Labeling for storage cabinets, room and areas should read: "FLAMMABLE - KEEP FIRE AWAY" Flammable liquids storage cabinet 15. Not more than 60 gallons of flammable, or 120 gallons of combustible liquid shall be stored in any one storage cabinet or container and the total gallons shall not exceed the cabinet rating. 16. No more than 25 gallons of flammable liquids shall be stored outside an approved storage cabinet (please see Layout Plans for location of cabinet), unless a designated area has been provided which meets all regulatory requirements. 17. Dispensing drums should be equipped with special self-closing faucets and pressure vacuum relief vents. Also, a bonding wire should be attached to the tank and be made available for attachment to the receiving container. 12-18
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 18. Flammable liquids should be stored well away from the immediate work area. 19. Outside portable tank storage shall be located no closer than 25 feet from any building. 20. Fire fighting equipment is for fire use only and shall be kept in its designated place at all times when not in use. 21. All fire protection equipment must be located in designated areas that are clearly identified with appropriate markings. This equipment should be located in the vicinity of likely fire hazards, but it must be accessible to operating personnel. The number, type, and location of extinguishers must meet all applicable standards. Fire Prevention Procedures 1. All fires shall be reported to the FSM/SSHS (Lee Dial, 301-640-1944) immediately. The FSM/SSHS may not be available at the time, but a supervisor from another crew is available and would have the ability to summon assistance via a cell phone. 2. The prevention of fires is of utmost importance. Good housekeeping and equipment maintenance must be followed to keep fire hazards at a minimum. 3. Good housekeeping should be maintained at all work locations and in all vehicles. 4. Paper and other combustible materials should not be allowed to accumulate. 5. Matches, cigarette lighters or any other source of ignition should not be carried into any area where a flammable atmosphere may be present. 6. Smoking must be confined to areas specifically designated and far away from any flammable substance storage and/or use. 7. Smoking is not permitted in the immediate vicinity of batteries, oil, and gasoline storage or in any area suspected or known to contain flammable substances, regardless of whether or not a "no smoking" sign is displayed. Any area subject to contamination by flammable substances should be designated as a "no smoking area,‖ and a sign to that effect should be displayed. 8. Before a source of ignition (such as a welding torch) is carried into a closed building or tank, a test should be made to detect the presence of a combustible atmosphere using an approved method (gas detector). 9. The use of gasoline as a cleaning agent is strictly forbidden. 10. Oil or gasoline from leaks should be cleaned up and disposed of in a prescribed manner. 11. All leaks should be reported and repaired immediately. If immediate repair is not possible, adequate warning signs must be posted and extra precaution against fires instituted. 12. In the event of a gas leak, all sources of ignition should be eliminated immediately. 12-19
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 13. When testing for gas leaks, use soap suds or approved leak detector fluid. Never use an open flame. 14. Since paint, insect sprays and most paint removers are usually flammable; their use near open flames or other sources of ignition must be avoided. Read the labels on the containers. 15. Extinguishers shall be located where they will be readily accessible, easily seen and immediately available for use. They shall be located along normal paths of travel and where needed. 16. Extinguishers having a gross weight not exceeding 40 pounds should be installed so that the top of the extinguisher is not more than five feet above the floor. Extinguishers having a gross weight greater than 40 pounds should be installed so the top of the extinguisher is not more than 3 1/2 feet above the floor. 17. The selection of fire extinguishers for a given situation will depend upon the characteristics of the fires anticipated, the construction of the individual property, acceptance by the owner, the vehicle or hazard to be protected, ambient- temperature conditions, and other factors. 18. During the construction phase of the Government Trailers and contractors trailers the construction area shall be provided with one portable hand fire extinguisher, multi-purpose, cartridge operated, with a minimum rating of 2-A (two pounds, type A) for each 3,000 square feet of area of building construction site with a maximum travel distance to an extinguisher of 100 feet. 19. Other areas such as remote fueling areas, electrical power distribution centers, engine sets and fuel-fired heaters may require additional extinguishers. 20. Access to all available fire fighting equipment must be maintained at all times. 21. Fire fighting equipment must be conspicuously located. 22. A 10-B rated fire extinguisher shall be provided within 50' when over five gallons of flammable or combustible liquids or five pounds of flammable gases are being used. In The Event of a Fire 1. When the emergency signal, consisting of three repeated long blasts of the job whistle, is sounded, all employees shall immediately cease work, secure all equipment, and proceed directly to the designated assembly points (General Contractor’s trailer or the FSM work truck, please see Appendix G) and remain there until further instructions are assigned by the FSM. 2. The FSM/SSHS (Lee Dial, 301-640-1944) shall immediately notify the TEI Project Manager (German Noriega, 240-216-0812) and the USACE project manager (Megan Coar, 410-436-0196) of any accident/incident. 3. Assess the type and magnitude of the fire. 4. Use prudent judgment. a. Minor small controllable fires: Extinguish with appropriate type of fire extinguisher. Assess the damage and report to the FSM/SHSS. 12-20
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland b. Severe uncontrollable fires: Evacuate area and call the Edgewood Fire Department (410-436-4451), account for all Workers evacuated to the designated assembly point, assist the fire department if requested and report to your supervisor. 5. Verify area is safe then return workers to their work area and resume installations. Ignition Hazards 1. Operations which constitute a fire hazard need signs posted. The sign should read: NO SMOKING OR OPEN FLAME 2. Only low voltage or battery powered lighting is approved when temporary lighting is needed in close proximity and/or around flammable storage, handling and/or dispensing. 3. No temporary building used to store flammable materials shall be erected where it will block an exit or means to an exit and must be 20 feet clear of other buildings. 4. When storing flammables in a storeroom located within another building or structure, only non-combustible material or material with a 1-hour fire rating may be used for the construction of that storeroom. 5. Storage cabinets, storerooms and designated areas used for the storage of flammable substances must be located no less than 50 feet from any source of ignition. 6. In open yard storage areas, combustible materials are stacked with due regards to the stability of stacks and in no case higher than 20 feet. 7. Driveways between and around combustible materials storage stacks shall be at least 15 feet wide. 8. Portable fire extinguishers rated not less than 2-A must be placed so that maximum travel distance to the nearest unit will not exceed 100 feet. The layout of an area could require additional fire extinguishers, ever though the total area does not exceed 3,000 feet (see examples below). These boxes represent 3,000 square feet of building area (50’ x 60’) and (10’ x 300’) Fire (typical) Fire 100’ 100’ max. 100’max. max. Fire Fire extinguisher (typical) Extinguisher 100 feet maximum travel distance 100 feet maximum travel distance 12-21
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland Classes of Fires 1. Class "A" fires are those that occur in ordinary materials such as wood, paper, rags, and rubbish. The quenching and cooling effects of water or fire extinguisher solutions containing large percentages of water are of first importance in extinguishing these fires. 2. Class "B" fires are those that occur in the vapor-air mixture over the surface of flammable liquids such as gasoline, oil, grease, paints and thinners. The limiting of air is of primary importance. Generally, regular dry chemical, multi-purpose dry chemical, carbon dioxide, and foam may be used depending on the circumstances of the fire. Solid streams of water are likely to spread the fire. 3. Class "C" fires are those, which occur in or near electrical equipment where non-conducting extinguishing agents shall be used. Dry chemical, carbon dioxide, compressed gas, or vaporizing liquid may be used. Foam or a solid stream of water should not be used because both are good conductors and can expose the operator to a severe shock hazard. 4. Class "D" fires are those that occur in combustible metals such as magnesium, titanium, zirconium, lithium and sodium. Specialized techniques, extinguishing agents, and extinguishing equipment are needed to control and extinguish fires of this type. Normal extinguishing agents generally should not be used as there is a danger in most cases of increasing intensity of the fire because of a chemical reaction between some extinguishing agents and the burning metal. 12-22
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland B D C A A Standard Symbols for the Four Classes of Fires A B C International fire symbols Extinguisher Types 1. For use on Class A fires a. Water b. Stored pressure, cartridge operated, water pump tank c. Soda Acid d. Dry Chemical e. Foam 2. For use on Class A and B fires a. Foam b. Dry chemical - sodium or potassium bicarbonate cartridge or stored pressure. (Will control small surface fires) 3. For use on Class B and C fires a. Carbon dioxide (will control small Class A fire) b. Dry Chemical 4. For use on A, B and C Fires a. Dry chemical - multi-purpose A B C cartridge or stored pressure 5. For use on Class D fires a. Special purpose Dry Powder. 12-23
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland Flammable Liquids (Flash Point 100°F or less) 1. Flammable liquids such as gasoline, benzene, naphtha, and lacquer thinner must not be used for cleaning purposes. 2. Spills or overflow of flammable liquids should be avoided. However, in the event of spillage, immediate steps should be taken to clean up and minimize the danger of fire. 3. When liquids such as condensates, gasoline, and some crude oils are drawn into open metal containers, the open container must be bonded by means of either threaded connections or a bonding wire to the vessel or piping in order to prevent any possible ignition source from generation of static electricity. 4. With exceptions of gasoline and oil, the mixing of two or more flammable liquids is prohibited. 5. When pumping highly flammable liquids from one container to another, metallic contact should always be maintained between the two containers or be bonded together. Safe Handling of Flammable & Combustible Materials 1. Never handle a flammable substance near a source of ignition or bring a source of ignition near a flammable substance. 2. Safe transfers of flammable liquids are made in an open, well ventilated area where the vapors will be diluted and dissipated by large quantities of fresh air. Make sure you have a bond between containers to eliminate static electricity. 12-24
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 3. Using funnels and spouted cans makes for a quick transfer and helps prevent dangerous spills. 4. Flammable and combustible liquid spills should be cleaned up immediately. 5. When refueling or lubricating machinery, be certain that it is shut down first. Pieces of machinery like exhaust pipes and bearings radiate heat, and electrical systems generate sparks that can ignite in an accidental spill. 6. Be certain that an engine is supplied with the proper type of fuel and the fuel supply is shut off by a valve when the engine is not in use. 7. Never use gasoline as a solvent - it produces dangerous amounts of vapor. Always use a high flashpoint solvent or thinner for cleaning off paint, grease, or oil around equipment. 8. To eliminate the build-up of static electricity on fuel cans being transported, unload the fuel cans onto the ground first then pick up cans and dispense the fuel. This helps to discharge the possible build-up of static electricity on the cans and is less likely to draw a static arc (source of ignition) from the can to the fuel tank causing a possible fire. 9. If fuel is dispensed from a fuel truck, the truck should be bonded to equipment being filled. If fuel is dispensed from a fixed fuel tank, the tank should be bonded to the fuel can before the fuel is dispensed (see below). The bonding between the tank and can will reduce the risk of igniting the fuel due to static electricity discharge which could be a source of ignition. 12-25
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland Typical Bonding Jumper Between Fuel Tank and Fuel Can Bonding Jumper Connected to the fuel can then to the tank Proper Use of Fire Fighting Equipment 1. Always use the handle to carry an extinguisher. Walk at a rapid pace do not run to a fire. 2. Proceed to the upwind side of a fire. Stay well clear of the flames and fumes. When you are approximately 10 feet upwind of the near edge, stop and ready your extinguisher for discharge. 3. Once your extinguisher is set for discharge, position yourself within eight feet of the near edge upwind of the fire. From this position the air currents will help carry the agent into the fire assuring maximum visibility and providing protection from the heat. 4. When discharging the extinguishing agent, aim your stream just short of the near edge at the base of the fire. 5. Apply the agent in a side-to-side sweeping action across the full width of the fire. Make sure each sweep of the extinguishing agent is slightly wider than the near or leading edge of fire. 6. Advance forward only as fast as the extinguishing action of your agent will permit. Do not outrun your protection. Do not raise your stream to chase the flame. Keep it down in front of the flame edge. 7. Stop short of the already extinguished fuel area. Do not become involved in the fire. Above all, maintain your side-to-side sweeping action until the fire is extinguished. Once the fire is out, stand by for a few minutes. Make sure there is no danger of a re-flash. Do not ever turn your back on an apparently extinguished fire. 8. Once your fire extinguisher is out of agent you must evacuate the area and report to your supervisor. If the fire is not out when your extinguisher is empty, it is possible for the fire to re-spread around you and trap you. 12-26
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland Remember P.A.S.S. Pull the pin This will allow you to discharge the extinguisher Aim at the base of the fire If you aim at the flame the agent will miss the fuel Depress the handle and Squeeze trigger Sweep from side to side until the extinguisher is completely discharged 12.13 WELDING AND BURNING The following guidance will apply during welding and burning operations (if applicable): • Hot Work Permits shall be obtained from the SSHS prior to the start of work each Monday morning (see Form 25 in Appendix D).  Fire Watch duties to include that fire watch personnel are training and required to stay ―on watch‖ for a minimum of 30 minutes immediately after ―hot work‖ activities have ceased, at any time, including a lunch break and at the end of a work shift. Provisions will be made if fire watch duties extend into lunch breaks or end of work shifts. • Welding leads and burning hosed must be kept clear of aisles and passageways. • Gauges, hoses, leads, ground, clamps, welding machines, torches and cylinders must be inspected each day prior to use. • Connections, couplings, and fittings must be secure. • Sparks and slag created by welding or burning operations must be contained or combustible materials must be removed. • Welding leads and burning hoses should not be run through doorways. 12-27
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland • Welding leads and burning hoses must be protected from damage by suspending or covering. • An adequate fire extinguisher must be near all welding, burning, and open flame operations. • All work must be adequately grounded. The ground lead must be pulled from the welding machine to the work location. • Welding rods must not be left in electrode holders (Stingers). • Welding operations must be enclosed to prevent arc flash burns to others. • Welders must wear hard hats that will accommodate welding shields. • Welding machines must be turned off at the end of each shift. • Arc welding operations shall not be performed from metal ladders. • No less than number nine (9)-filer lenses shall be used. • All welding and cutting operations carried out in confined spaces must be adequately ventilated. • When compressed gas cylinders are not in use, gauges shall be removed and valve protection capes shall be securely in place. • When cylinders are hoisted, they shall be secured on a cradle, sling board, pallet, etc. They shall not be hoisted by means of magnets or chokers. • Cylinders are to be moved by tilting and rolling them on their bottom edges one at a time. • Cylinders shall be transported in an upright position only. • Valve protection caps shall not be used for lifting cylinders. • Except while being transported, compressed gas cylinders shall be secured in an upright position. • Flash back arrestors shall be installed on both oxygen and acetylene cylinders at the gauges. • Compressed gas cylinders must never be stored in gang boxes. • Compressed air used for cleaning work area, machinery, etc., must be less than (30) thirty pounds per square inch. 12.14 ELECTRICAL WIRING AND APPARATUS The following guidance applies to all electrical wiring and apparatus: • All temporary wiring, lighting, etc. to be placed by qualified personnel in accordance with all codes and standards, and protected by a ground fault circuit interrupt device. • Temporary systems shall be monitored and logged regularly and necessary repairs made immediately upon discovery. All lines to be repaired shall be de-energized. • Extension cords shall be UL approved and rated for construction use, and shall be inspected for damage on a regular basis. 12-28
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 12.15 MOTOR VEHICLES The speed limit is 25 MPH unless otherwise posted. Lower limits are posted in certain locations. The speed limit when approaching or passing troop formations is 10 MPH. Passing troop formations in your lane of traffic is prohibited. Radar and other enforcement devises are frequently used Use of non-hands free cell phones while operating a moving vehicle is prohibited. The following guidance applies when operating motor vehicles or equipment: • The driver is responsible for the safety of passengers and cargo stability. • Seat belts will be worn at all times. • Obey all speed limit and other traffic signs. • Motor must be shut off during refueling. • Personnel must be properly seated in vehicles before moving. • A flagman should direct the backing of a vehicle in congested areas. • Only licensed drivers will be allowed to operate company vehicles. • All machinery and equipment shall be operated by qualified personnel and authorized personnel. • Inspections shall be conducted regularly and certified to be in safe operating condition. 12.16 TRAFFIC REGULATIONS All local traffic laws or regulations of the installation must be obeyed at all times both on and off the job site when operating company or personnel vehicles. 12.17 HOUSEKEEPING General contractor and all subcontractors shall be responsible for daily clean up and disposal of all construction and personal debris generated on the project. Inspections shall be done regularly and proper actions taken to insure that a clean and safe job site is maintained. 12.18 UNEXPLODED ORDINANCE PURPOSE AND SCOPE  Purpose This procedure provides the basic guidelines and requirements for the proper steps to be taken when unexploded ordnance is discovered.  Scope This procedure applies to all TEI personnel and subcontractors working on projects where unexploded ordnance safety requirements are applicable. 12-29
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland GENERAL  Definitions UXO - Unexploded Explosive Ordnance  Responsibilities The Manager/Supervisor is responsible for implementing and enforcing this procedure. The Safety Representative is responsible for monitoring compliance with this procedure. PROCEDURE For purposes of operations on this site if unexploded ordnance are encountered during field activities, personnel shall evacuate the area and report findings to the Tetratech’s competent person. TEI employees are not to disturb unexploded ordnance. The location of the unexploded ordnance will be marked with a flag. A detailed written report, providing a description of the ordnance, its location, and visual condition shall be prepared and submitted to the PM, SSHO, and the USAMRICD PM. There is no safe procedure for dealing with unexploded explosive ordnance (UXO). All UXO discovered during hazardous waste operations shall be handled by the U. S. Army Corp of Engineers and Tetratech. TEI employees and non-UXO subcontractors shall not handle UXO. Soil samples, test pit excavation and/or monitoring well installation are sometimes conducted in areas where subsurface UXO may be found. If there is any possibility that UXO may exist, or specialty subcontractor shall conduct a magnetometer survey to assure the safety of the sampling crews. Prior to a drilling rig arriving on a site, or specialty subcontractor will survey with both a magnetometer and a hand-held auger to ensure that the drilling site is free of subsurface UXO. Unauthorized and unessential personnel shall not be allowed in the vicinity of UXO or an area that is suspected to contain UXO. 12-30
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 13.0 SAFETY AND HEALTH EXPECTATIONS AND COMPLIANCE 13.1 PROJECT SAFETY GOALS AND POLICY TEI’s goal for this project is that it be completed without a loss-day injury. OSHA, State and local safety regulations will be incorporated in this program as required. Each Subcontractor is responsible for managing its own safety and health program and related programs. Subcontractors are also responsible for monitoring and enforcing the project disciplinary procedures, or disciplinary procedures which are more stringent, for employees performing non-conformance work in relation to safety and health. Subcontractors shall monitor the work of their employees to assure the employee’s actions do not create an unsafe condition, which may result in harm to themselves, other persons on site or result in property damage. Failure of Subcontractor management to enforce the disciplinary policies established in this manual may result in disciplinary action taken against Subcontractor management by Total Engineering, Inc. 13.2 MONITORING The enforcement of the Total Engineering, Inc. Project Safety and Health Program (an outline of Subcontractor minimum requirements) and all related local, state, federal or otherwise stated safety and health rules, regulations and policies is a vital aspect to achieving a safe and healthful work environment. For this reason, TEI will monitor the construction activities of the Subcontractors on site and enforce all aspects of the TEI Project Safety and Health Program. Project Safety and Health audits will be performed as discussed in Section 7.1 of this plan. All findings shall be immediately corrected with written verification of the corrections submitted to the TEI FSM within 24 hours. Project Manager 1. Responsible for maintaining a file of their required documentation which will be reviewed periodically by the SHM. At the conclusion of the project all documentation will be placed in the job file. 2. Once a quarter if the PM has not met their defined safety and health expectations for this project they will meet with the safety committee to be accountable and present a corrective action plan. 3. If the FSM does not meet safety and health expectations 2 consecutive quarters then the Vice President is expected to take appropriate disciplinary action (see section 13.4). Field Site Manager / Site Safety and Health Supervisor / Subcontractor Field Supervisor 1. Responsible for maintaining a file of their required documentation on the project which will be reviewed periodically by the SHM. At the conclusion of the project all documentation will be placed in the job file. 13-1
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland 2. Once a quarter if the FSM / SSHS / Subcontractor Field Supervisor has not met their defined safety and health expectations for this project they will meet with the TEI safety committee to be accountable and present a corrective action plan. 3. If the FSM / SSHS / Subcontractor Field Supervisor do not meet safety and health expectations 2 consecutive quarters then the TEI’s Vice President is expected to take appropriate disciplinary action (see section 13.4). 13.3 ENFORCEMENT Subcontractors are responsible for enforcing all safety and health policies adopted on this project. Total Engineering, Inc. will take disciplinary action against Subcontractor management for failing to enforce such policies. The following actions may be taken against Subcontractor management and personnel for noncompliance issues: Verbal instruction may be used at the discretion of the designated safety supervisor for conditions or practices which are less than serious and are not likely to cause an accident or incident. Violations may fit into four classes defined as follows: Non-serious – Any condition or practice which is not likely to cause death or serious physical harm to any person. Serious – Any condition or practice which is causing or likely to cause death or serious physical harm to any person. Stop Work/Imminent Danger – The existence of any condition or practice which would reasonably be expected to cause death or serious physical harm before such condition or practice can be corrected. This is a ―stop work‖ situation. All persons shall be withdrawn from the affected area, and no one is allowed in the area except those people deemed necessary to correct the condition or practice and whom are using the necessary controls to guard them from the hazard. Repeat – Violations which have been verbally stated or written to an employee or Subcontractor more than once. Abatement of safety and health violation notices shall take place within the allotted time given to abate the unsafe condition. If the Subcontractor fails to comply with the abatement policy within the allotted time period, without submittal of an alternate solution, Total Engineering, Inc. may take corrective action procedures and back charge expense to the Subcontractor who created the unsafe condition. All Subcontractors on site shall have a violation policy and procedures that shall meet, at a minimum, the following standards: 13.4 VIOLATION POLICY Violations issued are subject to the OSHA regulations which regulate construction sites, the Subcontractor Safety and Health Program and the TEI Safety and Health Program. The possible consequences subjective to the violation are as follows: Non-Serious Violations First Offense is verbal warning. Use log book documentation for future reference. Second Offense is written warning. Form 14, ―Violation Notice‖ may be used to provide 13-2
    • Accident Prevention Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan USAMRICD - Replacement Facility – Early Site Work Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, Maryland written notice. Third Offense is time off project or dismissal. Serious Violations and Repeat Violations First Offense is subject to time off project or dismissal at the discretion of the FSM and/or the PM. TEI reserves the right to request the dismissal of project personnel who commit serious or repeat safety or health violations. 13-3